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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2015 - 9:04pm
Story Leftovers: Windows-Like Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2015 - 9:03pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2015 - 9:02pm
Story Red Hat New CFO, All-Time High, Containers etc. Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2015 - 8:58pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2015 - 8:54pm
Story Introducing GNOME To Do Rianne Schestowitz 22/06/2015 - 8:44pm
Story Qt 5.5 Release Candidate Available Rianne Schestowitz 22/06/2015 - 8:40pm
Story Raspberry Pi Default Firmware Updates To Using Linux 4.0 Rianne Schestowitz 22/06/2015 - 8:37pm
Story The Third Platform: The Time for Open Source Is Nigh Rianne Schestowitz 22/06/2015 - 8:27pm
Story Solus Is the First OS to Get Linux Kernel 4.1 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 22/06/2015 - 8:10pm

The Nigerian OLPC Dispute - How Does It Look?

Filed under
OLPC

Groklaw: I thought you might like to see the Lagos Analysis Corp.'s keyboard "patent" allegedly infringed by OLPC. It turns out it's not a patent in the usual sense. It's a design registration. Why does that matter? Because what is registered is the way it *looks*, not the way it *works*.

Nautilus Tip: Gnome File Manager in Browser Mode

Filed under
HowTos

linuxlove.org: Several distributions such as Fedora are shipping Gnome with Nautilus configured in spatial mode. This means that there’s no toolbar, no address bar and worst of all, each folder opens in a new window. A file manager in spatial mode is nothing more than a relic.

Announcing FOSDEM 2008 Keynote and Main Track Speakers

Filed under
OSS

fosdem.org: The list of Main Track speakers for FOSDEM 2008 is almost complete and officially announced today, even though the website doesn't contain all the speaker bios and abstracts yet.

Ubuntu Linux vs Windows Vista: The Desktop Battle

polishlinux: It may be a brave opinion but I predict that Ubuntu Linux and Windows Vista are going to be the two operating systems that will take over the largest chunk of the desktop OS market during the next couple of years. This comparison is based on my experience with both systems during the last couple of weeks on two different computers.

Zonbu: Upping the ante

techrepublic: You might remember me covering Zonbu’s Zonbox recently. The Zonbox was a nice piece of hardware that had its limitations. Zonbu understands that and has come out with another product to raise the bar. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the Zonbu Notebook. Now naturally I want to put this piece of hardware through the wringer to see if it is worth the $279.00** dollar price tag.

End-of-2007 State of the Union

Filed under
Linux

distrogue.blogspot: 2007. What a year. Ubuntu cranked out two more solid releases, sub-$500 laptops flooded the market, and 3D desktop effects continued to improve. The DistroWatch charts were invaded by Texans, and several new distros appeared on the scene.

CRUX isn’t what I want right now

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: After two or three installations and probably as many, if not more, kernel recompilations, I’ve come to the conclusion that CRUX Linux isn’t what I want.

Asus Eee

dmartin.org: I bought a Asus Eee. It's a really nice machine. The interface is simple and easy to use, as best you can expect in such a confined space. The desktop isn't terribly pretty but, it really is a nice device.

Using KVM On Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

few shorts & leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Preliminary KDE-EDU screenshots/Photos

  • Three Useful Python Bindings - ClamAV, Apt and Evolution
  • Distro wars
  • Two Bugs Left Before X Server 1.4.1
  • Documentation: Give it up; it won't happen.
  • From the Obvious Department: Updates help Ubuntu

PCLinuxOS 2007

Filed under
PCLOS

alexeiz.blogspot: I wanted to try this OS on my computer over the weekend. So I downloaded and burned a CD and shoveled it into the CD drive hoping for a quick and easy install. I was wrong.

Why I Will Recommend Linux To Family This Year

Filed under
Linux

velocitywebdev.com: I read a recent post called “Why I Won’t Be Recommending Linux to Family this Holiday Season.” Th author makes a few good points about the various applications that family members use, but forget to tell you about. Things like the Sims or other games that don’t run well under Wine. Things like music under iTunes. The funny part is, the real reason…he doesn’t want to take the heat for telling them to use Linux and have something go wrong! Wimp!

The Incompleteness Theory Of Open Source, Continued

Filed under
OSS

Serdar Yegulalp: After my last post about how "failed" open-source projects aren't really failures at all, a colleague of mine provided me with more perspectives on that situation. The very way open source works, he claimed, is like an amortization of risk against failure in software development.

FLiMP (FreeBSD + Lighttpd + MYSQL + PHP)

Filed under
BSD

Want to try something a little different, build a FLiMP box it'll be faster and use less resources. I didnt want to run LAMP and i couldnt find an easy to follow guide on how to get a similar setup but using FreeBSD and Lighttpd my favourite os and webserver.

KDE 4.0 to be Released in January

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The KDE Release Team has decided to release KDE 4.0 this coming January. The release was originally planned for mid-December. The KDE developers want to solve a couple of essential issues before releasing.

Christmas Firefox Themes

Filed under
Moz/FF

cybernetnews.com: It’s December, and with the holidays just around the corner it is time to spruce up your browser to help spread the Christmas cheer! What you need are some Christmas Firefox themes to get the ball rolling.

First OLPC deployment: now it’s real.

Filed under
OLPC

radian.org: This week, Uruguay became the first-ever real, non-pilot deployment site of OLPC XO laptops. And I was there to hand out the first one.

Ubuntu - A Distribution for Everyone

Filed under
Ubuntu

it.gen.nz: I’ve been fiddling with Linux for a decade now. And, frankly, back then it was a total bear to get it working - you had to really, really, want to. How things have changed!

How to: simple security with Easy Crypt

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntuguru.wordpress: Add some secret ninja power to your Ubuntu system today with Easy Crypt. With only a right click you can open or close a ‘top secret’ file, protected by military grade encryption (AES 512-bit Whirlpool). Easy Crypt is a cute little menu which brings the power of TrueCrypt to your system tray. No terminal commands necessary.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)