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Wednesday, 13 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Linux conundrums lately srlinuxx 30/09/2010 - 5:03pm
Blog entry under the weather srlinuxx 3 30/09/2010 - 5:20pm
Blog entry Texas Mint Tea, anyone? revdjenk 24/09/2010 - 8:56pm
Blog entry Debian-Main Locus(t) Error revdjenk 24/09/2010 - 8:27pm
Blog entry echo "Hello World" JULinux 20/09/2010 - 7:02pm
Blog entry Virtualization artwales 08/09/2010 - 8:16pm
Blog entry Amnesia: TDD Ready srlinuxx 08/09/2010 - 2:30pm
Blog entry under the weather srlinuxx 3 15/07/2010 - 2:51am
Blog entry X Window System mywebblog 09/07/2010 - 3:56am
Blog entry Cloud computing on Linux can help small business bigbearomaha 06/07/2010 - 2:53am

Mesa 17.3

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 17.3.0

    The release consists of approximately 2700 commits from over 120 developers.

  • Mesa 17.3 Brings Intel i965, RadeonSI, and Nouveau Drivers Closer to OpenGL 4.6

    Collabora's Emil Velikov is pleased to announce today the general availability of the final Mesa 17.3 graphics stack release for GNU/Linux distributions.

    Mesa or Mesa 3D Graphics Library is an open-source graphics stack, a collection of open-source graphics drivers to bring support for the latest OpenGL and Vulkan technologies to Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia graphics cards on Linux-based operating systems.

  • Mesa 17.3 Officially Released: Nearly OpenGL 4.6, Better Vulkan Support

    Delays pushed back the Mesa 17.3 release from November, but this quarterly update to the Mesa 3D graphics stack is now available for users.

    Mesa 17.3 is another significant update this year for the open-source graphics drivers. Mesa 17.3 offers nearly complete OpenGL 4.6 support for RadeonSI / Intel / Nouveau NVC0 drivers with the notable exception of the SPIR-V ingestion support yet not being complete. Mesa 17.3 also contains significant improvements to the Radeon RADV and Intel ANV Vulkan drivers with new extension support, performance optimizations, and all important fixes.

  • Mesa 17.3.0 release to further advance open source graphics drivers

    Mesa 17.3.0 is the latest version of the open source graphics drivers and it has officially released today.

    While this is a major new version, as always, new versions can cause a bit of breakage due to so much changing. The Mesa developers recommend waiting for the first point release 17.3.1 if you're after a stable and reliable experience.

Qt Creator 4.5 Open-Source IDE Improves Android and CMake Support

Filed under
KDE

Available for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows platforms, the Qt Creator 4.5 release comes three months after the previous version to add a new UI tool that lets you manage Android SDK packages, as well as to offer better information about various issues with the installed Android SDK, including warnings about missing components or the minimum version of requirements.

"Since Android SDK tools version 25.3.0, there is no UI tool available to manage the Android SDK packages. Because of that, we have added such UI to Qt Creator," Eike Ziller wrote in the release announcement. "Unfortunately, the command line tool for managing SDKs that is provided with the SDK cannot update packages on Windows, and fails with JDK 9, so this applies to Qt Creator as well."

Read more

Qt 5.10 Released with Qt 3D Studio Graphical Editor, Numerous Improvements

Filed under
KDE

Coming six months after the long-term supported Qt 5.9 series, Qt 5.10 is a short-lived branch that introduces new stuff and a bunch of improvements. The biggest new feature of the Qt 5.10 release being the introduction of Qt 3D Studio, a graphical editor that lets you create 3D graphical user interfaces (GUIs).

"Qt 3D Studio consists of both a runtime component that is run in your application and a graphical design tool to design and create the UI. While the tool is a standalone application, the runtime can easily be integrated with the rest of Qt," said Lars Knoll. "Qt 3D Studio will work with both Qt 5.9 and 5.10."

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ReactOS Now Natively Supports More Filesystems Than all Windows OSes Combined

Filed under
OS

First introduced in the ReactOS 0.4.5 release, the support for styles created for Microsoft's Windows XP operating system received further enhancements in ReactOS 0.4.7 to reduce visual glitches for several apps, as well as to better handle transparency and messaging.

ReactOS 0.4.7 also implements support for Shell extension and allows users to enable the Quick Launch shell extension manually if they want an early taste of this feature. Furthermore, the devs managed to bring the ReactOS painting process closer to the one of the Microsoft Windows OS.

Read more

Debian 10 "Buster" Will Ensure Automatic Installation of Security Upgrades

Filed under
Debian

The Debian Installer Buster Alpha 2 release comes with a few important changes, such as the addition of the unattended-upgrades package by default through the pkgsel component to ensure the automatic installation of security upgrades, as well as the addition of the installation images for the mips64el architecture.

Another important change in this second alpha release of the Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Installer is that the Linux 4.13 kernel series is now supported for new installations, though you should know it reached end of life last month, so we believe the third alpha of Debian Installer will support Linux kernel 4.14 LTS.

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GeckoLinux Brings Flexibility and Choice to openSUSE

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

If you’re looking for an excuse to venture back into the realm of openSUSE, GeckoLinux might be a good reason. It’s slightly better looking, lighter weight, and with similar performance. It’s not perfect and, chances are, it won’t steal you away from your distribution of choice, but GeckoLinux is a solid entry in the realm of Linux desktops.

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Sessions And Cookies – How Does User-Login Work?

Filed under
Security

Facebook, Gmail, Twitter we all use these websites every day. One common thing among them is that they all require you to log in to do stuff. You cannot tweet on twitter, comment on Facebook or email on Gmail unless you are authenticated and logged in to the service.

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OnionShare – Share Files Anonymously

Filed under
Security

In this Digital World, we share our media, documents, important files via the Internet using different cloud storage like Dropbox, Mega, Google Drive and many more. But every cloud storage comes with two major problems, one is the Size and the other Security.

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more

Manjaro Linux - One Of The Finest Linux Distros

Filed under
Linux

​Manjaro is suitable for new users as well as experienced. The fact that Manjaro is based on Arch, being a rolling distro that is quite stable, ships with awesome tools and packs a good selection of software out of the box makes Manjaro a fantastic distro. Let us take a look at this excellent Linux distro.

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more

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • PHP version 7.0.27RC1 and 7.1.13RC1
  • The junior programmer’s guide to asking for help

    Asking for help is a skill, and a skill you can learn. Once you’ve mastered this skill you will be able ask questions at the right time, and in the right way.

  • Cliff Lynch's Stewardship in the "Age of Algorithms"

    I agree that society is facing a crisis in its ability to remember the past. Cliff has provided a must-read overview of the context in which the crisis has developed, and some pointers to pragmatic if unsatisfactory ways to address it. What I would like to see is a even broader view, describing this crisis as one among many caused by the way increasing returns to scale are squeezing out the redundancy essential to a resilient civilization.

  • Stewardship in the "Age of Algorithms"

    This paper explores pragmatic approaches that might be employed to document the behavior of large, complex socio-technical systems (often today shorthanded as “algorithms”) that centrally involve some mixture of personalization, opaque rules, and machine learning components. Thinking rooted in traditional archival methodology — focusing on the preservation of physical and digital objects, and perhaps the accompanying preservation of their environments to permit subsequent interpretation or performance of the objects — has been a total failure for many reasons, and we must address this problem. The approaches presented here are clearly imperfect, unproven, labor-intensive, and sensitive to the often hidden factors that the target systems use for decision-making (including personalization of results, where relevant); but they are a place to begin, and their limitations are at least outlined. Numerous research questions must be explored before we can fully understand the strengths and limitations of what is proposed here. But it represents a way forward. This is essentially the first paper I am aware of which tries to effectively make progress on the stewardship challenges facing our society in the so-called “Age of Algorithms;” the paper concludes with some discussion of the failure to address these challenges to date, and the implications for the roles of archivists as opposed to other players in the broader enterprise of stewardship — that is, the capture of a record of the present and the transmission of this record, and the records bequeathed by the past, into the future. It may well be that we see the emergence of a new group of creators of documentation, perhaps predominantly social scientists and humanists, taking the front lines in dealing with the “Age of Algorithms,” with their materials then destined for our memory organizations to be cared for into the future.

  • Testing OpenStack using tempest: all is packaged, try it yourself

    tl;dr: this post explains how the new openstack-tempest-ci-live-booter package configures a machine to PXE boot a Debian Live system running on KVM in order to run functional testing of OpenStack. It may be of interest to you if you want to learn how to PXE boot a KVM virtual machine running Debian Live, even if you aren’t interested in OpenStack.

Security: AMD and Intel 'Back Doors', Quantum Computing and SELinux

Filed under
Security

How to use Fossdroid to get open source Android apps

Filed under
Android
OSS
HowTos

Fossdroid is an alternate web interface for the F‑Droid repository of open source apps for the Android operating system. Unlike the official F‑Droid website, Fossdroid's design is based on the Google Play Store, which gives users who have never used an external app repository a familiar interface to search, browse, and install Android apps. Users who use a lot of F‑Droid apps should install the F‑Droid app, which can install apps and keep them automatically updated, but Fossdroid provides a nice way to explore what the F‑Droid repository offers. Here's how to use the Fossdroid website to find, download, and install apps.

Read more

Peppermint 8 Respin Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Team Peppermint are pleased to announce the latest iteration of our operating system Peppermint 8 Respin which still comes in 32bit and 64bit versions with the 64bit version having full UEFI and Secureboot support. Whilst a respin is generally a minor release intended as an ISO update, the Peppermint 8 Respin does contain some significant changes.

Read more

Also: “Fast And Light” Peppermint 8 Respin Released — Download This Linux Distro Here

Servers: US Army, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Kata

  • Army Tapping Open-Source, Cloud as Big Data Platform

    The Army is forging ahead with deployment of its Big Data Platform (BDP), a move that underscores the Department of Defense’s (DoD) plans for using open-source software, commercial technologies, and cloud services to get a grip on the data it collects from a wide range of sources.

    The Army recently announced its intention to award Enlighten IT Consulting a sole-source contract to implement the BDP, which officially became a program of record a year ago. Enlighten, which already had worked on the platform, is also working on the Defense Information System Agency’s (DISA) overarching Big Data Platform, most recently under a $40 million contract to continue development.

  • Kubernetes Ecosystem Grows as Cloud Native Computing Foundation Expands

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) was first launched by the Linux Foundation in July 2015, with a single project at the time: Kubernetes. At the CloudNativeCon/Kubecon North America Event in Austin, Texas, there are now 14 projects and an expanding membership base.

    The pace of growth for the CNCF has not been uniform, though, with much of the growth happening over the course of 2017, as Kubernetes and demand for cloud-native technologies has grown.

  • Kata Containers Project launches to secure container infrastructure

    At KubeCon in Austin, Texas, the OpenStack Foundation announced a new-open source project, Kata Containers. This new container project unites Intel Clear Containers with Hyper's runV. The aim? To unite the security advantages of virtual machines (VMs) with the speed and manageability of container technologies.

    It does this by provides container isolation and security without the overhead of running them in a Virtual Machine (VM). Usually. Containers are run in VMs for security, but that removes some of the advantages of using containers with their small resources footprint. The purpose of runV was to make VMs run like containers. In Kata, this approach is combined with Intel's Clear Containers, which uses Intel built-in chip Virtual Technology (VT), to launch containers in lightweight virtual machines (VMs). With Kata, those containers are launched in runV.

Games and Graphics Leftovers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • 2D horror 'Corpse Party' is now available for Linux on GOG, some thoughts

    GOG have now put up the recently released Linux version of Corpse Party, the 2D horror game from Team GrisGris and XSEED Games.

  • Something for the weekend: The X Franchise on Steam is free for a few days and on sale

    If you're stuck for something to do this weekend, you might want to take a look at the X Franchise on Steam, it's quite a good deal.

  • Running OpenCL On The CPU With POCL 1.0, Xeon & EPYC Testing

    This week marked the release of the long-awaited POCL 1.0 release candidate. For the uninformed POCL, or the Portable Computing Language, is a portable implementation of OpenCL 1.2~2.0 that can run on CPUs with its LLVM code generation and has also seen back-ends for its OpenCL implementation atop AMD HSA and even NVIDIA CUDA. I've been trying out POCL 1.0-RC1 on various Intel and AMD CPUs.

  • Intel Stages More Graphics DRM Changes For Linux 4.16

    Last week Intel submitted their first batch of i915 DRM driver changes to DRM-Next that in turn is slated for Linux 4.16. Today they sent in their second round of feature updates.

    This latest batch of material for DRM-Next / Linux 4.16 includes continued work on execlist improvements, better GPU cache invalidation, various code clean-ups, continued stabilization of Cannonlake "Gen 10" graphics support, display plane improvements, continued GuC and HuC updates, a hardware workaround for Geminilake performance, more robust GPU reset handling, and a variety of other fixes and code clean-ups/improvements.

LLVM 6.0 Release Plans

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • Initial C17 Language Support Lands In LLVM Clang 6.0 SVN

    Back in October is when GCC began prepping C17 support patches for their compiler as a minor update to the C programming language. LLVM's Clang compiler has now landed its initial support for C17.

    C17 is a minor "bug fix version" over the C11 standard. The C17 specification is still being firmed up and following the initial support appearing in GCC, it's now in Clang.

  • LLVM 6.0 Release Planning, Stable Debut Slated For March

    Hans Wennborg as the continuing LLVM release manager has begun drafting plans for the LLVM 6.0 release process.

    Continuing with their usual half-year release cadence, their goal is to ship LLVM 6.0.0 by early March.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
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Kubernetes and Kubeflow

  • Kubernetes on AWS Leads CNCF Cloud Native Survey
    A survey conducted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation indicates that the deployment of Kubernetes on AWS and other public clouds is on the rise.
  • What Is Kubernetes?
    Kubernetes is one of the hottest technologies in the cloud world today, with organizations big and small talking about the open-source platform. But what exactly is Kubernetes?
  • Kubeflow: Bringing together Kubernetes and machine learning
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