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Tuesday, 25 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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ITV: Avidly watching Linux

Filed under
Linux

ITV's director of operations Nick Leake has taken the brave move of moving a lot of his company's core systems onto Linux. We ask him how the migration is working out.

Sun exec: Galaxy to shape Sun's future

Filed under
Hardware

Announced yesterday, Sun's new servers are powered by Advanced Micro Devices' Opteron processors and have dual-core capabilities. Graham Lovell provided additional details about the servers and discussed how Sun plans to improve the bottom line going forward. He also talked about exactly how Linux and open source play into that strategy.

Computer Associates' patent donation is slammed

Filed under
OSS

Greg Aharonian, a vehement campaigner for higher quality patents, slammed Computer Associates' patent donation last week to the open source community as a 'fraud to impress the naive'.

Interview: Hans Reiser

Filed under
Reiser
Interviews
OSS

In this interview, Hans looks back at Reiser3, describing the advantages it had over other filesystems when it was released and its current state. He then explores the many improvements currently in Reiser4.

Open Source Journalist Named Principal Analyst By OSDL

Filed under
OSS

In addition to hands-on technology and product marketing expertise, Dave brings important relationships across the technology industry," said Stuart Cohen (pictured), CEO of OSDL, as OSDL today announced the appointment of Dave Rosenberg to a newly-created position as Principal Analyst.

Sony Recalls 3.5 Mln Playstation Power Adaptors

Filed under
Gaming

ruh-ro, Sony Corp. is recalling 3.5 million faulty power adaptors for its popular PlayStation 2 video game console because they may overheat and cause injury.

A Brief History of Technology

Filed under
Misc

The thing that distinguishes intelligent life is its ability to solve problems. When we think of technology nowadays, we tend to think of computers, science and other such advancements. However, it is very interesting to see how these advancements were brought about in the first place.

Slashdot Offering 30 Minute Advance Look

Filed under
Web

By logging in and agreeing to view an interstitial ad, DayPass users gain access to stories before other readers, 30 minutes ahead of them.

Bill Cosby Wins Fight Over Domain Name

Filed under
Web

A U.N. panel awarded to comedian Bill Cosby on Monday an Internet domain name based on the Fat Albert cartoon character he created in the 1960s.

Interview: Linspire's Kevin Carmony

Filed under
Linux

OfB's Timothy R. Butler talked with Linspire's new CEO, Kevin Carmony, a few weeks ago about some of Linspire's choices and the future of GNU/Linux.

Comparing Linux with Windows and Solaris

Filed under
Linux

Over the past few years, Linux adoption rates in the enterprise have soared. Users have quoted a wide range of TCO and ROI benefits, and Linux has become a strategic platform for business applications at many companies.

Intel's Viiv specifications leaked

Filed under
Hardware

Intel recently briefed system builders on the requirements for devices to qualify for the firm's Hometrino brand "Viiv".

Sun extends olive branch to Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Sun Microsystems initiated a warmer stage in its relationship with Red Hat on Monday, making conspicuous room onstage for the rival at a major server product launch.

FEMA relents on Microsoft Windows-only policy

Filed under
Web

FEMA updated their online FAQ on "Monday, 09-Sep-2005" which, of course is impossible, unless you're part of the government. Maybe that's why some of these government agencies botched the hurricane relief efforts? The simple lack of a common calendar?

Nexuiz 1.2.1 released

Filed under
Gaming

A new version of Nexuiz was released yesterday. Old clients won't work properly with 1.2.1 servers - so make sure to update your copy. You won't regret! There is a full download and patches for Nexuiz 1.1 and 1.2 - each download supports Windows, Linux and MacOS X.

Review: aLinux 12.5

Filed under
Reviews

aLinux, formerly known as Peanut Linux, is a strange GNU/Linux distribution. It bills itself as a "Professional Linux Operating System" for advanced users, hobbyists, and new Linux users. However, the distribution has a number of problems that make it unsuitable for new users and unpleasant even for experienced users.

Oh well, I liked it.

Samsung Targets Intel

Filed under
Hardware

Samsung Electronics Monday hinted that its next target is Intel Corp., the world’s biggest semiconductor maker headquartered in the United States.

GLA protests against "product placement" for M$ on German TV

Filed under
Linux

The German Linux Association is calling on Germany's ARD, the public Channel One, to remove the Microsoft logo from its reports on the elections. The lobby group stated that it was considering taking legal action.

Novell Exec Says Linux Growing

Filed under
Linux

David Patrick, vice president and general manager of Novell's Linux, open-source platforms and services group, spoke with Computerworld about the company's prospects as it tries to shift its customer base from NetWare to the open-source Linux operating system.

Also: Novell: Vista will drive users to Linux

S.Korean Music Industry Sues 1,985

Filed under
Legal

South Korea's music industry filed a criminal lawsuit Monday against 1,985 Internet file-swapping program users, in a move to stem unauthorized song swapping on the Web.

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Security: Updates, FUD, Back Doors and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Sting Catches Another Ransomware Firm — Red Mosquito — Negotiating With “Hackers”

    ProPublica recently reported that two U.S. firms, which professed to use their own data recovery methods to help ransomware victims regain access to infected files, instead paid the hackers. Now there’s new evidence that a U.K. firm takes a similar approach. Fabian Wosar, a cyber security researcher, told ProPublica this month that, in a sting operation he conducted in April, Scotland-based Red Mosquito Data Recovery said it was “running tests” to unlock files while actually negotiating a ransom payment. Wosar, the head of research at anti-virus provider Emsisoft, said he posed as both hacker and victim so he could review the company’s communications to both sides. Red Mosquito Data Recovery “made no effort to not pay the ransom” and instead went “straight to the ransomware author literally within minutes,” Wosar said. “Behavior like this is what keeps ransomware running.”

  • Carbon Black adds Linux support and more to its endpoint protection solution

    Endpoint protection company Carbon Black is adding a number of features to its platform, including Linux support and Amazon Web Services and container protection. The cloud-native platform gives security and IT teams remote access to cloud workloads and containers running in their environment, making it easier to resolve configuration drift, address vulnerabilities in real time, confidently respond to incidents and demonstrate compliance with business policies and industry regulations. The cloud workload and container protection capabilities are available from the same universal agent and cloud-native platform protecting Microsoft Windows, macOS and Linux endpoints. "The industry is quickly moving into the cloud era for endpoint protection and IT operations," says Ryan Polk, Carbon Black's chief product officer. "Carbon Black is proud to be at the front edge for cloud innovation and, with this latest release, our cloud-native EPP is now protecting some of the most important and emerging cloud real estate." As well as supporting AWS workloads and nearly every Linux distribution released since 2011, Carbon Black's platform extends direct access to more than 1,000 individual system artifacts across all major operating systems, including the ability to check the status of disk encryption, installed applications, kernel integrity, listening network ports, logged in users, OS versions, USB devices and more.

  • Top 10 Ethical Hacking Books

    Hacking is an ongoing process of information gathering and exploitation of any target. The hackers are consistent, practical and stay updated with daily appearing vulnerabilities. The first step to exploitation is always reconnaissance. The more information you gather, the better there are chances that you will make your way through the victim boundary. The attack should be very structured and verified in a local environment before being implemented on live target. The pre requisites are Networking skills, programming languages, Linux, Bash scripting and a reasonable workstation.Ethical hacking is the application of hacking knowledge for the benefit of society through good morals, and is usually defensive in nature, based on good knowledge of the core principles. Many books are available on hacking, but we will discuss today the top 10 which are appreciated and recommended by the hacking community. Note: The books are in no particular order.

  • Raspberry Pi used to steal data from Nasa lab [Ed: RasPi has a major new release (4), so MSBBC needs to spread some negative things/stories about it (googlebombing?). Microsoft failed to take over Raspberry Pi Foundation like it did OLPC. BBC (run by ex-Microsoft UK people) spreads anti-RasPi news belatedly (blaming it for something unrelated) only hours after a major product release.]

    A tiny Raspberry Pi computer has been used to steal data from Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the space agency has revealed. An audit report reveals the gadget was used to take about 500MB of data.

  • VMware’s Dirk Hohndel On Container Security, Mental Health And Open Source
  • Trump Ponders Banning All Chinese-Made Gear From US 5G Networks [Ed: Mandating NSA back doors everywhere]

    We've already noted extensively how the "race to fifth generation wireless (5G)" is kind of a dumb thing. While 5G is important in the way that faster, better networks are always important, the purported Earth-rattling benefits of the technology have been painfully over-hyped. And they've been painfully over-hyped largely for two reasons: one, mobile carriers want to give a kick to stalling cellphone sales numbers, and network hardware vendors like Cisco want to drive the adoption of new, more expensive, telecom hardware. The "race to 5G" isn't a race. And even if it were, our broadband maps are so intentionally terrible, we'd have no idea if and when we'd won it. Regardless, 5G has subsequently become a sort of magic pixie dust of tech policy conversations, justifying all manner of sometimes dubious policy. But the underlying desire to simply sell more kit has also infected the Trump administration's protectionist attacks on companies like Huawei, which is based on about 40% actual cybersecurity concerns, and 60% lobbying efforts by US hardware vendors that don't want to compete with cheaper Chinese hardware.

openSUSE Tumbleweed vs leap: What is the Difference?

Before talking about the differences between these versions of openSUSE, let’s have a brief look at its background and features. Earlier it was known as SUSE Linux but after a software company Novell acquired SUSE Linux in February 2004, Novell decided to release SUSE Linux Professional with 100% open source products, and as an open source project, this Linux got its prefix i.e Open. Later it split from Novell and became a separate brand. openSUSE inherits its properties from SUSE Linux Professional and the successor of the same. SUSE also offers open source-based enterprise-class OS known as SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. openSUSE Linux community is backed by the SUSE for further research and developments. It uses the easy-to-use YaST package management system and has great advantages for a small and medium-sized enterprise server. Using YaST2 can make the configuration of the server simpler and faster. SuSE Enterprise Linux can be used for large server systems too. When it comes to Linux, everyone knows that Linux is a very secure OS, and openSUSE is not an exception. Apart from the YaST Package manager, it also supports self-developed Zypper (ZYpp) and RPM. It uses KDE5 as the default desktop environment and also provides the GNOME, MATE, LXQt, Xfce… Now come to the main agenda of the article which is the difference between openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap? Read more

Canonical/Ubuntu: StarLabs’ Theme, Snap Store, 32-bit i386 Packages and More

  • Give Ubuntu an Electric-Blue Look with StarLabs’ Theme

    Fancy giving your Ubuntu desktop a dark, electric-blue makeover? If so, then Linux laptop seller StarLabs has you covered. The company (who I’l admit I hadn’t heard of until recently) joins a surfeit of British-based Linux laptop vendors, with StationX and the (fabulous) Entroware being the best known. But we’re not here to talk about systems, we’re here to talk themes! See, aside from selling a small range of (seemingly decent) laptops preloaded with a selection of Ubuntu-based Linux distributions, StarLabs also maintain their own theme. And i’m going to show you how to install it Ubuntu.

  • Ubuntu Has Started Work On A New Desktop Snap Store

    Ubuntu's software stores / software centers have gone through several revisions over the years and now a new Snap Store is in development. Developers at Canonical have begun committing to a new Snap Desktop Store. The first code commits were only last week, so it's not yet something for end-users to get all excited about but presumably they'll be aiming for it to be in good shape by next year's Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 drops 32-bit images, pledges to maintain some packages after user outcry

    Ubuntu 19.10 is scheduled for release in October, though controversy is already brewing following Canonical's abjectly poorly-communicated plans to stop providing new 32-bit x86 (i386) packages in new Ubuntu releases. This move will prevent users from installing Ubuntu on older computers, and using certain applications only provided in 32-bit versions. In fairness to Canonical, the first x86-64 processors will be 16 years old when Ubuntu 19.10 is released, and this is a reckoning that other Linux distributions—as well as Windows and Mac OS—will eventually face, as the amount of engineering time needed to protract legacy platform support is approaching the negative end of a cost-benefit analysis.

  • Ubuntu Will Provide Select 32-bit Packages For Ubuntu 19.10 And 20.04 LTS

    As a result of constant feedback from the open source community — specifically gamers, WINE users, and Ubuntu Studio users — Canonical has decided to change its plans regarding ditching the 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. For those who don’t know, last week, Canonical announced that it’s going to completely abandon the support for i386 architectures in the Ubuntu 19.10 release. Due to the same reason, Canonical restricted the users from upgrading their 18.04 LTS installations to 18.10, so that they don’t end up running 32-bit applications on an interim release with just nine months of support.

  • The future of mobile connectivity

    Mobile operators face a range of challenges today from saturation, competition and regulation – all of which are having a negative impact on revenues. The introduction of 5G offers new customer segments and services to offset this decline. However, unlike the introduction of 4G which was dominated by consumer benefits, 5G is expected to be driven by enterprise use. According to IDC, enterprises will generate 60 percent of the world’s data by 2025. Rather than rely on costly proprietary hardware and operating models, the use of open source technologies offers the ability to commoditise and democratise the wireless network infrastructure. Major operators such as Vodafone, Telefonica and China Mobile have already adopted such practices. Shifting to open source technology and taking a software defined approach enables mobile operators to differentiate based on the services they offer, rather than network coverage or subscription costs.

  • Design and Web team summary – 25 June 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.