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Thursday, 28 Aug 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Experimenting with Panamax Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 7:44pm
Story Red Hat bids to become a hybrid cloud power Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 7:31pm
Story First Firefox OS Phone Arrives in India, Priced at $33 Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 7:23pm
Story AN UPDATE ON KWIN_WAYLAND Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 7:10pm
Story RAW Sharpening and Noise Reduction With Raw Therapee on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 7:01pm
Story The New Features Of Mesa 10.3 Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:53pm
Story Linux Turns 23 Years Old Today Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:48pm
Story Don’t Fret Linus, Desktop Linux Will Slowly Gain Traction Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:41pm
Story Spice Fire One now in India: A look at alternate mobile OSes beyond Android, iOS, WP8 Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:22pm
Story Start Talking About the GNU/Linux Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 5:57pm

Canonical Joined The Khronos Group To Help Mir/Wayland Drivers

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's specific involvement with the Khronos Group isn't listed and we haven't seen Canonical names closely associated with any major specs out of the different working groups to date. However, Oliver Ries, the Head of Engineering Product Strategy at Canonical, wrote into Phoronix that they joined the group for pushing their display server agenda with trying to work towards an underlying driver standard for Mir/Wayland. Oli noted in his email, "Canonical has joined Khronos in order to help establish the necessary driver standard that is required for Mir (and Wayland) to succeed. We have specifically contributed to the current standard proposal/draft."

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Local Motors: Cars Should be Open Source Hardware

Filed under
OSS

There are several open source initiatives already underway to enable open source software in cars, including the Linux Foundation's Automotive Grade Linux group. But so far those projects have been mostly focused on the in-vehicle infotainment centers, which provide the user interface for the car and its entertainment system but not to the car's internal systems. That's not enough to fully transform the industry, Rogers said.

“You need to know how to hack the hardware in the car, because that's what defines how you can drive it and how you can run it.”

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Intel Sandy Bridge Gets A Surprise Boost From Linux 3.17

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Besides the recent work to support OpenGL Geometry Shaders for Sandy Bridge in Mesa, users of Intel "Sandy Bridge" HD Graphics can also be thankful for the forthcoming Linux 3.17 kernel. Early testing of Linux 3.17 has revealed that for at least some Intel Sandy Bridge hardware are OpenGL performance improvements with the newer kernel code.

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Open Source Okavango14: The Heartbeat of the Delta

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Misc

We can hear this heartbeat by listening to what the environment tells us through sensors and testing. I proposed that we build low cost sensors using open source hardware and software. In recent years there has been quite a disruption in computing ability as a result of the prevalence of smartphones. Increasingly small and powerful components and processors have created an opportunities that we would have never thought possible. One of the results of that is the single-board Raspberry Pi computer. Originally, the Raspberry Pi was created to enable students to learn hardware and software development. For the Okavango Wilderness Project, we are using them to take environmental readings and send those to us for inclusion into the Into The Okavango website. Jer will cover this more in his expedition post. We are using them to measure water temperature, pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, salinity, and specific gravity.

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Kochi innovator Arvind Sanjeev makes Google Glass clone for Rs 4,500

Filed under
Android
Linux

Instead of commercializing the product and with the intention of contributing to the community, Sanjeev posted a blog explaining how his 'Smart Cap' can be built by anyone using opensource hardware such as a Rasberry Pi computer, an Arduino board and Android software.

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Alfresco Raises A Fresh $45M To Fuel Open-Source Enterprise Content Management

Filed under
OSS

Alfresco, an open source, enterprise content management startup, is today announcing a new round of funding of $45 million — a Series D round that is more than twice as big as all of its previous rounds put together.

The UK-based company competes against legacy services like Documentum (which was co-founded by one of Alfresco’s co-founders, John Newton) and Sharepoint to help large organisations manage their disparate document storage both in the cloud and on-premises, and also offer versioning control and other compliance requirements across mobile, PC and other devices. Alfresco will use the new funding to step its business up a gear, with new sales and marketing efforts, and moves into more cloud-based services that could see it competing more directly also against the likes of Dropbox, Box and Huddle.

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HandyLinux 1.6.1 Is a Linux Distro with a Windows Vibe

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

HandyLinux is a newer operating system and its developers have tried to provide a clear and familiar desktop interface. It might feel like it has a Windows 8 vibe, which is probably an effect of the theme used, but the OS is actually quite interesting.

One of the most interesting aspects of the distribution is the menu launcher, which is quite odd. It opens a new window with all the applications and the user has to choose from there on. It's definitely something different from the norm.

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New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

Filed under
GNOME

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release.

Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of use in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit.

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Intel's Latest Linux Graphics Code Competes Against OS X 10.9

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Tests I carried out last month with a Haswell-based Apple MacBook Air showed Linux largely smashing OS X 10.9 with the latest open-source graphics driver code on Linux over Apple's OpenGL driver. Today I'm testing the latest OS X 10.9.4 state against the newest Linux kernel and Intel Mesa driver code on Ubuntu while this time using an older Sandy Bridge era Apple Mac Mini.

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Raspberry Pi powered juggling performance

Filed under
Linux

Flashing pins are spinning tens of feet into the air on a pitch dark stage. It's a juggling performance. All of the pins are perfectly synchronized to flash different colors in time to the music. It's part of the magic of theater and a special night out with friends to enjoy a distraction from daily life. Part of the magic—and why it's called magic—is that the audience doesn't know how these secrets are made backstage.

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Munich Reversal Turnaround, Linus on the Desktop, and Red Hat Time Protocol

Filed under
-s

Monday we reported that Munich was throwing in the Linux towel, but today we find that may not be exactly the case. In other news, Linus Torvalds today said he still wants the desktop. There are lots of other LinuxCon links and a few gaming posts to highlight. And finally today, Red Hat's Eric Dube explains RHEL 7's new time protocol.

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NHS open-source Spine 2 platform to go live next week

Filed under
OSS

Last year, the NHS said open source would be a key feature of the new approach to healthcare IT. It hopes embracing open source will both cut the upfront costs of implementing new IT systems and take advantage of using the best brains from different areas of healthcare to develop collaborative solutions.

Meyer said the Spine switchover team has “picked up the gauntlet around open-source software”.

The HSCIC and BJSS have collaborated to build the core services of Spine 2, such as electronic prescriptions and care records, “in a series of iterative developments”.

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What the Linux Foundation Does for Linux

Filed under
Linux

Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, talks about Linux a lot. During his keynote at the LinuxCon USA event here, Zemlin noted that it's often difficult for him to come up with new material for talking about the state of Linux at this point.

Every year at LinuxCon, Zemlin delivers his State of Linux address, but this time he took a different approach. Zemlin detailed what he actually does and how the Linux Foundation works to advance the state of Linux.

Fundamentally it's all about enabling the open source collaboration model for software development.

"We are seeing a shift now where the majority of code in any product or service is going to be open source," Zemlin said.

Zemlin added that open source is the new Pareto Principle for software development, where 80 percent of software code is open source. The nature of collaborative development itself has changed in recent years. For years the software collaboration was achieved mostly through standards organizations.

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Arch-based Linux distro KaOS 2014.08 is here with KDE 4.14.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linux desktop community has reached a sad state. Ubuntu 14.04 was a disappointing release and Fedora is taking way too long between releases. Hell, OpenSUSE is an overall disaster. It is hard to recommend any Linux-based operating system beyond Mint. Even the popular KDE plasma environment and its associated programs are in a transition phase, moving from 4.x to 5.x. As exciting as KDE 5 may be, it is still not ready for prime-time; it is recommended to stay with 4 for now.

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diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Filed under
Linux

One problem with Linux has been its implementation of system calls. As Andy Lutomirski pointed out recently, it's very messy. Even identifying which system calls were implemented for which architectures, he said, was very difficult, as was identifying the mapping between a call's name and its number, and mapping between call argument registers and system call arguments.

Some user programs like strace and glibc needed to know this sort of information, but their way of gathering it together—although well accomplished—was very messy too.

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GNU hackers discover HACIENDA government surveillance and give us a way to fight back

Filed under
GNU
Security

GNU community members and collaborators have discovered threatening details about a five-country government surveillance program codenamed HACIENDA. The good news? Those same hackers have already worked out a free software countermeasure to thwart the program.

According to Heise newspaper, the intelligence agencies of the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand, have used HACIENDA to map every server in twenty-seven countries, employing a technique known as port scanning. The agencies have shared this map and use it to plan intrusions into the servers. Disturbingly, the HACIENDA system actually hijacks civilian computers to do some of its dirty work, allowing it to leach computing resources and cover its tracks.

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Play Hexen, Quake I, and Quake II with 4MLinux Game Edition 9.1 Beta

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux Game Edition, a special Linux distribution based on Busybox, Dropbear, OpenSSH, and PuTTY, which also happens to feature a large number of games, is now at version 9.1 Beta.

The 4MLinux distributions are among the smallest ones in the world, but that doesn't mean the developers can't add a ton of interesting games into the mix.

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Firefox gets preliminary support for casting to Chromecast

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla is in the process of adding the ability to “cast” videos from Firefox to Chromecast devices, and you can try it now if you have the right hardware.

As announced in a post on Google+ post by Mozilla developer Lucas Rocha, “Chromecast support is now enabled in Firefox for Android’s Nightly build.”

To check this out, I downloaded the latest Firefox Nightly, installed it on my Nexus 10, and tested it with my Chromecast. It worked… although, it has some rough edges right now.

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SparkyLinux GameOver Is a Winning Work-Play Combo

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

This SparkyLinux game edition builds in access to a large collection of popular games compiled for the Linux platform. It brings the latest game fare via the Steam and Desura platforms. It provides handy access from a quick launch bar to a dozen plus emulators to let you run top-line games from leading gaming boxes and platforms.

GameOver does not wimp out on providing all of the needed everyday computing tools found in other Linux distros, either. It provides nearly all of the standard Linux applications out-of-the-box, so you do not have to install them on your own.

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WebKitGTK+ 2.5.2 Drops GTK+2 Dependency

Filed under
Software
GNOME

WebKitGTK+, a version of the WebKit open source web engine that uses GTK+ as its user-facing frontend, has reached version 2.5.2.

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