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Saturday, 24 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Story Wishtel to launch sub-Rs 3,000 tablet srlinuxx 01/12/2012 - 4:45pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 01/12/2012 - 3:34am
Story Mint Team Rushes out 14.1 Update srlinuxx 01/12/2012 - 3:26am
Story Xubuntu 12.10 review - Very nice srlinuxx 30/11/2012 - 11:09pm
Story How-to: Picking a desktop environment in Linux srlinuxx 30/11/2012 - 11:08pm
Story Slax 7.0 RC2 – Mini KDE 4 srlinuxx 30/11/2012 - 9:17pm
Story Debian veteran Garbee to keynote at LCA srlinuxx 30/11/2012 - 9:16pm
Story Why Open Source Software is More Secure srlinuxx 30/11/2012 - 9:11pm
Story Desktop Linux needs anti-virus like a fish needs a bicycle srlinuxx 30/11/2012 - 6:37pm
Story Going from A to B in KDE, GNOME, and Windows srlinuxx 30/11/2012 - 6:35pm

Why I finally switched to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

My first two months of using Ubuntu were pretty... difficult. Installing Linux on a laptop (for complete beginners) was supposedly a relatively complex task (specially if, like me, you don't like asking questions on forums). So I basically ended up with a pretty buggy installation (less buggy than my Windows partition, even though my laptop is only three months old). But still, other than my original ideological motivations, what could possibly warrant a definitive switch to Ubuntu?

KMyMoney: Coming along, but still not there

Filed under
Software

KMyMoney is KDE's personal financial management program. If you don't have complex needs and a lot of history to import, KMyMoney lets you set up accounts, enter transactions, and generate reports easily, and other features are doable with some help from the generous amounts of documentation. However, KMyMoney is not a good choice for small business owners, who need more functionality than it can provide.

Open source rival takes on Google Maps

Filed under
Software

Volunteer "citizen cartographers" are aiming to take on the likes of Google Maps and Ordnance Survey by creating a free open source wiki-style map of the planet.

Large public-sector Linux project flops

Filed under
Linux

A publicly funded Linux project which cost UK taxpayers half-a-million pounds has flopped. Birmingham City Council began the project — one of the largest public-sector Linux projects in the UK — in May 2005 to evaluate the potential of open-source software. The council, the largest local authority in the UK, intended to deploy open-source software on 1,500 PCs in libraries across the city.

UNIX tips and tricks for a new user, Part 2: The vi text editor

Filed under
Linux

The vi text editor might seem counterintuitive to new users but, make no mistake, there is a good reason this 30-year old tool is still widely used by many of the best developers in the world. The vi text editor separates operations into insert mode and command mode, which gives you ultrafast access to key commands that can edit, insert, and move text in on-the-fly, user-defined segments.

Microsoft patent pledge an 'empty promise'

Filed under
Microsoft

The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) has dismissed Microsoft's patent pledge to open source developers as "meaningless" and warned that it could provide a false sense of security.

CLI Magic: Enhancing the shell with fish

Filed under
Software

The Friendly Interactive Shell (fish) is an alternative command line that is designed to be easy to learn and use. fish turns on by default options that are available in shells such as Bash or tcsh and develops them far beyond other shells. The result is a command line that can go a long way toward curing the phobia that many GNU/Linux users nurse from their experience with the DOS command line.

PS3 is nifty, but it's a bit too pricey

Filed under
Gaming

After spending time with Sony's new PlayStation 3 game console last week, I understand why Microsoft's Xbox team has been strutting lately. Don't get me wrong. The PS3 is an amazing machine. I'd love to have one sitting beneath my TV. But not for $500 or $600.

Also: Playstation 3 dissected and analysed

Can Novell Make the Sale?

Filed under
SUSE

Recently, Novell made a statement that could’ve given them some grief. In an online publication Computer Business Review Online, Novell was apparently quoted as stating that Vista would cost $300 more than their SuSE option. What Novell appears to have missed is a seemingly long list of Vista licenses with a number of price ranges. To add insult to injury, it appears the page containing the quote has since been pulled down.

The four most trendy Linux developments

Filed under
Linux

The buzz over Linux is hardly new. Vendors of every ilk have tripped over themselves to announce Linux-related products. But even in the deafening noise surrounding Linux, four topics stand out : the duel for the desktop, 3-D desktop tools, isolated virtual environments (also known as containerization or virtualization), and mobile Linux devices.

Analysis - Sun GPLs Java

Filed under
Software

First, Sun Microsystems Inc. wouldn't do it. Then Sun teased us with it. Now, on Nov. 13, Sun will finally open-source its implementations of Java under the GNU GPLv2. On Monday, Sun released the first pieces of source code for Sun's implementation of JSE and a buildable implementation of JME.

Quick Look at Urli OS 6.10

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Urli 6.10 is an Debian/Ubuntu derived Linux OS developed in Argentina. It was recently added to distrowatch's waiting list and sounded a bit interesting given that their motto seems to be "Linux like never before!" Well, this I had to see.

Is Ubuntu set to become non-free?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Last week at the Ubuntu Developer Summit the release goals for Feisty Fawn—scheduled to appear April 2007—were discussed and drawn up. Ubuntu's next version is aiming for some pretty good features such as a bullet proof X.org and network roaming. There's one change that bothers me to no end though: composite by default.

Q&A: VMware co-founder Mendel Rosenblum

Filed under
Interviews

At the third and by far the biggest VMware's annual VMworld convention last week, we grabbed the chance to speak to the company's virtualisation visionary and co-founder, Mendel Rosenblum. Where does he see the company taking this fast-evolving technology?

Month of Kernel Bugs: Linux in the lead

Filed under
OS

At this point in time, nine vulnerabilities in operating system kernels have been publicised as part of the Month of Kernel Bugs. Following on July's Month of Browser Bugs initiated by H.D. Moore, a similar project to highlight security vulnerabilities has been announced for November under the title "Month of Kernel Bugs" (MoKB). The project's initiators intend to release one security hole per day for the various operating system kernels.

Clear indication that Linux has arrived

Filed under
Linux

Oracle’s announcement of providing support on Red Hat Linux is a clear indication that Linux has arrived. Linux, which started out as a hobby among some engineers, is today enterprise-ready and important enough for Oracle to provide support.

openSUSE 10.2 Beta 2 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

The countdown continues on the road to 10.2 with the latest release of beta 2 on the 10th. This release didn't bring too many surprises, but things seem to be shaping up nicely. In light of all the negative publicity of Novell's recent announcement, I imagine the pressure is bearing down on the openSUSE infantry to release a banner system. I wish them luck and I think they are on the right path.

Samba says Novell-Microsoft deal sucks

Filed under
SUSE

THE OPEN SOURCE guys at Samba hit out at Novell's rapprochement with Microsoft, saying they disapproved strongly of the former Utah firm's actions.

Racoon Roadwarrior Configuration

Filed under
HowTos

Roadwarrior is a client that uses unknown, dynamically assigned IP addresses to connect to a VPN gateway (in this case also firewall).

Linux Desktop Search

Filed under
Linux

Searching in Linux starts those venerable command line favorites: find, grep, and locate. These tools are very powerful and can easily be integrated into scripts, but for many users, this usefulness is also one of their key weaknesses. These users require a graphical interface in order to be comfortable with a program.

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