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Saturday, 21 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LWN on Linux: LTS, API, Pointer Leaks and Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 9:44am
Story An update on GnuPG Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 9:39am
Story Ubuntu: GNOME, New Video, Ubuntu Podcast, Refreshing the Xubuntu Logo Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 9:26am
Story Intel Linux and GCC Work Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 9:07am
Story Mesa Development Updates Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 9:03am
Story Firefox 57 coming soon: a Quantum leap Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 8:56am
Story 3 Tools to Help You Remember Linux Commands Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 8:54am
Story How Eclipse is advancing IoT development Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 6:48am
Story Effective Strategies for Recruiting Open Source Developers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 6:47am
Story Fedora meets RHEL Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 6:45am

Servers: Containers, 'Cloud', Microservices, and Hyperledger

Filed under
Server
  • How to Choose a Linux Container Image

    A comparison of Linux container images talks about the best-practices in choosing an image. Architecture, security and performance are among the factors, while commercial users would also look for support options.

    A Linux container allows separate management of kernel space and user space components by utilizing cgroups and namespaces, which are resource and process isolation mechanisms. Solaris and BSD also have abstractions similar to Linux containers but the article's focus is on the latter only. The host running the container has the operating system kernel and a set of libraries and tools required to run containers. The container image, on the other hand, has the libraries, interpreters and application code required to run the application that is being distributed in the container. These depend on underlying system libraries. This is true for interpreted languages too as the interpreters themselves are written in low level languages.

  • The Four Pillars of Cloud-Native Operations

    As organizations shift their application strategies to embrace the cloud-native world, the purpose of the cloud transitions from saving money to delivering and managing applications. Platforms such as Cloud Foundry, Kubernetes, and Docker redefine the possibilities for application environments that utilize the cloud. It’s time for us as operations professionals to rethink how we approach our jobs in this new world. We should be asking, how do our organizations take advantage of cloud-native as a new mode of application delivery?

  • How to align your team around microservices

    Microservices have been a focus across the open source world for several years now. Although open source technologies such as Docker, Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Swarm make it easier than ever for organizations to adopt microservice architectures, getting your team on the same page about microservices remains a difficult challenge.

    For a profession that stresses the importance of naming things well, we've done ourselves a disservice with microservices. The problem is that that there is nothing inherently "micro" about microservices. Some can be small, but size is relative and there's no standard measurement unit across organizations. A "small" service at one company might be 1 million lines of code, but far fewer at another organization.

  • Hyperledger Stitches in Another Blockchain Project

    The Linux Foundation’s open source Hyperledger Project, which works on blockchain technologies, added a sixth sub project — this one dubbed Quilt.

    Hyperledger Quilt started around 18 months ago and is an implementation of the Interledger Protocol (ILP), which helps facilitate transactions across ledgers.

  • Chinese Search Giant Baidu Joins Hyperledger Blockchain Consortium

    Chinese search engine giant Baidu has become the latest member of the Linux Foundation-led Hyperledger blockchain consortium.

    In joining the group – which focuses on developing blockchain technologies for enterprises – Baidu will assist the project's efforts alongside other member companies including Accenture, IBM, JP Morgan, R3, Cisco and SAP, among others.

Games: Steam Sale, Skirmish Line, Maia, Observer

Filed under
Gaming

Canonical on Path to IPO as Ubuntu Unity Linux Desktop Gets Ditched

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

In October 2010, Mark Shuttleworth, founder of the Ubuntu open-source operating system and CEO of Canonical, announced his grand plan to build a converged Linux desktop that would work on mobile devices, desktops and even TVs. He called the effort "Unity" and poured significant financial resources into it.

Seven years later, the Unity dream is dead.

On Oct. 19, Ubuntu 17.10 was released as the first Ubuntu Linux version since 2010 that didn't use Unity as the default Linux desktop. In a video interview with eWEEK, Shuttleworth details the rationale behind his decision to cancel Unity and why he has now put his company on the path toward an initial public offering (IPO).

Because Ubuntu has moved into the mainstream in a bunch of areas, including the cloud, he said some of the things his company had been doing were never going to be commercially sustainable.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 17.10 delivers new desktop and cloud enhancements

More “Linux On Galaxy”

Filed under
GNU
Linux

NODE Handheld Linux Terminal Version 3

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

YouTuber NODE has released a new video unveiling his third generation Handheld Linux Terminal which builds on the features from the previous creations and is once again fantastically awesome.

Check out the video below to learn more about the Handheld Linux Terminal Version 3 powered by a Raspberry Pi 3 mini PC. Great job NODE.

Read more

OSS: F-Droid, Rackspace, Oracle, CableLabs, Hacktoberfest, Mozilla, Facebook

Filed under
OSS
  • 7 years of open source: Twilio, Synopsys & Veracode

    “What was once considered fringe and anti-establishment has now become the norm powering some of the largest technological innovations of our times. In the fields of artificial intelligence, machine learning, autonomous driving and block chain, OSS leads the way,” said Mel Llaguno , open source solution manager at Synopsys Software Integrity Group.

  • F-Droid, the open-source app repository, has been updated to v1.0

    If you are a big Android enthusiast, then you're probably familiar with the name F-Droid. If not, it's an extensive repository of open source apps, as well as the name of its accompanying client. Today that client has been updated to v1.0.

    If you remember our coverage of v0.103, v1.0 should look pretty familiar. While there have been some significant changes behind the scenes, apart from a general improvement in performance and ease of use, you're not likely to notice much.

  • Rackspace ends discount hosting for open source projects

    Rackspace has ended a program under which it offered “generous discounts on hosting for more than 150 OSS projects and communities”, but flubbed the announcement.

    The closure of the program came to our attention after Reg operatives noticed the Tweet below from Eric Holscher, who posted an image in which it appears the fanatical services company planned to withdraw the discount entirely.

  • Oracle Joins Serverless Race with Open Source Fn Project

    Oracle has released Fn, a new open-source, cloud-agnostic, serverless platform. While supporting ‘any programming language’, it initially launched with extensive Java capabilities and a JUnit test framework.

    Fn comprises four of main components: Fn Server, Fn FDKs, Fn Flow and Fn Load Balancer. Written in Go, Fn Server is the platform that runs the code.

  • CableLabs Hints That It’s Planning an Open Source Group

    In a meeting at the SCTE-ISBE Cable Tec Expo show yesterday, Randy Levensalor, lead architect at CableLabs involved with the group’s software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) work, mentioned that CableLabs is planning to announce an open source group soon. He didn’t provide any further detail other than to say CableLabs will be making an announcement in about a month.

    We can speculate that it relates to CableLabs’ SNAPS initiative. SNAPS stands for “SDN/NFV Application development Platform and Stack.” The key objectives for SNAPS are to make it easier for NFV vendors to onboard their applications and to reduce the complexity of integration testing. The initiative attempts to accelerate the adoption of network virtualization, wrote Levensalor in a recent blog posting.

  • Hacktoberfest 2017 @ Tel Aviv

    I gave my “Midburn – creating an open source community” talk in Hacktoberfest 2017 @ Tel Aviv. This is the local version of an initiative by DigitalOcean and GitHub.

  • Bringing Mixed Reality to the Web

    Today, Mozilla is announcing a new development program for Mixed Reality that will significantly expand its work in Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) for the web. Our initial focus will be on how to get devices, headsets, frameworks and toolsets to work together, so web developers can choose from a variety of tools and publishing methods to bring new immersive experiences online – and have them work together in a fully functional way.

  • Facebook open sources concurrent programming debugger

    Learning how to do sequential computing, where one calculation is made after the other, is easy. Anyone who learns programmings gets that. Parallel programming, which empowers super-computing calculations to be made simultaneously, is much harder, but doable. Concurrent computing, where multiple calculations are made within overlapping time frames, now that's hard. It's also extremely useful whether it's tracking multiple trains on a single train-line or multiple comments on a single Facebook page. That's why Facebook has worked hard on concurrent programming. Now, Facebook is sharing its newest debugger tool: RacerD, its new open source race detector.

  • DragonFly 5.0 released!

     

    The normal ISO and IMG files are available for download and install, plus an uncompressed ISO image for those installing remotely.  

Ubuntu: NEC, Ubuntu 17.10, Lubuntu 17.10, Xubuntu 17.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mastodon 2.0

Filed under
OSS
Web

About 6 months have passed since April, during which the major mainstream breakthrough of our decentralized social network took place. From 20,000 users to almost a million! What better time to run through a couple examples of what’s been introduced since then?

Mastodon is defined by its focus on good user experience, polished design and superior anti-abuse tools. In that vein, the web app has received numerous updates. Using the latest browser features, the web app receives real push notifications, making it almost indistinguishable from a native mobile app. It works faster and looks smoother thanks to many performance and design improvements.

Read more

Red Hat: Satellite, OpenShift, Government, SoftBank

Filed under
Red Hat
  • A Red Hat Satellite tutorial to install an update server

    Is server patch management the best part of your job? Stop reading here. Many IT organizations struggle with OS patching processes. For Red Hat administrators who are willing to invest some initial energy to simplify later tasks, Satellite provides infrastructure lifecycle management, including capabilities for provisioning, reporting and configuration management. To this end, follow this Red Hat Satellite tutorial to set up a simple server for updates. Once we review how to install the basic update server, we'll create one example client.

  • Red Hat updates Gluster storage for OpenShift container apps

    Red Hat bolstered Gluster storage for its OpenShift Container Platform, adding iSCSI block and S3 object interfaces, as well as greater persistent volume density.

  • Red Hat to Cover Open Source Collaboration at Gov’t Symposium; Paul Smith Comments

    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) is set to hold its annual symposium on federal information technology on Nov. 9 where the company will host discussions on open source collaboration and its potential benefits for government, GovCon Executive reported Oct. 11.

  • Red Hat’s Container Technologies and Knowledge Were Chosen by SoftBank to Embrace DevOps

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that several of Red Hat’s open source technologies, including Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, as well as the knowledge of Red Hat Consulting, were chosen by SoftBank Corp (“SoftBank”), a subsidiary of SoftBank Group Corp., to implement DevOps methodology for its Service Platform Division, IT Service Development Division, Information Technology Unit, and Technology Unit, the company’s in-house IT organization. This large, varied organization develops, maintains and operates SoftBank’s IT systems for internal work and operations, supporting 600 diverse systems.

  • Form 4 RED HAT INC For: Oct 17 Filed by: Kelly Michael A
  • Taking a Fresh Look at Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)

Security: Google Play, WPA2, FERC, HackerOne

Filed under
Security
  • 8 'Minecraft' apps infected with Sockbot malware on Google Play found adding devices to botnet

    Security researchers have discovered that at least eight malware-laced apps on Google Play Store are ensnaring devices to a botnet to potentially carry out distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) and other malicious attacks. These apps claimed to provide skins to tweak the look of characters in the popular Minecraft: Pocket Edition game and have been downloaded as many as 2.6 million times.

  • KRACK Vulnerability: What You Need To Know

    This week security researchers announced a newly discovered vulnerability dubbed KRACK, which affects several common security protocols for Wi-Fi, including WPA (Wireless Protected Access) and WPA2. This is a bad vulnerability in that it likely affects billions of devices, many of which are hard to patch and will remain vulnerable for a long time. Yet in light of the sometimes overblown media coverage, it’s important to keep the impact of KRACK in perspective: KRACK does not affect HTTPS traffic, and KRACK’s discovery does not mean all Wi-Fi networks are under attack. For most people, the sanest thing to do is simply continue using wireless Internet access.

  • FERC sets rules to protect grid from malware spread through laptops

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday proposed new mandatory cybersecurity controls to protect the utility system from the threat posed by laptops and other mobile devices that could spread malicious software.

    The standards are meant to "further enhance the reliability and resilience of the nation's bulk electric system" by preventing malware from infecting utility networks and bringing down the power grid, according to the nation's grid regulator.

  • Hack These Apps And Earn $1,000 — Bug Bounty Program Launched By Google And HackerOne
  • Security Vulnerability Puts Linux Kernel at Risk

15 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark"

Filed under
Ubuntu

​The New Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" launch with GNOME3 has brought a big change and got a lot of people excited to try it as soon as they can. If you don't know yet the new stuff in Ubuntu 17.10, read the article we published today.

Read<br />
more

Anarchy Linux Dispels Fear of Arch

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Arch-Anywhere/Anarchy Linux is one of the nicest Arch-based distributions I have encountered. However, Anarchy Linux still requires familiarity with terminology and processes that usually are not needed to install Linux distros from a fully-functioning live session installation disk. Not having a demo mode to preview how the OS runs on your particular hardware can be a time-consuming setback.

However, once you have Anarchy Linux up and running, it will give you a very pleasing computing experience. Much of what happens after installation depends on the desktop environment you selected.

If you have a desktop preference or prefer one of the included window manager environments instead, you can forget about the sullied reputation that comes with Arch Linux distros. For many reasons, Anarchy Linux is a winning choice.

Read more

Intel Graphics Performance: Ubuntu 17.04 vs. 17.10

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the Ubuntu 17.10 release this week and its massive desktop changes from GNOME Wayland to Mesa/kernel upgrades, we've been busy benchmarking this new Ubuntu OS release. Complementing the Radeon Ubuntu 17.04 vs. 17.10 gaming comparison are now some OpenGL/Vulkan benchmarks when using Intel Kabylake graphics hardware on Ubuntu 17.04, 17.10 with X.Org and Wayland, and the performance if upgrading against Linux/Mesa Git.

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Room for Improvement: Areas Where Open Source Can Get Even Better

Filed under
OSS

Open source software delivers a huge amount of value. But it stands to offer even more. Here's a list of the ways open source can evolve to meet the needs of developers and organizations even better than it does today.

Opportunities for continued evolution and improvement in open source include:

Read more

Why it's pointless to criticize Amazon for being 'bad' at open source

Filed under
OSS

Apparently AWS is B-A-D because it's a net consumer of open source software. You know, like every single company on earth, inside or outside of tech, probably even including Red Hat. The simple truth is that everyone consumes far more open source software than they contribute. It's just how the world works.

For those trying to keep score, however, and paint Amazon Web Services (AWS) as a bad open source citizen, the question is "Why?" Accusations of open source parsimony don't seem to have damaged developers' love for AWS as a platform, so exactly what are critics hoping to accomplish? Is it simply a matter of "paying a tax," as some suggest? If we've been reduced to inventing taxes to be paid, with no apparent reason for imposing them, we're doing open source wrong.

Read more

Running Android on Top of a Linux Graphics Stack

Filed under
Android
Linux
Interviews

Traditional Linux graphics systems (like X11) mostly did not use planes. But modern graphics systems like Android and Wayland can take full advantage of it.

Android has the most mature implementation of plane support in HWComposer, and its graphics stack is a bit different from the usual Linux desktop graphics stack. On desktops, the typical compositor just uses the GPU for all composition, because this is the only thing that exists on the desktop.

Most embedded and mobile chips have specialized 2D composition hardware that Android is designed around. The way this is done is by dividing the things that are displayed into layers, and then intelligently feeding the layers to hardware that is optimized to handle layers. This frees up the GPU to work on the things you actually care about, while at the same time, it lets hardware that is more efficient do what it does best.

Read more

Why and how you should switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

When you start comparing computers, you probably pit Windows against macOS—but Linux rarely gets a mention. Still, this lesser-known operating system has a strong and loyal following. That's because it offers a number of advantages over its competitors.

Whether you're completely new to Linux or have dabbled with it once or twice already, we want you to consider running it on your next laptop or desktop—or alongside your existing operating system. Read on to decide if it's time to make the switch.

Read more

Purism disables Intel's flawed Management Engine on Linux-powered laptops

Filed under
Linux

LINUX PC MAKER Purism has devised a process to disable the flawed Intel Management Engine.

The company's line of Librem laptops, which run flexible open-source firmware Coreboot, are now running with Intel's management service completely disabled.

As a core part of Intel Active Management Technology (AMT), the management engine is present in all the company's CPUs and is capable of powering a computer, even when it is powered off.

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