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Thursday, 20 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 10:21am
Story Why Security Distributions Use Debian Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 10:07am
Story How to incorporate open source into computer science classes Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 10:04am
Story Systemd – Progress Through Complexity Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 10:03am
Story Bodhi 2.3.0 beta Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 9:54am
Story Clear Linux Now Powered by Kernel 4.8.1, Adds Wayland 1.12, GNOME 3.22 & Vim 8.0 Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 9:52am
Story Tiny OpenWRT WiFi module updated in $12 and $4 versions Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 9:49am
Story 3 Twitter clients for the Linux command line Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 9:03am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 5:00am
Story ‘Why Use Linux?’ Answered In 3 Short Words Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 1:56am

Linux/FOSS Events

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GParted 0.27.0 Open-Source Partition Editor Is Out with GRUB2 core.img Detection

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Today, October 19, 2016, GParted and GParted Live developer Curtis Gedak proudly announced the release of the GParted 0.27.0 open-source partition editor software.

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Linux Kernel 3.12.65 LTS Released with Updated Wireless Drivers, PowerPC Fixes

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Today, October 19, 2016, Linux kernel maintainer Jiri Slaby announced the release and immediate availability for download of the sixty-fifth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 3.12 kernel series.

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Linux Foundation:Blockchain and ONF/ONOS

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  • Blockchain technology can help save the lives of millions of refugees by giving them a verified identity

    What if you had no proof of who you are? What would you do when the bank manager asked for ID when you tried to open an account or when the hospital asked for your documentation?

    You wouldn’t be able to function, at least not easily. Billions face this problem internationally, but now blockchain technology is helping those with no paper proof of existence get the same services as those with “official” identification.

  • Open Networking Foundation and ON.Lab Merge

    As Software Defined Networking (SDN) has matured from just being a theoretical concept to a production reality, consolidation is now happening in SDN advocacy efforts as well. Today the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) and ON.Lab announced that they would be merging, bringing the two groups' SDN efforts under one umbrella organization.


    There is also a connection between ONF and the Linux Foundation, with the ONOS and CORD projects led by ON.Lab. Parulkar said that with the ONF merger, the ONOS and CORD boards and governance will continue unchanged and they will continue to be Linux Foundation Collaborative projects.

  • ONF to Merge With On.Lab

    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is merging with On.Lab, creating one entity that will curate standards such as OpenFlow while developing software projects such as ONOS and the Central Office Re-Imagined as a Datacenter (CORD).

NethServer 7 RC1 Replaces Snort with Suricata, Adds Deep Packet Inspection

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Red Hat

The development of the CentOS-based, server-oriented NethServer 7 operating system continues, and today, October 19, 2016, Alessio Fattorini informed Softpedia about the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) version.

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Linux Kernel News

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  • Linux 4.9 Is Showing Some Performance Improvements On A Core i7 6800K

    Now that Linux 4.9-rc1 is out, it's onward to testing this new Linux kernel on the dozens of test systems at Phoronix. With some early testing on a Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E box, there are some promising improvements.

  • Linux 4.10 To Expose EFI Framebuffer Configuration

    While Linux 4.9-rc1 was only released this past weekend, the EFI subsystem changes are already being staged for the next kernel cycle.

    One of the EFI changes catching my attention for Linux 4.10 is that the EFI frame-buffer configuration will be exposed. This will allow for localized status strings during firmware updates.

  • Features You Won't Find In The Linux 4.9 Mainline Kernel

    While there are many new features in Linux 4.9, there is some functionality we've been looking forward to that sadly isn't yet in the mainline kernel tree.

RaspEX Project Now Lets You Run Ubuntu 16.10 on Raspberry Pi 3 and 2, with LXDE

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Today, October 19, 2016, GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton informed us about the immediate availability of a new build of his RaspEX project, which brings the latest Ubuntu OS to Raspberry Pi users.

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Nasdaq Selects Drupal 8

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Dries Buytaert announced today that Nasdaq Corporate Solutions has selected Drupal 8 and will work with Acquia to create its Investor Relations Website Platform. In the words of Angela Byron, a.k.a "Webchick", "This is a big freakin' deal."

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Direct: Nasdaq using Drupal 8 for new Investor Relations websites

Android Leftovers

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat brings enterprise mobile apps to its containers platform

    Linux major Red Hat has unveiled its Red Hat Mobile Application Platform, a containerized offering designed to run in any public or private cloud or on-premise infrastructure that supports its Enterprise Linux. When used alongside Red Hat’s existing SaaS (software-as-a-service) mobile app platform, enterprises gain a wider set of deployment options to integrate, manage, and scale their mobile app initiatives to meet their business objectives, said the company.

  • Red Hat flaunts new curriculum offering

    The solution provides higher education institutions with the support to offer exams and courses centred around Red Hat technology.

    “Red Hat Academy goes beyond just implementing the software,” said Mustapha Hill, Channel Ecosystem Leader, MENA, Red Hat. “With this initiative, we actually advise universities on how they can implement software training into their curriculum. We do this because we want graduates to eventually be able to gain employment in the market based on their knowledge of Red Hat technology.

  • Fedora kernel scripting

    When I joined the Fedora kernel team about 1.5 years ago, I was the first brand new person in a long time. My teammates had most of the infrastructure instructions for the kernel in their brains. Part of my new hire tasks were documenting the steps for working with the Fedora kernel. These days, I can do most of the day to day tasks in my sleep. The tasks are still somewhat manual though which leaves room for error. I've decided to correct this by scripting some of the more manual parts.

  • Going to FUDCon: Phnom Penh Edition

    A little over a year ago, FUDCon APAC happened in Pune. I know because I lost a lot of nights sleep over it. The event also marked a turning point in my life because it coincided with my decision to move on from Red Hat and accept an offer with Linaro, a decision that I can say now was among the best I have taken in my life despite the very difficult choice I had to make to leave arguably the best team one could ever work with. FUDCon also brought me in touch with many volunteers from across Asia and it was interesting to see the kinds of challenges they faced when talking about Fedora and Open Source in general. That was also when I got to know Nisa and Somvannda from Cambodia better, especially when I had the chance to go over to Phnom Penh for APAC budget discussions. They had wanted to do a FUDCon in Phnom Penh in 2015 and we simply put out a better bid then.

  • Tommorow FOSSASIA meets PyLadies Pune

    Tomorrow we have a special PyLadies meetup at the local Red Hat office. Hong Phuc Dang from FOSSASIA is coming down for a discussion with the PyLadies team here. She will be taking about various projects FOSSASIA is working on, including codeheat. In the second half I will be taking a workshop on creating command line shell using Python.

  • Deploy containers with Atomic Host, Ansible, and Cockpit
  • How to Install Atom in Fedora

    A text editor is an important tool for developers, since they spend a lot of time using one. This article is about Atom, a cool modern editor.

    Atom is a free and open source text editor developed in 2015 by Github. Its developer calls it “the hackable text-editor for the 21st century.” It offers vast language support, and easy customization. It also works as an integrated development environment, or IDE. It comes with some built-in packages, but you can install other packages too. Most of these are freely licensed and maintained by community. Of course, it’s also free of cost.

  • debugging koji build failures

    From time to time builds fail in koji (The Fedora build system), and it’s good to know how to figure out where to look for the reason. Koji has a central hub that manages jobs and a bunch of builders that actually do the builds. When someone initiates a build you are talking to the hub and either uploading a src.rpm (for a scratch build) or telling it to use a particular git hash/repo for an official Fedora build. For official builds, koji will first generate a job to build the src.rpm from git and the packages lookaside cache with the source. This job will run on some builder thats ready and has capacity for it. Once the src.rpm is generated (or if you are providing it for a scratch build), the hub will generate build tasks for all the arches that are set in the target tag you are building to. Each one of those will go out to a builder of the right arch type that is enabled and has capacity, etc. If any of these fail, the entire build fails.

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More in Tux Machines

ARTIK is the Tizen’s Trojan Horse to dominate the IoT ecosystem

As part of the Forum “Tizen for the Internet of Things” held on September 22 in Moscow, Samsung Electronics has presented a new family of maker boards and modules named ARTIK, in addition to the infrastructure of the operating system Tizen 3.0. Samsung ARTIK’s value proposition, as declared by Samsung, is to reinvent the prototyping process by leveraging world-class data security granted by the company as well as a wide array of tools, both hardware and software, such as the ARTIK Modules and Cloud, formerly known as SmartThings Open Cloud. Read more

today's leftovers

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

  • Google Pixel review: The best Android phone, even if it is a little pricey
    Welcome to the age of Google Hardware. Apparently tired of letting third-party Android OEMs serve as the stewards of Android handsets, Google has become a hardware company. (Again). Earlier this year Google, launched a hardware division with former Motorola President Rick Osterloh at the helm. With the high-ranking title of "Senior Vice President," Osterloh doesn't oversee a side project—his group is on even footing with Android, Search, YouTube, and Ads. The hardware group is so powerful inside Google that it was able to merge Nexus, Pixel, Chromecast, OnHub, ATAP, and Glass into a single business unit. The group's coming out party was October 4, 2016, where it announced Google Home, Google Wifi, a 4K Chromecast, the Daydream VR headset, and the pair of phones we're looking at today: the Google Pixel and Google Pixel XL. The arrival of the Pixel phones marks the apparent death of the Nexus line; Google says that it has "no plans" for future Nexus devices. With the new branding comes a change in strategy, too. The Pixel brand is about making devices that are 100 percent Google, so despite Google's position as the developer of Android, get ready for Google-designed hardware combined with exclusive Google software.
  • Hands-on with the LeEco Le Pro3: services first, Android second
    LeEco’s flagship Le Pro3 smartphone isn’t trying to compete with the Google Pixel, which puts modern Google services in front of a stock Android backdrop. After playing with the Le Pro3 at the company’s U.S. launch event in San Francisco today, I’m left feeling that it’s an easy, low-cost way to get the full experience of LeEco’s applications. There are proprietary LeEco utility tools like the browser, email, calendar, messages, notes, and phone apps, along with bloatware like Yahoo Weather, but mostly the Pro3 is a means of distribution for the LeEco apps, like Live, LeVidi, and Le. There is also a standard-issue My LeEco app for managing services like EcoPass membership. Under it all is the EUI custom user interface. If you swipe left from the home screen, you see videos that LeEco recommends you watch — not Google Now.
  • Report: Google reaches agreement with CBS for 'Unplugged' web TV service - Fox and Disney may follow