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Wednesday, 17 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Big Thank You to Contributors srlinuxx 16/06/2010 - 7:55pm
Blog entry Linux Failed to Satisfy Old PC Users dangareyes 11/06/2010 - 5:28pm
Blog entry More Iron for your blood... revdjenk 21/05/2010 - 2:45am
Blog entry From Karmic to Lucid: Distribution Update Screenshots eco2geek 05/05/2010 - 5:49am
Blog entry Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Finally Released! akramshaikh 29/04/2010 - 7:18pm
Blog entry Freshly Squeezed Debian: Installing from Live DVD eco2geek 19/04/2010 - 7:26pm
Blog entry Open Source model for Drug Discovery (OSDD) sackana 12/04/2010 - 9:58am
Blog entry Secret Future Ubuntu User Interface Plans Revealed! eco2geek 4 03/05/2010 - 6:41pm
Blog entry Beginners guide to Linux installation on flashdrive linkin47 16/03/2010 - 1:23pm
Blog entry Beginners guide to Ubuntu customization linkin47 1 13/04/2010 - 5:06am

Running The Oibaf PPA On Ubuntu 14.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

While Ubuntu 14.10 is finally getting X.Org Server 1.16, it doesn't yet have Mesa 10.3 but that can be easily addressed via third-party packages.

Mesa 10.3 will hopefully still make it into Ubuntu 14.10 ahead of its debut next month since Mesa 10.3 brings many new features to the commonly used open-source Intel, Radeon, and Nouveau graphics drivers (along with promising drivers like Freedreno and VC4). If you want to try running the newest open-source user-space graphics driver code on Ubuntu 14.10, it can be easily achieved today using the well known Oibaf PPA.

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Fedora 21 Alpha to slip by one week

Filed under
Red Hat

Today at Go/No-Go meeting it was decided to slip Fedora 21 Alpha release
by one week due to unresolved blocker bugs [1] and no release candidate
available. More details in meeting minutes [2].

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There is no reason at all to use MySQL: Michael Widenius

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

MySQL was once the most popular open source database (it still is), but it’s popularity and deployment is declining under the ownership of Oracle. The founder of MySQL Michael Widenius “Monty” was not happy when Oracle announced to acquire MySQL through Sun Microsystem. He created MariaDB, an open source, drop-in replacement of MySQL, which is gaining popularity lately.

It’s not only become the default database of the leading open source operating systems, but is also replacing MySQL at WikiMedia and other major organizations and companies. Recently SkySQL merged with MariaDB’s parent company Monty Program Ab, increasing its developer force. We reached out to Monty to talk about the changing database landscape. Read on…

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Kolab creates a privacy refugee camp in Switzerland

Filed under
KDE
Security
Web

The disclosure by NSA contractor Edward Snowden has exposed the ‘out-of-control’ surveillance system of the US and the UK. The more stories we are getting from Guardian and NYTimes, the more people are losing trust in the proprietary solutions offered by the companies which operate from the US and seemingly work closely with the spy agencies.

This is a category of people who don’t yet understand the dangers of breach of privacy, but the more we are moving our lives into the digital world, the more important it is becoming to take control of our communication and privacy from the prying hands of those for whom we are the product.

Then there are those need this privacy, due to the profession they are in or for purely sensible reasons that our privacy should be respected.

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Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Red Hat Software Collections 1.2 beta: New software for Linux developers

Filed under
Red Hat

Want to keep your operating system on the straight and stable while at the same time using cutting edge development languages and programs? Then Red Hat has the tools for you with its beta release of Red Hat Software Collections (RHSC) 1.2.

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Catalyst For X.Org Server 1.16 Readied, Updates In Ubuntu 14.10

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Two months after the release of X.Org Server 1.16, AMD finally has readied a Catalyst Linux driver update that is compatible with the latest xorg-server ABI. This driver is being sent into the Ubuntu 14.10 archive and thus allowing the entire Linux graphics stack in Ubuntu 14.10 to finally be updated.

Sent into utopic-proposed on Tuesday was a new fglrx driver version. The new fglrx driver is labeled 14.201-0ubuntu1 as a new upstream Catalyst/fglrx release. While there is no full change-log for this driver, the Ubuntu change-log notes that the driver is compatible with xorg-video-abi-18 as the Application Binary Interface requirements for X.Org Server 1.16.

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Tizen IVI build with Yocto now available

Filed under
Linux

For developers and commercial companies Interested in Tizen IVI, here is the Tizen IVI image with Yocto, provided by Ronan from Eurogiciel.

You can find links for Tizen IVI image. https://wiki.tizen.org/wiki/Build_Tizen_with_Yocto#Bootable_USB

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Mozilla Officially Releases Thunderbird 31.1.1

Filed under
Moz/FF

The latest major Thunderbird release, 31.1, saw the introduction of a lot of features and fixes. These kind of changes were sorely missed and the devs managed to improve the application, even if it's no longer actively worked on.

Now, a couple of issues have been found in the Thunderbird 31.x branch and, apparently, they warranted an update, but the version number has changed very little. According to the changelog, an issue where mailing lists with spaces in their names couldn't be autocompleted has been fixed and an occasional startup crash has been corrected.

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GCC 4.9 vs. LLVM Clang 3.5 On Intel's Haswell-E Platform Under Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With my Intel Core i7 5960X Haswell-E Linux review out there, one of the quick to be requested extra tests is benchmarking the i7-5960X 16-thread processor with LLVM/Clang against GCC. Here's some initial data comparing the compilers for this $1000+ processor.

From the Core i7 5960X system with Gigabyte X99-UD4-CF motherboard, 16GB DDR4 memory, and 128GB SSD, Ubuntu 14.10 was running on the system with its stock Linux 3.16 kernel. For this quick, one-page testing of the i7-5960X compilers I used the packaged GCC 4.9.1 amnd LLVM Clang 3.5.0 compilers found within the Ubuntu 14.10 package archive.

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The State of ZFS on Linux

Filed under
Linux

The ZFS on Linux kernel driver performs the same block device operations as its counterparts on other platforms. As a consequence, its ability to ensure data integrity is equivalent to its counterparts on other platforms and this ability far exceeds that of any other Linux filesystem for direct attached storage.

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KitKat now powering almost a quarter of all Android devices

Filed under
Android

According to stats published by Google, the newest Android release, codenamed KitKat, is powering around one out of every four Android devices accessing the Google Play store.

The data, which is based on smartphones and tablets accessing the Google Play store over a 7-day period ending on September 9, 2014, shows that Android 4.4, codenamed KitKat, is installed on 24.5 percent of devices.

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The most exciting Android tablet this year is coming from Dell

Filed under
Android

You wouldn't know it by the name, but the Dell Venue 8 7000 Series is shaping up to be a pretty special tablet. Measuring a measly 6mm in thickness, this Atom-powered Android slate surpasses even Sony's Xperia Z3 Tablet Compact in the race to be the world's thinnest tablet. But whereas the Sony device has sizeable bezels all around its display, the Venue 8 has almost none on three of its sides. There's less than an inch of bezel on one side, which houses the speaker and front-facing camera while also serving as a handle for the user. It's the same approach that Sharp took with the Aquos Crystal smartphone and the visual effect is just as striking.

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A global shift to open source at the university

Filed under
OSS

Historically, universities were not inclusive places. While you can find free traditional university education (Norway's much-lauded education system comes to mind, as well as some other European countries), the vast majority of the world simply didn't have access to higher education before the emergence of online technologies. This made higher education largely an exercise in class and gender role reinforcement. In more recent decades, universities have been aggressively monetizing, which theoretically eliminates class and gender as exclusionary factors but more realistically simply acts to reinforce the exclusivity and inaccessibility of further study.

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30 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

At some point in time somebody convinced you to give Ubuntu a spin and now you are thinking "What now?"

This list provides 30 things to do after installing Ubuntu.

Take it one step at a time, bookmark the page and keep coming back.

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digiKam Recipes 4.0.9 Released

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Hot on the heels of the 3.17.01 release comes a new version of the digiKam Recipes ebook. As the version number indicates, this is a major release that features several significant improvements.

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Stephen Hawking Talks About the Linux-Based Intel Connected Wheelchair Project

Filed under
Linux

When people say Intel, they usually think about processors, but the company also makes a host of other products, including very cool or useful concepts that might have some very important applications in everyday life.

The latest initiative is called the Connected Wheelchair and the guys from Intel even convinced the famous Stephen Hawking to help them spread the word about this amazing project. It's still in the testing phases and it's one of those products that might show a lot of promise but never go anywhere because there is no one to produce and sell it.

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Listaller: Back to the future!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The current release of Listaller handles all of this with a plugin for PackageKit, the cross-distro package-management abstraction layer. It hooks into PackageKit and reads information passing through to the native distributor backend, and if it encounters Listaller software, it handles it appropriately. It can also inject update information. This results in all Listaller software being shown in any PackageKit frontends, and people can work with it just like if the packages were native packages. Listaller package installations are controlled by a machine policy, so the administrator can decide that e.g. only packages from a trusted source (= GPG signature in trusted database) can be installed. Dependencies can be pulled from the distributor’s repositories, or optionally from external sources, like the PyPI.

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