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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Python Programming Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 5:49pm
Story ProtonVPN Applications are Now 100% Open Source Roy Schestowitz 2 22/01/2020 - 5:29pm
Story s-tui CPU Monitoring And Stress Testing Tool Sees Its First Stable (1.0.0) Release Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 5:20pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 5:18pm
Story EasyOS version 2.2.5 released Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 5:14pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 5:01pm
Story Linux needs easier bug reporting tools Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 4:42pm
Story Games: Starcom: Nexus, Wild Woods, Shrine Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 3:55pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 11:25am
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2020 - 11:21am

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Screencasting – Week 13

Filed under
Linux

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of computers.

Given the multimedia strengths of the RPI4, I’ve spent a few weeks covering video streaming, then examining the viability of the RPI4 to play locally stored video, before turning to examining the RPI4 as a home theater. Continuing this theme, for this week’s blog I look at the RPI4 as a screencaster (i.e. screen recording).

In the field of open source video recording, my preferred application is OBS Studio. It’s a truly first class cross-platform application that’s excellent for both video recording and live streaming. Open source at its very best. Sadly, the software is not available in the Raspbian repositories. I did expend considerable effort trying to compile the software on the RPI4. While I got fairly close, I wasn’t able to successfully build the software. If you’ve got OBS Studio running on the RPI4, I’d love to hear from you.

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Get your RSS feeds and podcasts in one place with this open source tool

Filed under
Software
HowTos

RSS news feeds are an exceptionally handy way to keep up to date on various websites. In addition to Opensource.com, I follow the annual SysAdvent sysadmin tools feed, some of my favorite authors, and several webcomics. RSS readers allow me to "batch up" my reading, so I'm not spending every day on a bunch of different websites.

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Screenshot your Linux system configuration with Bash tools

Filed under
Linux

There are many reasons you might want to share your Linux configuration with other people. You might be looking for help troubleshooting a problem on your system, or maybe you're so proud of the environment you've created that you want to showcase it to fellow open source enthusiasts.

You could get some of that information with a cat /proc/cpuinfo or lscpu command at the Bash prompt. But if you want to share more details, such as your operating system, kernel, uptime, shell environment, screen resolution, etc., you have two great tools to choose: screenFetch and Neofetch.

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9 favorite open source tools for Node.js developers

Filed under
OSS

I recently read a survey on StackOverflow that said more than 49% of developers use Node.js for their projects. This came as no surprise to me.

As an avid user of technology, I think it's safe to say that the introduction of Node.js led to a new era of software development. It is now one of the most preferred technologies for software development, right next to JavaScript.

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OpenBSD Hackathon and FreeBSD Advocacy

Filed under
BSD
  • u2k20 Hackathon Report: Alexandr Nedvedicky on PF anchors work

    Looking back everything could have be done with simple one-liner diff, which was just good enough for my particular use case. But the diff itself would not bring much improvement to pf(4). It feels so good to see, how quite a few people helped me to put stuff in shape, which brings us one step closer towards perfect pf(4).

  • u2k20 Hackathon Report: Tracey Emery on GotWeb

    Stefan Sperling and I started a discussion in November about a CGI program, which would work in httpd(8), use the Game of Trees library along with the kcgi library by Kristaps Dzonsons, to display repository information in a browser. I was getting frustrated with working on my own project and was looking for something else to hack on. So, I told Stefan that I'd take a crack at Gotweb.

  • Why you should migrate everything from Linux to BSD

    A Linux distribution is a collection of tools written by different groups of people, often with conflicting interests and priorities, and because of this fragmented structure of the GNU/Linux operating system, the project as a whole is rapidly spinning out of control as it gets pushed around by commercial interests.

    Even the best GNU/Linux distributions, such as Debian GNU/Linux and Arch Linux, that are still driven by Open Source enthusiasts, are not immune to this problem because they still depend heavily on the fragmented tools.

    In my article The real motivation behind systemd I have previously written about how the primary reason for developing systemd is Red Hat's interests in embedded devices. Initially systemd was released as a new init system, but it has slowly grown into what Poettering describes as "a suite of software that provides fundamental building blocks for a Linux operating system." This is by design, not by coincidence.

  • Why you should migrate everything from Linux to BSD - part 2

    It is correct that Netflix is one of the biggest commercial contributors to FreeBSD, but this has nothing to do with "hijacking" as in the Linux world. Netflix is contributing all the improvements they make on FreeBSD back to the project. All the performance enhancements they have made has been contributed back to FreeBSD. This is very beneficial for FreeBSD.

    But Netflix is in no way trying to influence the FreeBSD project or trying to "hijack" FreeBSD. They don't need to. The BSD license makes it possible for Netflix to do whatever they want with FreeBSD, and they could easily just use FreeBSD without contributing anything back. However, Netflix has decided to give something back to the project and the least they could do was to contribute the improvements they have made.

    With regard to the services that Netflix provides and their so-called DRM content that can only be played using their proprietary application, and other proprietary project based upon FreeBSD, then that has no influence on FreeBSD, and that has absolutely nothing to do with "hijacking". None of these projects are affecting FreeBSD.

    [...]

    With the recent forced adoption of DRM going into the Linux kernel, and Linus Torvalds several detached statements from reality, and his complete disregard for many of the important matters in the Linux world, where he clearly doesn't care about how the companies are affecting the development (lots of bloatware), the future of the Linux kernel doesn't look bright, not from a privacy perspective and not from a security perspective.

FreeBSD is an amazing operating system

Filed under
BSD

What I failed to realize back then was that FreeBSD was (and it still is) designed as a complete multi-purpose operating system meant to be setup and tuned according to specific use cases. When I occasionally installed FreeBSD it didn't always perform as well as a default Debian GNU/Linux installation for the same task. Even FreeBSD on my FTP server at home eventually got replaced by Debian GNU/Linux because FreeBSD had to be rebooted every third day or so otherwise the performance degraded a lot. Debian on the other hand performed without any "hick-ups".

Later in the years to come GNU/Linux also got better hardware support, and often when I wanted to install FreeBSD some stupid hardware didn't work. Hardware was very expensive back then and I didn't have the option to purchase hardware that I knew would work on FreeBSD. All of these issues eventually made me use GNU/Linux more than FreeBSD. Today this is no longer a problem as FreeBSD has great support for most modern hardware.

Later I discovered and learned about many of the tuneable options and specific settings in FreeBSD, which makes it possible for the system administrator to tailer FreeBSD to his specific needs. I eventually ended up using FreeBSD as my main desktop computer for a very long time.

Some of the things I love about FreeBSD are: [...]

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Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: GNU/Linux Laptop Screencast, LINUX Unplugged and Linux Headlines

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • [VIDEO] Linux Laptop Screencast

    A few weeks ago, I wrote about tuning up my Linux laptop for writing. Via YouTube, here’s a very quick (20 minute) screencast. Enjoy!

  • Mystical Users | LINUX Unplugged 337

    We make an appeal to keep Linux powerful and avoid the Macification of the desktop, and review the latest developer-focused XPS 13.

    Plus some community news that's getting missed, picks, and more.

  • 2020-01-21 | Linux Headlines

    Canonical announces a cloud delivery suite for Android apps, EarlyOOM is on hold for the next Fedora, and ProtonMail open sources its VPN clients.

Kubernetes: KubeInvaders, CSI Ephemeral Inline Volumes and Reviewing 2019 in Docs

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • KubeInvaders - Gamified Chaos Engineering Tool for Kubernetes

    Some months ago, I released my latest project called KubeInvaders. The first time I shared it with the community was during an Openshift Commons Briefing session. Kubenvaders is a Gamified Chaos Engineering tool for Kubernetes and Openshift and helps test how resilient your Kubernetes cluster is, in a fun way.

  • CSI Ephemeral Inline Volumes

    Typically, volumes provided by an external storage driver in Kubernetes are persistent, with a lifecycle that is completely independent of pods or (as a special case) loosely coupled to the first pod which uses a volume (late binding mode). The mechanism for requesting and defining such volumes in Kubernetes are Persistent Volume Claim (PVC) and Persistent Volume (PV) objects. Originally, volumes that are backed by a Container Storage Interface (CSI) driver could only be used via this PVC/PV mechanism.

    But there are also use cases for data volumes whose content and lifecycle is tied to a pod. For example, a driver might populate a volume with dynamically created secrets that are specific to the application running in the pod. Such volumes need to be created together with a pod and can be deleted as part of pod termination (ephemeral). They get defined as part of the pod spec (inline).

    Since Kubernetes 1.15, CSI drivers can also be used for such ephemeral inline volumes. The CSIInlineVolume feature gate had to be set to enable it in 1.15 because support was still in alpha state. In 1.16, the feature reached beta state, which typically means that it is enabled in clusters by default.

    CSI drivers have to be adapted to support this because although two existing CSI gRPC calls are used (NodePublishVolume and NodeUnpublishVolume), the way how they are used is different and not covered by the CSI spec: for ephemeral volumes, only NodePublishVolume is invoked by kubelet when asking the CSI driver for a volume. All other calls (like CreateVolume, NodeStageVolume, etc.) are skipped. The volume parameters are provided in the pod spec and from there copied into the NodePublishVolumeRequest.volume_context field. There are currently no standardized parameters; even common ones like size must be provided in a format that is defined by the CSI driver. Likewise, only NodeUnpublishVolume gets called after the pod has terminated and the volume needs to be removed.

  • Reviewing 2019 in Docs

    Hi, folks! I’m one of the co-chairs for the Kubernetes documentation special interest group (SIG Docs). This blog post is a review of SIG Docs in 2019. Our contributors did amazing work last year, and I want to highlight their successes.

    Although I review 2019 in this post, my goal is to point forward to 2020. I observe some trends in SIG Docs–some good, others troubling. I want to raise visibility before those challenges increase in severity.

Programming/Development: Perl, Python/Django and Bash

Filed under
Development
  • Springtime in Switzerland

    During the same week I’ll also be giving a half-day seminar on Raku, which has been generously sponsored by EPFL and so will cost nothing to attend. It’s suitable for anyone who would like a quick but comprehensive overview of this remarkable new programming language.

    Besides making the Raku seminar entirely free, SIB/UNIL/EPFL have done an amazing job
    keeping the prices of the other classes extremely competitive...especially if you can claim a plausible association to any academic institution, either as a student or staff member.

    If you’re looking for some training that’s economical, practical, and just plain fun,
    in a location that’s central, civilised, and simply breathtaking, then this week
    in Switzerland might fit just the bill.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #404 (Jan. 21, 2020)
  • Basic Data Types in Python

    In this step-by-step course, you’ll dig into the basic data types that are built into Python.

  • Python 3.7.5 : Django security issues - part 002.
  • Python 3.7.5 : Use Django Formsets.

    Django Formsets manage the complexity of multiple copies of a form in a view. 
    This simplifies the task of creating a formset for a form that handles multiple instances of a model.

  • Hunting gremlins

    In the UTF-8 files I audit, the only invisible characters I expect to see... er... not see... are whitespace (hexadecimal 20), horizontal tab (09) and newline (linefeed; 0a). All others I call "gremlins". They include carriage return (0d), no-break space (c2 a0), soft hyphen (c2 ad) and another 62 control characters.

    Gremlins are a nuisance. One gremlin causes a shell to hang. Less evil gremlins lurk inside apparently OK strings and cause the strings to be processed weirdly. In the file "demo1", two of the strings contain no-break spaces (in different places), two contain soft hyphens (in different places) and three have no gremlins. 

  • A more expressive Bash prompt

    Bash provides some interesting built-in specifiers for the prompt strings PS1. 

Mozilla: Developer Roadshow (Asia Tour), CRLite, Async Interview

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • The Mozilla Developer Roadshow: Asia Tour Retrospective and 2020 Plans

    November 2019 was a busy month for the Mozilla Developer Roadshow, with stops in five Asian cities —Tokyo, Seoul, Taipei, Singapore, and Bangkok. Today, we’re releasing a playlist of the talks presented in Asia.

    We are extremely pleased to include subtitles for all these talks in languages spoken in the countries on this tour: Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Thai, as well as English. One talk, Hui Jing Chen’s “Making CSS from Good to Great: The Power of Subgrid”, was delivered in Singlish (a Singaporean creole) at the event in Singapore!

    In addition, because our audiences included non-native English speakers, presenters took care to include local language vocabulary in their talks, wherever applicable, and to speak slowly and clearly. We hope to continue to provide multilingual support for our video content in the future, to increase access for all developers worldwide.

  • CRLite: Speeding Up Secure Browsing

    CRLite pushes bulk certificate revocation information to Firefox users, reducing the need to actively query such information one by one. Additionally this new technology eliminates the privacy leak that individual queries can bring, and does so for the whole Web, not just special parts of it. The first two posts in this series about the newly-added CRLite technology provide background: Introducing CRLite: All of the Web PKI’s revocations, compressed and The End-to-End Design of CRLite.

    Since mid-December, our pre-release Firefox Nightly users have been evaluating our CRLite system while performing normal web browsing. Gathering information through Firefox Telemetry has allowed us to verify the effectiveness of CRLite.

  • Niko Matsakis: Async Interview #5: Steven Fackler

    Hello! For the latest async interview, I spoke with Steven Fackler (sfackler). sfackler has been involved in Rust for a long time and is a member of the Rust libs team. He is also the author of a lot of crates, most notably tokio-postgres.

    I particularly wanted to talk to sfackler about the AsyncRead and AsyncWrite traits. These traits are on everybody’s list of “important things to stabilize”, particularly if we want to create more interop between different executors and runtimes. On the other hand, in [tokio-rs/tokio#1744], the tokio project is considering adopting its own variant traits that diverge significantly from those in the futures crate, precisely because they have concerns over the design of the traits as is. This seems like an important area to dig into!

Graphics: Wayland 1.18 Alpha, Linux on Embedded Ryzen with Radeon, and Keith Packard's X Talk

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • wayland 1.17.91
    This is the alpha release for Wayland 1.18. Here's a highlight of the
    biggest changes:
    
    - Add support for the Meson build system (autotools is still supported
      but will be removed in a future release)
    - Add API to tag proxy objects to allow applications and toolkits to
      share the same Wayland connection
    - Track wayland-server timers in user-space to prevent creating too
      many FDs
    - Add wl_global_remove, a new function to mitigate race conditions with
      globals
    
    Thanks to all contributors!
    
    Full commit history below.
    
    Antonio Borneo (1):
          log: remove "%m" from format strings by using strerror(errno)
    
    Daniel Stone (2):
          build/doc: Ensure destination dir exists despite VPATH
          display-test: Remove unused variables
    
    Drew DeVault (3):
          Document unusual wl_registry.bind new_id behavior
          Add .editorconfig
          Improve description of wl_surface
    
    Emmanuel Gil Peyrot (2):
          cursor: Use memfd_create() when available
          wayland-shm: Don’t set SIGBUS handlers on unshrinkable fd
    
    Emmanuele Bassi (2):
          Support running tests from different build directories
          Add Meson build
    
    Harish Krupo (2):
          docs: Abort configure if docbook-xsl package is missing
          wayland.xml: document invalid_finish error in wl_data_offer.finish
    
    Jiayuan Ren (1):
          adding O_RDWR flag in the open()
    
    Jonas Ådahl (1):
          proxy: Add API to tag proxy objects
    
    Joshua Watt (2):
          scanner: Add configure check for strndup
          Move wl_priv_signal to wayland-server-private.h
    
    Leonid Bobrov (1):
          configure: detect libdl and librt
    
    Liu Wenlong (1):
          server: Fix fake "Address already in use" error
    
    Manuel Stoeckl (13):
          scanner: error when element names will not compile
          tests: Verify that wayland_scanner can catch bad identifiers
          protocol: clarify wl_display.delete_id description
          connection: do not abort when dup(fd) fails
          client: Ignore new requests if display has a fatal error
          client: Don't abort when sending a request fails
          tests: Test that send overflow doesn't abort
          tests: Fix race condition in send overflow test
          tests: Ensure that overflow test always overflows
          event-loop-test: Verify proper timer cancellation
          event-loop-test: Confirm distant timers do not fire
          event-loop: Track timer event sources in userspace
          event-loop-test: Add test to verify timer ordering
    
    Marty E. Plummer (1):
          scanner: prepend protocol name to types symbol
    
    Michael Forney (3):
          Use wl_container_of internally
          Avoid pointer arithmetic on `void *`
          protocol: fix typo in wl_data_offer.set_actions description
    
    Mosè Giordano (1):
          Add $(RT_LIBS) to fixed-benchmark LD dependencies
    
    Pekka Paalanen (2):
          configure.ac: reopen master for regular development
          scanner: include config.h from command line
    
    Scott Anderson (1):
          wayland.xml: Make releases for multiple 'wl_surface.attach' undefined
    
    Simon Ser (22):
          Add releasing.txt
          releasing: adapt for Wayland
          releasing: fixup section numbers
          protocol: allow to send a zero output refresh rate
          client: check event opcode in queue_event
          Update .editorconfig for Python
          Add an automated script to update wl_shm.format
          protocol: add a comment about the wl_shm.format script
          protocol: sync wl_shm.format with libdrm 2.4.99
          server: check global interface on bind
          tests: test that binding to a global with an interface mismatch fails
          protocol: invalid_method is sent on malformed request
          server: add wl_global_set_user_data
          server: add wl_global_remove
          tests: add a test for wl_global_remove
          build: check wayland-scanner version
          Revert "build: check wayland-scanner version"
          meson: use strict wayland-scanner mode
          autotools: use strict wayland-scanner mode
          build: check wayland-scanner version
          protocol: add missing enums for wl_data_device_manager.dnd_action
          build: bump to version 1.17.91 for the alpha release
    
    asynts (1):
          doc: Expand the abbreviation "hw" to "hardware".
    
    orbea (1):
          Add a missing -pthread to fix compile with slibtool.
    
    git tag: 1.17.91
    
  • Wayland 1.18 Alpha Released With Meson Support, Connection Sharing

    Wayland 1.18 is adding Meson build system support so that Autotools can be dropped in a future release, API support for allowing applications and toolkits to share the same Wayland connection, better handling over file descriptors, and wl_global_remove as a new function for mitigating race conditions with globals. There are also various test improvements, improved documentation, and various other fixes and minor improvements.

  • Linux on Embedded Ryzen with Radeon

    American Micro Devices (AMD) has released the Ryzen processors which works very well with Linux. The embedded processor also contains a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) which is an AMD Ryzen Vega.

    The board I am using is the IBase 918f-1605 to install Linux. Linux can be installed from a stock ISO, but the system does not perform as well unless using a special Linux kernel from AMD. It also helps to have the proper GPU driver for performance. Stability is much better with the AMD kernel they provide on their website.

  • Keith Packard Talks About The Early Politics Of X Window System + Code Licensing

    At last week's Linux.Conf.Au conference was an interesting presentation by longtime X developer Keith Packard on the early days of the pre-X.Org X Window System, the collapse of Unix, and how his views formed on copyleft licenses for building thriving communities.

    Keith's LCA 2020 presentation is focused on the X happenings largely during the 80's and very early 90's. Keith's involvement goes back to the 80's during which he was employed at MIT as part of the X Consortium.

  • Keith Packard: lca2020

    I just got back from linux.conf.au 2020 on Saturday and am still adjusting to being home again. I had the opportunity to give three presentations during the conference and wanted to provide links to the slides and videos.

ODF 1.3 approved as OASIS Committee Specification

Filed under
LibO
OOo

OASIS is pleased to announce that Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.3 from the OpenDocument TC has been approved as an OASIS Committee Specification.

The OpenDocument Format is an open XML-based document file format for office applications, to be used for documents containing text, spreadsheets, charts, and graphical elements. OpenDocument Format v1.3 is an update to the international standard Version 1.2, which was approved by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as ISO/IEC 26300 in 2015. OpenDocument Format v1.3 includes improvements for document security, clarifies underspecifications and makes other timely improvements.

The OpenDocument Format specifies the characteristics of an open XML-based application-independent and platform-independent digital document file format, as well as the characteristics of software applications which read, write and process such documents. It is applicable to document authoring, editing, viewing, exchange and archiving, including text documents, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, drawings, charts and similar documents commonly used by personal productivity software applications.

This Committee Specification is an OASIS deliverable, completed and approved by the TC and fully ready for testing and implementation.

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Venturing out

Filed under
KDE

Plasma 5.18 LTS Beta has been released, which brings many exciting new features to a computer near you, especially if you’re upgrading from our previous LTS release, Plasma 5.12. Of course for us developers this now means that a stable git branch has been created and we can work on new stuff on master to eventually become Plasma 5.19, scheduled for an early June 2020 release. This blog post is less about KDE code, though.

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Games: Planetary Sanitations Inc., Terminal Phase, The Humble Europa Universalis IV Bundle and Half-Life

Filed under
Gaming
  • Planetary Sanitations Inc, a free and open source world exploration mecha roguelike

    A game I completely forgot to cover some time ago is Planetary Sanitations Inc., a free and open source roguelike that has you exploring different worlds. As you explore, you piece together a mech unit from various modules, each of which can be destroyed individually.

    Thankfully, even though I forgot about it there was a big update to it recently which popped up in my feed so here we are. It's another game made with Godot Engine, with the source code available up on GitLab. The recent update to it brings in some first steps towards polishing the experience with a proper starting menu and a small tutorial.

  • Terminal Phase, a space shooter you can play in a Terminal window

    Ever wanted to play a space shooter in your Terminal window? Well, now you can with Terminal Phase which was announced recently.

    The developer, Christopher Lemmer Webber, is a name some of you might know as they're involved in the ActivityPub specification and they're the co-founder of GNU MediaGoblin amongst other things. Terminal Phase was actually released as a result of hitting a goal on their Patreon page, funding their work in the free software community.

  • The Humble Europa Universalis IV Bundle is live ready to take your time away

    That's a pretty ridiculously good deal, considering just how much playable content is included with all of that together. As usual though, there's higher tiers as well.

    If you pay more than the average there's also: Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man, Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum, Europa Universalis IV: The Cossacks, Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense and Europa Universalis IV - El Dorado.

  • The original Half-Life games are now free to play until Half-Life: Alyx launches

    Valve have made their original Half-Life titles all the way up to Half-Life 2: Episode Two free to play for a few months.

    This is to build up excitement for their VR-only title, Half-Life: Alyx, which releases in March. Which we still don't know if it will support Linux or not, I'll be speaking to Valve more about that closer to the time. It likely all depends on the state of SteamVR at the time.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

All new Chromebooks will get at least 8 years of automatic updates

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

One of the nice things about buying a Google Chromebook is that the operating system receives automatic security and feature updates delivered straight from Google — which means that it’ll stay up to date years after your Android phone stops receiving official updates.

But up until recently, Google only promised 5 to 6.5 years of updates… which might seem fine if you spend $200 or less on a cheap Chrome OS laptop, but which can be rather frustrating if you drop $999 or more on a premium model.

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today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • Road Map for 2020

    Following the last year's leitmotif of "bridging worlds", we turn our attention to the removal of the hurdles faced by aspiring developers and users. During the annual road-map discussion on our mailing list, we identified four tangible approaches towards that goal. First, making Sculpt OS more user friendly. Second, reinforcing trust in Genode by fostering the framework's high quality. Third, making the tooling around Genode a joy to use. And finally, the illustration of Genode's versatility in the form practical use cases.

  • Genode OS Draws Up 2020 Plans Of USB Audio, A Kernel Written In Ada

    The Genode operating system framework that's been going strong for over a decade and continuing to employ a micro-kernel architecture continues to plan for an interesting future.

    The twelve year old Genode OS open-source project has drawn up an interesting road-map for 2020. Some of their plans for this year include:

    - 64-bit ARM (specifically the i.MX8 SoC) support for its general purpose Sculpt OS operating system.

  • Incentivizing Accessible Design

    When scholars contemplate the legal tools available to policymakers for encouraging innovation, they primarily think about patents. If they are keeping up with the most recent literature, they may also consider grants, prizes, and taxes as means to increase the supply of innovation. But the innovation policy toolkit is substantially deeper than that. To demonstrate its depth, this Article explores the evolution of designs that help people with disabilities access the world around them. From artificial limbs to the modern wheelchair and the reshaping of the built environment, a variety of legal doctrines have influenced, for better and for worse, the pace and direction of innovation for accessible design.

    This Article argues that two of the most important drivers of innovation for accessible design have been social welfare laws and antidiscrimination laws. Both were responsible, in part, for the revolution in accessibility that occurred in the second half of the twentieth century. Unlike standard innovation incentives, however, these laws operate on the “demand side.” Social welfare laws and antidiscrimination laws increase the ability and willingness of parties to pay for accessible technology, ultimately leading to greater supply. But in doing so, these laws generate a different distribution of the costs and benefits of innovation. They also produce their own sets of innovation distortions by allowing third parties to make decisions about the designs that people with disabilities have to use.

    The law can promote innovation, and it can hinder it. The law’s relationship to the wheelchair, the most important accessibility innovation of the twentieth century, produced both results. Policymakers have choices about which legal incentives doctrines they can use and how they can use them. This Article evaluates those tools, and it provides guidelines for their use to encourage accessible technology in particular and innovation generally.

  • Introduction to the Linux terminal commands

    Those of you just beginning to learn the basics of Linux may be interested in a great video published by the YouTube channel Explaining Computers. The Linux Terminal tutorials are aimed at those of you moving from the Microsoft Windows operating system as well as users of the Raspberry Pi mini PC and similar. The 20 minute video covers a range of Linux terminal commands and Linux concepts, including navigating and manipulating drives and directories using the commands pwd, ls, lsblk, cd, mkdir, rmdir, cp, and mv.

    If you would like to play around with the Linux commands but don’t have a Linux system you can also use a terminal emulator. A program that allows the use of the terminal in a graphical environment. Here are some free, commonly-used terminal emulators by operating system : Mac OS X: Terminal (default), iTerm 2 – Windows: PuTTY – Linux: Terminal, KDE Konsole, XTerm

  • How to install Microsoft fonts on Linux
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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GameMode 1.5

  • Feral's GameMode 1.5 Now Supports Changing The CPU Governor Differently For iGPUs

    With Feral's GameMode 1.5 the big change facing users is for those running integrated graphics. In a change led by an Intel open-source graphics driver developer, GameMode now supports setting an alternative CPU frequency scaling governor for integrated graphics use-cases. Up to now GameMode has defaulted to always using the "performance" CPU frequency scaling governor for normally delivering the best performance, but for integrated graphics that in some situations can lead to lower performance. Due to the integrated graphics and CPU cores sharing the same power envelope, ramping up the CPU performance can throw the graphics performance out of balance and at least for some games lead to lower performance. So with GameMode 1.5, the user can now opt for "powersave" or an alternative governor instead when using an iGPU.

  • Feral Interactive's open source 'GameMode' system performance booster has a new release

    Feral Interactive don't just port a lot of games to Linux, they also work on some open source bits here and there. One of their projects is GameMode, which just got a new release. GameMode is a "daemon/lib combo for Linux that allows games to request a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS and/or a game process". In simple terms, it can help ensure your Linux PC is giving the game all it can to run smoothly. Looks like someone new is handling the project too, with Alex Smith having left Feral Interactive.

Mozilla on Privacy Badger, Rust and Digital ID Systems

  • Firefox Extension Spotlight: Privacy Badger

    People can't be expected to understand all of the technically complex ways their online behavior is tracked by hidden entities. As you casually surf the web, there are countless techniques different third party actors use to secretly track your online movement. So how are we supposed to protect our privacy online if we don't even understand how the game works? To help answer this, the good folks at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (a non-profit devoted to defending digital privacy) built Privacy Badger--a browser extension designed to give you highly advanced tracking protection, while requiring you to do nothing more than install it on Firefox. No configuration, no advanced settings, no fuss. Once you have Privacy Badger installed, it automatically scours every website you visit in its relentless hunt for hidden trackers. And when it finds them, blocks them.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 322
  • What could an “Open” ID system look like?: Recommendations and Guardrails for National Biometric ID Projects

    Digital ID systems are increasingly the battlefield where the fight for privacy, security, competition, and social inclusion is playing out. In our ever more connected world, some form of identity is almost always mediating our interactions online and offline. From the corporate giants that dominate our online lives using services like Apple ID and Facebook and Google’s login systems to government IDs which are increasingly required to vote, get access to welfare benefits, loans, pay taxes, get on transportation or access medical care. Part of the push to adopt digital ID comes from the international development community who argue that this is necessary in order to expand access to legal ID. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for “providing legal identity for all, including birth registration” by 2030. Possessing legal identity is increasingly a precondition to accessing basic services and entitlements from both state and private services. For the most marginalised communities, using digital ID systems to access essential services and entitlements from both state and private services are often one of their first interactions with digital technologies. Without these commonly recognized forms of official identification, individuals are at risk of exclusion and denial of services. However, the conflation of digital identity as the same as (or an extension of) “legal identity”, especially by the international development community, has led to an often uncritical embrace of digital ID projects. In this white paper, we survey the landscape around government digital ID projects and biometric systems in particular. We recommend several policy prescriptions and guardrails for these systems, drawing heavily from our experiences in India and Kenya, among other countries. In designing, implementing, and operating digital ID systems, governments must make a series of technical and policy choices. It is these choices that largely determine if an ID system will be empowering or exploitative and exclusionary. While several organizations have published principles around digital identity, too often they don’t act as a meaningful constraint on the relentless push to expand digital identity around the world. In this paper, we propose that openness provides a useful framework to guide and critique these choices and to ensure that identity systems put people first. Specifically, we examine and make recommendations around five elements of openness: multiplicity of choices, decentralization, accountability, inclusion, and participation.

Red Hat/IBM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenShift 4.3 and OpenSCAP

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM POWER9: An open foundation to power intelligent business decisions

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, we unveiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, the next generation of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, which provides the scale, flexibility and innovation to drive enterprise workloads across the hybrid cloud. Even with the advancements across the platform, we recognize that there’s no singular panacea to overcome every unique IT challenge. To meet these needs, Red Hat delivers specialized offerings built around Red Hat Enterprise Linux to address specific hardware, applications and environment requirements, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 continues this strategy with the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM Power Systems (POWER9).

  • OpenShift 4.3: Quay Container Security Integration

    In the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 Web UI Console, we introduced a new Cluster Overview Dashboard as the landing page when users first log in. The dashboard is there to help users resolve issues more efficiently and maintain a healthy cluster. With the latest 4.3 release, we added an image security section to the cluster health dashboard card. This section will appear on the dashboard when the Container Security Operator gets installed.

  • Deploying OpenSCAP on Satellite using Ansible

    In many environments today, security is one of the top priorities. New information security vulnerabilities are discovered regularly, and these incidents can have a significant impact on businesses and their customers. Red Hat customers I talk to are frequently looking for tools they can use to help evaluate and secure their environments. One of these tools is OpenSCAP, which is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and can perform compliance and vulnerability scanning on RHEL servers. Satellite makes OpenSCAP easier to use by allowing you to deploy the OpenSCAP agent to hosts, manage the OpenSCAP policies centrally, and to view OpenSCAP reports from the Satellite web interface.