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goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
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bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

KDE Gear 21.12 Software Suite Released as a Massive Update, Here’s What’s New

Filed under
KDE
Linux
News

After several months of development, KDE Gear 21.12 is now ready for mass deployment with an improved Dolphin file manager that now makes it easier than ever to locate and identify files and folders, shows previews for .cbz comic book files that contain WebP images, and improves icon zooming.

Dolphin is also one of the first KDE app to adopt the new mechanism for saving volatile state data, such as window position and size, into a separate config file instead of the one that explicitly stores configurable settings. More KDE apps will adopt this major new feature in future updates.

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KDE Gear 21.12

Filed under
KDE

KDE Gear 21.12 has landed and comes with a massive number of updates and new versions of applications and libraries. Literally, dozens of classic KDE everyday tools and the specialised sophisticated apps you use to work, be creative and play, are getting refreshers with design improvements, new features and performance and stability enhancements.

And the whole set of packages comes just in time for the season of giving. Hanukkah/the Winter Solstice/the Generic Mid-Winter Holiday/Christmas/whatever-you-celebrate is just around the corner, so why not share with those that are less fortunate, that is, those who do not use KDE software yet?

Install Plasma for your friends and family and deck them out with the brand new versions of KDE’s utilities and programs!

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A deep dive into Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W’s power consumption

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

When I completed my review of Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W, I mentioned I would test the power consumption of the board later. It took a while, but I’ve finally come around it using Otii Arc from Qoitech and Otii software to provide some pretty power consumption charts, and even energy consumption. Since the Raspberry Pi Foundation recommends a 5V/2.5A power supply, I’ll first try to get as close as possible as 2.5A, then I’ll go through tricks to reduce idle power consumption to less than 75 mA / 375 mW, and finally check the energy consumption under various CPU core count and frequency.

I started with the latest Raspberry Pi OS Lite “BullEyes” image and connected my Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W board to Qoitech Otii Arc tools as shown below. It used to cost around $500, but now pricing starts at $699, and it’s a great tool for people developing battery-powered devices, and I admit it’s a bit over the top, but the purpose of this post, but it still does the job.
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13 Best Free and Open Source Build Systems

Filed under
Software

Build automation is the process of automating the creation of a software build and the associated processes including: compiling computer source code into binary code, packaging binary code, and running automated tests.

This type of software takes as input the interdependencies of files (typically source code and output executables) and orchestrates building them, quickly.

In the beginning, Make was the only build automation tool available beyond home-grown solutions. Make has been around since 1976. Make remains widely used, especially in Unix and Unix-like operating systems. But there are lots of other high quality build systems

Here’s our recommendations captured in a legendary LinuxLinks chart.

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Jolla: Congrats UK, we’re back!

Filed under
OS

Last month, as part of our 10-year celebrations, we announced that we’re working to expand the Sailfish X availability to include new countries in addition to the current EU, Norway, and Switzerland.
Now we have great news for you: we have re-opened Sailfish X sales in the UK!
The UK has always been a stronghold for Sailfish OS. This started already in the early days when many Brits decided to purchase the Jolla phone and start their Sailfish OS journey. Over the years, our developer community and fan base has grown in the UK, and many of our employees (aka sailors) are also from this great island nation.
All this in mind, we were disappointed when we had to leave the UK for a while (Brexit), but now we are thrilled to start again!

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Capturing and Correcting the Perfect Video Color

Filed under
Linux

Next in our video editing series for the Librem 14, Gardiner Bryant dives into color balancing. In this video, you’ll learn how to capture images without losing color data and how to use effects to correct color using Kdenlive, a free software video editing solution. This video will help those looking to level up their overall video production. We hope to do similar projects like this in the future, so if you have ideas for topics you’d like us to cover, please let us know!

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Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • The European Commission is making its software open source to benefit society

    If you’re wondering what sort of code the EC could offer to the world, it gave two examples. First, there’s its eSignature, a set of free standards, tools, and services that can speed up the creation and verification of electronic signatures that are legally valid inside the EU. Another example is LEOS (Legislation Editing Open Software) which is used to draft legal texts.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: #34: Less Is More

    Welcome to the 34th post in the rambunctiously refreshing R recitations, or R4. Today’s post is about architecture.

    Mies defined modernism. When still in Europe, I had been to the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin which provides a gorgeous space for the arts. Twenty-five years ago, I worked next to his Toronto-Dominion Center in Toronto. Here in Chicago we have numerous buildings: the Federal Center (the Dirksen, the Kluczynski and the US Post Office rounding out the square in the Loop), multiple buildings on the Illinois Tech (aka IIT) Campus where he taught in the architecture department he created and lead, the (formerly called) IBM Plaza building at the river and more.

    Structure and minimalism, often based on the same core elements of black steel beams and glass, are a landmark of these buildings. One immediately senses that there is nothing left to take away.

  • Launching the 2021 State of Rust Survey | Rust Blog

    It's that time again! Time for us to take a look at who the Rust community is composed of, how the Rust project is doing, and how we can improve the Rust programming experience. The Rust Community Team is pleased to announce our 2021 State of Rust Survey! Whether or not you use Rust today, we want to know your opinions. Your responses will help the project understand its strengths and weaknesses, and establish development priorities for the future.

  • Apple debuts new Open Source website, will release projects on GitHub [Ed: Openwashing in Microsoft's proprietary software monopoly]

    Featured Projects details some of the open source projects that Apple leads. Additionally, it also features open source projects led by third-party organizations but contributed to by Apple engineers.

    The Releases section will see Apple publishing the code used in various macOS, iOS, and Developer tools. Apple says, alongside the updated website, it will begin making its open source projects available as git repositories on Github.

Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Install WPS Office on Debian 11 Bullseye or 10 Buster Linux

    The free office suite “WPS Office Free” which was earlier known as Kingsoft Office Free is one of the best free alternatives available for Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. It is not open source like LibreOffice but readily available for Linux systems. Here we learn the commands or steps to install WPS Office on Debian 11 Bullseye.

    The WPS office package supports and opens all documents saved in Microsoft file types such as DOC, DOCX, XLS, XLSX, PPT, and PPTX. Functionally, the three modules offer a professional range of services: from the spell checker, thesaurus and mail merge function via formula editor, WordArt function, and target value search for tables to saving presentations as MPEG videos. The creation of PDFs is also possible with “WPS Office Free”.

  • How to Install Zend OPcache in Debian and Ubuntu

    This article was earlier written for APC (Alternative PHP Cache), but APC is deprecated and no longer working with PHP 5.4 onwards, now you should use OPcache for better and faster performance as explained in this article…

    OpCache is an advanced caching module based on opcode that works similar to other caching solutions. It significantly improves PHP performance, and your website by extension, by storing your site’s pre-compiled PHP pages in shared memory. This eliminates the need for PHP to constantly load these pages on each request by the server.

  • How to install the latest version of nano text editor - Unixcop the Unix / Linux the admins deams

    First, install Homebrew from the project’s website. In our chaos, I have opted for Debian for the demo. So, read our post

    How to install Homebrew on Debian 11?

    After the installation has been successful. It is then convenient to uninstall the version of nano that we have on the system.

  • Ana Guerrero Lopez, Aurelien Jarno, EDF, ESA & Debian toxic woman

    Here in the Debian Community News Team, we are disgusted about violence against women. Yet we also want to tell the truth: every time a toxic woman like Ana Guerrero Lopez makes a conspiracy, many innocent women and volunteers suffer.

    Ana thinks she is special. She works for a nuclear company in France. Her husband works for the European Space Agency. Therefore, she can write this horrible defamation and she will never suffer any consequences. Other women will suffer for Ana's arrogance.

    Ana never created any real software for Debian users. Ana became a Debian Developer by going to DebConf and meeting the men. Ninety-nine percent of the code in a Debian release comes from real developers. People like Ana are imposters, they take our code, they put it into packages and they create these big titles for themselves to hide the developers who did the real work.

  • Revisiting default initramfs compression
    Hi all,
    
    some time ago, the default compressor for initramfs was changed
    from lz4 -9 to zstd -19. This caused significant problems:
    
    - it is very slow
    - it uses a lot of memory
    
    The former is a problem for everyone, the latter means that
    zstd just crashes on a Pi Zero.
    
    This is an analysis of what we have in terms of time spent,
    memory spent, and file size achieved, and where we can
    go from here.
    
  • Ubuntu Rethinking Its Initramfs Compression Strategy - Phoronix

    While Ubuntu switched from LZ4 to Zstd for compressing its initramfs, they now are finding they were too aggressive in defaulting to Zstd with the highest compression level of 19. Due to speed and memory consumption concerns, they are looking at lowering their Zstd compression level.

    Ubuntu had switched from LZ4 at its maximum compression level of 9 to going with Zstd, which is wonderful, and has a maximum level of 19. But with that highest compression level they have found the initramfs decompression to be too slow and consumes too much memory. In particular, for low-end devices and embedded hardware like the Raspberry Pi Zero with just 512MB of RAM, it just crashes.

Servers: Containers, Istio, and More

Filed under
Server
  • Containers 101: In-person in Columbia, SC; Online from Anywhere - FOSS Force

    With a brand spanking new version of Kubernetes being released today, here’s an event that might be just what the doctor ordered for many.

    On Thursday, December 9 (that’s tomorrow, and we apologize for being so late with this), the folks behind the All Things Open conference are presenting a single-night free event in Columbia, South Carolina called Containers 101.

  • Announcing Istio 1.12.1

    This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.12.0 and Istio 1.12.1

  • Industry Participants Discuss Security, Benefits of Internet-Connected Devices

    Many in-home appliances currently on the market, such as washing machines and refrigerators, are connected to the [Internet], which opens it up to [cracking].

    During a Federal Communications Bar Association event Tuesday, Harold Feld, senior vice president of Public Knowledge, expressed concern over this trend in the consumer market.

PostgreSQL: Pgpool-II 4.3.0 is now released.

Filed under
Server

Pgpool Global Development Group is pleased to announce the availability of Pgpool-II 4.3.0.

Read more

Also: PostgreSQL: PostgreSQL @ FOSDEM 2022: Call for Proposals

Kernel and Graphics: AMD and XWayland

Filed under
Linux
  • AMD Linux EDAC Driver Prepares For Zen 4, RDDR5 / LRDDR5 Memory - Phoronix

    AMD's Linux engineers continue preparing for next-gen EPYC server processors based on Zen 4 and supporting DDR5 memory.

    In addition to recent work like preparing for up to 12 CCDs per socket, temperature monitoring, and other bits, out today is a set of patches for AMD's EDAC (Error Detection and Correction) driver code for the next-generation Zen 4 server processors.

    The work sent out today includes adding support for RDDR5 and LRDDR5 memory support to the driver (conventional DDR5 support was already mainlined). This is for Registered DDR5 memory support as well as Load-Reduced DDR5 memory support. LRDDR5 support is for the higher memory density servers, similar to LRDIMMs with prior DDR generations.

  • RADV Working On ETC2 Emulation Support For Newer Radeon GPUs To Satisfy Android - Phoronix

    Mesa's Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" is implementing emulated support for ETC2 texture compression to use with newer AMD GPUs to improve compatibility with Google's Android operating system.

    ETC2 is the royalty-free texture compression standard developed by Ericsson that has worked its way into the OpenGL and OpenGL ES specifications. RADV already supports ETC2 with Radeon GPUs having the support, but that is rather limited to the likes of AMD Stoney APUs and Vega/GFX9 graphics processors. Unfortunately, the ETC2 support on the AMD GPU side has been rather spotty and not supported by newer APUs/GPUs.

  • XWayland gets DRM leasing support for helping VR on Linux

    A big improvement has been merged into XWayland called DRM (Direct Rendering Manager) Leasing, which should allow good VR support under Wayland. Something we've been waiting on!

Open Hardware/Modding Leftovers

Filed under
Hardware
  • SiFive adds mid-range Essential 6-Series RISC-V cores, including two Linux-ready models

    SiFive announced a “21G3” release of its RISC-V cores, including a new, embedded focused “Essential 6-Series” featuring the Linux-ready, 64-bit U64 and a similar U64-MC designed for quad-core SoCs.

    Leading RISC-V core and SoC vendor SiFive, which last week unveiled a Cortex-A77 like SiFive Performance P650 core for up to 16-core SoCs, has released a 21G3 update to its entire product line. SiFive also announced a new mid-range line of 64-bit and 32-bit Essential 6-Series core IP, including Linux-friendly, 64-bit U64 and U64-MC models.

  • Two 64-bit RISC-V cores debut: StarFive Dubhe and CAS Nanhu

    StarFive has launched its 64-bit RISC-V “Dubhe” core with up to 2GHz @ 12nm performance plus Vector and Hypervisor extensions. Meanwhile, the Chinese Academy of Sciences announced a similarly Linux-friendly, 14nm RISC-V RV64GC “XiangShan Nanhu” core that also clocks to 2GHz.

    Chinese RISC-V chipmaker StarFive, which recently showed off a VisionFive V1 SBC with a StarFive JH7100 SoC with dual Cortex-A55 like SiFive U74 cores, has announced the “delivery” of its own RISC-V core called Dubhe. In other China-related RISC-V news, the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed a line of open source XiangShan RISC-V cores that run Linux, including a new, high performance XiangShan Nanhu design (see farther below).

  • An Easy Music Visualizer With The Arduino Nano | Hackaday

    Flashing LEDs are all well and good, but they’re even better if they can sync up with ambient sounds or music. [mircemk] has built the LUMAZOID visualizer to do just that, relying on some staple maker components to do so.

    The build is open-source, and designed to work with strings of 60, 120, or 180 WS2812B LEDs. An Arduino Nano is charged with running the show, capturing audio via its analog-to-digital converter. A sensitivity pot enables the input level to be set appropriately.

  • 3D Printed Lithographic Moon Lamp | Hackaday

    After years of being a software developer, [Chris] was excited to get back into embedded development and we’re glad he did. His 3D printed lithographic moon lamp combines a number of hacker and maker skills, and is sure to impress.

    3D-printed lithographic moons have gotten pretty popular these days, so he was able to find a suitable model on Thingiverse to start with. Gotta love open-source. Of course, he needed to make a few modifications to fit his end design. Namely, he put a hole at the bottom of the moon, so he could slide the LED and heatsink inside. The 3 watt LED is pretty beefy, so he definitely needed a heat sink to make sure everything stayed cool.

  • Simple Design Elevates This Mechanical Dot Matrix Display | Hackaday

    Don’t get us wrong — we love unique displays as much as anyone. But sometimes we stumble across one that’s so unique that we lack the basic vocabulary to describe it. Such is the case with this marble-raising dot-matrix alphanumeric display. But it’s pretty cool, so we’ll give it a shot.

    The core — literally — of [Shinsaku Hiura]’s design is a 3D-printed cylinder with a spiral groove in its outside circumference. The cylinder rotates inside a cage with vertical bars; the bars and the grooves are sized to trap 6-mm AirSoft BBs, which are fed into the groove by a port in the stationary base of the display. BBs are fed into the groove at the right position to form characters, which move upwards as the cylinder rotates. Just watch the video below — it explains it far better than words can.

  • PicoVoice offline Voice AI engine gets free tier for up to 3 users - CNX Software

    PicoVoice offline Voice AI engine has now a free tier that allows people to create custom wake words and voice commands easily for up to three users on any hardware including Raspberry Pi and Arduino boards.

    I first learned about PicoVoice about a year ago when the offline voice AI engine was showcased on a Raspberry Pi fitted with ReSpeaker 4-mic array to showcase the company’s Porcupine custom wake word engine, and Rhino Speech-to-Intent engine. The demo would support 9 wake words with Alexa, Bumblebee, Computer, Hey Google, Hey Siri, Jarvis, Picovoice, Porcupine, and Terminator.

  • This Arduino device can detect which language is being spoken using tinyML | Arduino Blog

    Although smartphone users have had the ability to quickly translate spoken words into nearly any modern language for years now, this feat has been quite tough to accomplish on small, memory-constrained microcontrollers. In response to this challenge, Hackster.io user Enzo decided to create a proof-of-concept project that demonstrated how an embedded device can determine the language currently being spoken without the need for an Internet connection.

    This so-called “language detector” is based on an Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense, which is connected to a common PCA9685 motor driver that is, in turn, attached to a set of three micro servo motors — all powered by a single 9V battery. Enzo created a dataset by recording three words: “oui” (French), “si” (Italian), and “yes” (English) for around 10 minutes each for a total of 30 minutes of sound files. He also added three minutes of random background noise to help distinguish between the target keywords and non-important words.

Games: Esports and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Dramatic Rise of Esports Worldwide

    The Boiling Steam Matrix Room is full of surprises. Turns out that one of our readers, @Grazen, is in a senior leadership role at an Esports company. Since Esports are growing like crazy these days, it was a great opportunity to ask him for more details about the market and where everything is headed (and if Linux fits anywhere currently).

    [...]

    Adam: I play all of them, badly, but I keep trying. I would say Overwatch is my favorite to play but tough to master. Overwatch and League of Legends also work well via Lutris in Linux so it makes it easier for me to play as I don’t generally use Windows or OSX. There’s of course a native Linux version of Counter-Strike but I don’t believe it’s as well optimized as the Windows version. Call of Duty isn’t playable on Linux due to the anti-cheat system used.

  • Assistive Tech And Video Games | Hackaday

    The basic premise of the circuit is pretty simple. She DIY’d a few contact switches using conductive plates made of cardboard, duct tape, and aluminum foil. The output of the switch is read by analog input pins on an Arduino Leonardo. When the switches are off, the analog input pins are pulled HIGH using 1 MegaOhm resistors. But when the user hits their head on one of the four conductive pads, the switch is engaged, and the analog input pins are shorted to ground.

  • How to install Grapple! by Barji on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Grapple! by Barji on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

    This tutorial will only work on Chromebooks with an Intel or AMD CPU (with Linux Apps Support) and not those with an ARM64 architecture CPU.

5 Best Terminal Based Linux Monitoring Tools

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are going to explore the 5 best terminal based monitoring tools that you can use on your Linux systems to keep you fully aware of their status.

Everyone will agree that Linux monitoring tools are required to ensure a healthy Linux infrastructure. Hence, a performance monitoring solution becomes important to observe the health, activities, and capability of your Linux systems.

Fortunately, there are many Linux monitoring tools available out there. In this article we are going to talk about 5 lightweight terminal-based and free-to-use tools to monitors servers and desktops running Linux.

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‘Video Trimmer’ GTK App Adds Dark Mode, New Encode Option

Filed under
Development
GNOME

Among the changes offered in Video Trimmer 0.7.0 is a new checkbox for “accurate trimming with re-encoding” to the output file selection dialog. Whenever you need a frame-perfect result you may want to make use of this option — though it can sometimes result in lower quality, so YMMV.

As well as more accurate trimming, the look of the app has been given a once-over. The design of Video Trimmer is said to better match the GNOME Adwaita theme, and the app now sports a dark style/dark mode (and uses this by default, in-keeping with other editing tools).

Finally, the app makes finding your exports a touch easier. When video trimming is complete the app shows a(n in-app) notification. As of this release that notification gains a “Show in Files” button. This lets you quickly locate the resulting clip.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, FLOSS Weekly, Freespire 8.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Reptilian Power Play | Coder Radio 443

    We peak in on one of the nastiest corporate moves in a while, and Chris has a big confession.

  • FLOSS Weekly 659: Open Source and Amateur Radio - Steve Stroh

    Steve Stroh (N8GNJ) joins Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett (KG5IAR) for an hour of conversation regarding the world of wireless communication, HAM radio and open source. It's quite the masterclass as he discusses how HAM radio modeled and still practices openness for the world, packet radio, TNCs, SDRs (and transceivers) WSJT, Helium, LoRa, the ups and downs of crypto, WSPRnet, CHIRP, disaster recovery, making antennas, StarLink, mesh networks and much more.

  • Freespire 8.0 Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at Freespire 8.0.

  • Freespire 8.0

    Today we are looking at Freespire 8.0. It is based on Ubuntu 20.04, Linux Kernel 5.4, XFCE 4.16, and uses about 900MB - 1.5GB of ram when idling.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to – Inkscape – rounded corners
  • Install WPS Office on Debian 11 Bullseye or 10 Buster Linux

    The free office suite “WPS Office Free” which was earlier known as Kingsoft Office Free is one of the best free alternatives available for Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. It is not open source like LibreOffice but readily available for Linux systems. Here we learn the commands or steps to install WPS Office on Debian 11 Bullseye.

    The WPS office package supports and opens all documents saved in Microsoft file types such as DOC, DOCX, XLS, XLSX, PPT, and PPTX. Functionally, the three modules offer a professional range of services: from the spell checker, thesaurus and mail merge function via formula editor, WordArt function, and target value search for tables to saving presentations as MPEG videos. The creation of PDFs is also possible with “WPS Office Free”.

  • GNU Linux bash – analyze get detailed info on hardware summary with inxi
  • Understanding the PHP values in the php.ini configuration file

    In this tutorial, we are going to explain what contains the “php.ini” configuration file and what is used for. The PHP ini configuration file is a special file for PHP applications used to control PHP settings what users can or can not do with the website.

    When PHP is installed the server is configured to use the default PHP settings, but sometimes we need to change the behavior of the PHP at runtime and this is when this configuration file comes to in use.

  • Using whois/jwhois on Linux | Network World

    The whois and jwhois commands allow you to retrieve a lot of information on Internet domains--likely a lot more than you might imagine. Here's how these commands work and how they can be useful.

  • How To Install Siege Benchmarking Tool on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Siege Benchmarking Tool on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Siege is one of the popular HTTP load testings and benchmarking utility tools to measure the performance of web servers under stress. You can perform a stress test using a single URL with a specific number of users or you can put all URLs in files and stress them simultaneously. Siege reports the total number of hits recorded, bytes transferred, response time, concurrency, and return status. Siege supports HTTP/1.0 and 1.1 protocols, the GET and POST directives, cookies, transaction logging, and basic authentication.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the Siege open-source regression test and benchmark utility on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • Find out who Edited Files in Linux - kifarunix.com

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to find out who edited files in Linux. Linux provides user space tools for security auditing called auditd (Audit daemon). auditd keeps track of all the changes happening on the system and generate logs that can be analyzed so as to get an insight into system security posture. This include finding out who edit what files at what specific time.

  • Linux Fu: The Ultimate Dual Boot Laptop? | Hackaday

    I must confess, that I try not to run Windows any more than absolutely necessary. But for many reasons, it is occasionally necessary. In particular, I have had several laptops that are finicky with Linux. I still usually dual boot them, but I often leave Windows on them for one reason or another. I recently bought a new Dell Inspiron and the process of dual booting it turned out to be unusually effective but did bring up a few challenges.

    If you ever wanted a proper dual-booting laptop, you’ll be interested in how this setup works. Sure, you can always repartition the drive, but the laptop has a relatively small drive and is set up very specifically to work with the BIOS diagnostics and recovery so it is always a pain to redo the drive without upsetting the factory tools.

    Since the laptop came with a 512 GB NVMe drive, I wanted to upgrade the drive anyway. So one option would have been to put a bigger drive in and then go the normal route. That was actually my intention, but I wound up going a different way.

GNOME and GTK Development

Filed under
GNOME
  • State persistence for apps and sessions: Endless Orange Week | Philip Withnall

    Those two bullet points hide a lot of complexity, and it’s not surprising that I didn’t get particularly far in this project! It requires coordinated changes in a lot of components: GLib, GTK, gnome-session and applications themselves.

    A lot of these changes have been prototyped or worked on before, by various people, but nothing has yet come together. In fact, gnome-session used to fully support restoring apps to a certain degree — before it was ported away from XSMP, it used to support saving the set of apps when closing a session, and re-starting those apps when starting the session again. It did not support restoring the state of each app, though, just the fact that it was running.

  • GstVA in GStreamer 1.20 – Herostratus’ legacy

    It was a year and half ago when I announced a new VA-API H.264 decoder element in gst-plugins-bad. And it was bundled in GStreamer release 1.18 a couple months later. Since then, we have been working adding more decoders and filters, fixing bugs, and enhancing its design. I wanted to publish this blog post as soon as release 1.20 was announced, but, since the developing window is closed, which means no more new features will be included, I’ll publish it now, to create buzz around the next GStreamer release.

  • Carlos Garnacho: An Eventful Instant

    Traditionally, GNOME Shell has been compressing pointer motion events so its handling is synchronized to the monitor refresh rate, this means applications would typically see approximately 60 events per second (or 144 if you follow the trends).

    This trait inherited from the early days of Clutter was not just a shortcut, handling motion events implies looking up the actor that is beneath the pointer (mainly so we know which actor to send the event to) and that was an expensive enough operation that it made sense to do with the lowest frequency possible. If you are a recurrent reader of this blog you might remember how this area got great improvements in the past.

    But that alone is not enough, motion events can also end up handled in JS land, and it is in the best interest of GNOME Shell (and people complaining about frame loss) that we don’t need to jump into the JavaScript machinery too often in the course of a frame. This again makes sense to keep to a minimum.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Germany’s new government will firmly defend encryption, key Social Democrat says – EURACTIV.com

    According to Jens Zimmermann, the German coalition negotiations had made it “quite clear” that the incoming government of the Social Democrats (SPD), the Greens and the business-friendly liberal FDP would reject “the weakening of encryption, which is being attempted under the guise of the fight against child abuse” by the coalition partners.

    Such regulations, which are already enshrined in the interim solution of the ePrivacy Regulation, for example, “diametrically contradict the character of the coalition agreement” because secure end-to-end encryption is guaranteed there, Zimmermann said.

    Introducing backdoors would undermine this goal of the coalition agreement, he added.

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (nss), Fedora (rubygem-rmagick), openSUSE (xen), Red Hat (firefox and nss), SUSE (kernel and xen), and Ubuntu (mailman and nss).

  • Security: This new Firefox feature could stop zero-day flaws in their tracks | ZDNet

    Mozilla has released Firefox 95 and shipped it with its new security sandboxing technology called RLBox for Firefox on Windows, Linux and macOS.

  • Mozilla Releases Security Updates for Firefox, Firefox ESR, and Thunderbird | CISA

    Mozilla has released security updates to address vulnerabilities in Firefox, Firefox ESR, and Thunderbird. An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

    CISA encourages users and administrators to review the Mozilla security advisories for Firefox 95, Firefox ESR 91.4.0, and Thunderbird 91.4.0 and apply the necessary updates.

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A deep dive into Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W’s power consumption

When I completed my review of Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W, I mentioned I would test the power consumption of the board later. It took a while, but I’ve finally come around it using Otii Arc from Qoitech and Otii software to provide some pretty power consumption charts, and even energy consumption. Since the Raspberry Pi Foundation recommends a 5V/2.5A power supply, I’ll first try to get as close as possible as 2.5A, then I’ll go through tricks to reduce idle power consumption to less than 75 mA / 375 mW, and finally check the energy consumption under various CPU core count and frequency. I started with the latest Raspberry Pi OS Lite “BullEyes” image and connected my Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W board to Qoitech Otii Arc tools as shown below. It used to cost around $500, but now pricing starts at $699, and it’s a great tool for people developing battery-powered devices, and I admit it’s a bit over the top, but the purpose of this post, but it still does the job. Read more

13 Best Free and Open Source Build Systems

Build automation is the process of automating the creation of a software build and the associated processes including: compiling computer source code into binary code, packaging binary code, and running automated tests. This type of software takes as input the interdependencies of files (typically source code and output executables) and orchestrates building them, quickly. In the beginning, Make was the only build automation tool available beyond home-grown solutions. Make has been around since 1976. Make remains widely used, especially in Unix and Unix-like operating systems. But there are lots of other high quality build systems Here’s our recommendations captured in a legendary LinuxLinks chart. Read more

Jolla: Congrats UK, we’re back!

Last month, as part of our 10-year celebrations, we announced that we’re working to expand the Sailfish X availability to include new countries in addition to the current EU, Norway, and Switzerland. Now we have great news for you: we have re-opened Sailfish X sales in the UK! The UK has always been a stronghold for Sailfish OS. This started already in the early days when many Brits decided to purchase the Jolla phone and start their Sailfish OS journey. Over the years, our developer community and fan base has grown in the UK, and many of our employees (aka sailors) are also from this great island nation. All this in mind, we were disappointed when we had to leave the UK for a while (Brexit), but now we are thrilled to start again! Read more

Capturing and Correcting the Perfect Video Color

Next in our video editing series for the Librem 14, Gardiner Bryant dives into color balancing. In this video, you’ll learn how to capture images without losing color data and how to use effects to correct color using Kdenlive, a free software video editing solution. This video will help those looking to level up their overall video production. We hope to do similar projects like this in the future, so if you have ideas for topics you’d like us to cover, please let us know! Read more