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Tuesday, 12 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Gstreamer Conference 2010 Videos and Slides uploaded raseel 16/11/2010 - 4:43am
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos gnome 2010.11 Texstar 13/11/2010 - 2:32am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS Enlightenment (E-17) Desktop updated. Texstar 13/11/2010 - 2:29am
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos kde 2010.10 Texstar 06/11/2010 - 3:46am
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos lxde 2010.10 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:35pm
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos phoenix xfce 2010.10 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:32pm
Blog entry 5 most interesting linux commands linkin47 02/07/2010 - 3:10pm
Blog entry Tomboy and Dropbox, the Dynamic Duo bigbearomaha 08/12/2011 - 1:44pm
Blog entry Is Mark Shuttleworth the new Steve Jobs? fieldyweb 24/11/2011 - 11:48pm
Blog entry How I customized my Android.. fieldyweb 24/11/2011 - 11:46pm

2018: The year of the open source desktop, browser, and office suite

Filed under
Linux
OSS

It was last year, around this same time, that I predicted a monumental year for open source in 2017. I even went so far as to say open source would finally pass the 5% market share on the desktop. There was a moment when it looked like that was actually going to happen, only to find out it was a bit of false reporting. Even without hitting that magic number, Linux and open source had a stellar year.

Will that success hold over to the upcoming year? I believe it will, and then some. Let's gaze into that always questionable crystal ball and see what kind of predictions we can come up with for Linux and open source.

Read more

Kubernetes in Storage, Bitnami

Filed under
Server
  • Running storage services on Kubernetes

    If you are looking to adopt the benefits of containers, introduce and support a DevOps culture in your organization, run micro-services or in general try to get corporate IT to provide more immediate value to the business by shortening the time to market, you will at least evaluate Kubernetes. When you adopt it, it won't be long until stateful applications find their way into the cluster—and with that the need for robust, persistent storage. Will databases be among those applications? Very likely. Or workloads, that share large content repositories or such that consume object storage? In either of those cases, you should definitely take a look at gluster-kubernetes.

  • Bitnami Introduces Kubeapps for Click and Deploy Kubernetes Containers

    At KubeCon, Bitnami demonstrated a tool for deploying pre-packaged Kubernetes containers with the click of a mouse.

Security: Andromeda (Windows), NSA Leak (Also Windows), Blockchain in Security

Filed under
Security
  • Global law enforcement operation decimates giant Andromeda botnet

    Developed in September 2011, Andromeda, aka Gamarue or Wauchos, is known for stealing credentials from victims as well as downloading and installing up to 80 different secondary malware programs onto users' systems, including spam bots. Over the last half-year, it has been detected or blocked on an average of more than 1 million machines per month, Europol added.

  • Ex-NSA Worker Pleads Guilty to Taking Classified Data

    Pho worked for the NSA's Tailored Access Operations Unit from 2006 until 2016 and had access to data and documents that included classified and top secret national defense information. "According to the plea agreement, beginning in 2010 and continuing through March 2015, Pho removed and retained U.S. government documents and writings that contained national defense information, including information classified as Top Secret and Sensitive Compartmented Information," the DOJ stated.

  • Is blockchain a security topic?

    What's really interesting is that, if you're thinking about moving to a permissioned blockchain or distributed ledger with permissioned actors, then you're going to have to spend some time thinking about trust. You're unlikely to be using a proof-of-work system for making blocks—there's little point in a permissioned system—so who decides what comprises a "valid" block that the rest of the system should agree on? Well, you can rotate around some (or all) of the entities, or you can have a random choice, or you can elect a small number of über-trusted entities. Combinations of these schemes may also work.

Opera-Inspired Otter and Vivaldi

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Otter RC3 Released As The Browser Inspired By Opera 12 & Implemented Using Qt5

    At the end of 2013 we wrote about a new Qt5 web-browser inspired by Opera and in 2014 it entered alpha form. But since then we hadn't heard much of that browser, Otter, until a Phoronix reader brought it up in our forums today.

    It turns out that the Otter web browser is nearing its hard feature freeze for their first major release and the latest release candidate was made available this week. The goal of Otter remains to "recreate the best aspects of the classic Opera (12.x)" while making use of the Qt5 tool-kit and offering packages for Windows, macOS, and Linux (including AppImage support).

  • Raspberry Pi, Linux on Arm users: Now you get a new browser option with Vivaldi

    Raspberry Pi users now have one more browser to choose from besides Chromium, Firefox and Midori, with the newly announced availability of an experimental version of power-user focused Vivaldi.

    The Blink-based browser from former Opera CEO Jon von Tetzchner is expanding beyond Windows, macOS and Linux PCs to a range of Arm-based developer boards, including the Raspberry Pi, CubieBoard, Asus Tinker Board, and more.

    Vivaldi doesn't yet have a mobile browser but it was its work on one that helped spawn the build for Raspberry Pi, according to the company. It also points to Samsung's DeX project as a potential new platform for Vivaldi. DeX aims to run full Linux on a Galaxy phone connected to a display.

Graphics: Intel, Mesa, OpenCL

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Wants You To Help Test The i965 Mesa Shader Cache, Not Yet Enabled By Default

    Back in early November Intel finally landed its shader cache support for allowing GLSL shaders to be cached on-disk similar to the RadeonSI shader caching that has been present since earlier in the year. But this functionality isn't yet enabled by default as it still needs more testing.

    Last month I covered some early test results of this Intel i965 Mesa shader on-disk cache within Intel's Mesa GLSL Shader Cache Is Speeding Up Game Load Times. In my experiences thus far it's been working out well but currently isn't used by the Intel driver unless the MESA_GLSL_CACHE_DISABLE=0 environment variable is set.

  • 16-Bit Storage, variablePointers Land For ANV Vulkan Driver

    It's always great waking up to new features landing in Mesa Git.

    For the past several months Igalia developers have been working on SPV_KHR_16bit_storage and VK_KHR_16bit_storage support for the Intel ANV Vulkan driver. As implied by the name, this is about supporting 16-bit data types in shader input/output interfaces and push constant blocks. This Vulkan "half float" support has now landed in Mesa Git across a number of patches affecting NIR, ANV, and the Intel shader compiler.

  • POCL 1.0 RC1 Adds Experimental CUDA Backend, Full OpenCL 1.2 Support

    One of the most exciting open-source OpenCL projects we have been following in recent years is POCL as "Portable C" for having an LLVM-based portable OpenCL implementation to run on CPUs as well as GPUs now via AMD HSA back-end and a new experimental NVIDIA CUDA back-end. The POCL 1.0 release is finally near.

ReactOS 0.4.7

Filed under
OS
  • ReactOS 0.4.7 released!

    The ReactOS Project is pleased to announce the release of version 0.4.7 as we continue to work on releasing every three months.

    We’re especially pleased to present this release as the very first one that’s been developed in our new Git/GitHub repository. Moving from Subversion to GitHub has proven to be an invaluable way to reach new testers, users and improve the overall awareness of the ReactOS project.

  • ReactOS 0.4.7 Released As The Latest For "Open-Source Windows"

    At the end of October ReactOS 0.4.7-RC1 was released as the newest test release for this open-source operating system project continuing to work on re-implementing the Windows APIs. That official v0.4.7 release is now available.

POP!_OS - Ubuntu, bang, curtain

Filed under
Reviews

POP!_OS is a rather average Gnome spin of a Gnome-based Ubuntu, which itself is a pale shadow of its former self. System76 did create their own operating system, but it is not drastic enough to warrant a special place in the charts as an independent entry - this is true for 94% of all distros - and not good enough in the first place. It does somewhat improve Aardvark, but it's still a weak offering.

We had hardware issues before we ever got into the live session, all sorts of hardware problems in the installed system, the ergonomics are awful, Samba performance is flaky, overall system responsiveness is average. Package management and updates are rather robust and good and so is smartphone support, but then you need Gnome extensions and codecs to really experience the desktop as it's meant to be. All in all, you can accomplish all of this on your own in any which Gnome, or use something that actually has a sane layout and offers genuine productivity, like Plasma or Windows.

This is an interesting experiment, but ultimately, I can't see a reason why anyone would prefer this over stock Ubuntu (with Unity, a good ole 14.04 LTS), Plasma or even any other tailored Debian-based Gnome system. The differences aren't large or important enough, and there are way too many bugs and issues, making it an even more difficult choice. Overall, POP!_OS deserves something like its 4/10 for its debut. There's only so much you can do with a broken foundation. Well, let's see how this one evolves. For now, skip.

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Games: Bridge Constructor, Empires of the Undergrowth, Pizza Connection, The Escapists

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Kernel Developer: Kees Cook

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Security is paramount these days for any computer system, including those running on Linux. Thus, part of the ongoing Linux development work involves hardening the kernel against attack, according to the recent Linux Kernel Development Report.

This work, according to report authors Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman, involves the addition of several new technologies, many of which have their origin in the grsecurity and PaX patch sets. “New hardening features include virtually mapped kernel stacks, the use of the GCC plugin mechanism for structure-layout randomization, the hardened usercopy mechanism, and a new reference-count mechanism that detects and defuses reference-count overflows. Each of these features makes the kernel more resistant to attack,” the report states.

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Linux then, and why you should learn it now

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It started back in 1983 with another operating system known as UNIX, first released in 1971. In 1983, the GNU Project was started to create a complete UNIX-compatible operating system, but the project was stalled and had a missing kernel. Around 1987, a UNIX-like operating system for students was released called MINIX, but its licensing prevented it from being distributed freely. Irritated by the licensing of MINIX, Linus Torvalds at the University of Helsinki began working on his own operating system kernel. His kernel was released in 1991, and when combined with the GNU components and open source licensing, it became the Linux operating system we know today.

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Kali Linux Review: Not Everyone’s Cup of Tea

Filed under
Reviews

In this review of Kali Linux, we try to answer regular questions like what is Kali Linux, what is the use of Kali Linux and whether beginners should use Kali Linux or not?
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Getting started with Turtl, an open source alternative to Evernote

Filed under
OSS
HowTos

Just about everyone I know takes notes, and many people use an online note-taking application like Evernote, Simplenote, or Google Keep. Those are all good tools, but you have to wonder about the security and privacy of your information—especially in light of Evernote's privacy flip-flop of 2016. If you want more control over your notes and your data, you really need to turn to an open source tool.

Whatever your reasons for moving away from Evernote, there are open source alternatives out there. Let's look at one of those alternatives: Turtl.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

OSS and Programming: DeepVariant, Embedded Linux Conference, Voice Dataset, Glibc, NuttX and More

Filed under
Development
OSS
  • Google makes AI tool for precision medicine open source

    Google announced Monday an open source version of DeepVariant, the artificial intelligence tool that last year earned the highest accuracy rating at the precisionFDA’s Truth Challenge.

    The open source tool comes as academic medical centers, hospitals, insurance companies and other healthcare organizations are gearing up for if not already embarking on artificial intelligence, cognitive computing and machine learning as well as precision medicine and the genomic sequencing that entails.

    Likewise, Google rivals IBM and Microsoft are all moving into the healthcare AI space while much speculation surrounds Apple and Amazon making forays into the space.

  • One Month Left to Submit Your Talk to ELC + OpenIoT Summit NA 2018

    Embedded Linux Conference (ELC), happening March 12-14 in Portland, OR, gathers kernel and systems developers, and the technologists building the applications running on embedded Linux platforms, to learn about the newest and most interesting embedded technologies, gain access to leading experts, have fascinating discussions, collaborate with peers, and gain a competitive advantage with innovative embedded Linux solutions.

  • Mozilla Releases Open Source Speech Recognition Engine and Voice Dataset

    After launching Firefox Quantum, Mozilla continues its upward trend and releases its Open Source Speech Recognition Model and Voice Dataset. Well, Mozilla is finally back!

    In the past few years, technical advancements have contributed to a rapid evolution of speech interfaces and, subsequently, of speech-enabled devices powered by machine learning technologies. And thanks to Mozilla’s latest efforts, things look better than ever.

  • Glibc Rolls Out Support For Memory Protection Keys

    While kernel side there's been Memory Protection Keys support since Linux 4.9 and work has already landed in GCC and Clang, the glibc GNU C Library is finally adding support for MPK.

  • Scheme For NuttX

    To fix the first problem, I decided to try and just implement scheme. The language I had implemented wasn't far off; it had lexical scoping and call-with-current-continuation after all. The rest is pretty simple stuff.

    To fix the second problem, I ported the interpreter to NuttX. NuttX is a modest operating system for 8 to 32-bit microcontrollers with a growing community of developers.

  • SD Times news digest: Android Oreo 8.1 (Go edition), Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, and Django 2.0

Slax Linux – A Modern, Portable and Fast Linux Operating System

Filed under
Debian

Today’s OS review is on a somewhat mini version of Slackware OS – a LiveCD OS that can be run directly from a USB stick, CD drive, or even RAM, without needing to install it on your PC’s hard drive.

First, let’s begin with the facts.

Slax is small Live Debian-based Linux distro that can be regarded as the Minimalist’s OS. It is Live because you can run it right from a USB stick and it works with a plethora of filesystems including NTFS, FAT, EXT (ext2,ext3,ext4), and btrfs.

It was developed by Tomas Matejicek from the Czech Republic with a Monolithic kernel type to be fully customizable using Slackware packages and Slax modules – which, of course, are also open-source.

Read more

More Debian:

  • Announcing sources.debian.org

    We're happy to announce that Debsources, the Web application that
    allows to browse and search the entire source code of all Debian
    releases, is now hosted on the official Debian infrastructure and
    available at https://sources.debian.org.

  • Sources.Debian.Org Launches To Provide Easy Access To Debian Source Code

    For those wanting to easily browse the source-code to all Debian packages, it can now be trivially done so from your hardware.

    DebSources is a platform for viewing the Debian source-code via the web in searchable form and for all Debian releases. Previously DebSources was deployed to unofficial Debian infrastructure, while now it's made official and running on Debian.org hardware.

Software: libblockdev and udisks, Portainer, Vivaldi

Filed under
Software
  • Release time again for libblockdev and udisks!

    A new month has come and that means new releases of libblockdev and UDisks2 have come too. We are trying to stick to the golden rule of successful open-source projects - "Release early, release often." - and even if there are no major changes and no new major features, we do regular releases every month. Usually the target date is the end of the month which then in reality means a new release is done at the beginning of the month that follows. And that is exactly what happened this time too. libblockdev-2.15 was released on December 1st and UDisks-2.7.5 on December 4th.

  • Talk about UDisks2

    A talk about UDisks2 was given at the OpenAlt 2017 conference in Brno, Czech Republic on November 5th 2017. It summarizes the history and evolution of the UDisks project and provides an insight into the development and big changes that have been happening in the last two years.

  • Portainer – A Simple Docker Management GUI

    Everyone knows, day to day technology is moving to next level because earlier we had a dedicated servers (Development, Test, and Production) for every applications.

    Later we have migrated most of the Development & Test servers to Virtual Environment (VPS – Virtual Private Server), Now most of the IT infrastructure is moving to containers to save the IT infrastructure cost.

    Linux containers application is one of the revolution application in the IT, and docker is part of it. By default docker was not come with any GUI and we have to manage through CLI.

  • Vivaldi releases version for Linux-based ARM devices

    The Norwegian browser company Vivaldi Technologies has released an experimental version of its Vivaldi browser for Linux on ARM devices, including the Raspberry Pi.

    This includes the Raspberry Pi Zero, Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 — single-board ARM based computers with over 14 million units sold worldwide — as well as CubieBoard, ASUS Tinker Board and others.

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Graphics: AMD, Mesa, VESA and More

  • AMD Moving Forward In Their RadeonSI Support For ARB_gl_spirv
    AMD open-source developer Nicolai Hähnle has spent the past few months working on the ARB_gl_spirv extension as mandated by OpenGL 4.6. Some of the prep work for supporting that extension has landed in Mesa 17.4-dev Git. ARB_gl_spirv is about bringing SPIR-V support to OpenGL drivers, the IR shared by Vulkan and OpenCL 2.1+. ARB_gl_spirv allows for loading SPIR-V modules into OpenGL programs and allows for GLSL to be a source language in creating SPIR-V modules. This is basically for creating better interoperability between OpenGL and Vulkan/SPIR-V.
  • Mesa Glthread Gets Adds Another Game, AMDGPU Winsys Gets Performance Workaround
    This week has started off to being another busy time in Mesa Git just ahead of the holidays. First up, Mount & Blade: Warband is the latest game to be white-listed by the Mesa glthread functionality for enabling OpenGL threading on this Steam Linux game. Mount & Blade: Warband was actually whitelisted back in July but then disabled a few days later as it turned out not to be working.
  • VESA Rolls Out DisplayHDR As Its Latest Standard
    VESA has rolled out DisplayHDR 1.0 as its newest standard. As implied by the name, the standard is in regards to specifying HDR (High Dynamic Range) quality for displays.
  • VC5 OpenGL & Vulkan Driver Advancing
    Broadcom developer Eric Anholt has offered an update on the state of the VC5 Gallium3D driver for OpenGL support as well as the work being done on the "BCMV" Vulkan driver. Additionally, the VC4 Gallium3D driver for existing Raspberry Pi devices continues to get better.
  • Initial Tessellation Shader Support For RadeonSI NIR
    The RadeonSI Gallium3D driver's NIR back-end is moving one step closer to feature parity with the existing OpenGL capabilities of this AMD GCN graphics driver. Timothy Arceri working for Valve has been focusing on the NIR back-end recently for RadeonSI. This NIR intermediate representation handling is being driven in order to add SPIR-V ingestion support to RadeonSI with code sharing for RADV's existing NIR-based infrastructure.

Games: Rocket League, Ultimate Trivia Challenge, Grass Cutter, Hyper Knights: Battles, Opus Magnum

If You're Ready for Arch, ArchMerge Eases the Way

Newcomer ArchMerge Linux offers a big change for the better to those switching from the Debian Linux lineage to the Arch Linux infrastructure. ArchMerge Linux is a recent spinoff of ArchLabs Linux. I recently reviewed Archlabs and found it to be a step up from most Arch Linux offerings in terms of installation and usability. Arch Linux distros, in general, are notorious for their challenging installation and software management processes. ArchMerge Linux brings a few extra ingredients that make trying it well worth your while if you want to consider migrating to the Arch Linux platform. Still, no Arch Linux distro is a suitable starting point for Linux newcomers. That reality does not change with ArchMerge, although it helps ease the process considerably for those who are ready for it. Read more

today's howtos