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Thursday, 05 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
webpathinlovelinux srlinuxx 07/02/2008 - 3:44pm
bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

Leftovers: BSD Now, TLLTS, Canonical, Snapcraft, LibreOffice and More

Filed under
Misc
  • ZFS Rename Repo | BSD Now 327

    We read FreeBSD’s third quarterly status report, OpenBSD on Sparc64, ZoL repo move to OpenZFS, GEOM NOP, keeping NetBSD up-to-date, and more.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 836
  • [Canonical on] The mundane revolution: Unexpected innovations in robotics

    Today’s headlines tend to focus on the weird and wonderful robots of this world: the Hollywood Terminators or mechanical dogs developed by Boston Dynamics and other Silicon Valley start-ups.

    The greatest innovations, however, can often be found in the more mundane corners of our society, within the industries and environments people least expect.

    It’s happened with medicine and the discovery of penicillin, for example, while Archimedes had his eureka moment in the bath.

    Robotics is no different. Its true value as a proposition will only reveal itself when we take the obvious with the sublime, and do not overlook the sublime simpler uses of robots, already active in the market today.

  • Snapcraft now auto-detects missing dependencies

    When you build snaps, the process of composing a complete snapcraft.yaml file will usually revolve around three main activities: parts, build requirements and runtime components. Sometimes, you may discover that you’re missing certain libraries in the compilation stage, or that they are required for your application to run. In most cases, you will iterate on your build a few times, and perhaps use our faster development guide to quickly nail down the missing elements.

    From snapcraft release 3.7 onward, things have become ever so easier. Now, it is possible to have snapcraft automatically detect and list missing runtime libraries, and allow you to complete your build with fewer errors and in less time.

  • Fixed a terrible [LibreOffice] regression

    There was a bug tdf#128133 about "muddy fonts in LibreOffice GUI with 125% scale in Windows". I have 125% scaled GUI on all my machines with Windows because I have a bad vision. And that bug was very terrible for me.
    The bug was a regression but we have couldn't to find a bad commit using bibisect process. We just have had wrong result.

  • [LibreOffice] Celebrating International Volunteer Day

    Today is International Volunteer Day. All around the world, volunteers give their time and energy to help many different causes – including free and open source software projects like LibreOffice.

    Indeed, LibreOffice wouldn’t be where it is today, without the incredibly valuable help of hundreds of volunteers in the last decade. So to everyone who has contributed to our project and community over the years, we at The Document Foundation want to say a big thank you! Your work has helped many millions of LibreOffice users around the world benefit from powerful, open and multilingual productivity tools.

  • The rise, disappearance, and retirement of Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin

    In that context, it’s important to look back at the big moments in both men’s careers and how the actions they took have had an outsized impact not just on the tech industry, but on the internet and society itself. What Page and Brin have built will likely last for decades to come, and knowing how Google got to where it is today will be an important piece in the puzzle of figuring out where it goes in the future.

  • CERN selects Juniper Networks to increase data centres capacity

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has deployed Juniper Networks networking solutions to increase the capacity of its data centres and technical network to adapt to increasing research requirements.

  • The Foundational Era of Open Source

    Between 2012 and 2015, though, we passed into a new, modern era of open source software that I call the Foundational era of open source. Open source projects were given to community-owned, non-profit foundations to manage and nourish—organizations such as the Linux Foundation, the folks behind Cloud Native Computing Foundation and the Continuous Delivery Foundation; Cloud Foundry Foundation; The Apache Foundation; and the Eclipse Foundation (one of the early entrants, even if IBM did come to dominate it) took over the stewardship of many open source projects.

    This has ushered in a truly golden age of open source software that has seen open source become the dominant form of software in the world. The Foundational era of open source has flourished for several reasons. For one, now multiple commercial entities can contribute code without worrying that it is for the exclusive benefit of just one company. What’s more, these foundations have a mix of vendors, practitioners and large enterprise users that really do allow for the democratization of open source at levels not seen before. Also, there is a process of incubation to graduation that these projects are put through that help them evolve and grow.

  • Apostrophe society shuts down because 'ignorance and laziness have won'

    “There are two reasons for this. One is that at 96 I am cutting back on my commitments and the second is that fewer organisations and individuals are now caring about the correct use of the apostrophe in the English Language."

Events: KVM Forum 2019 and "Bar Charts for Diversity"

Filed under
Linux
  • A recap of KVM Forum 2019

    The 13th KVM Forum virtualization conference took place in Lyon, France in October 2019. One might think that development may have finished on the Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) module that was merged in Linux 2.6.20 in 2007, but this year's conference underscored the amount of work still being done, particularly on side-channel attack mitigation, I/O device assignment with VFIO and mdev, footprint reduction with micro virtual machines (VMs), and with the ability to run VMs nested within VMs. Many talks also involved the virtual machine monitor (VMM) user-space programs that use the KVM kernel module—of which QEMU is the most widely used.

  • Enhancing KVM for guest protection and security

    A key tenet in KVM is to reuse as much Linux infrastructure as possible and focus specifically on processor virtualization. Back in 2007, this meant a smaller code base and less friction with the other kernel subsystems, especially when compared with other virtualization technologies such as Xen. This led to KVM being merged into the mainline with relative ease.

    But now, in the era of microarchitectural vulnerabilities, the priorities have shifted, and the KVM's reliance on other kernel subsystems can be a liability. For one thing, the host kernel widens the TCB (Trusted Computing Base) and makes for a larger attack surface. In addition, kernel data structures such as the direct memory map give Linux access to guest memory even when it is not strictly necessary and make it impossible to fully enforce the principle of least privilege. In his talk "Enhancing KVM for Guest Protection and Security" (slides [PDF]) presented at KVM Forum 2019, long-time KVM contributor Jun Nakajima explained this risk and suggested some strategies to mitigate it.

  • Bar charts for diversity

    At the Linux App Summit I gave an unconference talk titles Hey guys, this conference is for everyone. The “hey guys” part refers to excluding people from a talk or making them feel uncomfortable – you can do this unintentionally, and the take-away of the talk was that you, (yes, you) can be better.

    I illustrated this mostly with conversational distance, a favorite topic of mine that I can demonstrate easily on stage. There’s a lot of diversity in how far people stand away from strangers, while explaining something they care about.

    The talk wasn’t recorded, but I’ve put the slides up.

    Another side of diversity can be dealt with by statistics. Since I’m a mathematician, I have a big jar of peanuts and raisins in the kitchen. Late at night I head down to the kitchen and grab ten items from the jar. Darn, all of them are raisins. What are the odds!?

    Well, a lot depends on whether there are any peanuts in the jar at all; what percentage is peanuts; whether I’m actually picking things randomly or not.

    There’s a convenient tool that Katarina Behrens pointed me to, which can help figure this out. Even if there’s only a tiny fraction of peanuts in the jar, there’s an appreciable chance of getting one (e.g. change the percentage on that page to 5% and you’ll see).

Linux on the MAG1 8.9 inch mini-laptop (Ubuntu and Fedora)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Ubuntu

The Magic Ben MAG1 mini-laptop is a 1.5 pound notebook computer that measures about 8.2″ x 5.8″ x 0.7″ and which features an 8.9 inch touchscreen display and an Intel Core m3-8100Y processor.

As I noted in my MAG1 review, the little computer also has one of the best keyboards I’ve used on a laptop this small and a tiny, but responsive trackpad below the backlit keyboard.

Available from GeekBuying for $630 and up, the MAG1 ships with Windows 10, but it’s also one of the most Linux-friendly mini-laptops I’ve tested to date.

[...]

I did not install either operating system to local storage, so I cannot comment on sleep, battery life, fingerprint authentication, or other features that you’d only be able to truly test by fully installing Ubuntu, Fedora, or another GNU/Linux-based operating system. But running from a liveUSB is a good way to kick the tires and see if there are any obvious pain points before installing an operating system, and for the most part the two operating systems I tested look good to go.

Booting from a flash drive is also pretty easy. Once you’ve prepared a bootable drive using Rufus, UNetbootin, or a similar tool, just plug it into the computer’s USB port, hit the Esc key during startup to bring up the UEFI/SETUP utility.

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Also: Top 10 technical skills that will get you hired in 2020

An Extensive Look At The AMD Naples vs. Rome Power Efficiency / Performance-Per-Watt

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Since the AMD EPYC 7002 "Rome" series launch in August we have continue to be captivated by the raw performance of AMD's Zen 2 server processors across many different workloads as covered now in countless articles. The performance-per-dollar / TCO is also extremely competitive against Intel's Xeon Scalable line-up, but how is the power efficiency of these 7nm EPYC processors? We waited to deliver those numbers until having a retail Rome board for carrying out those tests and now after that and then several weeks of benchmarking, here is an extensive exploration of the AMD EPYC 7002 series power efficiency as well as a look at the peak clock frequencies being achieved in various workloads to also provide some performance-per-clock metrics compared to Naples.

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Firefox Picture in Picture is Sweet, Here’s How to Use it on Linux

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF

Picture in picture (PIP) is a novel feature that makes it a doddle to watch a video while you’re busy doing something else (like reading blog posts).

How? It allows video content to “pop out” of a web page and play in a separate floating window (with mouse-over player controls, where possible).

With PIP you no longer need to tear out a browser tab, resize it narrowly, and try and fit it in somewhere on your screen.

And Firefox 72, which is currently in beta, supports this handy feature on the Linux desktop.

Read more

Stable kernels 5.4.2, 5.3.15, 4.19.88, 4.14.158, 4.9.206, and 4.4.206

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.4.2

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.4.2 kernel.

    All users of the 5.4 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.4.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.4.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.3.15
  • Linux 4.19.88
  • Linux 4.14.158
  • Linux 4.9.206
  • Linux 4.4.206

Graphics: Mir, X.Org, Gallium3D, GPUOpen, Mesa, Lima and Libinput

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Mir 1.6 Released With New Wayland, DispmanX Platform Support

    Mir 1.6 is out today with the latest batch of features for this Ubuntu-focused display server that offers Wayland client compatibility.

    The two big additions to Mir 1.6 are on the graphics platform front. First, there is now a "Wayland platform" for running Mir as a nested compositor on top of a Wayland compositor. Secondly, the rpi-dispmanx platform is for Broadcom's DispmanX API.

  • Before Ending 2019, Vintage SiS X.Org Driver Sees A New Release

    xf86-video-sis 0.12.0 is available this week as a new version of the SiS display driver for X.Org systems in supporting Silicon Integrated Systems' display hardware.

    This X.Org user-space mode-setting driver has seen its first update in four months but prior to that it hadn't seen any update to the open-source code in three years.

  • RadeonSI Lands SDMA Copy Support For Vega/GFX9

    The RadeonSI Gallium3D driver has finally landed SDMA copy support for Vega/GFX9 graphics hardware, which should principally benefit compute shaders and other cases.

  • AMD's GPUOpen Releases Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.3

    AMD's GPUOpen team has released their first official update to the open-source Vulkan Memory Allocator project in nearly one year.

    Vulkan Memory Allocator is an easy-to-use Vulkan memory allocation library that in the two and a half years since being open-sourced has been picked up for use by multiple games/engineers, Vulkan code samples, and other projects.

  • Chromium's Ozone Wayland Back-End Is Now Considered Beta, Aiming To Ship Next Year

    For years there has been work on a Wayland back-end to Ozone, the Google component for abstracting user-interface elements and input/window handling among other tasks across platforms. It looks like in 2020 the Ozone Wayland support will be in good standing and promoted out of beta.

    We were tipped off to a recent presentation by Igalia's Alexander Dunaev on their work contributing to the Ozone Wayland code. From consulting firm Igalia's perspective, they have been focused on bringing up Ozone Wayland support in the embedded Linux context considering the number of consumer devices now shipping that use Wayland and Chromium or CEF. But all their embedded Linux work for Ozone Wayland also benefits the Linux desktop.

  • Mesa Developers Weigh Renaming Gallium "State Tracker" To "API"

    Gallium3D state tracker terminology has been around a decade now in referring to the portions of the architecture that are ultimately implementing various graphics / compute / video APIs. Marek proposed keeping the Mesa OpenGL state tracker term but in renaming the other state trackers to being "API implementations" as that terminology is technically more accurate for the likes of Clover OpenCL, VA-API, VDPAU, and the other state trackers / APIs implemented.

  • Lima Gets Tiling While Vulkan Turnip Lands SSBO + Compute Shaders

    The Lima Gallium3D driver that supports older Mali 400/450 hardware with an open-source OpenGL driver hasn't been seeing too many improvements these days compared to the likes of the Panfrost Gallium3D driver for the newer Arm Mali Bifrost/Midgard architectures. But hitting Mesa 20.0-devel yesterday was tiling support for Lima. This should improve the performance for this open-source Mali driver and also end up working around the driver's broken mipmapping support for linear textures.

  • Libinput 1.15 Is On Approach With Various Improvements/Fixes For Linux Input Handling

    Peter Hutterer has been preparing libinput 1.15 as the next update to this open-source input handling library used by Linux systems both on X.Org and Wayland.

    Compared to past releases that have seen exciting changes on supporting new input devices like the Dell Totem, scrolling enhancements, and other major additions, there isn't too much of that with libinput 1.15.

Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" Installer Is Now Available for Public Testing

Filed under
Debian

Unveiled earlier this year during the DebConf19 conference, Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" will be the next major release of the acclaimed Linux-based operating system used by millions of computer users around the globe. It's development kicked off a few months ago, so now it's time to test drive the very first alpha build of the Debian Bullseye Installer.

"It's high time we started doing this: many components were updated, replacing “CD”/“CD-ROM” with “installation media”. Such changes are not documented individually below. That also explains why many languages are not fully translated in this alpha release," said Cyril Brulebois on behalf of the Debian release team.

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Python Programming and This Week in Rust

Filed under
Development
  • Adding Notifications to Long-Running Jupyter Notebook Cells

    If you use Jupyter Notebook to run long-running processes, such as machine learning training, then you would probably like to know when the cell finishes executing. There is a neat browser plugin that you can use to help solve this issue called jupyter-notify. It will allow you to have your browser send a pop-up message when the cell finishes executing.

  • #100DaysOfCode, Day 015 – Quick and Dirty Web Page Download

    I wanted to write a program that would just get the latest comic from turnoff.us and save the picture to a file.

  • Mozilla and Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to support pip
  • Creating Palindromes -- if possible -- from a string of letters.

    I don't like the idea of Union[str, int] as a return type from this function. Yes, it's valid Python, but it seems like a code smell. Since the intent is to build lists, a None would be more sensible than a number; we'd have Optional[str] which seems better overall.

    The solution that was posted was interesting. It did way too much work, but it was acceptable-looking Python. (It started with a big block comment with "#" on each line instead of a docstring, so... there were minor style problems, but otherwise, it was not bad.)

  • Functional programming design pattern: Nested Iterators == Flattening

    Here's a functional programming design pattern I uncovered. This may not be news to you, but it was a surprise to me. It cropped up when looking at something that needs parallelization to reduced the elapsed run time.

  • List Comprehensions in Python

    A list is one of the fundamental data types in Python. Every time you come across a variable name that's followed by a square bracket [], or a list constructor, it is a list capable of containing multiple items, making it a compound data type. Similarly, it is also a breeze to declare a new list and subsequently add one or more items to it.

  • Python if else demo

    A simple kata from codewars will show us how to use the if-else statement in python.

    The wide mouth frog is particularly interested in the eating habits of other creatures.

    He just can’t stop asking the creatures he encounters what they like to eat. But then he meets the alligator who just LOVES to eat wide-mouthed frogs!

    When he meets the alligator, it then makes a tiny mouth.

  • This Week in Rust 315

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

Kernel: LWN Articles (Outside Paywall Today), F2FS and BPF

Filed under
Linux
  • LSM stacking and the future

    The idea of stacking (or chaining) Linux security modules (LSMs) goes back 15 years (at least) at this point; progress has definitely been made along the way, especially in the last decade or so. It has been possible to stack "minor" LSMs with one major LSM (e.g. SELinux, Smack, or AppArmor) for some time, but mixing, say, SELinux and AppArmor in the same system has not been possible. Combining major security solutions may not seem like a truly important feature, but there is a use case where it is pretty clearly needed: containers. Longtime LSM stacker (and Smack maintainer) Casey Schaufler gave a presentation at the 2019 Linux Security Summit Europe to report on the status and plans for allowing arbitrary LSM stacking.

    LSMs allow adding more restrictions to Linux than those afforded by the traditional security policies. For the most part, those policies reflect the existing mechanisms, such as permissions bits on files. But there are also other security concerns, such as binding to a network socket, that are outside of the usual permissions, so mechanisms to restrict access to them have been added to the LSM interface.

  • Some near-term arm64 hardening patches

    The arm64 architecture is found at the core of many, if not most, mobile devices; that means that arm64 devices are destined to be the target of attackers worldwide. That has led to a high level of interest in technologies that can harden these systems. There are currently several such technologies, based in both hardware and software, that are being readied for the arm64 kernel; read on for a survey on what is coming.

  • Keeping memory contents secret

    One of the many responsibilities of the operating system is to help processes keep secrets from each other. Operating systems often fail in this regard, sometimes due to factors — such as hardware bugs and user-space vulnerabilities — that are beyond their direct control. It is thus unsurprising that there is an increasing level of interest in ways to improve the ability to keep data secret, perhaps even from the operating system itself. The MAP_EXCLUSIVE patch set from Mike Rapoport is one example of the work that is being done in this area; it also shows that the development community has not yet really begun to figure out how this type of feature should work.
    MAP_EXCLUSIVE is a new flag for the mmap() system call; its purpose is to request a region of memory that is mapped only for the calling process and inaccessible to anybody else, including the kernel. It is a part of a larger address-space isolation effort underway in the memory-management subsystem, most of which is based on the idea that unmapped memory is much harder for an attacker to access.

    Mapping a memory range with MAP_EXCLUSIVE has a number of effects. It automatically implies the MAP_LOCKED and MAP_POPULATE flags, meaning that the memory in question will be immediately faulted into RAM and locked there — it should never find its way to a swap area, for example. The MAP_PRIVATE and MAP_ANONYMOUS flags are required, and MAP_HUGETLB is not allowed. Pages that are mapped this way will not be copied if the process forks. They are also removed from the kernel's direct mapping — the linear mapping of all of physical memory — making them inaccessible to the kernel in most circumstances.

    The goal behind MAP_EXCLUSIVE seems to have support within the community, but the actual implementation has raised a number of questions about how this functionality should work. One area of concern is the removal of the pages from the direct mapping. The kernel uses huge pages for that mapping, since that gives a significant performance improvement through decreased translation lookaside buffer (TLB) pressure. Carving specific pages out of that mapping requires splitting the huge pages into normal pages, slowing things down for every process in the system. The splitting of the direct mapping in another context caused a 2% performance regression at Facebook, according to Alexei Starovoitov in October; that is not a cost that everybody is willing to pay.

    Elena Reshetova indicated that she has been working on similar functionality; rather than enhancing mmap(), her patch provides a new madvise() flag and requires that the secret areas be a multiple of the page size. Her version will eventually wipe any secret areas before returning the memory to general use in case the calling process doesn't do that.

  • F2FS File-System Gets More Fixes With Linux 5.5

    The Flash-Friendly File-System continues to be refined and with the forthcoming Linux 5.5 kernel are more improvements albeit largely bug fixes.

    F2FS in Linux 5.5 improves the in-place updating I/O flow, ensures no garbage collection for pinned files, avoids a needless data migration within the garbage collection code, fixes a potential memory leak, and has a number of other fixes.

  • Netflix: BPF is a new type of software we use to run Linux apps securely in the kernel

    There's growing interest in a new type of software for Linux machines called BPF, which allows the user to run a program in the kernel and enjoy "observability super powers", according to Brendan Gregg, a senior performance architect at Netflix.

    BPF isn't something an average computer user would know about or even use, but for network and software engineers it promises value. At Facebook, for example, engineers use BPF as part of a network load balancer.

    Facebook software engineer Alexei Starovoitov is credited with creating Extended BPF, which is now used in Android for collecting statistics from the kernel, monitoring, or debugging. And Google is using it as part of its Kernel Runtime Security Instrumentation to improve detection of security threat signals, such as a kernel module that loads and hides itself.

The Yocto Project 3.0 release

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Yocto Project recently announced its 3.0 release, maintaining the spring/fall cadence it has followed for the past nine years. As well as the expected updates, it contains new thinking on getting the best of two worlds: source builds and prebuilt binaries. This fits well into a landscape where reproducibility and software traceability, all the way through to device updates, are increasingly important to handle complex security issues.
This update contains the usual things people have come to expect from a Yocto Project release, such as upgrades to the latest versions of many of the software components including GCC 9.2, glibc 2.30, and the 5.2 and 4.19 kernels. But there is more to it than that.

One major development in this release was the addition of the ability to run the toolchain test suites. The project is proud of its ability to run builds of complete Linux software stacks for multiple architectures from source, boot them under QEMU, and run extensive software tests on them, all in around five hours. In that time we can now include tests for GCC, glibc, and binutils on each of the principal architectures. As a result, the test report for the release now has around two-million test results.

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Librem Boot Freedom and Purism Closes $2.5m Note Series

Filed under
Gadgets
  • coreboot 4.11: Leaving No Librem Behind

    One of Purism’s core beliefs is to ensure that to the best of our ability, all new features, fixes, and improvements will be applied to all products, past and present.

  • Purism Closes $2.5m Note Series

    Purism as a Social Purpose Company (SPC) ensures the rights of humanity by creating products that fully respect people, and that mission has garnered a lot of attention and growth. One of the reasons Purism registered as an SPC was so that we could accept inbound investment without the risk that a toxic investor could force us to violate our values for profit (a common problem in C corporations). As a social purpose company Purism enshrines in its articles of incorporation that we must do what is good for society, therefore avoiding any and all toxic funding by virtue of the strictness of those articles.

    Funding growth—in addition to the triple-digit (yes that is over doubling) shipped revenue growth year-over-year since 2014 that Purism has been fortunate to see—can come in many forms, be that inventory financing, lines of credit, investment, and equity financing, to name a few.

Switching from Gnome to a tiling window manager

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After having thought about it since "forever", I finally decided to switch to a tiling window manager. I went with sway since it runs on wayland and since it seems to be the recommended "wayland version of i3", a tiling window manager that many of my tech friends use Wink

After a few days of using sway, I'm pretty sure that I won't switch back anytime soon. It feels super convenient to have all windows tiled on the screen and being able to rearrange and resize them easily with a few keyboard shortcuts.

There's still some things that didn't work instantly, so I'll try to document them here in hope that it's useful to others.

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Mozilla: GFX, JavaScript, DeepSpeech and RFC Process

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla GFX: moz://gfx newsletter #49

    By way of introduction, I invite you to read Markus’ excellent post on this blog about CoreAnimation integration yielding substantial improvements in power usage if you haven’t already.

    Next steps in this OS compositor integration saga include taking advantage CoreAnimation with WebRender’s picture caching infrastructure (rendering tiles directly into CoreAnimation surfaces), as well as rendering using a similar mechanism on Windows via DirectComposition surfaces. Markus, Glenn and Sotaro are making good progress on all of these fronts.

  • JSConf JP 2019 - Tokyo, Japan

    I do not step often in JavaScript conference. The language is not my cup of tea. I go through minified, obfuscated broken code every day for webcompat work. JavaScript switched from language that "makes Web page inaccessible and non performant" to "waste of energy, cpu, and nightmare to debug".

    But this last week-end, I decided to participate to JSConf JP 2019 and I had a good time. I met cool and passionate people. I also felt old. You will understand later why.

  • DeepSpeech 0.6: Mozilla’s Speech-to-Text Engine Gets Fast, Lean, and Ubiquitous

    The Machine Learning team at Mozilla continues work on DeepSpeech, an automatic speech recognition (ASR) engine which aims to make speech recognition technology and trained models openly available to developers. DeepSpeech is a deep learning-based ASR engine with a simple API. We also provide pre-trained English models.

    Our latest release, version v0.6, offers the highest quality, most feature-packed model so far. In this overview, we’ll show how DeepSpeech can transform your applications by enabling client-side, low-latency, and privacy-preserving speech recognition capabilities.

  • AiC: Improving the pre-RFC process

    I want to write about an idea that Josh Triplett and I have been iterating on to revamp the lang team RFC process. I have written a draft of an RFC already, but this blog post aims to introduce the idea and some of the motivations. The key idea of the RFC is formalize the steps leading up to an RFC, as well as to capture the lang team operations around project groups. The hope is that, if this process works well, it can apply to teams beyond the lang team as well.

    [...]

    In general, you can think of the RFC process as a kind of “funnel” with a number of stages. We’ve traditionally thought of the process as beginning at the point where an RFC with a complete design is opened, but of course the design process really begins much earlier. Moreover, a single bit of design can often span multiple RFCs, at least for complex features – moreover, at least in our current process, we often have changes to the design that occur during the implementation stage as well. This can sometimes be difficult to keep up with, even for lang-team members.

    This post describes a revision to the process that aims to “intercept” proposals at an earlier stage. It also proposes to create “project groups” for design work and a dedicated repository that can house documents. For smaller designs, these groups and repositories might be small and simple. But for larger designs, they offer a space to include a lot more in the way of design notes and other documents.

    Assuming we adopt this process, one of the things I think we should be working on is developing “best practices” around these repositories. For example, I think that for every non-trivial design decision, we should be creating a summary document that describes the pros/cons and the eventual decision (along with, potentially, comments from people who disagreed with that decision outlining their reasoning).

Red Hat: Ceph Storage, RHEL, OpenShift and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Comparing Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.3 BlueStore/Beast performance with Red Hat Ceph Storage 2.0 Filestore/Civetweb

    This post is the sequel to the object storage performance testing we did two years back based on Red Hat Ceph Storage 2.0 FileStore OSD backend and Civetweb RGW frontend. In this post, we will compare the performance of the latest available (at the time of writing) Ceph Storage i.e. version 3.3 (BlueStore OSD backend & Beast RGW frontend) with Ceph Storage 2.0 version (mid-2017) (FileStore OSD backend & Civetweb RGW frontend).

    We are conscious that results from both these performance studies are not scientifically comparable. However, we believe that comparing the two should provide you significant performance insights and enables you to make an informed decision when it comes to architecting your Ceph storage clusters.

    As expected, Ceph Storage 3.3 outperformed Ceph Storage 2.0 for all the workloads that we have tested. We believe that Ceph Storage 3.3 performance improvements are attributed to the combination of several things. The BlueStore OSD backend, the Beast web frontend for RGW, the use of Intel Optane SSDs for BlueStore WAL, block.db, and the latest generation Intel Cascade Lake processors.

  • Red Hat: Leading the enterprise Linux server market

    Red Hat has long believed that the operating system should do more than simply exist as part of a technology stack; it should be the catalyst for innovation. Underpinning almost every enterprise IT advancement, from cloud services and Kubernetes to containers and serverless, is the operating system; frequently, this operating system is Linux. Red Hat is proud of the leadership position we have long maintained in the enterprise operating system market, providing the Linux foundation to drive enterprise IT innovation forward.

    Today, we’re pleased to continue this leadership, with a new report from IDC that includes data showing that Red Hat as the leading choice for paid Linux in the worldwide server operating environment market as well as a powerful player in server operating systems at-large.

    According to the report, "Worldwide Server Operating Environments Market Shares, 2018: Overall Market Growth Accelerates:"

  • Microservices-Based Application Delivery with Citrix and Red Hat OpenShift

    Citrix is thrilled to have recently achieved Red Hat OpenShift Operator Certification (Press Release). This new integration simplifies the deployment and control of the Citrix Application Delivery Controller (ADC) to a few clicks through an easy-to-use Operator.

    Before we dive into how you can use Citrix Operators to speed up implementation and control in OpenShift environments, let me cover the benefits of using the Citrix Cloud Native Stack and how it solves the challenges of integrating ingress in Kubernetes.

  • Wavefront Automates and Unifies Red Hat OpenShift Observability, Full Stack

    Red Hat OpenShift is an enterprise Kubernetes platform intended to make the process of developing, deploying and managing cloud-native applications easier, scalable and more flexible. Wavefront by VMware provides enterprise-grade observability and analytics for OpenShift environments across multiple clouds. Wavefront ingests, analyzes and visualizes OpenShift telemetry – metrics, histograms, traces, and span logs – across the full-stack, including distributed applications, containers, microservices, and cloud infrastructure.

    As a result of Wavefront’s collaboration with Red Hat, you can now get automated enterprise observability for OpenShift that’s full stack, through the Red Hat OpenShift Certified Wavefront Operator for OpenShift 4.1 and later. This Operator is available in Operator Hub embedded in OpenShift, a registry for finding Kubernetes Operator-backed services.

  • RHEL 8.1: A minor release with major new container capabilities

    The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 is a minor update to RHEL, but a major step forward with containers. The container-tools:rhel8 application stream has been updated with new versions of Podman, Buildah, Skopeo, runc, container selinux policies and other libraries. The core set of base images in Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) have been updated to 8.1, and UBI has expanded to include Go 1.11.5 as a developer use case. There are now 37 images released as part of UBI - they can all be seen on the UBI product page. Finally, we have released some really good updated documentation covering rootless, and other new features in the container-tools module.

    [...]

    When we launched Red Hat Universal Base Image at Red Hat Summit in 2019, we got a lot of great feedback. One of the first requests we received was for Golang. It is a popular programming language in the Cloud Native space, and we immediately recognized the value of adding it (also, I know what you’re thinking! Stay tuned and you might see OpenJDK images soon).

    With the update to RHEL 8.1, we have added the ubi8/go-toolset container to the UBI family. This gives users the ability to compile Go applications using a pre-packaged container with Go 1.11.5.

  • Red Hat’s CTO sees open-source as driver of choice and consistency in hybrid environments

    A case can certainly be made that Red Hat Inc. and the open-source movement have commoditized portions of the information technology infrastructure. A much wider range of tools and systems are now available to enterprises than ever before.

    This trend is just part of the open-source journey, one that Chris Wright (pictured), as the senior vice president and chief technology officer of Red Hat and a veteran Linux developer, has seen evolve over more than 20 years as a software engineer.

    “What we’re experiencing in the Linux space is, it’s driving a commoditization of infrastructure,” Wright said. “It’s switching away from the traditional vertically integrated stack of a [reduced instruction set computer]/Unix environment to providing choice. As infrastructure changes, it’s not just hardware, it’s virtualized data centers, it’s public clouds.”

  • Introduction to the Red Hat OpenShift deployment extension for Microsoft Azure DevOps

Polo – A Modern Light-weight File Manager for Linux

Filed under
Software

Polo is a modern, light-weight and advanced file manager for Linux, that comes with a number of advanced features that are not present in many commonly used file managers or file browsers on Linux distributions.

It comes with multiple panes with multiple tabs in each pane, support for archive creation, extraction and browsing, support for cloud storage, support for running KVM images, support for modifying PDF documents and image files, support for writing ISO files to UDB drives and much more.

Read more

Fedora: End of Life (EOL), RPMs of PHP and Heroes of Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 29 Officially Reached End of Life (EOL) on November 26th 2019

    Fedora 29 has officially reached End of Life (EOL) effective on November 26th 2019.

    Users are advised to upgrade the latest release of Fedora 30 or Fedora 31, which was released on October 29, 2019.

    It’s a good time to upgrade your system as this EOL version repositories won’t be get any updates from the Fedora community.

    I mean to say, no updates will be pushed to any of the Fedora 29 repositories going forward such as security, bugfix, or enhancement updates.

    Also, they won’t add anymore new packages to Fedora 29 repositories.

    It means, we shouldn’t run EOL operating system because we won’t be getting any benefits from the community.

    It’s very risk and leads to face some security related issues when we run the EOL operating system.

  • PHP version 7.2.26RC1 and 7.3.13RC1

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.13RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30-31 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 29 and Enterprise Linux.

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.26RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F31 Final

    Hello fellow testers, welcome to the Fedora 31 Final installation of Heroes of Fedora! In this post, we’ll look at the stats concerning the testing of Fedora 31 Final. The purpose of Heroes of Fedora is to provide a summation of testing activity on each milestone release of Fedora. Without community support, Fedora would not exist, so thank you to all who contributed to this release! Without further ado, let’s get started!

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