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Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ministry of ICT and NITA Uganda Urge on Adoption of Open Source Software

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OSS

Increased awareness, integration and adoption of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) in Uganda, both by government and the private sector is key to improved service delivery by government, reduced cost of public service deliver as well as improve competitiveness of Uganda’s ICT and ICT Enabled Services (ITES), Hon. Frank Tumwebaze, Uganda’s ICT and National Guidance Minister has said.

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Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Now in Feature Freeze, First Beta to Land August 25

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu and Debian developer Iain Lane informed the Ubuntu community that the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system is in Feature Freeze as of August 18, 2016.

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Kodi 17 "Krypton" Beta 1 Out Now with Huge Video Playback, Live TV Improvements

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Development

Kodi's Nathan Betzen announced just a few minutes ago the availability of the first Beta development release of the upcoming Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center software.

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Trying Out Fedora 25 With Wayland, Early Benchmarks Included

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

With the news from Friday that Fedora 25 will run Wayland by default I loaded up the current Fedora 25 development packages on a test system this weekend and I used that as my primary system for all of my business/production work this weekend. It went well and included are some early gaming benchmarks of Fedora 25 Workstation GNOME on Wayland and X.Org.

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FOSS Policy in EU, NZ, US and Taiwan

  • New US Government Source Code Policy Could Provide Model For Europe

    The United States government this month published its new federal source code policy to allow government-wide access to custom source code developed by or for any agency of the federal government. The policy, which aims to reduce duplication, avoid technology “lock-in,” and tap the best minds in or outside government, has caught the attention of free software developers in Europe who are hoping to use it as a basis for change there too.

    “We plan to use that in the next months as an example for European countries,” Matthias Kirschner, president of the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE), said in a recent email discussion on the new US policy.

  • Open Source at work, Open Society working in Taiwan

    There was striking evidence that Open Source can lead to Open Society at the first day of OS//OS at Wellington’s Michael Fowler Centre on Monday August 22.

    One of the keynote speakers, Audrey Tang from Taiwan, outlined how a quiet (and unheralded, at least in New Zealand) revolution has completely changed how democracy is practiced in the 23 million people nation sitting off China’s coast.

    It started with a parliamentary sit-in in 2014 – aided and abetted by Taiwan’s digital wizards as informal representatives debated how to use internet tools to ensure that all voices are heard before any new legislation is put in place.

    Eventually parliamentarians agreed that what was proposed by the ‘Sunflower Movement’ was valid.

    Now, the feelings and opinions of many different people (and animals and the environment) are considered. The role of parliament is to enact this debate outcome through legislation.

NVMe over Fabrics Support Coming to the Linux 4.8 Kernel

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Linux

The Flash Memory Summit recently wrapped up its conferences in Santa Clara, California, and only one type of Flash technology stole the show: NVMe over Fabrics (NVMeF). From the many presentations and company announcements, it was obvious NVMeF was the topic that most interested the attendees.

With the first industry specifications announced in 2011, Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe) quickly rose to the forefront of Solid State Drive (SSD) technologies. Historically, SSDs were built on top of Serial ATA (SATA), Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) and Fibre Channel buses. These interfaces worked well for the maturing Flash memory technology, but with all the protocol overhead and bus speed limitations, it did not take long for these drives to experience performance bottlenecks. Today, modern SAS drives operate at 12 Gbit/s, while modern SATA drives operate at 6 Gbit/s. This is why the technology shifted its focus to PCI Express (PCIe). With the bus closer to the CPU and PCIe capable of performing at increasingly stellar speeds, SSDs seemed to fit right in. Using PCIe 3.0, modern drives can achieve speeds as high as 40 Gbit/s. Leveraging the benefits of PCIe, it was then that the NVMe was conceived. Support for NVMe drives was integrated into the Linux 3.3 mainline kernel (2012).

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Linux 4.4.19

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.4.19 kernel.

All users of the 4.4 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.4.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.4.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Up to EUR 200,000 for Austria open source projects

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OSS

The Austrian government will award up to EUR 200,000 for open source projects on eGovernent, eHealth, eLearning, eInclusion, or commercial products and services. “Open source has beneficial macroeconomic effects, improving possibilities for use and development”, explained Muna Duzdar, State Secretary for Digitisation, in a statement.

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DNF 1.1.10 and DNF-PLUGINS-CORE 0.1.21-3 Released

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Red Hat

Another stability release of DNF and DNF-PLUGINS-CORE has been made. This release should eliminate the most critical bugs, especially the Unicode tracebacks and COPR plugin should work in Korora again. More information about the release can be found in DNF and plugins release notes.

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The Big Android Dev Interview: Maarten Edgar

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Android
Interviews

Good question! Well, I like [that] it's open source, I like that [in mobile development in particular] you make something and it's "one there." Specifically or Android, I like that it runs on a lot of different things. I've done some commercial Google Glass development — and, you know, it has a skin, but it is Android.

I like that you can do really useful stuff [with Android], it keeps on evolving and getting more interesting, so I like that.

What I don't like is... implementations of Android that are not truly Android — Samsung had this problem where, for example, you'd ask something in the system, you'd do a system call [asking] what kind of resolution it was and it would lie to you! It would say "oh no, I'm HDPI" when really it was an MDPI thing. And that just pisses me off. Incorrect documentation. And what's difficult is all the different device sizes. That is a challenge. Not necessarily something that I hate but it is challenging.

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Linux Messengers For Facebook

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Linux

Hi Guys, Today I am going to discuss messengers that you have in Windows but have you ever wondered that they have a version for Linux too. One of my friends asked me today if we have a Linux messenger for Facebook. There are several Linux messengers for Facebook but two messengers are that I used and I am very much satisfied.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft Has Broken Millions Of Webcams With Windows 10 Anniversary Update

    On August 2nd, Microsoft released the Anniversary Update for Windows 10 and when the bits arrived on computers around the globe, it brought with it new features and also broke webcams for millions of consumers. If your webcam has stopped functioning since the release of the Anniversary update, you are not alone but the good news is a fix is coming, hopefully in September.

    Microsoft made a significant change with the release of Windows 10 and support for webcams that is causing serious problems for not only consumers but also the enterprise. The problem is that after installing the update, Windows no longer allows USB webcams to use MJPEG or H264 encoded streams and is only allowing YUY2 encoding.

    Why did the company remove these options? The short answer is that with the Anniversary update there are new scenarios for applications to be able to access the webcam and the MJPEG or H264 encoding processes could have resulted in duplication of encoding the stream (poor performance) so the company limited the input methods to stop this from happening.

    Because of this change, which Microsoft tried to defend but then realized the scale of the impact this change has caused, means that when a webcam tries to use MJPEG or H264, the device will freeze. If you use Skype and your webcam freezes after about a minute, this is the reason.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.2.9.0
  • Flock 2016 in Krakow – Recap

    The fourth annual Flock conference for Fedora contributors took place from August 2nd-5th in Krakow, Poland. Over 200 developers and enthusiasts from different continents met to learn, present, debate, plan, and celebrate. Although Fedora is the innovation source for a major Red Hat product (Red Hat Enterprise Linux), this event received “gold” level sponsorship from a sister community — openSUSE. openSUSE serves the same function for SuSE Linux Enterprise as Fedora does for RHEL. SUSE showed the fellowship that rules in the open source world, which is why we love it!

  • GSoC 2016: That’s a wrap!

    Tomorrow, August 22, 2016, marks the end of the Google Summer of Code 2016 program. This year, I participated as a student for the Fedora Project working on my proposal, “Ansible and the Community (or automation improving innovation)“. You can read my original project proposal on the Fedora wiki. Over the summer, I spent time learning more about Ansible, applying the knowledge to real-world applications, and then taking that experience and writing my final deliverable. The last deliverable items, closing plans, and thoughts on the journey are detailed as follows.

  • Freelance Debian consultant: running DEBAMAX

    Everything started two years ago. Back then I blogged about one of the biggest changes in my life: trying to find the right balance between volunteer work as a Debian Developer, and entrepreneurship as a Freelance Debian consultant. Big change because it meant giving up the comfort of the salaried world, and figuring out whether working this way would be sufficient to earn a living…

  • Instagraph Update Adds Direct Messages, Pull-to-Refresh Support, Plus More

    A big update to the unofficial Instagram app for Ubuntu Touch just hit the Ubuntu Store.

  • Lunduke & Whatnot - Solus, elementary & Ubuntu-MATE
  • $5 Linux IoT compute module targets connected hardware applications

    Omega 2 is a Linux compute module designed specifically for building connected hardware applications. It combines, say Onion, its designers, “the tiny form factor and power-efficiency of the Arduino, with the power and flexibilities of the Raspberry Pi.”

Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • Linux Mint 18 KDE Beta released

    Clement Lefebvre, head of the Linux Mint project, has announced the availability of the Linux Mint 18 Sarah KDE edition. The KDE edition is the final official spin to get a beta release in the Mint 18 series. What is interesting about the KDE version this cycle is that users running Mint 17.3 KDE won't be able to upgrade to 18 because of the inclusion of Plasma 5, which is “considered a different desktop.”

  • Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" KDE Edition Beta Officially Released Based on Ubuntu 16.04

    Clement Lefebvre has had the great pleasure of announcing the official availability of the Beta release of the upcoming Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" KDE Edition operating system.

    A couple of days ago we had an exclusive first look at Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" KDE Edition, thanks to a news tip from one of our regular readers, but we also gave users the possibility of download the ISO images and take the upcoming GNU/Linux distribution for a test drive on their personal computers so they can see for themselves what's new.

  • Kdenlive 16.08.0 is here
  • Kdenlive Video Editor Snags Big Update, Improves Stability

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • When you wake up with a feeling

    One philosophy - Free software. Let me not explain it as a technical debt. Let me explain it as social movement. In age, where people are "bombed" by media, by all-time lying politicians (which use fear of non-existent threats/terror as model to control population), in age where proprietary corporations are selling your freedom so you can gain temporary convenience the term Free software is like Giordano Bruno in age of Inquisitions. Free software does not only preserve your Freedom to software source usage but it preserves your Freedom to think and think out of the box and not being punished for that. It preserves the Freedom to live - to choose what and when to do, without having the negative impact on your or others people lives. The Freedom to be transparent and to share. Because not only ideas grow with sharing, but we, as human beings, grow as we share. The Freedom to say "NO".

  • Every Simplenote App Is Now Open-Source
  • What do we mean when we talk about software 'alternatives'?

    OK, so alternative is a malleable term. But it's bigger than that. It's not just a question of life with The Munsters, it's a question of who's allowed in. With open source, there's no exclusion; even in the worst case where you feel unwelcome by some community that is building an open source application, you still have access to the code. Then the barrier to entry is your own resolve to learn a new application.

    And that ought to be the standard, no matter what. My Rorschachian responses to application types default to open source, with the alternatives being the ones that you might choose to use if, for whatever reason, you find the ones available to everyone insufficient:

    Office: LibreOffice
    Photo: GIMP
    Video: Kdenlive
    Operating system: Slackware

    The list goes on and on. You define your own alternatives, but my mainstream day-to-day tools are not alternatives. They're the ones that gets my seal of authenticity, and they're open to everyone.

  • Mozilla open-sourced its logo redesign, and here are the finalists

    Today, the company unveiled the seven finalists up for selection. “Each of the seven concepts we’re sharing today leads with and emphasizes a particular facet of the Mozilla story,” Mozilla’s Creative lead wrote in a blog post.

  • App development, avoiding pitfalls, and more OpenStack news
  • MariaDB open-source credentials take a hit

    The open-source credentials of MariaDB, the database company that was born as a fork from MySQL, have taken a hit after it announced that it would be releasing the new version of its MaxScale database proxy software under a proprietary licence.

    MaxScale is vital to monetising the MariaDB software as it enables the deployment of MariaDB databases at scale. Its new version, 2.0, is now available under what the man behind MariaDB, Michael "Monty" Widenius, calls a Business Source Licence. This will switch to the GNU General Public Licence in 2019.

    The licence terms state: "Usage of the software is free when your application uses the software with a total of less than three database server instances for production purposes."

    Though there is now a fork of MaxScale, it is from the old version from which this was possible. None of the fixes that are in version 2.0 are present.

  • issue #42: PowerShell, Bus1, SAM, Minisign, flyingwhale & much more!
  • How scientists are using digital badges

    The open source world pioneered the use of digital badges to reward skills, achievements, and to signal transparency and openness. Scientific journals should apply open source methods, and use digital badges to encourage transparency and openness in scientific publications.

    Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts know all about merit badges. Scouts earn merit badges by mastering new skills. Mozilla Open Badges is a pioneer in awarding digital merit badges for skills and achievements. One example of a badge-issuing project is Buzzmath, where Open Badges are issued to recognize progress in mathematics to students, or anyone wanting to brush up on their skills. Another example is IBM Training and Skills, which issues badges to validate credentials earned in their certification programs.

    The Center for Open Science went beyond validating skills and established badges for open data and open materials in 2013, and created guidelines for issuing these badges.

  • Nasa just made all its research available online for free

    Care to learn more about 400-foot tsunamis on Mars? Now you can, after Nasa announced it is making all its publicly funded research available online for free. The space agency has set up a new public web portal called Pubspace, where the public can find Nasa-funded research articles on everything from the chances of life on one of Saturn’s moons to the effects of space station living on the hair follicles of astronauts.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • GUADEC 2016, laptops and tablets made to run GNOME, surprise Pitivi meeting

    I arrived a couple of days early to attend my last GNOME Foundation board meeting, in one of the KIT’s libraries. The building’s uncanny brutalist architecture only added to the nostalgia of a two years adventure coming to an end:

  • GUADEC: what a week!

    So, another GUADEC is over. As I said in the previous post, this was my second time at the event. This time I’ve tried to be more involved: I applied for the volunteer team by helping with the catering which gave me the opportunity to meet the organizers (by the way, they are amazing!). Volunteering is a great experience, you have the opportunity to see some parts of the hard work that is behind the scene in a conference like GUADEC. I would recommend it to everyone!

  • GNOME's New US-Based Conference Is One Month Away

    Happening next month in Portland, Oregon is GNOME's first US-based conference.

    The Libre Application Summit (LAS) is the new event hosted by GNOME. It's described as like "a userland version of the Linux Plumbers conference." There will be discussions at LAS about Flatpak and other application technologies.

  • GNOME Photos 3.21.90 released
  • GNOME Photos 3.22 Is Coming With Sharing Support

    GNOME Photos 3.21.90 was released this weekend and it finally adds experimental sharing support ahead of next month's GNOME 3.22 release.

  • Do you want to test GNOME Photos?

    If you are interested in testing the latest version of GNOME Photos, now it will be easier than before!

    Recently we made Photos available as a Flatpak application. This means that you can now run the latest, unstable version and help us to find regressions or general bugs. At this time to install the application you still need to use the command line.

  • Oranchelo: A New Flat Icon Theme for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    You may have tried lots of icon themes and you may have a favorite but it is always a good idea to give try a new theme, who knows you may like. Here we are presenting you a new icon theme 'Oranchelo' which made way to Linux last year and continuously adding new icons. It is created with the design techniques "flat" and "Flat Long Shadow". Basically it is inspired by two icon themes "super-flat-remix" and "Cornie icons", some icons are also extracted from the pack Plateau icon theme. There is an official PPA from creator of this pack but only offers package for Ubuntu/Linux Mint/other Ubuntu derivatives. Since this icon theme is in active development, if you encounter any missing icon then directly report it creator via Github page. Arc theme suite used in the following screenshots and you can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • Recap of first impressions
  • Paper Prototype Test Analysis

    This usability test was a paper prototype usability test of the updated GNOME Settings application. Ciarrai included ten testers between twenty and forty years old, with good gender distribution (male, female, nonbinary) and pretty equal preferred OS platform (Mac, Windows, Linux) with slightly more non-technology professionals than technology professionals. Every participant claimed to use the internet daily. Only three of the participants had ever seen GNOME before.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Skylake Multi-Screen Issues On Linux Still Happening
  • Skylake EDAC Driver Is A Late Addition To Linux 4.8 Kernel
  • AMD Launches Open Source Ray Traced VR Audio Tech “TrueAudio Next”

    AMD has announced TrueAudio Next a “scalable” physics-based audio rendering engine for generating environmentally accurate, GPU accelerated audio for virtual reality.

    AMD has announced a set of key technologies to bolster its open source technology arsenal represented by GPUOpen, this time in the field of immersive VR audio. TrueAudio Next, AMD claim, provides “real-time dynamic physics-based audio acoustics rendering” and that any soundscape can now be modelled physically, taking into account reflection and occlusion.

    With GPUOpen and LiquidVR, AMD continues to pitch its tent in the open source camp, a reaction to its main rival NVIDIA’s approach which focuses largely on proprietary, GPU hardware and driver locked Gameworks VR (now known as VRWorks) initiatives and technologies – i.e. things that will only work if you develop for and buy their graphics cards.

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More in Tux Machines

Distro Development: Rescatux and Bodhi

  • Rescatux 0.40 beta 9 released
    Many code in the grub side and in the windows registry side has been rewritten so that these new features could be rewritten. As a consequence it will be easier to maintain Rescapp. Finally the chntpw based options which modify the Windows registry now perform a backup of the Windows registry files in the unlikely case you want to undo some of the changes that Rescapp performs. I guess that in the future there will be a feature to be able to restore such backups from Rescapp itself, but, let’s focus on releasing an stable release. It’s been a while since the last one. UEFI feedback is still welcome. Specially if the Debian installation disks work for you but not the Rescatux ones.
  • Bodhi 4.0.0 Updates and July Donation Totals
    Late last month I posted a first alpha look at Bodhi 4.0.0. Work since then has been coming along slowly due to a few unpredictable issues and my own work schedule outside of Bodhi being hectic over the summer. Bodhi 4.0.0 will be happening, but likely not with a stable release until September. I am traveling again this weekend, but am hoping to get out a full alpha release with 32bit and non-PAE discs next week.

Devices and Android

Leftovers: BSD/LLVM

Emma A LightWeight Database Management Tool For Linux

Today who does not interact with databases and if you're a programmer then the database management is your daily task. For database management, there is a very popular tool called, MySQL Workbench. It's a tool that ships with tonnes of functionalities. But not all of us as beginner programmers use all Workbench features. So here we also have a very lightweight database manager in Linux, Emma. Read
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