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Wednesday, 21 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Gaim 2.0.0beta1 Available

Filed under
Software

We've released Gaim 2.0.0beta1. We're looking for lots of feedback on this release--especially what you love about it and what you hate about it.

GOOGLE'S First Big Failure

Filed under
Web

There was a huge rush to sign up for Google Analytics when it was first announced a few weeks ago. The Google search engine is widely believed to be the best on the Web. Google Gmail was a smash hit. So why does Google Analytics suck?

Also: Oops! Everybody but Google is Case-Sensitive?!

Bruce Perens' Forecasts for 2006

Filed under
Misc
  • Trouble ahead for PHP

  • Java begins its decline as an Enterprise Platform
  • Native Linux APIs gain ground as a Cellular Applications Platform

Firefox browser enters mainstream

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Firefox Web browser hit a milestone recently with the release of version 1.5 in Mac, Windows and Linux flavors. It has graduated from its hacker roots and turned into a powerful, fast and easily customizable browser that anyone can use.

Apache 2.2.0: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Filed under
Software

Apache 2.2.0 is major release of the Apache httpd server and includes a number of critical changes. This article will cover some of the specific elements that have changed (with examples and alternative configurations) as well as discuss when to upgrade to the new version and when to wait for a future revision.

Kat Continues to Purrrr

Filed under
Linux
-s

Kat is purring louder than ever, and folks are hearing. Not long ago Kat was a new technology brought to my attention by being included in a beta of the last Mandriva release. Not much later I interviewed Roberto Cappuccio and found out much more about him and his exciting project. Recently an article by Roberto was published in one of the largest Linux magazines in existence today. Now Robert Cappuccio celebrates a new site, a new logo and fund raiser.

Running Linux - Fifth Edition

Filed under
Reviews

If you have a passing interesting Linux or if you're a seasoned veteran, you like Running Linux Fifth Edition . It's not only a good book to read, it's an excellent reference.

It pays to be a Novell exec

Filed under
SUSE
Misc

According to the press release, "During the fourth fiscal quarter 2005, Novell recognized Linux platform revenue of $61 million, which was up 418 percent from the year ago quarter." Sounds impressive, doesn't it?

FSM: On free vs. proprietary

Filed under
Software

There is currently a competition going on between two types of business model. Each have their strong advocates, supporters and enemies. Flame wars have raised the temperature of various communication channels. In short, it's good old fashioned fun for all and sundry.

SUSE 10.1 Alpha 4 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

OpenSuSE's SUSE Linux 10.1 alpha4 was released right on schedule December 15 and as usual those developers have been hard at work. No big visual changes, but plenty under-the-hood serve as testament to their dedication. Again some key features this release include superior performance, unparalleled stability, and unrivaled software availability. Weelll, almost...

Digging Distributed Journalism: Digg.com

Filed under
Web

For those of you who haven't heard about Digg, it's a news site that relies on its readers to determine what the most important news stories are that day. In this interview, Kevin and Jay talk in depth about Digg, it's history, why Digg works, and Digg's international aspirations, and where Digg is going in the future.

Linux--The Teenage Years

Filed under
Linux

For seasoned IT citizens (i.e., senior managers and executives) it must be quite a show. Many can sit back and say, "Yup, I remember my AT&T Unix teen years. They were wild and exciting, but we sure are glad we got through them alive."

Creating a Wiki with kwiki

Filed under
HowTos

Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Why Do They Want My Phone Number?

Filed under
Security

On the checkout line this holiday season, make sure you have everything on your gift list, your cash or credit card ready -- and, oh yeah, get set for one more thing.

"Can I have your phone number, please?"

Where Computer Interfaces Are Going : 3D Beyond Games

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Will we be stuck with flat rectangles on our desktop forever or will we finally live in a 3D desktop? This article discusses some alternatives and proposes a framework in which future interface designs may be evaluated.

High-tech gift ideas, items in wee sizes, at tiny prices

Filed under
Misc

Ask your favorite techies what they want for the holidays, and they'll probably suggest a 50-inch plasma television, the hottest Windows laptop or a 60-gigabyte iPod.

Hackers find first Xbox 360 cracks

Filed under
Gaming

Only weeks after the introduction of the Xbox 360, hackers appear to have cracked their way into the software that runs the Microsoft game console.

Classic Doom with New Tech

Filed under
Gaming

Wish you could relive the glory days playing the original Doom but with all the flair of a modern graphics engine? Well, thanks to the folks over at Flaming Sheep Software, you can!

Enterprise Unix Roundup: What's Driving Mandriva?

Filed under
MDV

Even before you open the door, you can sometimes tell how urgent the person on the other side wants to talk to you. A quiet knock is polite, well-mannered. A harder knock communicates more of a desire to hurry up, let's get this open so we can talk.

Then there's Mandriva. They kicked the door in this week.

The Voice of IP: Open Source and the Traditional Business Model -- Can They Be Buddies?

Filed under
OSS

Something that has become really noticeable is the prominence of Asterisk (the open source PBX) in the telecoms media and at telephony shows. It is not just the high profile presence of Asterisk, but it is the growing number of other companies who have products based on Asterisk that is truly staggering.

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