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Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Mandriva Linux 2011TP (Tech Preview) - Quick Look gfranken 08/02/2011 - 6:46pm
Blog entry Linux Libraries Texstar 01/06/2011 - 8:27pm
Blog entry first ticket srlinuxx 4 29/05/2011 - 7:38am
Blog entry Angry Birds for Chrome Browser Texstar 2 14/05/2011 - 2:35pm
Blog entry What next? harshasrisri 1 11/05/2011 - 5:34pm
Blog entry A Fishy Tale harshasrisri 01/05/2011 - 2:11pm
Blog entry storming srlinuxx 2 27/04/2011 - 6:05am
Blog entry Downtime srlinuxx 1 21/04/2011 - 10:28pm
Blog entry Gnome3 is a YES revdjenk 08/04/2011 - 12:27pm
Blog entry Mageia 1 Alpha2 -- A Status Report gfranken 27/03/2011 - 3:59am

Debian Isn't Difficult, Fedora Elections Winners, Fav Distro

Filed under
-s

Prospective users still avoid Debian initially because it's difficult to install, or so they believe. It turns out they're not basing their opinions on real life. Keith Curtis wrote up his experience installing Arch on his new Lenovo laptop, after a fairly complete hardware review as well. Jamie Watson got a new notebook too and today shared a bit on getting it ready for Linux. Part of that was booting Mint 18.1 which gave him something to smile about. Elsewhere, the Fedora committee elections results are in and Dominique Leuenberger posted a review of this week in Tumbleweed. Gary Newell test drove Elementary OS 0.4 and OpenSource.com asked, "What is your favorite Linux distribution?"

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Epiphany Browser to Add New "Copy Image" Context Menu Item, Support IDN URLs

Filed under
GNOME
Web

Even if it might not become your everyday web browser, Epiphany is getting much-deserved attention from the GNOME Project, which plans on implementing many new features for the next major release, Epiphany 3.24.

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Oracle Continues to Improve Linux 4.10 Kernel Support in New VirtualBox Releases

Filed under
Linux

Oracle today, January 17, 2017, announced the release of VirtualBox 5.1.14 and 5.0.32, the seventh and sixteenth maintenance updates to the VirtualBox 5.1 and VirtualBox 5.0 stable series respectively.

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Meet the new Week view

Filed under
GNOME

This morning, I had some free hours to spend on my baby Calendar, and of course I’d spend on what matters the most: the Week view.

I’ve been working on and off in this feature for quite a while, and the last missing piece was proper drag n’ drop support. Fear no more!, and say hello to the new Week view in GNOME Calendar

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Mycroft AI Intelligent Personal Assistant Now Available as a Raspberry Pi Image

Filed under
Linux
OSS

It's been very quiet lately for the Mycroft project, an open-source initiative to bring a full-featured intelligent personal assistant to Linux desktops, but it looks like it's still alive and kicking, and it's now available as a Raspberry Pi image.

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You Can Now Have All the Essential Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS Flavors on a Single ISO

Filed under
Ubuntu

After informing Softpedia about the release of the Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 Live DVDs, Željko Popivoda from the Linux AIO team is now announcing the availability of Linux AIO Ubuntu 14.04.5.

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Benchmarking Radeon Open Compute ROCm 1.4 OpenCL

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last month with AMD/GPUOpen's ROCm 1.4 release they delivered on OpenCL support, albeit for this initial release all of the code is not yet open-source. I tried out ROCm 1.4 with the currently supported GPUs to see how the OpenCL performance compares to just using the AMDGPU-PRO OpenCL implementation.

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Canonical to Remove Old Unity 7 Scopes from Ubuntu Because They're Not Secure

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Security

Canonical's Will Cooke has revealed recently the company's plans on removing some old, unmaintained Unity 7 Scopes from the Ubuntu Linux archives because they could threaten the security of the entire operating system.

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antiX 16.1 Linux OS Is Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie," without Systemd

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Debian

More than six months after its official release, the antiX 16 "Berta Cáceres" GNU/Linux distribution sees its first point release, based on the recently unveiled Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie" operating system.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Elementary OS Loki 0.4

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Elementary looks great. It is easy to install, easy to use and the applications are perfectly adequate for basic tasks.

The big issue is the package manager. The biggest issue with Ubuntu is the package manager.

The fact that somebody has had to go to the effort to create the Ubuntu After Install application shows there is a problem.

Why can't Ubuntu or one of these derivatives grasp the bull by the horns and come up with a solution.

People like to use Chrome yet all we get is Firefox or some basic equivalent. Chrome works with everything. It is by far the best browser and I don't want to settle for second best.

If you don't want to include it as part of the main package manager add a simple tool for installing this and many other applications including Steam.

On the whole though the distribution looks good and is simple to use and I do recommend it for the Everyday Linux User.

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Canonical Improves Classic Confinement and Aliases Support in Snapd 2.21 Daemon

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Snappy team is back from the extended Christmas and New Year's holidays, and they've recently announced the release of the Snapd 2.21 Snappy daemon through Michael Vogt, Synaptic and APT developer.

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Dell Announces New Ubuntu-Powered Dell Precision Mobile Workstation Line-Up

Filed under
Ubuntu

Following the introduction of the 6th generation Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition mobile workstation back in October 2016, Dell's Barton George is proud to announce the next generation of company's Dell Precision line.

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Distributions and Kernels

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • What is your favorite Linux distribution?

    Of all the many questions you might ask an open source enthusiast, none may evoke quite the passionate response as asking which distribution they prefer.

    People choose a distribution for many reasons, from look and feel to stability, from speed to how it runs on older machines, from the pace of updates to simply which offers the packages they need. Whatever the reason, with so many distributions available, asking which one you use can be seen as a proxy for asking how you choose to interact with your computer.

  • The joy of Just Works
  • Amdocs, Linux Foundation to accelerate service provider, developer adoption of open source ECOMP

    Amdocs and the Linux Foundation have struck up a partnership in an effort to accelerate adoption of the open source Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) platform developed by AT&T.

  • The Age of the Unikernel: 10 Projects to Know

    When it comes to operating systems, container technologies, and unikernels, the trend toward tiny continues. What is a unikernel? It is essentially a pared-down operating system (the unikernel) that can pair with an application into a unikernel application, typically running within a virtual machine. They are sometimes called library operating systems because they include libraries that enable applications to use hardware and network protocols in combination with a set of policies for access control and isolation of the network layer.

    Containers often come to mind when discussion turns to cloud computing and Linux, but unikernels are doing transformative things, too. Neither containers nor unikernels are brand new. There were unikernel-like systems in the 1990s such as Exokernel, but today popular unikernels include MirageOS and OSv. Unikernel applications can be used independently and deployed across heterogeneous environments. They can facilitate specialized and isolated services and have become widely used for developing applications within a microservices architecture.

    [...]

    In this series of articles, we are looking at the projects mentioned in the guide, by category, providing extra insights on how the overall category is evolving. Below, you’ll find a list of several important unikernels and the impact that they are having, along with links to their GitHub repositories, all gathered from the Guide to the Open Cloud:

  • Mesa 17.0 Delayed To Allow For Ivy Bridge OpenGL 4.0

    Mesa 17.0 (formerly known as Mesa 13.1) was supposed to enter its feature freeze last weekend, but that milestone and branching of the code-base didn't happen due to last minute feature work.

Software and today's howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos

More Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • Here's How To Setup Clear Linux For Intel Steam Linux Gaming

    A few weeks back we learned of Intel's Clear Linux distribution working towards Steam support. While Clear Linux is a performance-oriented workstation/server/cloud distribution, repeatedly in our tests it performs among the top Linux distributions even when it comes to Intel OpenGL Linux gaming, so being able to game with it isn't a far stretch with Steam support -- there is also Vulkan support now too.

    If you aren't familiar with Clear Linux for OpenGL/gaming performance, see some of our past tests like in Clear Linux With Mesa 13 Is A Strong Match For Intel Linux Performance or Clear Linux Continues To Have Graphics Performance Advantage Over Ubuntu. Clear Linux on Intel graphics systems can even outperform Ubuntu and other more popular desktop distribution alternatives. Though this is just for Linux gaming with Intel graphics -- AMD/NVIDIA graphics aren't currently supported by this Intel Open-Source Technology Center project.

  • Smartphone Game: Highway Traffic Rider game now available for free on Tizen Store

    Last year a motorbike riding game named Highway Traffic Rider was released on Tizen Store by Janos Barkoczi and copyright of ZipZap Games Kft. for ₹33. Now this game is available in the Tizen store for FREE. This is an awesome bike riding game, which has different types of missions & levels, different types of riding mode, different types of environments and different bikes for different levels. There are 3 missions in a level.

  • Wine Staging 2.0 RC5 Improves Support for Apps That Require Windows 7 or Vista

    The road to Wine 2.0 and Wine Staging 2.0 continues, and while the former already got its fifth Release Candidate (RC) development release at the end of last week, the latter yesterday received a new unstable build.

    That's right, we are talking here about Wine Staging 2.0 RC5, which comes hot on the heels of Wine 2.0 RC5 to add numerous goodies for those who want to run Windows apps and games on their Linux computers.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Do you like Windows 10 Look but Love LINUX? Here are Windows 10 GTK Themes for you!
  • A history about Gtk+, Vulkan and Wayland

    A few weeks ago, I was curious to test Gtk+ 4. I know it has some awsome features like OpenGL rendering, major cleanups and other hot stuff, but didn’t have the chance to check it out until then.

    I was mostly excited about Vulkan.

    I know both of my laptop’s graphic cards support Vulkan. It’s a hybrid Intel Broadwell G2 + NVidia GeForce 920M, although I don’t use the latter because Linux sucks hard with Dual GPU.

    Downloaded the latest Gtk+ source, compiled and… nothing. Immediate segmentation fault. Yay! What a great chance to get involved with the next major Gtk+ version development!

  • GNOME Developer On GTK4: State-of-the-Art of Toolkit Support

    GNOME developer Georges Stavracas has shared his thoughts on the state of the GTK4 tool-kit with the recent work involving a Vulkan renderer, including which also now works on Wayland.

    Georges Stavracas was excited to try the current state of GTK4 development but initially hit a segmentation fault. But after overcoming that, he was successful in running GTK4 on Wayland and the widgets being rendered by Vulkan. He commented on his blog, "May not be as exciting, since there are no new visible features but… damn, it’s Gtk+ being rendered with Vulkan on Wayland. It’s basically the state-of-the-art of toolkit support right now. Even better, the absolute majority of applications will gain this for free once they port to Gtk+ 4 series."

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Recipes and Outreachy

  • Recipes for you and me
    Since I’ve last written about recipes, we’ve started to figure out what we can achieve in time for GNOME 3.24, with an eye towards delivering a useful application. The result is this plan, which should be doable.
  • Outreachy (GNOME)-W5&W6
    My plan was altered in this two-week, because the strings of GNOME 3.24 have not frozen yet and the maintainers of Chinese localization group told me the Extra GNOME Applications are more necessary to be translated than documents, so I began to translate the Extra GNOME Applications (stable) during this period.
  • [Older] Outreachy (GNOME)-W3&W4
    During this period, I finished the UI translation of GNOME 3.22, I’m waiting to reviewed and committed now, and I met some troubles and resolved them these days.

Home Recording with Ubuntu Studio Part One: Gearing Up

Twenty years ago, the cost of building a studio for the creation of electronic music was pricey, to say the least. The cost of a computer that was suitable for multimedia production could cost the average musician between $1,000 and $2,000. Add in the cost of recording software, additional instruments and equipment, and one could easily spend between $5,000 and $10,000 just to get started. But nowadays, you do not have to break the bank to start making music at home. The price of personal computers has dropped substantially over the past two decades. At the time of this writing, it is possible to get a notebook PC that’s suitable for audio production for around $500. Other pieces of equipment have also dropped in price, making it possible to build a functional recording studio for around $1,000. (Read the rest)

Leftovers: Gaming

Red Hat and Fedora