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Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Story Peppermint 4 - Turns a netbook into a Chromebook Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2014 - 9:28am
Story South Tyrol to increase use of free software Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2014 - 4:02pm
Story Today is Hardware Freedom Day! Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2014 - 4:06pm
Story Debian, Mint (LMDE), SolydX and Tanglu, compared and contrasted Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2014 - 4:11pm
Story OpenStack's top operating system: Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 3:34am
Story Popcorn Time Is Dead Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 11:25pm
Story Linux 3.15 To Support DRM Render-Nodes By Default Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:43pm
Story Meizu to allow other devices to run its Flyme OS? Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:36pm
Story March of the penguins: how we migrate from UNIX to Linux Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:18pm
Story Bitcoin Scoops Linux Media Award at CeBIT 2014 Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:16pm

MPGTX: Lossless editing of MPEG video

Filed under
Software

Debian Package of the Day: MPEG is the JPEG of the video world. It is a format that plays everywhere, and has built-in lossy compression. Unfortunately, that means that, also like a JPEG, if you open and edit an MPEG you will lose more and more quality with each save. Worse, since video files tend to be large, many people will take MPEG compression as far as it will go, creating files that look yucky to start with.

Howto: Troubleshoot Nvidia drivers with the Ubuntu 7.04 desktop CD

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HowTos

Motho ke motho ka botho: Part of the difficulty in troubleshooting a video driver issue is that after two or three unsuccessful tries, settings are changed and it’s hard to tell if new problems have cropped up as a result. Too many tweaks and changes, added and removed packages, installed and uninstalled drivers and it’s a challenge to make sure the old changes you’ve made aren’t keeping the new ones from taking effect.

Microsoft and SanDisk to develop portable usb desktop

Filed under
Microsoft

iTWire: Microsoft and flash memory maker SanDisk have teamed up to develop new portable USB flash drives that can be automatically loaded with their desktop software applications and personal settings, as well as data.

KDE 4.0-alpha1: still a proof of concept

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Beranger: I do not intend to be rude and inconsiderate for the hard work of an entire team, but if KDE 4.0 will release end-October, it will be a big stain on the image of the KDE project. The current 3.90.1 is still what I would call "a proof of concept", for not saying it's a joke.

Project launch: openSUSE Software Portal / Application Manager

Filed under
SUSE

/dev/loki: Today we had our first/kick-off IRC meeting about the "openSUSE Software Portal / Application Manager" project.

Coupla Short Howtos:

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HowTos

Installing Ubuntu Studio Theme

Filed under
HowTos

Complicated Mind: Ubuntu Studio is a multimedia editing/creation flavour of Ubuntu. It’s built for the GNU/Linux audio, video, and graphic enthusiast or professional. Because I don’t do audio, video and graphic editing or creation, so I didn’t install Ubuntu Studio. But from the screenshot, I really like the theme that is used by Ubuntu Studio. So I decide to install the theme into my Feisty Fawn.

Lazarus: Pascal and Delphi Rise Again

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Linux Online: Lazarus is a RAD tool, or Rapid Application Development tool that runs on the three major platforms (Linux, Windows and Mac OS). It is very similar to Delphi, a popular RAD developed by Borland. And like Delphi, it uses a variant of Pascal for its underlying programming language. In Lazarus' case, it's Free Pascal.

New IT course at seven institutions

Filed under
SUSE

the star: NOVELL Inc has signed a memorandum of understanding with seven universities and institutes of higher learning to offer Open Source and Linux training as part of their information technology curriculum.

Review: Pardus Linux 2007.1

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Seopher: Pardus is a relatively unknown release funded and developed by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey. It has a range of unique features and clearly has converted some fans on basis I'm sitting here playing with it because readers recommended it. So let's see what this KDE release can do.

TX Students may get recycled Linux computers

Filed under
Linux

wcmessenger.com: Some students in the Northwest school district don’t have computers at home, but administrators hope that will change soon.

OpenOffice.org in Education: A Roundup

Filed under
OOo

Linux In Novell’s East Region: Wow, sometimes you think you’re really tied into a product and who’s using it and where, but even I was surprised at the amount of people and institutions deploying, using and enhancing OpenOffice.org. The vast majority are kind enough to take the time to document their experiences so others can take advantage of those findings.

The Red Hat business model, Part II

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: I've written once on this topic before, but never with Red Hat's assistance. But yesterday I got to present the Red Hat subscription model with two members of Red Hat's legal team. And all throughout the Summit I had open source entrepreneurs asking me for clarification on just how the model works.

Ubuntu Studio 7.04 - The Crowning Jewel of the Ubuntu Family

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu
-s

Ubuntu Studio 7.04 was finally released yesterday to what seemed like quite a bit of excitement. Ubuntu Studio is a version that focuses on multimedia creation and manipulation with what appears to me as an emphasis on music. At the time of this writing the official website seems to be experiencing a bit of trouble, perhaps due to the high traffic. In any case, sometimes the early bird does gets his worm and this time I was up early.

Review: Ubuntu Studio 7.04

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

thepcspy: Because this is based off an alternative Ubuntu release, the only option to use Ubuntu Studio is by installing it using the text-based installer. I can't deny I was a little sad not to see a live version, especially considering that they had already cracked into a DVD-sized distribution. To me it would have made sense to go the whole hog and let people play with it before they install.

Howto: Install Xfce 4.4.1 on (X)Ubuntu 7.04

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HowTos

Tuxcity: Ubuntu Feisty comes with an xubuntu-desktop package delivering a Xfce4.4.0 Desktop environment. However, some of us (like me) want the latest of the latest, so if you are not faint hearted and feel like upgrading your Xfce desktop to the latest stable version here is how.

Also: Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Installation notes
And: Install Pidgin 2.0.0 on Ubuntu Feisty (with all plugins)
And: Automatix Alternatives

Newspapers use open-source software to engage readers online

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Drupal

journalism.co.uk: A growing number of newspapers are turning to open-source software in the race to build engaging news websites. An online a free content management system (CMS) called Drupal is gaining more and more ground.

I changed to KUbuntu Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu

Rudd-O: After a decade of using RPM-based distributions (first Red Hat 5.2, then Mandrake, then Red Hat 9, then Fedora), I’m now using a Debian-based distro. Yes, I changed to KUbuntu a few hours ago.

OpenSUSE Profiles Linux Users. Uses Macintosh to Report.

Filed under
SUSE

Sniptools: Novell’s openSUSE has been getting some press lately. To move along their gamble for enterprise Linux, they conducted a massive survey. And then, there’s the fun in noting the “Document Properties” of this PDF file.

Also: New look for opensuse.org

Gentoo 2007.0

Filed under
Gentoo
Reviews

techgage.com: The latest Gentoo release is upon us and I am going to take a look at what's new. Promised updates include a revamped installer and the latest versions of your favorite applications.

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More in Tux Machines

New Releases

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Leftovers: Software

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  • The future of GNOME Calendar
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More Android Leftovers

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    To recap, Oracle claimed the 37 Java application programming interface (API) packages Google used to develop Android are covered by copyright. Of course, that's not really the issue. True, the the US Federal Circuit Court of Appeals foolishly ruled that APIs could be copyrighted. But the US District Court for the Northern District of California ruled in May 2016 that Google's use of the Java APIs were not subject to copyright licensing fees. Instead, Android's use of the APIs was covered by "fair use."
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    Few things are more tantalizing than a good mystery, and Google is making waves for an open source-centric mystery that may end up having profound implications. It all started in August when an extensive and unusual code repository for a new operating system called Fuchsia was discovered online, and now the growing source code set is on GitHub. Thus far, Google officials have been mostly mum on the aim of this operating system, although they have made a few things clear in chat forums. Two developers listed on Fuchsia's GitHub page — Christopher Anderson and Brian Swetland — are known for their work with embedded systems. The Verge, among other sites, has made a few logical deductions about the possible embedded systems focus for Fuchsia: “Looking into Fuchsia's code points gives us a few clues. For example, the OS is built on Magenta, a “medium-sized microkernel” that is itself based on a project called LittleKernel, which is designed to be used in embedded systems,” the site reports. The GitHub postings that confirm that Fuchsia is based on Magenta are particularly notable because Magenta has had applications in the embedded systems space. Here are some direct quotes: "Magenta is a new kernel that powers the Fuchsia OS. Magenta is composed of a microkernel as well as a small set of userspace services, drivers, and libraries necessary for the system to boot, talk to hardware, load userspace processes and run them, etc. Fuchsia builds a much larger OS on top of this foundation."
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