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Tuesday, 19 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
webpathinlovelinux srlinuxx 07/02/2008 - 3:44pm
bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

Unixstickers

Filed under
Just talk

Unixstickers

Awesome products, will definitely get another bunch of some more stickers soon Smile

DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 Released To Fix The Lazy State Save/Restore Bug

Filed under
BSD

DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 is now available as the latest stable release to this popular BSD operating system.

While there aren't usually two point releases per cycle for DragonFlyBSD, the v5.2.2 release is coming to address the recent "Lazy FPU" vulnerability affecting Intel CPUs due to Lazy State Save/Restore as the newest CPU speculation bug.

DragonFlyBSD began patching their kernel earlier this month and now those fixes are available in stable form with the DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 release. The OpenBSD folks have also been changing around their kernel and FreeBSD 11.2 RC3 is also mitigated.

Read more

Canonical/Ubuntu: Canonical's Engineering Tech Lead, Field Product Manager, and Designers'/Developers' Updates

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • A Complete Look At Spectre V1/V2/V4 & Meltdown

    Canonical's Engineering Tech Lead, Gavin Guo, has passed along a big slide deck on a presentation he is preparing about the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities.

    Gavin's presentation is mostly focused on Spectre V2 since that is vulnerable to attacking the host system from a guest VM, but the other vulnerabilities are also covered in his 77-page slide deck with great detail.

  • A unified OpenStack for a scalable open infrastructure

    Stu Miniman and John Boyer of theCUBE interviewed Mark Baker, Field Product Manager, Canonical at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver. Read on to to find out about OpenStack’s increasing maturity.

    The Kubernetes and OpenStack story isn’t simple. Challenges exist, and plenty of pathfinding still needs to take place when it comes to Kubernetes.

    Customers want to take different approaches with how they want to plug together OpenStack components in order to create a unified stack is complex. Some customers want Kubernetes running alongside OpenStack, or on top of OpenStack, or even OpenStack running on Kubernetes.

  • Design and Web team summary – 18 June 2018

    Welcome to the latest work and updates from the design and web team.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 532

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 532 for the week of June 10 – 16, 2018.

How Linux and Open Tech Empower Medical Healthcare

Filed under
Linux

Open Source is not just for IT industry. Linux and Open Source technologies are impacting Medical and Healthcare industries as well.
Read more

Security: Open Source Security Podcast, New Updates, MysteryBot and Grayshift

Filed under
Security

Containers and 'Clouds'

Filed under
Server
  • [Podcast] PodCTL #39 – CI/CD and Kubernetes

    One of the characteristics of the most successful deployments of OpenShift are the CI/CD pipelines that enable application integrations. This week we dove into a question from a listener – “Can you talk more about best practices for integrating CI/CD systems into Kubernetes?“

    Brian and Tyler talk about the latest news from the Kubernetes community, the difference between CI and CD, and various considerations for integrating CI/CD environments with Kubernetes.

  • Partners See Docker's 'Promise Of Choice' As A Unique Inroad To Enterprise Customers
  • Docker’s Name and Operations Could Appeal to Microsoft, Red Hat, VMware

    Docker Inc. owns one of the most prominent names in the cloud container ecosystem. But a recent report from Cowen and Company named a handful of established cloud players as potential acquirers of Docker Inc. Those included Microsoft, Red Hat, and VMware, with the first two deemed most likely to take the plunge.

    “Despite its strong name recognition and customer momentum, Docker’s long-term financial success – at least as an independent company – is hardly a fait accompli,” the Cowen and Company report stated. “We do believe that Docker will have to work hard in order to overcome its smaller footprint with enterprise companies.”

  • Every Silver Lining Has a Cloud

    The savings in cloud computing comes at the expense of a loss of control over your systems, which is summed up best in the popular nerd sticker that says, "The Cloud is Just Other People's Computers."

Mozilla: Motion, Contributors, Testday, ActivityMonitor, San Francisco Oxidation

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox has a motion team?! Yes we do!

    Motion may sometimes feel like an afterthought or worse yet “polish”. For the release of Firefox Quantum (one of our most significant releases to date), we wanted to ensure that motion was not a second class citizen and that it would play an important role in how users perceived performance in the browser.

    We (Amy & Eric) make up the UX side of the “motion team” for Firefox. We say this in air quotes because the motion team was essentially formed based on our shared belief that motion design is important in Firefox. With a major release planned, we thought this would be the perfect opportunity to have a team working on motion.

  • Firefox 61 new contributors

    With the upcoming release of Firefox 61, we are pleased to welcome the 59 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 53 of whom were brand new volunteers!

  • QMO: Firefox 61 Beta 14 Testday Results

    As you may already know, last Friday – June 15th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 61 Beta 14.

    Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place!

  • IOActivityMonitor in Gecko

    This is a first blog post of a series on Gecko, since I am doing a lot of C++ work in Firefox these days. My current focus is on adding tools in Firefox to try to detect what's going on when something goes rogue in the browser and starts to drain your battery life.

    We have many ideas on how to do this at the developer/user level, but in order to do it properly, we need to have accurate ways to measure what's going on when the browser runs.

    One thing is I/O activity.

    For instance, a WebExtension worker that performs a lot of disk writes is something we want to find out about, and we had nothing to track all I/O activities in Firefox, without running the profiler.

    When Firefox OS was developed, a small feature was added in the Gecko network lib, called NetworkActivityMonitor.

  • San Francisco Oxidation meeting notes

    At last week’s Mozilla All Hands meeting in San Francisco we had an Oxidation meeting about the use of Rust in Firefox. It was low-key, being mostly about status and progress. The notes are here for those who are interested.

Games: Riot Games, Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, Dead Cells

Filed under
Gaming
  • Riot Games' anti-cheat software for League also targets Linux users

    This week Riot Games implemented a new anti-cheat software for the game that is meant to limit the number of players who use third-party programs while playing. Most of these programs help users cheat in-game, such as by inputting movement commands for a player to allow them to dodge enemy skillshots.

    Unfortunately for players who run Linux as their operating system, the new anti-cheat also targets it as a third-party program, preventing them from playing League. Many players took to Reddit and other forums to protest the change, even creating a petition for Riot to add Linux compatibility.

  • Riot Games New Anti-Cheat Could Wipe Out League of Legends Linux Player Base

    ​Riot Games has been working on a new anti-cheat system for League of Legends. There are reports that this update would make the game unplayable for Linux users, because it would make the game incompatible with virtual environments, something Linux users have to employ to play the game.

  • A small but nice update on Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Linux support

    We've been waiting quite a while for any real news on the Linux port of Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [Official Site]. While we still don't know when, we do know it's still happening.

  • Dead Cells, a 'RogueVania' now has a Beta available for Linux

    Dead Cells mixes in elements of a Rogue-lite with a MetroidVania to create an interesting mix and it's now available on Linux with a Beta.

    I did notice in the comments of the previous article, that people were debating the choice of article title. I said it was a "rogue-lite metroidvania action-platformer", which was obviously a bit wrong. They've actually coined their own term for it, calling it a "RogueVania".

"Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp."

Filed under
Development
Microsoft
  • Mixed Reaction
  • After Github purchase, Microsoft remains a relatively untrusted open source player to some
  • What is GitHub?

    GitHub is now the de facto home of open-source software. But Microsoft’s acquisition reignited a debate over the platform’s centrality. Microsoft assures users the service is safe under its stewardship, but many are wary. When Mr Ballmer spoke of developers, he had a specific sort in mind: those using Microsoft’s tools to build projects for Microsoft products. He once called open-source Linux a “cancer”, which would spread uncontrollably. In a sense, his words proved prophetic: today, open-source software is everywhere, from websites to financial markets to self-driving cars. Under Mr Nadella’s leadership, Microsoft has embraced open-source development. In buying GitHub it hopes to gain the trust of developers it once spurned. But some wonder if the change is complete, or if Microsoft will use its newly bought dominance of open-source hosting to push its own products. Alternatives to GitHub—some themselves open-source—wait in the wings. If it is not careful, Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp.

Making Free Software Suffer Using New Laws

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • Free software is at risk in the EU -- take action now

    Members of the European Parliament want to turn upload platforms like GitLab into "censorship machines" that require user-uploaded materials to be monitored and automatically filtered, a process which would prevent modified and reused code from being uploaded. This provision is covered under Article 13 of the Copyright Directive.

    If Article 13, embedded within the proposal, becomes official policy, it will be impossible for developers to build off of one another's code -- which is not only a blow to the collaborative development of free software, but a push against the basic freedoms of free software. Software isn't free unless it can be modified and shared. Article 13 will affect all users of free software -- as development of free software suffers, the quality and availability of updates, new features, and new programs will also suffer.

  • Open Source Industry Australia Says Zombie TPP Could Destroy Free Software Licensing

    Without the ability to enforce compliance through the use of injunctions, open source licenses would once again be pointless. Although the OSIA is concerned about free software in Australia, the same logic would apply to any TPP-11 country. It would also impact other nations that joined the Pacific pact later, as the UK is considering (the UK government seems not to have heard of the gravity theory for trade). It would presumably apply to the US if it did indeed rejoin the pact, as has been mooted. In other words, the impact of this section on open source globally could be significant.

    It's worth remembering why this particular article is present in TPP. It grew out of concerns that nations like China and Russia were demanding access to source code as a pre-requisite of allowing Western software companies to operate in their countries. Article 14.17 was designed as a bulwark against such demands. It's unlikely that it was intended to destroy open source licensing too, although some spotted early on that this was a risk. And doubtless a few big software companies will be only too happy to see free software undermined in this way. Unfortunately, it's probably too much to hope that the Australian Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence & Trade will care about or even understand this subtle software licensing issue. The fate of free software in Australia will therefore depend on whether TPP-11 comes into force, and if so, what judges think Article 14.17 means.

Fedora: Anaconda Improvements, Greenboot, Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes and Abhishek

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Anaconda improvements in Fedora 28

    Fedora 28 was released last month, and the major update brought with it a raft of new features for the Fedora Installer (Anaconda). Like Fedora, Anaconda is a dynamic software project with new features and updates every release. Some changes are user visible, while others happen under the hood — making Anaconda more robust and prepared for future improvements.

  • Lorbus: Introducing: greenboot

    Not too long ago, I applied to Google Summer of Code for the student scholarship position together with a Fedora project ideated by Peter Robinson, who is the principal IoT architect at Red Hat, named Fedora IoT: Atomic Host Upgrade Daemon. As you may be guessing by now, I was very fortunate and the proposal was accepted! The coding phase started on the 14th of May and in this blog post I’ll try to give a little insight into my first month working on the project.

  • Pre-release Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes

    I am very excited to share that sometime back the Fedora project gave the go ahead on my idea of making Fedora Scientific available as Vagrant boxes starting with Fedora 29. This basically means (I think) that using Fedora Scientific in a virtual machine is even easier.

  • [Week 5] GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Abhishek

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • An Open Source Load Balancer for OpenShift

    A highly-available deployment of OpenShift needs at least two load balancers: One to load balance the control plane (the master API endpoints) and one for the data plane (the application routers). In most on-premise deployments, we use appliance-based load balancers (such as F5 or Netscaler).

  • Red Hat Beefs Up Platform as a Service Suite

    Red Hat has begun shipping Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service (iPaaS) offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, the vendor says expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.

  • Red Hat ‘Fuses’ Low Code Development and Data Integration

    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, Red Hat is expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform.

    Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.

  • The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects

    As of today, all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start.

    This is the latest development in an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses. The “automatic termination” provision in GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x is often interpreted as terminating the license upon noncompliance without a grace period or other opportunity to correct the error in compliance. When the Free Software Foundation released GPLv2 in 1991, it held nearly all GPL-licensed copyrights, in part a consequence of the copyright assignment policy then in place for GNU project contributions. Long after the Linux kernel and many other non-GNU projects began to adopt the GPL and LGPL, the FSF was still the only copyright holder regularly engaged in license enforcement. Under those conditions, the automatic termination feature of GPLv2 section 4 may have seemed an appropriate means of encouraging license compliance.

  • Monness Believes Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) Still Has Room to Grow
  • Comparing Red Hat (RHT) & Autoweb (AUTO)
  • As Red Hat (RHT) Share Value Rose, Calamos Advisors Upped Its Position by $300,831; Chilton Capital Management Increases Stake in Equinix (EQIX)
  • Blair William & Co. IL Buys 23,279 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Total War: WARHAMMER

Filed under
Gaming

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important.

So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal.

Read more

Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.7 Brings More Mitigations Against Spectre Flaws

Filed under
Gentoo

Powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.14.50 kernel, Porteus Kiosk 4.7.0 is the second release of the operating system in 2018 and comes five months after version 4.6 to introduce more mitigations against the Spectre security vulnerabilities, though the next-gen Spectre flaws require microcode firmware updates for Intel CPUs.

"Newly discovered "Spectre Next Generation" vulnerabilities require updated microcode from Intel which is not available yet. Please consider enabling automatic updates service for your kiosks to receive latest fixes and patches as soon as they become available," reads today's announcement.

Read more

Linspire 8 Enters Development Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Freespire 3.0.9 Is Out

Filed under
Ubuntu

Freespire 3.0.9 is a small incremental update of the free and open-source GNU/Linux distribution that includes all the latest security and software updates released upstream until June 11, 2018. It also introduces new light and dark modes, a full instance of the Calligra office suite, and replaces Mozilla Thunderbird with Kontact.

The developers recommend all users running the Freespire 3.0 operating system series on their personal computers to run a system-wide update if they want to upgrade to Freespire 3.0.9 and receive all the latest changes. On the other hand, new users are encouraged to download the Freespire 3.0.9 ISO image.

Read more

Also: Linspire 8.0 Alpha 1 Released

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More in Tux Machines

How Linux and Open Tech Empower Medical Healthcare

Open Source is not just for IT industry. Linux and Open Source technologies are impacting Medical and Healthcare industries as well. Read more

Security: Open Source Security Podcast, New Updates, MysteryBot and Grayshift

Containers and 'Clouds'

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #39 – CI/CD and Kubernetes
    One of the characteristics of the most successful deployments of OpenShift are the CI/CD pipelines that enable application integrations. This week we dove into a question from a listener – “Can you talk more about best practices for integrating CI/CD systems into Kubernetes?“ Brian and Tyler talk about the latest news from the Kubernetes community, the difference between CI and CD, and various considerations for integrating CI/CD environments with Kubernetes.
  • Partners See Docker's 'Promise Of Choice' As A Unique Inroad To Enterprise Customers
  • Docker’s Name and Operations Could Appeal to Microsoft, Red Hat, VMware
    Docker Inc. owns one of the most prominent names in the cloud container ecosystem. But a recent report from Cowen and Company named a handful of established cloud players as potential acquirers of Docker Inc. Those included Microsoft, Red Hat, and VMware, with the first two deemed most likely to take the plunge. “Despite its strong name recognition and customer momentum, Docker’s long-term financial success – at least as an independent company – is hardly a fait accompli,” the Cowen and Company report stated. “We do believe that Docker will have to work hard in order to overcome its smaller footprint with enterprise companies.”
  • Every Silver Lining Has a Cloud

    The savings in cloud computing comes at the expense of a loss of control over your systems, which is summed up best in the popular nerd sticker that says, "The Cloud is Just Other People's Computers."

Mozilla: Motion, Contributors, Testday, ActivityMonitor, San Francisco Oxidation

  • Firefox has a motion team?! Yes we do!
    Motion may sometimes feel like an afterthought or worse yet “polish”. For the release of Firefox Quantum (one of our most significant releases to date), we wanted to ensure that motion was not a second class citizen and that it would play an important role in how users perceived performance in the browser. We (Amy & Eric) make up the UX side of the “motion team” for Firefox. We say this in air quotes because the motion team was essentially formed based on our shared belief that motion design is important in Firefox. With a major release planned, we thought this would be the perfect opportunity to have a team working on motion.
  • Firefox 61 new contributors
    With the upcoming release of Firefox 61, we are pleased to welcome the 59 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 53 of whom were brand new volunteers!
  • QMO: Firefox 61 Beta 14 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday – June 15th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 61 Beta 14. Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place!
  • IOActivityMonitor in Gecko
    This is a first blog post of a series on Gecko, since I am doing a lot of C++ work in Firefox these days. My current focus is on adding tools in Firefox to try to detect what's going on when something goes rogue in the browser and starts to drain your battery life. We have many ideas on how to do this at the developer/user level, but in order to do it properly, we need to have accurate ways to measure what's going on when the browser runs. One thing is I/O activity. For instance, a WebExtension worker that performs a lot of disk writes is something we want to find out about, and we had nothing to track all I/O activities in Firefox, without running the profiler. When Firefox OS was developed, a small feature was added in the Gecko network lib, called NetworkActivityMonitor.
  • San Francisco Oxidation meeting notes
    At last week’s Mozilla All Hands meeting in San Francisco we had an Oxidation meeting about the use of Rust in Firefox. It was low-key, being mostly about status and progress. The notes are here for those who are interested.