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Sunday, 19 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: OpenGL and VC5 Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 3:57am
Story KDE and GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 3:51am
Story More Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 3:18am
Story These are the 12 Potential LibreOffice Mascots Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 2:48am
Story Features for Linux 4.15 and 4.14 Roundup Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 2:32am
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 2:25am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 10:36pm
Story Lunera turns lights into an “ambient cloud” of distributed Linux servers Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 10:31pm
Story Portable, open source retro game player runs Linux and Arduino Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 10:29pm
Story Why serverless computing makes Linux more relevant than ever Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 6:38pm

Raspberry Pi and MoodleBox make an accessible e-learning platform pair

Filed under
OSS
HowTos

Are you a teacher, librarian, or homeschooler who's looking for a powerful, secure e-learning solution? MoodleBox may be the answer. Its small footprint on a Raspberry Pi makes it an affordable option with the strength and flexibility of Moodle, the de facto standard in open source learning management systems.

First released in 2002, the Moodle e-learning platform is under continuous development and currently boasts more than 89,000 registered sites worldwide, including colleges, military installations, high schools, and more. It is robust and secure and is guided by a social constructionist pedagogy, according to its website. Moodle’s functionality is supported by numerous plugins, and because it is open source, Moodle has no licensing fees. Typically, Moodle is housed in an on-campus file server or in a public cloud like Moodle.com. If you are new to Moodle, Learn Moodle is a great resource.

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Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Beta Cinnamon & MATE Editions Now Available to Download

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Mint development team has uploaded today the Linux Mint 18.3 Beta release to the official download mirror, with 64-bit and 32-bit live ISO images of both Cinnamon and MATE editions of the operating system, though no official announcement was published at the moment of writing.

We downloaded both Cinnamon and MATE editions of Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Beta and took a quick look inside to see what's new. We can confirm that the OS is based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and runs the Linux 4.10 HWE (Hardware Enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus).

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GNU/Linux Is Still Cooking

    t’s true that smartphones have taken a huge share of personal computing away from desktops and notebooks but there are still huge limitations around screen-size, computing power, storage etc. where smartphones are not enough. I’ve long recommended using smartphones and desktop equipment together. Every time I find my text runs outside a text-box or some page is viewable only in portrait mode in Android/Linux, I long for some way to get to GNU/Linux. Today, I get up off the sofa and walk to my desk. Perhaps some day, I’ll dock the smartphone and carry on. Now, I have to reopen work from the desktop PC I call Beast.

  • Samsung teases Linux desktops on Galaxy S8 and Note 8 smartphones, thanks to DeX
  • Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Episode 8 | CYA!
  • The Latest In Our Massive Linux Benchmarking Setup - November 2017

    Two and a half years ago was the start of the continually evolving effort around turning a basement into a big Linux server room and last year having shared a one year redux in the effort but having been late in a second year redux into this effort and how the systems are configured for our Linux/BSD/open-source benchmarking at scale, here is an update.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Atom, Football Manager 2018, Kdenlive + More

    It’s a Sunday, which means it’s time for a concise roundup of recent Linux releases that didn’t merit their own dedicated post.

    A rather diverse set of apps and projects made releases in the past week, including two of the most popular code editing apps, what is (arguably) the best open-source video editor, and a desktop favoured by an enlightened few.

  •  

  • An Introduction to Linux Mint 18.2
  • [Slackware] LibreOffice 5.4.3 packages available

    The Document Foundation released the third update for LibreOffice 5.4 last week, as you can read on their blog where they write about the new LibreOffice 5.4.3 . My manic-depressive mood-swings are on the manic side at the moment so next to baking sausage rolls (brabantse worstenbroodjes for which I will publish an updated recipe on this blog soon) and a batch of sourdough bread, I finally had the energy to fix the admin interface for the SlackDocs mailing lists, wrestled myself through 14,000+ emails in my administrative mailboxes, wrote a plan to migrate my LAN services from the ageing server to the new server I bought this summer (which involves conversion of several large databases to InnoDB and loads of custom packages), plus I binge-watched almost 2 full seasons of Stranger Things in 3 days’ time. I know I will crash hard in a couple of days but I hope to have a new Plasma ‘ktown’ update before that happens.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Exam Results and Pass List #PeruRumboGSoC2018

    This early morning, students from different universities of Lima, Peru came to UNI to take an exam to prove knowledge of programming and GNU/Linux.

    [...]

    However, there are interest students that might not have enough skills as intermediate or advance level in programming on Linux. That is why we consider important to have a general view of the new group throughout the exam, so they can compare their academic achievements at the end of the instructional period.

  • Intel Icelake CPU Target Patch Published For GCC

    While it was just days ago Intel got around to posting the patch for introducing -march=cannonlake support for GCC, this weekend they already posted the patch for its successor with the new Icelake target.

    Icelake is Intel's successor to Cannonlake that likely won't be released until 2019. These 10nm+ CPUs are expected to feature a "Gen 11" graphics processor over Gen 10 coming with Cannonlake. But overall details on Icelake are still scarce given it's a ways out with Cannonlake even not here yet.

  • Inside the mechanical brain of the world’s first robot citizen

    Experts who have reviewed the robot's open-source code, which is posted on GitHub, agree that the most apt description of Sophia is probably a chatbot with a face.

  • Open Source Underwater Glider Wins 2017 Hackaday Prize

    The Open Source Underwater Glider has just been named the Grand Prize winner of the 2017 Hackaday Prize. As the top winner of the Hackaday Prize, the Open Source Underwater Glider will receive $50,000 USD completes the awarding of more than $250,000 in cash prizes during the last eight months of the Hackaday Prize.

    More than one thousand entries answered the call to Build Something That Matters during the 2017 Hackaday Prize. Hardware creators around the globe competed in five challenges during the entry rounds: Build Your Concept, Internet of Useful Things, Wings-Wheels-an-Walkers, Assistive Technologies, and Anything Goes. Below you will find the top five finisher, and the winner of the Best Product award of $30,000.

Security: Minix, Shadow Brokers, Kaspersky

Filed under
Security
  • The Truth About the Intel’s Hidden Minix OS and Security Concerns

    That supplemental unit is part of the chipset and is NOT on the main CPU die. Being independent, that means Intel ME is not affected by the various sleep state of the main CPU and will remain active even when you put your computer in sleep mode or when you shut it down.

  • Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core

    Mr. Williams had written on his company blog about the Shadow Brokers, a mysterious group that had somehow obtained many of the hacking tools the United States used to spy on other countries. Now the group had replied in an angry screed on Twitter. It identified him — correctly — as a former member of the National Security Agency’s hacking group, Tailored Access Operations, or T.A.O., a job he had not publicly disclosed. Then the Shadow Brokers astonished him by dropping technical details that made clear they knew about highly classified hacking operations that he had conducted.

  • UK spymasters raise suspicions over Kaspersky software's Russia links

AMD Linux Development

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring Queued For Linux 4.15

    We've been expecting it to happen for weeks while indeed the hwmon pull request was indeed sent in today exposing AMD Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC temperature reporting on Linux.

    The patch to the existing k10temp Linux hwmon driver has been floating around since September for AMD Zen / Family 17h temperature reporting finally being in place. It was staged in hwmon-next and is now called for pulling into the just-opened Linux 4.15 merge window.

  • Mesa Linux Graphics Stack Update Fixes AMD GPU Hang with Vulkan Dota 2 in VR

    Mesa, the open-source graphics stack for Linux-based operating systems, has been updated to this week to version 17.2.5, the fifth stability update to the Mesa 17.2 series.

    While Mesa devs are still working hard on the next major release of the graphics stack, Mesa 17.3, which is expected to arrive next week with numerous exciting new features and enhancements for Intel and AMD Radeon GPUs, they pushed another maintenance update to Mesa 17.2 to fix bugs, memory leaks, hangs, and other issues.

SparkyLinux 5.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

SparkyLinux is a Debian-based distribution for 32- and 64-bit computers. According to Sparky's website, the distro aims to "provide a ready to use, out of the box operating system with a set of slightly customised, lightweight desktop environments." There are no less than 24 desktops to choose from, as well as various "Special" editions. Like Debian, Sparky has three branches, which Sparky refers to as 'editions': Stable, Rolling and Development. For each edition there is a "Home" and "Minimal" version and, to make your choice yet more overwhelming, for each version various ISOs are available. Among others, the Home versions include ISOs for four different desktop environments and the Minimal versions include a "Linux Freedom" ISO. I couldn't find any information about the Linux Freedom version on the Sparky website but I am assuming that it ships with a libre kernel and no non-free packages.

If the download options sound complicated then that is because they are complicated. It doesn't help that the download section on the Sparky website is poorly designed. The pages feature long lists with links to dozens of ISOs and virtually no information to help you pick a suitable image. Worse, what little information is available is ambiguous. Various pages on the Sparky website state that the distro uses Debian's Testing branch while it is in fact built on all three Debian branches. Also, the download page suggests that the Stable editions are recommended - the link to the Stable ISOs is listed first and features an icon of a computer with a green monitor. The Rolling ISOs use the same icon with a red monitor, while the Development branch uses the colour black.

While trying to decide which version of Sparky to install I made the following table, which might make the available flavours a little easier to digest.

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Blockchain, Linux, and FOSS

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • PayThink Blockchain's potential rivals that of Linux and the Internet

    Every 10 years or so, a technology comes along that shows so much promise that it creates boundless opportunities for developers. Everything from Linux in 1991 to the Internet boom in the early 2000s to today’s blockchain.

    Developers who understand blockchain and get curious about all of its potential uses can both support their organization’s digital transformation, as well as forge a new, lucrative career path for themselves.

  • 80,000+ Blockchain Projects, 8 Percent Survive
  • Most Open-Source Blockchain Projects Are Abandoned Within Six Months

    The blockchain industry has seen major growth over the past few years. Virtually everyone and their dog has come up with a new use case for blockchain technology, even though most of these ideas are not viable whatsoever. It turns out just 8% of the 26,000 open-source blockchain projects created back in 2016 are still around today. That’s a worrisome statistic, albeit not entirely surprising either.

Why Australian enterprises are embracing open source

Filed under
OSS

Cost is another reason. Many organisations are in distress. They're being digitally disrupted, and can no longer justify spending millions of dollars on software licenses, maintenance fees and infrastructure/support costs. Open source software is a way of reducing their operating costs.

A recent TechCrunch survey identified the need for speed and control, scalability and developer network power as major drivers of OSS. Companies are also contributing to open source and encouraging their own developers to engage in open source projects. These aren't just tech firms, but global giants such as Walmart. GE and Goldman Sachs

The result is that open source can be much safer and more stable, due to being "constantly stretched, pushed, moulded and smoothed by their developer communities".

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Linux Kernel 4.14 Released

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.14

    No surprises this week, although it is probably worth pointing out how
    the 0day robot has been getting even better (it was very useful
    before, but Fengguang has been working on making it even better, and
    reporting the problems it has found).

    Sure, some of the new reports turned out to be just 0day doing things
    that just don't work (ie KASAN with old gcc versions, but also doing
    things like loading old ISA drivers in situations that just don't make
    sense - remember when you couldn't even ask if the hardware existed or
    not, and just had to know), but even then it's been all good.

  • Linux Kernel 4.14 Released, This is What’s New

    Linus Torvalds has announced the release of a Linux 4.14, the latest stable release of the Linux kernel.

    Linux 4.14 features a number of new features and changes, and is set to become the next long term support (LTS) release backed by several years of ongoing maintainence and support.

  • Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS Officially Released, Supports AMD Secure Memory Encryption
  • Linux 4.14 Kernel Officially Released

    The Linux 4.14 kernel is now official!

    Linus Torvalds has just released the stable Linux 4.14 kernel. And for a bit of bar trivia, the codename remains the stale "Fearless Coyote" that has been this way all year, back to Linux 4.10.

  • The 4.14 kernel has been released

    The 4.14 kernel has been released after a ten-week development cycle. Some of the most prominent features in this release include the ORC unwinder for more reliable tracebacks and live patching, the long-awaited thread mode for control groups, support for AMD's secure memory encryption, five-level page table support, a new zero-copy networking feature, the heterogeneous memory management subsystem, and more.

  • Linux 4.14 arrives and Linus says it should have fewer 0-days

    Linus Torvalds has given the world version 4.14 of the Linux Kernel.

    Torvalds announced the new release with his usual lack of fanfare, but with a couple of interesting nuggets of news.

    He opened by saying “it is probably worth pointing out how the 0day robot has been getting even better (it was very useful before, but Fengguang has been working on making it even better, and reporting the problems it has found).” Said robot is an automated vulnerability-checker that scours kernel code for issues. With version 4.14 slated to be the next kernel version to receive Long Term Support, and that support now running for six years instead of two, a more secure release will be widely welcome.

Server: MongoDB 3.6, Web Component. PHP 7.2.0 RC6

Filed under
Server
  • MongoDB 3.6 runs at the 'speed of data'

    MongoDB 3.6 will be generally available in early December.

    The open source (at its core) general purpose database has some noteable changes (its makers would call them enhancements) including a so-called ‘change streams’ feature, which enable developers to build what are being described as more ‘reactive’ web, mobile and IoT applications that can view, filter and act on data changes as they occur in the database.

  • I wrote a Web Component

    I’ve been meaning to play with Web Components for a little while now. After I saw Ben Nadel create a Twitter tweet progress indicator with Angular and Lucas Leandro did the same with Vue.js I thought, here’s a chance to experiment.

    Web Components involve a whole bunch of different dovetailing specs; HTML imports, custom elements, shadow DOM, HTML templates. I didn’t want to have to use the HTML template and import stuff if I could avoid it, and pleasantly you actually don’t need it. Essentially, you can create a custom element named whatever-you-want and then just add content here elements to your page, and it all works. This is good.

  • PHP 7.2.0RC6 Released

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.2.0 RC6. This release is the sixth Release Candidate for 7.2.0. Barring any surprises, we expect this to be the FINAL release candidate, with Nov 30th's GA release being not-substantially different. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system.

  • PHP 7.2 Is One Step Away From Release

    This week marked the sixth and final planned release candidate for PHP 7.2.

    This release is the final step before the official PHP 7.2 debut that is slated for 30 November unless there are any last minute blockers.

Games: Space Pirates And Zombies, Rec Center Tycoon and More

Filed under
Gaming

Security: Fancy Bear, MINIX, WikiLeaks Vault 8, Face ID

Filed under
Security
  • New Microsoft Word attacks infect PCs sans macros

    Fancy Bear, the advanced hacking group researchers say is tied to the Russian government, is actively exploiting a newly revived technique that gives attackers a stealthy means of infecting computers using Microsoft Office documents, security researchers said this week.

    Fancy Bear is one of two Russian-sponsored hacking outfits researchers say breached Democratic National Committee networks ahead of last year's presidential election. The group was recently caught sending a Word document that abuses a feature known as Dynamic Data Exchange. DDE allows a file to execute code stored in another file and allows applications to send updates as new data becomes available.

  • Minix Inside!

    Everything was find but in May a major security flaw was discovered and the fix required an update data to the AMT code. An update that many machines are unlikely to get. Since then various security researchers, mostly Google-based, have been looking into the hardware and the software and have made the discovery that there is an additional layer in the hardware that Intel doesn't talk about. Ring 3 is user land, Ring 0 is OS land and Ring -1 is for hypervisors. These we know about, but in addition there is Ring -2, used for the secure UEFI kernel and Ring -3, which is where the management OS runs. Guess what the management OS is Minix 3 - or rather a closed commercial version of Minix 3.

  • WikiLeaks: CIA impersonated Kaspersky Labs as a cover for its malware operations

    WikiLeaks, under its new Vault 8 series of released documents, has rolled out what it says is the source code to a previously noted CIA tool, called Hive, that is used to help hide espionage actions when the Agency implants malware.
    Hive supposedly allows the CIA to covertly communicate with its software by making it hard or impossible to trace the malware back to the spy organization by utilizing a cover domain. Part of this, WikiLeaks said, is using fake digital certificates that impersonate other legitimate web groups, including Kaspersky Labs.

  • My Younger Brother Can Access My iPhone X: Face ID Is Not Secure

    What this means is family members, who are probably the people you don’t want accessing your device, can now potentially access your iPhone. Especially your younger brother, or Mom… or Grandma.

KDE Frameworks 5.40 Software Stack Brings OpenSSL 1.1 Support, over 80 Changes

Filed under
KDE

KDE Frameworks 5.40.0 is here as the latest stable release of the software stack used in Linux-based operating systems that want to offer their users support for KDE apps, and it looks like it brings over 80 bug fixes and improvements across various of the included components.

Among the highlights, we can mention that KDELibs 4 support was enhanced with support for OpenSSL 1.1.0 in the KSSL library, HTTPS support is now used for all KDE URLs, improved recognition of WPS Office presentations, support for categories in KfilesPlacesView, as well as better support for the Wayland display server.

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Also: KDE Frameworks 5.40 Brings Kirigami Improvements, Wayland Foreign Protocol

Samsung’s Linux on Galaxy software will bring full-fledged Ubuntu desktop to your phone (with an external display)

Filed under
Ubuntu

Samsung’s DeX dock lets you connect one of the company’s recent phones to an external display, mouse, and keyboard to use your phone like a desktop PC… assuming you’re comfortable with a desktop PC that runs Android.

But soon you may also be able to use your Android phone as a Linux PC. Samsung recently unveiled plans for “Linux on Galaxy,” promising that you’d be able to run a full-fledged Linux environment on a phone hooked up to a DeX dock.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Audio/Video: Unleaded Hangout, Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers