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Saturday, 23 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A preliminary review of /e/ Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2019 - 6:20am
Story Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2019 - 3:39am
Story Programming: Sublime Text Editor, RcppArmadillo, Django, Python and C Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2019 - 3:36am
Story From Trusty to Bionic - my Ultrabook story Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2019 - 3:33am
Story Fedora: Parental Controls, FPgM, Ambassadors/Translation Sprint, Modularity Test Day and Delays Roy Schestowitz 1 23/03/2019 - 3:30am
Story Software: Avidemux, Cockpit and NVMe VFIO in Linux Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2019 - 3:18am
Story Games: Lutris, Flux Caves, Cities: Skylines Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2019 - 3:05am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2019 - 2:26am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2019 - 10:34pm
Story Best Linux Distributions For Beginners Mohd Sohail 22/03/2019 - 8:38pm

These Are The Top Reasons Why You Should Use Fedora Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Fedora is one of the most famous Linux distros. It has a lot of Amazing features and is powered by Red Hat Linux. However, many people prefer alternatives which are quite easy to operate. Those like Ubuntu is known for its simplicity and easy to use interface. Additionally, Kali Linux is known for its unique pen testing feature. On the other hand, people consider Fedora to be a difficult option because of its complicated user interface. However, we believe that Fedora is one of the most useful Linux distros with an active community. Hence, we have listed the Features And Advantages of Using Fedora Linux.

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R.I.P. mrdocs (1963–2019)

Filed under
Obits

The Scribus Team is deeply saddened to announce the loss of our friend and colleague Peter Linnell who in the end lost his long battle against cancer.

It is no understatement to say that without Peter Scribus wouldn’t be what it is today. It was Peter who spotted the potential of Franz Schmid’s initially humble Python program and, as a pre-press consultant at the time, contacted Franz to make him aware of the necessities of PostScript and PDF support, among other things. Peter also wrote the first version of the Scribus online documentation, which resulted in his nickname “mrdocs” in IRC and elsewhere. Until recently, and despite his detoriating health, Peter continued to be involved in building and releasing new Scribus versions.

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New features in OpenStack Neutron

Filed under
Server

OpenStack is the open source cloud infrastructure software project that provides compute, storage, and networking services for bare-metal, container, and VM workloads. To get a sense of the core functionality and additional services, check out the OpenStack map.
The platform has a modular architecture that works across industry segments because infrastructure operators can choose the components they need to manage their infrastructure in the way that best supports their application workloads. The modules are also pluggable to provide further flexibility and make sure they can be used with a specific storage backend or software-defined networking (SDN) controller.

Neutron is an OpenStack project to provide a de-facto standard REST API to manage and configure networking services and make them available to other components such as Nova.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Full Circle Weekly News #125
  • Why Open19 Designs Matter for Edge Computing [Ed: Openwashing Microsoft without even any source code]

    On the opening day of this year's Data Center World in Phoenix, Yuval Bachar, LinkedIn's principal engineer of data center architecture, was on hand to explain why the social network's Open19 Project will be an important part of data centers' move to the edge.

  • Course Review: Applied Hardware Attacks: Rapid Prototying & Hardware Implants

    Everyone learns in different ways. While Joe is happy to provide as much help as a student needs, his general approach probably caters most to those who learn by doing. Lecture is light and most of the learning happens during the lab segments. He gives enough space that you will make mistakes and fail, but not so badly that you never accomplish your objective. If you read the lab manual carefully, you will find adequate hints to get you in the right direction.

    On the other hand, if you’re a student that wants to site in a classroom and listen to an instructor lecture for the entire time, you are definitely in the wrong place. If you do not work on the labs, you will get very, very, little out of the course.

    The rapid prototyping course is a good introduction to using the 3D printer and pcb mill for hardware purposes, and would be valuable even for those building hardware instead of breaking it. It really opened my eyes to the possibilities of these technologies. On the other hand, I suspect that the hardware implants course has limited application. It’s useful to learn what is possible, but unless you work in secure hardware design or offensive security that would use hardware implants, it’s probably not something directly applicable to your day to day.

  • Nulloy – Music Player with Waveform Progress Bar

    I’ve written a lot about multimedia software including a wide range of music players, some built with web-technologies, others using popular widget toolkits like Qt and GTK.

    I want to look at another music player today. You may not have heard of this one, as development stalled for a few years. But it’s still under development, and it offers some interesting features. It’s called Nulloy.

    The software is written in the C++ programming language, with the user interface using the Qt widget toolkit. It’s first release was back in 2011.

  • A Complete List of Google Drive Clients for Linux

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

SmartArt and Contributors to LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO
  • SmartArt improvements in LibreOffice, part 4

    I recently dived into the SmartArt support of LibreOffice, which is the component responsible for displaying complex diagrams from PPTX. I focus on the case when only the document model and the layout constraints are given, not a pre-rendered result.

    First, thanks to our partner SUSE for working with Collabora to make this possible.

  • Things to know if you are a new contributor to LibreOffice code

    When I began contributing code to LibreOffice, I faced some issues because I didn't know several facts that the other active contributors knew. This blog post summarizes some of those facts, and I hope it will be useful for other new contributors!

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • How CYBG is increasingly running 'as-a-service' with Red Hat

    British banking group CYBG, which encompasses Clydesdale Bank, Yorkshire Bank, B, and Virgin Money, has turned to Red Hat to unify its digital banking systems under a single platform, which the organisation hopes will help it better roll out changes across brands.

    Speaking with Computerworld UK, Fraser Ingram, the interim COO at CYBG explained how the open source Linux vendor underpins the bank's modern platform-as-a-service (PaaS) approach to delivering consistent digital experiences across its brands, all starting with its digital-only brand B.

  • A Self-Hosted Global Load Balancer for OpenShift

    This is the fifth installment on a series of blog posts related to deploying OpenShift in multi-cluster configurations.

    In the first two posts (part 1 and part 2), we explored how to create a network tunnel between multiple clusters.

    In the third post, it was demonstrated how to deploy Istio multicluster across multiple clusters and how to deploy the popular bookinfo application in this multiple cluster-spanning mesh.

    In the fourth installment, we showed further improvement by adding Federation V2 to the mix to help propagate federated resources across multiple clusters.

    In each of the previous implementations, we ignored how to channel traffic between each of the federated clusters.

    In a previously published article, it was described how to build a global load balancer to balance traffic across multiple OpenShift clusters.

    In this post, we will implement that architecture, building upon the concepts from the last four posts. We will also see how it is possible to host the global load balancer in the federated clusters themselves, achieving a self-hosted global load balancer.

  • Fedora Security Lab

    The Fedora Security Lab was released as part of the Fedora 30 Candidate Beta cycle.

  • Fedora 29 : Testing the dnf python module.
  • FAS username search in Fedora Happiness Packets

Linux Foundation: CI/CD Gets Governance and Standardization, Microsoft-Connected CommunityBridge, and DataPractices.Org

Filed under
Linux
Server
  • CI/CD Gets Governance and Standardization

    Kubernetes, microservices and the advent of cloud native deployments have created a Renaissance-era in computing. As developers write and deploy code as part of continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) production processes, an explosion of tools has emerged for CI/CD processes, often targeted for cloud native deployments.

  • CommunityBridge by the Linux Foundation: Digging In

    As such, the Linux Foundation has produced an environment across their projects and events in which independent discussion and development can happen. Is it perfect, no, but nothing is. What I do know is that we wouldn’t be where we are today with open source if the Linux Foundation hadn’t helped facilitate a lot of this.

    As such, CommunityBridge seems like an entirely logical next step. The only way we can grow to serve the broader ecosystem is to not just help the big-ticket projects like Kubernetes, but also the long-tail of projects too. A clear, featureful platform will pay dividends here in the broader success of open source.

    Now, this isn’t going to be a walk in the park. For CommunityBridge to succeed, it needs to be informed and guided by the broader community. The Linux Foundation can’t possibly have all the answers, none of us do. They are have been open in expressing their receptiveness to feedback, and it is important that projects provide it. This will ensure that CommunityBridge shapes the most critical needs in the open source ecosystem.

  • DataPractices.Org Becomes a Linux Foundation Project

    “By joining forces with the Linux Foundation, we are inviting the broader community to help datapractices.org evolve,” said Brett Hurt, co-founder and CEO of data.world. “This is the collective knowledge of a group of experts that can, and should, continue to be refined by those closest to the effective, modern, and ethical use of data.”

Xfce Screensaver 0.1.4 Released and the GNOME Metered Data Survey

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • Xfce Screensaver 0.1.4 Released

    Featuring numerous performance improvements and an improved low-power resource footprint, Xfce Screensaver 0.1.4 continues to improve screen locking on Xfce.

  • Tether Often? Take the GNOME Metered Data Survey

    In some parts of the world (even here in Blighty) many internet packages come with a usage limit, traffic shaping or “data cap”. For many, myself included these restrictions are part and parcel of going online.

    I often tether my Ubuntu laptop to my (data-capped) mobile internet, mostly when if i’m working from a cafe with a dodgy or insecure network.

    Using a computer with a data limit certainly affects the way you use it, the websites you access (and how long they stay open), the apps you run (or have running in the background), and so on.

    Overage charges can be costly. Traffic slowdowns often inopportune. Nixed connections the absolute worst.

Firefox 66 Is Now Available for Ubuntu 18.10, 18.04 LTS, and 16.04 LTS Users

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Released earlier this week, the Mozilla Firefox 66 web browser has landed in Ubuntu's repositories with a bunch of great improvements, such as the hidden system title bar that respects the GNOME guidelines. Not only Firefox will now look good, but you won't have two title bars, nor you'll have to use extensions to get rid of one.

Apart from the looks for GNOME users, which is now the default desktop environment on Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), Mozilla Firefox 66 comes with various under the hood improvements, such as freezeless downloading of files and faster web content loading by reducing the crash rates and increasing the processes from 4 to 8.

Read more

A Quick Look At The Firefox 66.0 vs. Chrome 73.0 Performance Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recent releases of Chrome 73 and Firefox 66, here are some fresh tests of these latest browsers on Linux under a variety of popular browser benchmarks.

This initial round of testing was done on the latest of Intel's Clear Linux with a Core i9 9900K and Radeon RX Vega 56 graphics card. Originally the intent was to look at the performance of Clear Linux's default Firefox build compared to the upstream Firefox x86_64 Linux binary to see how the performance differed or if any Clear optimizations paid off there. In this particular instance, Clear Linux's Firefox build and that of the upstream/generic Firefox Linux binary basically came down to the same. As a follow-up though will be tests of Firefox/Chrome running on Clear Linux against the likes of Ubuntu to see if the underlying operating system changes yield any performance difference.

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Gaming: DeviluitionX, Walmart, Stadia, Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, Baba Is You, Epic, We. The Revolution and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • DeviluitionX: Enjoying The 23 Year Old Diablo Game Atop An Open-Source Engine

    The latest open-source game engine project working to re-implement a legendary commercial game is DeviluitionX. This new effort is an open-source re-implementation of Blizzard's Diablo game from 1996 while now working on Linux and other operating systems nicely.

    The DeviluitionX effort has already reached "a fully playable state on Linux / macOS / Windows, with only minor issues remaining." DeviluitionX does require the game assets from the official Diablo release, which is now available easily from GOG.com following the recent Diablo release on that DRM-free platform.

  • Walmart Is Planning Its Own Gaming Streaming Service: Report

    Google recently entered the $140 billion gaming industry by launching Stadia, a cloud-gaming service. The company garnered a lot of attention from tech enthusiasts as it showcased the service that supports 4K resolutions and gaming at 60fps.

  • Exclusive: Walmart is Talking to Developers and Publishers About a Potential Streaming Service

    Google made headlines this week when it announced its arrival into the video game space with a new streaming venture called Stadia. But according to sources, another major corporation is investigating the video game streaming business too, and it's none other than Walmart.

    Multiple sources familiar with Walmart's plans, who wish to remain anonymous, confirmed to USG that the retail giant is exploring its own platform to enter in the now-competitive video game streaming race. No other details were revealed other than it will be a streaming service for video games, and that Walmart has been speaking with developers and publishers since earlier this year and throughout this year's Game Developers Conference.

  • Google Has Killed 147 Projects, Will Stadia Join Them?
  • In Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, music is your weapon and it's coming to Linux

    One Kickstarter I completely missed is Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, a musical themed quirky RPG where music is your weapon. The campaign is over and it managed to smash the funding goal, with Linux noted as a release platform.

    Based on the Deathbulge comic from Dan Martin (who is involved too of course in this), over two thousand backers pledged their support to give the developers just under sixty thousand dollars to bring the game to life. It smashed some stretch goals, including bringing in guest artists and having more character classes.

  • Baba Is You is an excellent rule-breaking puzzle game, some thoughts

    Baba Is You, a recent puzzle game release from Hempuli Oy offers a pretty different take on the genre and I have some thoughts. Note: My key was provided by the developer directly. Also, likely spoilers contained within.

    Baba is honestly like no other puzzle game I can think of, one where you are literally changing the rules of the game to progress through each level and it's a magical experience. Truthfully, I thought it would be quite a simple game considering the mechanics but I've been massively surprised overall.

  • Epic Games new 'Epic Online Services' will support Linux and it's free for developers to use

    Building upon the work they've done with Fortnite, it's going to offer support for: Parties, an in-game Overlay, Matchmaking, Player reports, Achievements, leaderboards, stats and so on. Don't get too excited though, as right now it's only offering Game analytics (telemetry about players) and a support ticket system with everything else "Coming soon".

  • We. The Revolution sounds pretty awesome and it's out now

    Set in the blood-soaked and paranoid world of the French Revolution, We. The Revolution from Polyslash is officially out with Linux support.

    As much as I wanted to have some thoughts on it, given how incredibly interesting it sounds, I can't. GOG's Linux team sent over a copy but I'm not quite sure what's going on with the GOG release at this point. It advertises Linux support yet it has no Linux download even though supposed to have one, so there's some kind of delay on GOG's side with it. Update: Now actually live on GOG too.

  • 2D indie platformer fighter 'Super Powered Battle Friends' looks interesting in the new trailer

    One thing we don't have enough of on Linux, is good platform fighting games and Super Powered Battle Friends is looking pretty good.

    Last time I wrote about it, there wasn't an official trailer to properly show it off.

  • CodeWeavers have released CrossOver 18.5 pulling in Wine 4.0 and FAudio

    For those who want to help with Wine development without contributing code, CodeWeavers host the Wine project and contribute to its development along with their own CrossOver product.

Programming: Qt, Python, Rust, C++, C and Git

Filed under
Development
  • Effective HMI interaction and safety attention monitoring using eye tracking technology: DeepGlance Quick

    Interacting effectively with increasingly widespread and advanced systems is one of the most important challenges of our time. Most modern HMIs are based on mouse, keyboard or touch screen and allow controlling even very complex devices in a simple and intuitive way. However, in certain contexts, the user may be unable to have direct contact with a device, in this case, we are talking about hands-free interactions and often voice commands are used to interact. But controlling a system by voice, however natural, is not effective for all types of operations and in all environments. In fact, every technology has its peculiarities, that’s why the HMI design and the UX are the subject of continuous research and aim to offer increasingly effective and natural interaction methods, also thanks to the combined use of more complementary technologies between them.

  • Seven ways to improve your team’s Python

    If you’re a manager, then you’re always trying to find ways that’ll help your team do more in less time. That’s why you use Python — because it makes your developers more productive. They can spend more time creating new features, and less time debugging or maintaining existing code. It’s no surprise that so many companies are moving to Python.

    After you’ve moved to Python, you can still make your team more effective. That is, your organization can become more productive, combining technology and culture to help your developers improve. In such a scenario, everyone wins: Your company becomes more efficient and effective, and your team members are more satisfied.

  • Rust All Hands 2019: Array iterators, Rayon, and more

    A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of attending the second annual Rust All Hands meeting, hosted by Mozilla at their Berlin office. The attendees were a mix of volunteers and corporate employees covering the full range of Rust development, including the compiler, language, libraries, docs, tools, operations, and community. Although I’m sure there will be an official summary of the meeting (like last year’s), in this article, I’ll cover a few things I was directly involved in. First, I’ll look at a feature many developers have wanted for a long time…

  • GCC 9 libstdc++ Lands The C++17 Parallel Algorithms Implementation From Intel

    While the release of GCC 9 (v9.1) is just a few weeks ago, a late addition to this annual compiler collection update is its C++ standard library now having a C++17 parallel algorithms implementation thanks to Intel developers.

    Intel has been working on contributing their C++17 parallel algorithms library code to both GCC and also to the LLVM project. Intel has been working on this Parallel STL implementation the past few years with a focus on contributing the support to the libc++ and libstdc++ C++ standard libraries. The Parallel STL is a portable implementation of threaded/vectorized execution of standard C++ algorithms, which can equate to a performance win on today's multi-core systems.

  • Linux C Programming Tutorial Part 14 - Bitwise operators practical examples
  • Tutorial: Introduction to Git and Github

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

How to save time with TiDB

Filed under
OSS

Last November, I wrote about key differences between MySQL and TiDB, an open source-compatible, cloud-based database engine, from the perspective of scaling both solutions in the cloud. In this follow-up article, I'll dive deeper into the ways TiDB streamlines and simplifies administration.

If you come from a MySQL background, you may be used to doing a lot of manual tasks that are either not required or much simpler with TiDB.

The inspiration for TiDB came from the founders managing sharded MySQL at scale at some of China's largest internet companies. Since requirements for operating a large system at scale are a key concern, I'll look at some typical MySQL database administrator (DBA) tasks and how they translate to TiDB.

Read more

Security: Updates, Windows, Medtronic and FUD

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Norwegian firm attack likely through Microsoft Active Directory: claim

    The Windows network at the Norwegian aluminium maker Norsk Hydro was probably infiltrated by attackers who planted the LockerGoga ransomware using something like scheduled tasks or services in Microsoft's Active Directory, a British security expert says.

  • Microsoft starts notifying Windows 7 users about end of support

    Microsoft’s end of support date means that Windows 7 users will no longer receive security updates, and the company wants consumers to upgrade to Windows 10 PCs instead. While the notification doesn’t mention Windows 10, Microsoft links to a new Windows 7 site that encourages consumers to upgrade their PCs.

  • Critical flaw lets [attackers] control lifesaving devices implanted inside patients

    The federal government on Thursday warned of a serious flaw in Medtronic cardio defibrillators that allows attackers to use radio communications to surreptitiously take full control of the lifesaving devices after they are implanted in a patient.

    Defibrillators are small, surgically implanted devices that deliver electrical shocks to treat potentially fatal irregular heart rhythms. In recent decades, doctors have increasingly used radios to monitor and adjust the devices once they're implanted rather than using older, costlier, and more invasive means. An array of implanted cardio defibrillators made by Medtronic rely on two types of radio-based consoles for initial setup, periodic maintenance, and regular monitoring. Doctors use the company's CareLink Programmer in clinics, while patients use the MyCareLink Monitor in homes to regularly ensure the defibrillators are working properly.

  • New vulnerability reporting platform aims to make open source safer [Ed: Ad disguised as an article for firm that works with Microsoft and never speaks about back doors in proprietary software]
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More in Tux Machines

Events: SREcon19 Americas, Scale, FudCon and Snapcraft Summit Montreal

  • SREcon19 Americas Talk Resources
    At SREcon19 Americas, I gave a talk called "Operating within Normal Parameters: Monitoring Kubernetes". Here's some links and resources related to my talk, for your reference.
  • Participating at #Scale17x
    Everytime somebody asks me about Scale I can only think of the same: Scale is the most important community lead conference in North America and it only gets better by the years. This year it celebrated its seventeenth edition and it just struck me: with me being there this year, there have been more Scales I have attended than I have not. This is my nineth conference out of 17. The first time that I attended it was 2011, it was the edition followed by FudCon Tempe 2010 which happened to be my first Fedora conference and it was also the first time I got to meet some contributors that I had previously collaborated with, many of which I still consider my brothers. As for this time, I almost didn’t make it as my visa renewal was resolved on Friday’s noon, one day after the conference started. I recovered it that same day and book a flight in the night. I couldn’t find anything to LAX -as I regularly fly- so I had to fly to Tijuana and from there I borrowed a cart to Pasadena. Long story short: I arrived around 1:30 AM on Saturday.
  • Snapcraft Summit Montreal
    Snapcraft is the universal app store for Linux that reaches millions of users and devices and serves millions of app installs a month. The Snapcraft Summit is a forward-thinking software workshop attended by major software vendors, community contributors and Snapcraft engineers working at every level of the stack.

today's howtos

Draw On Your Screen with this Neat GNOME Shell Extension

Ever wish you could draw on the Linux desktop or write on the screen? Well, there’s a new GNOME Shell extension that lets you do exactly that: draw on the Linux desktop. You may want to point out a bug, highlight a feature, or provide some guidance to someone else by sending them an annotated screenshot. In this short post we’ll show you how to install the add-on and how to use it. Read more

Fedora 31 Preparing To Start Removing Packages Depending Upon Python 2

Python 2 support will formally reach end-of-life on 1 January 2020 and Fedora 31 is preparing for that by working to drop packages (or parts of packages) that depend upon Python 2. Fedora has been pushing for a Python 2 to Python 3 migration for many cycles now -- as most Linux distributions have -- while with Fedora 31 they are planning a "mass Python 2 package removal" if necessary. They are planning to closely track the state of packages depending upon Python 2 to either drop the packages or allow packagers to easily abandon Python 2 parts of programs. Read more