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Tuesday, 12 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Turi as FOSS Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2017 - 10:18am
Story Security: Patch Management, Windows Keyloggers, and Fingerprinting MySQL Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2017 - 10:17am
Story Linux on Devices: Ataribox and More Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2017 - 9:05am
Story Server/Back End: Orange, Oracle, Docker Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2017 - 8:38am
Story BlackArch Linux Ethical Hacking OS Gets Linux Kernel 4.14.4, Updated Installer Rianne Schestowitz 12/12/2017 - 8:02am
Story System76 Enables HiDPI Support on All of Their Linux Laptops and Desktops Rianne Schestowitz 12/12/2017 - 8:01am
Story Mint 18.3: The best Linux desktop takes big steps forward Rianne Schestowitz 12/12/2017 - 7:58am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2017 - 6:39am
Story Security: NSA, Microsoft Debacles, and FOSS Updates Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2017 - 10:48pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2017 - 10:46pm

KDE: Randa Meetings and KDE Edu Sprint 2017

Filed under
KDE
  • Looking Back at Randa Meetings 2017: Accessibility for Everyone

    Randa Meetings are a yearly collection of KDE Community contributor sprints that take place in Randa, Switzerland. With origins dating back to a Plasma meeting in 2009, Randa is one of the most important developer-related events in the community.

  • KDE Edu Sprint 2017

    Two months ago I attended to KDE Edu Sprint 2017 at Berlin. It was my first KDE sprint (really, I send code to KDE software since 2010 and never went to a sprint!) so I was really excited for the event.

    KDE Edu is the an umbrella for specific educational software of KDE. There are a lot of them and it is the main educational software suite in free software world. Despite it, KDE Edu has received little attention in organization side, for instance the previous KDE Edu sprint occurred several years ago, our website has some problems, and more.

    Therefore, this sprint was an opportunity not only for developers work in software development, but for works in organization side as well.

    In organization work side, we discuss about the rebranding of some software more related to university work than for “education” itself, like Cantor and Labplot. There was a wish to create something like a KDE Research/Science in order to put software like them and others like Kile and KBibTex in a same umbrella. There is a discussion about this theme.

Programming/Development: fwupd, LLVM and More

Filed under
Development
  • CSR devices now supported in fwupd

    The BlueCore CSR chips are used everywhere. If you have a “wireless” speaker or headphones that uses Bluetooth there is a high probability that it’s using a CSR chip inside. This makes the addition of CSR support into fwupd a big deal to access a lot of vendors. It’s a lot easier to say “just upload firmware” rather than “you have to write code” so I think it’s useful to have done this work.

  • Skylake Server Scheduler Model Updated In LLVM 6.0 Along With Other Intel CPU Updates
  • Most Software Code Will Be Written By Machines By 2040, Researchers Predict

    Imagine a scenario where a programmer needs to follow a couple of tried and tested procedures to write code that becomes a part of a bigger program that needs some insightful contribution from another programmer. So, is the first programmer really needed? Can’t we find a robotic replacement for the same?

    In the past, GitHub CEO had already made a prediction which says that future of coding is no coding at all. A similar speculation has been made by the researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, who have said that machines will write most of their own code by 2040.

  • Hazelcast joins Eclipse, JCache is key focal point

    Open source In-Memory Data Grid (IMDG) company Hazelcast has joined the Eclipse Foundation – and it has done so for a reason.

    Hazelcast’s primary focus will be on JCache the Eclipse MicroProfile and EE4J.

    In particular, Hazelcast will be collaborating with members to popularize JCache, a Java Specification Request (JSR-107).

    So what place does JCache fill in the universe then?

Software: Darktable, VLC, Mesa, Audacity, Toplip, GNUstep

Filed under
Software
  • Darktable 2.4-RC1 Rolls Out With Windows Support, OpenCL Improvements

    The open-source Darktable RAW photography software that's long been available for Linux and macOS has finally been ported to Microsoft Windows. But fortunately that's not all to be found in Darktable 2.4.

    While Windows support is their big headline feature of Darktable 2.4, the RC1 release that came out today is also packed with other improvements.

  • Linux Release Roundup: VLC, Mesa, Audacity + More

    Another week has flown by, making it time for another round-up of pertinent Linux app releases that didn’t manage to wangle a full post’s worth of waffle on this site.

    This week’s crop of curios includes updates to the world’s most popular open-source video player, the world’s most popular open-source audio editor, and the world’s most popular open-source graphics drivers.

  • Toplip – A Very Strong File Encryption And Decryption CLI Utility

    There are numerous file encryption tools available on the market to protect your files. We have already reviewed some encryption tools such as Cryptomater, Cryptkeeper, CryptGo, Cryptr, Tomb, and GnuPG etc. Today, we will be discussing yet another file encryption and decryption command line utility named “Toplip”. It is a free and open source encryption utility that uses a very strong encryption method called AES256, along with an XTS-AES design to safeguard your confidential data. Also, it uses Scrypt, a password-based key derivation function, to protect your passphrases against brute-force attacks.

  • GNUstep Takes Another Step Forward For Implementing Apple's Cocoa Frameworks

    GNUstep is the long-standing free software project working to implement Apple's Cocoa Objective-C frameworks used by macOS. The GNU project has made new releases of their GUI and Back libraries.

    GNUstep GUI 0.26 is out this morning as the latest update to their graphical user-interface library. GNUstep GUI 0.26 has a number of compatibility improvements, translation updates, mouse tracking logic improvements, bug fixes, and other work.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Games: The Last Wind Monk, Haque, Super Night Riders, Bad Pad

Filed under
Gaming

Is PowerTop / TLP Still Useful To Save Power On Linux Laptops?

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This system was running Ubuntu 17.10 and the configurations tested included:

- Ubuntu 17.10 in a "stock" or "out of the box" experience when using its Linux 4.13 kernel, GNOME Shell 3.26.1 with Wayland, and Mesa 17.2.2 atop an EXT4 file-system.

- Upgrading the Ubuntu 17.10 system to Linux 4.15 Git for showing the power consumption when using the very latest kernel cycle.

- This Ubuntu 17.10 + Linux 4.15 system then with Intel PowerTop installed and changing all the tunables to their "good" values for maximum power-savings.

- Installing TLP and using its default power-saving options.

Read more

Linux 4.15 I/O Scheduler Tests: BFQ, CFQ, Kyber

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

With some BFQ performance fixes included as part of Linux 4.15 along with other I/O scheduler work and block improvements for this latest Linux kernel series, here are some fresh benchmarks of the different I/O scheduler options using the Linux 4.15 Git kernel.

Read more

Ataribox Pre-Orders Begin on December 14

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Gaming

The company behind the new games machine revealed the pre-order date in a (now deleted) Facebook post. It later uploaded an image teasing the date ‘14.12.17’ (pictured above).

Users will be able to “pre-order” the Ataribox through IndieGoGo, where the price for the console is expected to be start somewhere around the $299 mark.

Read more

Ubuntu Devs Work on Demoting Python 2 to "Universe" Repo for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Matthias Klose informed the Ubuntu community in a mailing list announcement last week that getting the Python 2 interpreter demoted from Ubuntu has been an ongoing task for the last few releases, and that Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) is the first to ship with a Desktop ISO image that doesn't contain Python2.

However, the next step for them is to prepare to move the Python 2 packages to the "universe" repository in the next few months before the release of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system in April 2018. While Python 2 will be supported for only two more years, Ubuntu 18.04 is an LTS (Long Term Support) release supported for five years, until 2023.

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SysAdmins and Kernel Developers Advance Linux Skills with LiFT

Filed under
Linux

The annual Linux Foundation Training (LiFT) Scholarships provide advanced open source training to existing and aspiring IT professionals from all over the world. Twenty-seven recipients received scholarships this year – the highest number ever awarded by the Foundation. Scholarship recipients receive a Linux Foundation training course and certification exam at no cost.

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New Antivirus Live CD Release Is Out Now Based on 4MLinux 24.0 and ClamAV 0.99.2

Filed under
Linux

Every time a new major 4MLinux release is being prepped, Antivirus Live CD gets updated with the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source components that have been included in the respective 4MLinux release. As such, Antivirus Live CD 24.0-0.99.2 is based on 4MLinux 24.0 and ClamAV 0.99.2 open-source antivirus software toolkit.

"Antivirus Live CD is an official 4MLinux fork including the ClamAV scanner. It's designed for users who need a lightweight live CD, which will help them to protect their computers against viruses," said Zbigniew Konojacki in the release announcement‏. "The latest version 24.0-0.99.2 is based on 4MLinux 24.0 and ClamAV 0.99.2."

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LibreOffice 6.0 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed, Along with KDE Apps 17.12

Filed under
LibO

A total of six snapshots have been released to the public this month, as OpenSuSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger announced this past weekend, and they brought lots of goodies, along with some of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software components. But first, there's been a bunch of more python2->python3 conversions lately that you should know about.

"For the ones that don’t know yet, the python2 -> python3 switches are especially of interest to SLE/Leap 15," said Dominique Leuenberger. "Minimizing the support surface for Python 2 in favor of Python 3 will lead to a much stronger, supportable product for the future. As Tumbleweed is the leading and trendsetting product, it is but natural that we get those changes as well."

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Linux Kernel 5.0 is Coming in the Summer of 2018

Filed under
News

Linus Torvalds reveals the silly reason about why there will be a Linux Kernel 5 hopefully in the summer of 2018. He also discusses the need for new Linux Kernel maintainers.
Read more

Linux: 4.14.5, 4.9.68, 4.4.105, and 3.18.87

Filed under
Linux

Dedoimedo interviews: Tuxmachines

Filed under
Interviews

Dedoimedo prowls the many corners of the Web, searching for textogenic faces for a fresh new interview. Truth to be told, finding the candidate for today's slot wasn't too difficult. Roy Schestowitz is a familiar name round the Tux block. Nowadays, you will most likely find him on tuxmachines.org, a community-driven news site.

News aggregation can be tricky; finding the right balance of quality content isn't easy, but even with the relatively recent change of ownership, tuxmachines marches on with solid consistency, ardently trying to offer its readers the best the open-source world has to report. I have always been a great fan and supporter, and I approached Roy for an interview. He agreed.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software, Howtos, and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
HowTos

Distributions: Debian, Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • MX-17 Release Candidate 1 now available

    MX-17 RC1 images are now available for download.

  • Debian 8.10 and Debian 9.3 released - CDs and DVDs published
  • “Rock Solid” Debian 9.3 And “Lightweight” Bodhi Linux 4.4.0 Available — Download Here

    In early 2017, the Debian Release team pushed Debian 9.0 “stretch” release, which would remain supported for the next 5 years. Named after Toy Story’s rubber toy octopus, this release has just witnessed its third update in the form of Debian 9.3 (release notes).

    As expected, Debian “stretch” 9.3 ships with tons of security patches and fixes for some serious issues. Prior to this release, on various instances, security advisories for different issues have already been released.

  • 3rd Ubucon Europe 2018

    Yes! A new edition for ubunteros around the world!

  • HiDPI is Released!  Work on Initial Setup continues and the TryPopOS contest

    You can now plug in a LoDPI external display to your Galago Pro or you HiDPI Oryx, Serval, or Bonobo and expect it to just work.  The same is true when plugging a HiDPI display into any other System76 laptop.  No more complicated tricks every time you plug a second monitor in.

  • System76 Rolls Out Its New HiDPI Daemon

    Linux system vendor System76 has released their new HiDPI daemon for their laptops and desktops to improving the display experience on multi-monitor configurations.

    This HiDPI daemon is geared for offering a better display experience when using both HiDPI and lower DPI displays, e.g. a HiDPI laptop display paired with a lower resolution external monitor, a desktop with multiple monitors of varying resolutions, etc.

    Their HiDPI experience is built around X.Org for now until Wayland is mature and is tested for Intel/NVIDIA graphics given those are the GPUs they are mostly shipping at this point. This daemon will listen for monitor plug/unplug events and then configure the HiDPI/LoDPI experience accordingly, allow you to switch displays between different modes if the application in use doesn't support HiDPI properly, etc.

  • What’s New in Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon Edition

    Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon edition is the latest release of Linux Mint 18 series features Cinnamon Desktop 3.6 as default desktop environment. Cinnamon 3.6 is the largest and most important part of the Linux Mint 18.3 release. It includes loads of improvements, new features and bug fixes.

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More in Tux Machines

Systemd, Devuan, and Debian; FOSS at the Back End

  • Systemd, Devuan, and Debian
  • Devuan ASCII sprint -- 15-16-17 Dec. 2017
  • This open-source, multicloud serverless framework claims faster-than-bare-metal speed
    The move toward fast, serverless computing technology got a boost this month from Iguazio Systems Ltd. The data platform company (named from the Iguazu waterfalls in South America) announced the release of Nuclio, an open-source, multicloud serverless framework that claims faster-than-bare-metal speed. “We provide one platform, all the data services that Amazon has, or at least the ones that are interesting, serverless functions, which are 100 times faster, and a few more tricks that they don’t have,” said Yaron Haviv (pictured), founder and chief technology officer of Iguazio Systems. “We do fewer services, but each one kicks ass; each one is much faster and better engineered.”
  • CORD Says It’s the De Facto Choice for Edge Computing
    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) today released 4.1 of its Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD) code. CORD has only been around as an independent project within ONF for about a year and a half, but with this release a couple of things have gelled for the project. First, it has merged its residential-CORD, mobile-CORD, and enterprise-CORD into one overarching project. Secondly, the ONF has realized CORD’s relevance in edge computing and edge cloud data centers.

Graphics: AMD, Mesa, VESA and More

  • AMD Moving Forward In Their RadeonSI Support For ARB_gl_spirv
    AMD open-source developer Nicolai Hähnle has spent the past few months working on the ARB_gl_spirv extension as mandated by OpenGL 4.6. Some of the prep work for supporting that extension has landed in Mesa 17.4-dev Git. ARB_gl_spirv is about bringing SPIR-V support to OpenGL drivers, the IR shared by Vulkan and OpenCL 2.1+. ARB_gl_spirv allows for loading SPIR-V modules into OpenGL programs and allows for GLSL to be a source language in creating SPIR-V modules. This is basically for creating better interoperability between OpenGL and Vulkan/SPIR-V.
  • Mesa Glthread Gets Adds Another Game, AMDGPU Winsys Gets Performance Workaround
    This week has started off to being another busy time in Mesa Git just ahead of the holidays. First up, Mount & Blade: Warband is the latest game to be white-listed by the Mesa glthread functionality for enabling OpenGL threading on this Steam Linux game. Mount & Blade: Warband was actually whitelisted back in July but then disabled a few days later as it turned out not to be working.
  • VESA Rolls Out DisplayHDR As Its Latest Standard
    VESA has rolled out DisplayHDR 1.0 as its newest standard. As implied by the name, the standard is in regards to specifying HDR (High Dynamic Range) quality for displays.
  • VC5 OpenGL & Vulkan Driver Advancing
    Broadcom developer Eric Anholt has offered an update on the state of the VC5 Gallium3D driver for OpenGL support as well as the work being done on the "BCMV" Vulkan driver. Additionally, the VC4 Gallium3D driver for existing Raspberry Pi devices continues to get better.
  • Initial Tessellation Shader Support For RadeonSI NIR
    The RadeonSI Gallium3D driver's NIR back-end is moving one step closer to feature parity with the existing OpenGL capabilities of this AMD GCN graphics driver. Timothy Arceri working for Valve has been focusing on the NIR back-end recently for RadeonSI. This NIR intermediate representation handling is being driven in order to add SPIR-V ingestion support to RadeonSI with code sharing for RADV's existing NIR-based infrastructure.

Games: Rocket League, Ultimate Trivia Challenge, Grass Cutter, Hyper Knights: Battles, Opus Magnum

If You're Ready for Arch, ArchMerge Eases the Way

Newcomer ArchMerge Linux offers a big change for the better to those switching from the Debian Linux lineage to the Arch Linux infrastructure. ArchMerge Linux is a recent spinoff of ArchLabs Linux. I recently reviewed Archlabs and found it to be a step up from most Arch Linux offerings in terms of installation and usability. Arch Linux distros, in general, are notorious for their challenging installation and software management processes. ArchMerge Linux brings a few extra ingredients that make trying it well worth your while if you want to consider migrating to the Arch Linux platform. Still, no Arch Linux distro is a suitable starting point for Linux newcomers. That reality does not change with ArchMerge, although it helps ease the process considerably for those who are ready for it. Read more