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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Apache Mounts Strong Defense, Equifax Retreats

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Security

One of the largest financial data breaches in U.S. history, it exposed names, addresses, Social Security Numbers, birth dates, driver's license numbers and other sensitive information belonging to 143 million U.S. consumers, as well as data belonging to an undisclosed number of UK and Canadian consumers.

The attackers also accessed credit card data for about 209,000 consumers and credit dispute information for about 182,000 consumers, Equifax said.

[...]

However, with respect to the possibility that it resulted from an exploitation of a vulnerability in the Apache Struts Web Framework, it was not clear which vulnerability could have been utilized, Gielen said.

One assumption connected the breach to CVE-2017-2805, one of several patches Apache announced on Sept. 4.

"However, the security breach was already detected in July, which means that the attackers either used an earlier announced vulnerabiity on an unpatched Equifax server or exploited a vulnerability not known at this point in time -- a so called Zero Day Exploit," Gielen noted.

The committee members have put enormous effort into "securing and hardening the software we produce," he added, and they fix problems that come to their attention.

There's a distinction between the existence of an unknown flaw in the wild for nine years and failing to address a known flaw for nine years, said Gielen, emphasizing that the committee just learned about this flaw.

The has not had any contact with anyone using the @equifax domain on any Apache list in more than two years, said Apache spokesperson Sally Khudairi.

"To be clear, whilst we haven't had contact with anyone using the @equifax domain -- official or otherwise -- that is not to say there isn't a chance that someone from their team may have done so using an alternate channel," she told LinuxInsider.

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Software: KGraphViewer 2.4.0, Harmony, Inkscape, GCC

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Software
  • KGraphViewer 2.4.0

    KGraphViewer 2.4.0 has been released.

    KGraphViewer is a visualiser for Graphviz’s DOT format of graphs.
    https://www.kde.org/applications/graphics/kgraphviewer

    This ports KGraphViewer to use KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt 5.

  • KGraphViewer Brought To KDE Frameworks 5, Qt 5

    For those relying upon KGraphViewer as a Graphviz dot graph viewer, it's the latest package ported to Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5.

  • Harmony: A Player That Can Play Audio Locally And From Cloud Services

    Harmony is audio player inspired from iTunes, it is built with Electron and vanilla JS, available for Linux, Windows and Mac. It plays audio files locally and from cloud services as well. It is based on plugins, and plugins are available for Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Play Music, Hype Machine, Deezer, and local files.
    It is skinable means you can write and install themes but it has two themes available other than default. Harmony can be controlled using keyboard shortcuts and media keys. Press ? to see the list of available shortcuts. It is responsive design player that means you can resize it however you want, make it compact or half screen or full screen, it will follow you. It uses the tray or the sound menu integration to control the playback even when the app isn't focused.

  •  

  • Draw Freely Vector Graphics Using Professional Inkscape

    Inkscape is a free and open-source professional vector graphics application, it is cross-platform available for GNU/Linux, Windows and Mac. You can use Inkscape if you are either professional or hobbyist designer, using this software you can create wide variety of graphics such as illustrations, icons, logos, diagrams, maps and web graphics. Inkscape uses the W3C open standard SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) as its native format.

  • GCC 8 Might Pursue Better, More Modern Default Options

    Motivated by the 2017 GNU Tools Cauldron, an ARM developer is looking for feedback on improving the options enabled by default for the GCC 8 compiler.

    Wilco Dijkstra of ARM is looking to possibly loosen GCC's conservative defaults a bit by allowing some more modern options by default and possibly adding more optimizations to -O2 too.

Devices: Congatec, Aaeon, Anavi

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Linux
Hardware
  • Linux-ready module features Atom C3000 and 4x 10GbE ports

    Congatec’s “Conga-B7AC” is a Linux-friendly Type 7 COM with up to a 16-core Atom C3000, and support for 4x 10GbE, 32x PCIe, and industrial temperatures.

    Congatec delivered one of the first COM Express 3.0 Type 7 modules with its Conga-B7XD, based on Intel 5th Gen “Broadwell” Xeon D and Pentium processors. Now it has introduced the Conga-B7AC Type 7 module with the same 125 x 95mm dimensions, 10GbE support, Linux support, and an up to 16-core Intel Server-class SoC, but with a more power efficient Atom C3000 “Denverton” SoC. There’s also a Conga-X7/EVAL carrier board (see farther below)

  • COM Express modules build on Kaby Lake and Xeon E3

    Aaeon announced a “NanoCOM-KBU” COM Express Type 10 Mini module with Intel 7th Gen U-Series chips and a “COM-KBHB6” Type 6 Basic module with a Xeon E3.

  • pHAT adds IR to the Raspberry Pi

    Anavi has gone to Crowd Supply to launch a new run of its $16 “Anavi Infrared pHAT,” which adds IR remote control to the Pi, and offers optional sensors.

Java EE Moves to the Eclipse Foundation, Functional Programming in JavaScript, and What Motivates Today's Developers

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Development
  • Opening Up Java EE - An Update

    In a previous post, we announced that Oracle was beginning to explore moving Java EE technologies to an open source foundation in order to make the process of evolving these standards more agile, flexible and open. Since mid-August, we’ve had many discussions with other vendors, community members and open source foundations in order to move the process forward. Here’s an update on the progress we have made so far.

  • Java EE Moves to the Eclipse Foundation

    Oracle announced today that they, along with IBM and Red Hat, will be moving Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation. I would like to welcome everyone involved to our community. We look forward to working with all of the participants in the Java EE ecosystem as it moves to a more open and collaborative development model.

  • Functional Programming in JavaScript? Yes Please.

    One of the hot topics right now in the web development world is functional programming in the language of the web, JavaScript.

    Functional programming encompasses a whole host of mathematical properties and phenomena that is beyond this post, but what I am going to address here is how to write a a few functions with nominal functional programming.

  • What Motivates Today's Developers?

    That's one of many takeaways from a new survey, aptly titled The 2017 State of the Modern Developer, that was conducted by research firm Coleman Parkes for the software analysis and measurement company CAST. In all, 500 developers in four countries -- USA, UK, France and Germany -- were surveyed. According to CAST, the research was conducted "to learn more about the motivators and behavior of modern developers, in addition to their attitude towards code quality."

Porteus: portability for pros

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Reviews

Porteus 3.2.2 left a very strange feeling in my heart.

From one side, it ran smoothly, very fast (from-memory) and crashed nowhere.

On another side, complexity with installation of additional software is definitely a show-stopper for many inexperienced Linux users.

Have you used Porteus yourself? How do you like it?

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Bluetooth Mess: Almost Everything Affected

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Security
  • ​Linux gets blasted by BlueBorne too

    he security company Armis has revealed eight separate Bluetooth wireless protocol flaws known collectively as BlueBorne. This new nasty set of vulnerabilities have the potential to wreak havoc on iPhones, Android devices, Windows PC, and, oh yes, Linux desktops and server, as well.

    While BlueBorne requires a Bluetooth connection to spread, once the security holes are exploited, a single infected device could infect numerous devices and computers in seconds. Attacks made with BlueBorne are silent, avoid activating most security measures, and require nothing from new victims except that their devices have Bluetooth on.

  • Linux Impacted By Information Leak & Remote Code Execution Via Bluetooth

    Armis Labs has gone public today with "Bluebourne", an IoT-focused attack vector via Bluetooth. This Bluetooth attack does not require the targeted device to even be paired with the attacker or on discoverable mode, making it more frightening.

  • The IoT Attack Vector “BlueBorne” Exposes Almost Every Connected Device

    Armis Labs revealed a new attack vector endangering major mobile, desktop, and IoT operating systems, including Android, iOS, Windows, and Linux, and the devices using them.

Parrot 3.8 Release Notes

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GNU
Linux
Security

What i personally love about this project is its little but awesome developers community, and this summer was more productive than ever.

I am proud to announce the official release of Parrot 3.8, that introduces many new features and updates.

A quick look at our changelog will immediately spot the most important changes.

First of all, the new parrot 3.8 is now based on Debian 10 buster (current Debian testing release) with Linux 4.12, ZFS support, better wireless drivers support and the introduction of the new MATE 1.18, GCC 6.4 and 7.2, java 9 and so on, and all the parrot flavors now include electrum, a lightweight bitcoin client.

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today's leftovers: GNU/Linux at Dropbox, Debian and Gentoo Development, Managing Linux Disks

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Misc
  • Optimizing web servers for high throughput and low latency

    This is an expanded version of my talk at NginxConf 2017 on September 6, 2017. As an SRE on the Dropbox Traffic Team, I’m responsible for our Edge network: its reliability, performance, and efficiency. The Dropbox edge network is an nginx-based proxy tier designed to handle both latency-sensitive metadata transactions and high-throughput data transfers. In a system that is handling tens of gigabits per second while simultaneously processing tens of thousands latency-sensitive transactions, there are efficiency/performance optimizations throughout the proxy stack, from drivers and interrupts, through TCP/IP and kernel, to library, and application level tunings.

  • Summary of the discussion on off-line keys.
  • Xiaomi’s stunning Mi Mix gets a sequel, the Mi Mix 2
  • Squeezing More Juice Out Of Gentoo With Graphite, LTO Optimizations

    Developer Shane Peelar has come up with a Gentoo Portage configuration for building out the distribution with aggressive compiler optimizations in the name of performance.

    Peelar's Gentoo configuration will build with -O3 optimizations, GCC Graphite optimizations, and LTO (Link Time Optimizations).

  • Debian-Administration.org is closing down

    The site will go read-only at the end of the month, and will slowly be stripped back from that point towards the end of the year - leaving only a static copy of the articles, and content.

  • What you need to know to manage Linux disks

    There are numerous other commands for examining disks and file systems. Those described here are some of the most useful and informative. Using them periodically has advantages as the easiest way to spot problems is becoming so used to the output of commands such as these that you easily spot the kind of differences that might indicate problems.

  • Install and Configure LEMP in Debian 9

Kernel and Graphics: Linus Torvalds in His Gown, Vulkan Driver News

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Linux
  • Linus Torvalds' lifestyle tips for hackers: be like me, work in a bathrobe, no showers before noon

    Linux Lord Linus Torvalds has offered some lifestyle advice for hackers, suggesting they adopt his admittedly-unglamorous lifestyle but also his ethos of working on things that matter.

    In an on-stage interview with Linux Foundation founder and executive director Jim Zemline at the Open Source summit in Los Angeles on Monday, Torvalds admitted that “I have long since gotten over the fact that the UPS guy brings me a package from Amazon at 3:00PM and I am still in my bathrobe.”

    Zemline joked that the Linux Foundation has a shower before noon policy and Torvalds shot back that it's the reason he works from home instead of coming into the office.

  • VK_EXT_debug_report Lands For Intel's Vulkan Driver
  • Better Hang Detection For The RADV Vulkan Driver

    Samuel Pitoiset of Valve's latest work on the open-source Radeon driver stack has been figuring out better GPU hang detection for the RADV Vulkan driver.

KDE: New digiKam (Version 5.7) and Randa Meeting Roundups

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KDE
  • digiKam 5.7.0 is released

    Following the release of 5.6.0 published in June, the digiKam team is proud to announce the new release 5.7.0 of the digiKam Software Collection. In this version a lot of work has happened behind the scenes and in fixing bugs, which does not mean there is no enhancements: A new tool to create print layouts has been introduces, albums can now be exported by mail, support for Hugin 2017 was added and GPS traces are storable as KML.

  • digiKam 5.7 Released With Print Creator & Email Sending Support

    For fans of the Qt-powered Digikam photo management software, the 5.7 release is out today with many bug fixes and underlying improvements along with some new user features.

  • digiKam 5.7 Image Editor Lets You Create Print Layouts, Export Albums by Email

    digiKam 5.7.0 was released today as the latest maintenance update to the open-source and cross-platform image editor, viewer and organizer software that introduces a couple of new features and many improvements.

    Two and a half months in development, digiKam 5.7.0 is here to introduce two new tools, namely "Send by Mail" and "Print Creator." The first one will allow users to send photos by email directly from the app, supporting popular email clients like Mozilla Thunderbird, Evolution, KMail, Claws Mail, Sylpheed, Balsa, and Netscape.

  • Randa Roundup - Part II

    The last time we wrote about Randa Meetings 2017, preparations for the event were still in progress. The developer sprint is now in full swing. Everyone is settled in and ready to start improving, debugging and adding features to KDE's apps and frameworks. But what exactly will the developers work on during Randa 2017? Here are some more details.

    As you're probably already aware, the theme of Randa Meetings 2017 is accessibility. This doesn't include only desktop software, but also extends to mobile apps. Sanjiban Bairagya is working on the Marble Maps Android app, KDE's answer to Google Earth. His accessibility-related tasks include making the turn-by-turn navigation experience more visually intuitive in real-time. He will also be switching Marble to the Qt 5.8 Speech module instead of using Java for text-to-speech support in navigation. Another thing Sanjiban wants to do is find a way to let users add notes to any place on the map.

  • Take Randa and Stuff It

    (O yeah, lunch was pretty expansive and tasty, so we’re stuffed. And in Randa.)

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Will Soon Get Linux Kernel 4.13 and GNOME 3.26 Desktop

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SUSE

openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger is back with a new weekly report to inform OpenSuSE Tumbleweed users about the fact that a total of four snapshots have been published this week despite infrastructure's issues still not being fully addressed.

"I’m mainly astonished that there were still 3 (4) snapshots completed, considering the issues the infrastructure had during the last days (openQA had a corrupted disk/database, then download.opensuse.org disappeared on us)," said Dominique Leuenberger in his report.

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Open-Source AMDGPU and ATI Linux Video Drivers Updated for AMD Radeon GPUs

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OSS

xf86-video-amdgpu 1.4.0 and xf86-video-ati 7.10.0 ship with the same set of enhancements and are designed to work with X.Org Server version 1.13 to 1.19 on any supported GNU/Linux distribution. The new releases improve performance of clients, including composite managers that use DRI page flipping even when the "TearFree" option is enabled for any CRTC, and make sure CRTCs that don't have TearFree support won't suffer from tearing.

Both drivers are now capable of preventing certain DRM master processes from accessing buffers that have been created by the respective driver when switching away to a different VT (Virtual Terminal). This improvement alone might be useful especially when the DRM master processes come from other local users.

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Games: Dominions 5, Best of Indie Legends 2 Bundle, Death Point and More

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Gaming

OSS: Chrome 63, AcadiaSoft, HAMMER2, LLVM 2017 Meeting, and GNU Tools Cauldron 2017

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OSS

Security: 'Bashware' and Other FUD

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Security

GNOME/GTK: OpenGL, WebKitGTK+ 2.18.0, GTK4's Vulkan Support and Icon Size

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Flickerless Gtk3 OpenGL Transitions

    While I got OpenGL transitions working under Gtk3 at the end of last year basically matching the Gtk2/Generic OpenGL quality the transition into and out of the OpenGL sequence wasn't very satisfying. And with access to HiDPI it was clearly even worse with an unscaled image momentarily appearing before the correct one.

  • LibreOffice Gets Flicker-Free OpenGL Transitions

    Last year McNamara got GTK3 OpenGL transitions working, but it was less than perfect. But now he's managed to provide flicker-less GTK3 OpenGL transitions after landing some improvements into LibreOffice Git.

  • WebKitGTK+ 2.18.0 released!
  • WebKitGTK+ 2.18.0 Brings WebDriver Support, Remote Inspector & Kinetic Scrolling

    The WebDriver support is interesting and allows easily automating/scripting interactions with the browser. WebDriver is just geared for WebKit-based browsers. Details on the WebDriver WebKitGTK+ support via this blog post. When time magically allows I would like to investigate the feasibility of using it for some automated browser benchmarks.

    On the developer front the WebCrypto API is now enabled by default. Additionally, there are APIs to allow overriding the popup menu of select elements and to create a WebKitContextMenuItem from a GAction.

  • GTK4's Vulkan Support Continues Maturing

    One of the questions that came up following our GNOME 3.26 feature overview was how GTK4's Vulkan renderer is coming along.

    It's coming along as is GTK4, albeit not ready for production use quite yet.

  • You need an application icon of at least 64×64 in size

    At the moment the appstream-builder in Fedora requires a 48x48px application icon to be included in the AppStream metadata. I’m sure it’s no surprise that 48×48 padded to 64×64 and then interpolated up to 128×128 (for HiDPI screens) looks pretty bad. For Fedora 28 and higher I’m going to raise the minimum icon size to 64×64 which I hope people realize is actually a really low bar.

KDE: Latte Dock, New Plasma 5 for Slackware, and Kubuntu Council Election Results

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KDE
  • Intro to Latte Dock, New Decoration for Kubuntu

    Latte is a new MacOS-like dock desktop decoration for KDE Plasma. It's first released in 14 January 2017 as v0.5.90. It's now installable for Kubuntu from PPA (and other distros via specific channels). If you're a Kubuntu user and waiting for a decent dock, or if you missed the legendary AWN dock, then Latte is for you. This article will show you some pictures (and GIF) and features of Latte. Enjoy!

  • Plasma 5 for Slackware – KDE 5_17.09

    For some time now, no news about Plasma 5 for Slackware appeared on this blog. I just have been too occupied with family life and the demands of my day job.

    But the configuration of my new server, the one I bought last month, finally is at a point where I can use it for running virtual machines and compiling packages. And it is fast… compiling LibreOffice in 90 minutes where in the past it would take me 10 times as long. Therefore I was able to create a new release of Plasma 5 packages while at the same time working on new LibreOffice packages.

  • Kubuntu Council Election Results Announced

    The Kubuntu Council is happy to announce the results of the election, and welcome the following members: Rik Mills, Aaron Honeycutt (returning) and Rick Timmis.

Kernel/Foundation: CHAOSS, Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), OpenChain, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • If You Can’t Measure It, You Can’t Improve It: CHAOSS Project Creates Tools to Analyze Software Development and Measure Open Source Community Health

    Initial members contributing to the project include Bitergia, Eclipse Foundation, Jono Bacon Consulting, Laval University (Canada), Linaro, Mozilla, OpenStack, Polytechnique Montreal (Canada) Red Hat, Sauce Labs, Software Sustainability Institute, Symphony Software Foundation, University of Missouri, University of Mons (Belgium), University of Nebraska at Omaha, and University of Victoria.

  • Vodafone Joins Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project

    The Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project today announced that Vodafone Group has joined as a Platinum member. The addition of Vodafone, one of the world's largest service providers with operations in 26 countries, demonstrates the continuing momentum ONAP is achieving and highlights Vodafone's ongoing commitment to open standards and open source.

  • OpenChain Project Welcomes Hitachi

    The OpenChain Project is proud to welcome Hitachi as a Platinum Member. Hitachi joins eleven other companies to take a leadership role in our industry standard for open source compliance in the supply chain.

  • Become a Certified Kubernetes Admin with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    The ever-increasing push to the cloud demands proven skills in areas such as cloud migration, application integration, automation, and more. The recent Open Source Jobs Report from The Linux Foundation, in fact, cited cloud technology as the most sought-after area of expertise among 70 percent of employers. Now you can demonstrate your skills through the new Certified Kubernetes Administrator (CKA) exam, offered by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

  • AMDGPU DC Display Code Tacks On Another 28 Patches

    The big undertaking of the rewriting/modernizing of the AMDGPU DRM driver's display code stack has out now another 28 patches.

    This AMDGPU DC display stack has been well over one thousand lines of code and in development for years in trying to better synchronize the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager's display code with that of their Windows driver. AMDGPU DC is what's needed for HDMI/DP audio on modern Radeon GPUs, HDMI 2.0 support, atomic mode-setting, FreeSync, and other modern display features. More recently, it's now needed for driving physical displays/monitors attached to Radeon Vega graphics cards.

  • RadeonSI/AMDGPU Switches Over To New Command Submission API

    Landing today within Mesa Git is a switchover for the AMDGPU winsys layer to using the new command submission (CS) API.

    This change benefits the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver when using the AMDGPU kernel driver. Added to libdrm back in July was a new low overhead command submission API when dealing with the AMDGPU kernel driver. This API sends chunks to the kernel API for a single command stream. This new API is designed to be "more future proof and extensible API."

  • New ARM Board Support In Linux 4.14: Raspberry Pi Zero W, Banana Pi & More

    Olof Johansson has submitted the pull requests of ARM/ARM64 board/SoC updates for the Linux 4.14 merge window.

Programming: Build Systems, Phoronix Test Suite 7.4, Requests for Comments (RFCs) and Node.js

Filed under
Development
  • Meson+Ninja Showing Speedy Build Results For Shotwell
  • Phoronix Test Suite 7.4 M4 Released As "Tynset" Nears Final

    The last planned test/development release of Phoronix Test Suite 7.4-Tynset is now available ahead of the planned stable release in the days to come.

  • 6 lessons on using technical RFCs as a management tool

    As an engineering leader, I value trust and believe that individual contributors should be involved in architectural and high-level technical decision making. I consider every line of code to be a decision made on behalf of someone else (including your future self), and having a fast-growing distributed team makes technical decision making particularly difficult to manage.

    In the early days of building ride-sharing app Ride, we went from three to more than 25 members, across product, design, and engineering, in the first six months. We were tasked with the challenge of taking an early prototype for a carpooling platform and bringing it to life on the web, iOS, and Android. To make things more fun, we were also distributed across the United States, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Argentina, and Ireland.

    [...]

    We weren't the first people to encounter this problem, so we looked at how open source software projects dealt with these situations, and came to the conclusion that adopting the Request for Comments (RFC) process would help us make better decisions together.

  • Modern Modules

    Re-thinking the Node.js ecosystem for modern JavaScript.

    A few months back I sat down to write some code.

    Node.js 8 had been out a while and I decided to take advantage of some of the new language features like async/await in my new code.

  • Using Node.js Packages Manager (NPM)

today's howtos

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HowTos
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More in Tux Machines

Games: Ostriv, Back to Bed, EVERSPACE, Hiveswap: Act 1

Openwashing and Microsoft FUD

BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS