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Friday, 26 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 6:51pm
Story Leftovers: Debian Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 6:46pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 6:45pm
Story KDE Plasma 5.7.4 Desktop Environment Is Out with Plasma Desktop and KWin Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 6:44pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 6:39pm
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 5:03pm
Story Linux/FOSS Events: LinuxCon, ContainerCon, Software Freedom Day, and More Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 4:31pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 4:25pm
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 4:24pm
Story Nouveau Open-Source NVIDIA Tests On Linux 4.8, Mesa 12.1-dev Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 4:09pm

Systemd Rolls Out Its Own Mount Tool

Filed under
Linux

Systemd-mount is the newest tool added to systemd by Lennart Poettering.

The systemd-mount command is similar to the traditional mount command on Linux systems but with some differences.

Lennart describes in the documentation for systemd-mount, "instead of executing the mount operation directly and immediately, systemd-mount schedules it through the service manager job queue, so that it may pull in further dependencies (such as parent mounts, or a file system checker to execute a priori), and may make use of the auto-mounting logic."

Read more

Microsoft Embrace and Extend

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • initialsession: remove curl and wget aliases [iophk: “MS hobbles curl and wget unapologetically, and probably other tools too”]

    ...you do not create programs which intentionally have the same names as well known programs, especially when your programs do not provide exactly the same functionality as the originals. There is no way to view that sort of behavior in a positive light.

  • More Open Source is Good Open Source [Ed: openwashing is a problem (trying to make Windows look open), but some Novell/Red Hat staff disagrees]

New Strategy in War on Android

Filed under
Android
  • Anti-Google research group in Washington is funded by Oracle

    The Google Transparency Project is a Washington, DC group that's laser-focused on letting Americans know about Google's lobbying efforts. To get its message out, GTP has worked with journalists at Re/Code and The Intercept, which have run stories about Google's many visits to the White House, the prevalence of ex-Googlers in the US Digital Service, and other links.

    What wasn't known, until today, is who was paying the bills for research by the "nonprofit watchdog" group. "The folks running the Google Transparency Project won’t say who is paying for it, which is odd for a group devoted to transparency," noted Fortune's Jeff John Roberts, one of many journalists who the group reached out to in April.

    Today, Roberts has published a followup, confirming that based on a tip, he found at least one funder—Oracle. That's the same company that lost a major copyright trial to Google and continues to spar with the search giant in court.

  • Oracle Is Funding a New Anti-Google Group [iophk: "Why is Oracle helping MSFT? They are shooting themselves in the foot."]

    Groups with words like “transparency” in their name are typically very open about how they operate. That’s why the “Campaign for Accountability,” a non-profit hatched in Washington this spring, is such a mystery: the group refuses to say who pays for its activities.

    In case you’re unfamiliar, the activities of the CfA, as it calls itself, consist of a smattering of do-gooder projects — LGBT rights, clean water and so on — and a permanent campaign called “The Google Transparency Project,” which claims to expose various villainies carried out by the search giant. Now, though, at least one company has claimed credit for funding it.

  • Windows Phone sales collapse as Microsoft ravages Nokia remnants [iophk: "That's sales specifically. After the sale, many end up in the bin, as Tomi Ahonen showed figures for a while back"]

    Sales of Windows Phones plunged 76 percent in the second quarter, plummeting from 8.2 million in 2015 to less than 2 million this year, researcher Gartner said today.

    The dramatic decline was more fallout from Microsoft’s botched acquisition of Nokia’s handset business, the writing off of more than $10 billion, and the subsequent decision to back out of the consumer smartphone market.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Putt-Putt Goes to the Moon, an excellent Linux & SteamOS game for kids

    Today was another typical British summers day (rain), so I decided to pick up Putt-Putt Goes to the Moon and it has impressed me.

    I am always iffy about letting my son play games for some reason, partially due to the views of other parents I am around and how poorly they look at video games. Today I thought “screw it”. I personally see nothing wrong with them, as long as they are age appropriate.

    I picked up Putt-Putt Goes to the Moon which is the first point and click adventure game my son has ever played. Initially I though the interface would be confusing, but much to my surprise it’s actually relatively simple even for a young child's mind to grasp.

    It's a sweet and simple little point & click game where you play as a car called Putt-Putt and you accidentally have a trip into space. It has some really fun activities for kids clicking on random objects and seeing what happens, small puzzles like a maze to find your way through and so on. Watching my son quickly pick up how to navigate the maze by pointing the cursor in different directions was incredible.

  • Yooka-Laylee ToyBox shows that Yooka-Laylee should have no problems coming to Linux, plus new trailer

    Remember, we've seen Krome talk about the possibility of a Linux version of Ty and about 2 years ago Sonic Adventure got a Linux sub folder, so perhaps we might see more interest from them.

  • Spacewars: Interstellar Empires, a turn-based tactical strategy MMO is coming to Linux this December

    Need a new MMO in your life? Spacewars: Interstellar Empires is a turn-based tactical strategy MMO that will go into Early Access in December. Linux supported included as standard.

  • Slime Rancher is another Linux game you should let your kids try if you haven't already

    Along with trying my son out with Putt-Putt, another one I tried to great success is Slime Rancher and it's awesome.

    Disclosure: Key provided by developer for Steam, GOG also provided me with a key to their version.

    Note: Slime Rancher is currently in Early Access, but it's very playable.

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora Meetup Pune August 2016

    Fedora Pune Meetup for the month of August 2016 happened today at our usual location. We had in total 12 people turning out for the meetup.

    The event started with introductions and we had two new comers joining us this time, Trishna and Prathamesh.

  • Fedora/RISC-V, steady progress
  • GSoC: Final Submission

    This summer has been really amazing, I learnt a lot and worked crazy hours it has been a crazy yet amazing ride. I am not going to stop working on open source projects and with Pagure it is something really close to my heart.

  • What's my next badge?

    I love Fedora Badges. I'm not saying all I do is to get more badges, but it's a great motivator. One thing that somewhat miss a guidance on what options I have, what should I do to get another badge, how much activity will it need.

Android/Chrome

Filed under
Android

Intel Euclid: a brain, vision, sensor, hotspot module for robots

Filed under
Ubuntu

Intel demoed a “Euclid” robotics compute module running Ubuntu on a quad-core Atom, and equipped with a RealSense 3D cam, WiFi hotspot, and various sensors.

At the Intel Developer Conference in San Francisco this week, Intel showed off a prototype of an Intel Euclid robotics controller, equipped with a stereo depth-sensing Intel RealSense camera and running an Ubuntu/ROS stack. Designed for researchers, makers, and robotics developers, the device is a self contained, candy-bar sized compute module ready to pop into a robot. It’s augmented with a WiFi hotspot, Bluetooth, GPS, and IR, as well as proximity, motion, barometric pressure sensors. There’s also a snap-on battery.

Read more

Android posts highest ever market share in latest mobile data

Filed under
Android

What’s even better is that Android’s market share typically grows for 2-3 quarters before dropping off a little when the new iPhone hits. That means Android’s market share in Q3 may well break the 88% barrier before slowing down again.

On the other hand, in the gutter of Statista’s graph, lies iOS, which still sits comfortably in second place above the myriad other flatlining mobile OSes on the list. Apple’s mobile market share has been on an ever-so-slight decline in the last five years, something the company is surely hoping to reverse with the upcoming iPhone 7.

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AMDGPU-PRO vs. Open-Source Gallium3D OpenGL Performance On Polaris Is A Very Tight Race

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering how AMD's hybrid "AMDGPU-PRO" Linux driver stack compares to the latest pure open-source driver stack of the AMDGPU kernel driver and RadeonSI Gallium3D driver, here are side-by-side results for the Radeon RX 460, RX 470, and RX 480 Polaris hardware as well as the R9 Fury (Fiji) graphics card.

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The Big Android Dev Interview: Jolanda Verhoef

Filed under
Android
Interviews

My name is Jolanda Verhoef and I've been developing for Android for six years, focusing mainly on architecture. [At the Big Android BBQ] I gave a talk on architecture together with RxJava. So, how can RxJava help you create a nice clean architecture. I work at a company called Blendle, which is a startup in the Netherlands, and before that I worked at companies like Philips, Dutch railway stations, Enexis, stuff like that. And I built my own app for geocaching as well.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Foundation Picks Up a Big Data Platform

    The Linux Foundation announced today that it is adding Platform for Network Data Analytics (PNDA) as a Linux Foundation project. PNDA provides users with an open source big data platform for network analytics.

    PNDA’s vision is to remove the complexity of combining multiple technologies into an end-to-end system, using open source technology to provide a big data analytics platform. It has a streamlined data pipeline to surface the right data at the right time.

  • Intel Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Linux

    Earlier this year I heard from an Intel PR representative they had no plans for a Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Linux driver and immediately heard after that from a developer it was bollocks from the media department as usual. Today patches have emerged for supporting Turbo Boost Max 3.0 in the Linux kernel.

    Turbo Boost Max 3.0 is a feature to the Intel Broadwell-E CPUs and presumably more forthcoming high-end CPUs. Turbo Boost Max 3.0 is about boosting the frequency of a single CPU core when a single-threaded application is busy on the system occupied. TBM Tech 3.0 is in contrast to Turbo Boost 2.0 that boosts the frequency of all CPU cores when needed for short periods of time. But over the older Turbo Boost tech, TBM 3.0 can maintain its single-boosted-core frequency for a longer duration.

  • Linux Foundation Offering New Online Security Course

    The Linux Foundation's new online Linux security training program will cover a broad range of topics, from application security to network security. The course is geared toward professionals who are already running Linux systems.
    IT security threats seem to be everywhere, but skilled IT security professionals do not seem to be nearly as pervasive. It's a conundrum that the Linux Foundation wants to help alleviate with the introduction of a new online Linux skills training program.

    The online course, called Linux Security Fundamentals (LFS216), is an attempt to help individuals evaluate their own organizations' security readiness. The course is not intended as an introduction for those who are new to Linux, but rather is targeted at those already running Linux systems.

  • Geary User? Here’s A Question For You…

    If you’ve ever used the (frankly awesome) desktop e-mail app Geary, its maintainer has a question for you. He’s launched a poll asking for your feedback on whether the app should switch to instant search and away from the single-keystroke commands it currently uses. Not sure what either of those are? I’ll explain.

  • keysafe alpha release

    Keysafe securely backs up a gpg secret key or other short secret to the cloud. But not yet. Today's alpha release only supports storing the data locally, and I still need to finish tuning the argon2 hash difficulties with modern hardware. Other than that, I'm fairly happy with how it's turned out.

    Keysafe is written in Haskell, and many of the data types in it keep track of the estimated CPU time needed to create, decrypt, and brute-force them. Running that through a AWS SPOT pricing cost model lets keysafe estimate how much an attacker would need to spend to crack your password.

  • RQuantLib 0.4.3: Lots of new Fixed Income functions
  • Wammu 0.42
  • Full Metal Backup Using the dd Command
  • Basics of Backups
  • Monit is not limited to Monitor Linux system performance, also doing auto repair action for dead services
  • Latest Steam Client Update Now Rolling Out, This Is What’s New

    A new update to the Steam desktop client on Linux is rolling out. Though short on big new features there are some welcome fixes on offer.

  • The BeagleBone's I/O pins: inside the software stack that makes them work

    This article focuses on the BeagleBone Black, the popular new member of the BeagleBoard family. If you're familiar with the Arduino, the BeagleBone is much more complex; while the Arduino is a microcontroller, the BeagleBone is a full computer running Linux. If you need more than an Arduino can easily provide (more processing, Ethernet, WiFi), the BeagleBone may be a good choice.

KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Taming KDEwallet

    On opensuse forums, I often see complaints about KDEwallet (or “kwallet” for short). It can be annoying at times. In this post, I’ll indicate ways of keeping it under control.

    While this is oriented toward opensuse, it should also apply to other distros with one caveat. In opensuse, some of the applications have their settings and configuration under the directory “$HOME/.kde4”. For other distros, it is more typical to use “$HOME/.kde” (without that final “4”). So just adjust my suggestions accordingly.

  • KDE Applications 16.08 Released, Canonical Becomes A Patron

    KDE Applications 16.08 was released today as the newest bundle of KDE applications built atop KDE Frameworks 5.

    KDE Applications 16.08 features the KF5 ports of Kolourpaint, Cervisia, and KDiskFree. KDE's Kontact suite has also been improved upon, Marble 2.0 was added, Ark archiving support can now handle ApplImage and more, the Konsole terminal has been improved, and much more.

  • Emoji Toolbar Control
  • Contributors to Nautilus

    At GUADEC Andre Klaper made a report of top most contributors to GNOME in the last year, and to my surprise I saw my name in the top 5 of patch reviewers. Did I really review so many patches?

  • Mutter Now Supports Virtual Input Devices, GNOME Shell Improved Wayland Keyboard

    The GNOME 3.21.90 packages were released this week in preparation for next month's GNOME 3.22 desktop release.

    GNOME Shell 3.21.90 features an improved on-screen keyboard for Wayland. Also various bugs were fixed as part of this update.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • What’s Zacks EPS Estimates For Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Friday Trading Session Review for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fedora 25 To Run Wayland By Default

    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee has decided that Fedora 25 will indeed ship the Wayland display server by default in place of the X.Org Server.

    While many were doubting whether Fedora Workstation with its GNOME-based desktop would be ready for a Wayland default on Fedora 25, FESCo has determined it's feasible. This is great to see after Fedora Wayland didn't end up making it the past few cycles it was proposed while for a long time now it's been exposed as a non-default log-in option.

  • Fedora QA onboarding call tomorrow (2016-08-20) at 1700 UTC

    Hi folks! We are having another ‘onboarding’ video call to help new Fedora QA recruits get started tomorrow. Sumantro will be leading the call, I’ll try and stop by if I can. To join the call, just keep this piratepad open. The call agenda is shown there and it will be used for notes when the call is happening, plus there’s a chat panel. Ten minutes before the call starts, Sumantro will post the URL for people to join. Then just join the call and follow along! Please make sure to mute yourself on the call when you’re not talking.

    Thanks everyone, and welcome to the group, new members!

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • [New page] Open source alternatives
  • AT&T: What Is 'Open Source,' Anyway?

    Companies evaluating open source technology need to be careful that they get all the open source benefits. That's sometimes tricky, which is why AT&T has defined "three key characteristics of open source software that we consider paramount," says Greg Stiegler, AT&T assistant vice president of cloud.

    AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) is a leader among big network operators making a big open source commitment, with involvement in multiple projects and aggressive code-sharing. Last month, it released its Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) for network management and orchestration (MANO) as open source. (See AT&T Offers 'Mature' ECOMP as Open Source MANO, AT&T Makes Case for Open Source Sharing and AT&T's Chiosi: Unite on Open Source or Suffer.)

  • Mozilla Spurring Tech Project Development with Sprints and Grants

    At Mozilla, there is momentum gathering around new open source projects and the Internet of Things (IoT). The company is hosting an IoT sprint development weekend this September. Mozilla’s Hive Chattanooga, in collaboration with The Company Lab, is hosting 48Hour Launch: Internet of Things (IoT) Edition, on September 9-11. 48Hour Launch is a weekend-long competition that challenges teams of entrepreneurs and specialists to spend 48 hours transforming a startup concept into a viable business model, prototype, policy proposal, or piece of curriculum.

    The experience culminates with a Demo Night, where participants debut their work for a chance to win cash prizes, free business services, and a free trip to MozFest in London.

  • Crowdfunding closing on $5 Linux + Wifi tiny IoT compute module

    Omega 2 is a Linux compute module designed specifically for building connected hardware applications. It combines, say its designers Onion, “the tiny form factor and power-efficiency of the Arduino, with the power and flexibilities of the Raspberry Pi.”

  • FSFE summit 2016

    Imagine a European Union that builds its IT infrastructure on Free Software. Imagine European Member States that exchange information in Open Standards and share their software. Imagine municipalities and city councils that benefit from decentralized and collaborative software under free licenses. Imagine no European is any longer forced to use non-Free Software.

  • Google's new OS, Intel's open source VR headset, and more news
  • How to build your own maker workbench

    Maker projects can be tough if you don't have a good workspace. For a long time, mine was an ESD mat on the dining room table. But as my projects (and family) grew, I was under increased pressure to find somewhere else to work. Really, the 3D printer is what put my wife over the edge (and rightfully so).

  • Dutch consider mandatory eGovernment standards

    The Dutch government wants to make the use of open standards mandatory for public administrations, to provide business and citizens with easier access to eGovernment services. The government is developing a generic digital infrastructure, and its services and standards are to be used by all public administrations, writes Henk Kamp, the country’s Minister of Economic Affairs in a letter to Parliament.

Development News

Filed under
Development

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Tips on adding Linux to Your Developer Skill Set

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

The time when developers and administrators can get by with only Microsoft in their bag of tricks is over. With Linux's continuing dominance and growth in server space and with Redmond now embracing open source with actions as well as words, even those who develop exclusively for the Windows platform are almost certain to find times when they need to wrap their heads around an aspect of the Linux kernel or some open source application.

If you've been following tech news, you know that across the board there is an increasing need for people with Linux skills, which has pushed the salaries available for those with certifiable Linux talents to record highs. This opens an opportunity in traditional Windows shops where fully certified Linux people might not be necessary, but where certified Windows people with good Linux skills have extra value.

In other words, you can increase your value as an employee simply by honing your Linux and open source skills, without the need to necessarily shell out big bucks to Red Hat or the Linux Foundation for certification. There are plenty of educational opportunities available online, some free and others offered with a very low price tag.

Read more

Also: Talent remains the biggest issue for deploying open source in the enterprise

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Games for GNU/Linux