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Sunday, 20 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Best Linux applications (2018)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Over the years, I have compiled several articles detailing the best-of software for Linux and Windows, starting as early as 2008, and then making the last bundle in 2012. Six years is a very long time in the software sphere, so I thought about making another compilation.

My criteria for the inclusion and nomination are relatively simple: Applications need to be robust and stable, they need to accessible, the installation process should be relatively straightforward, and ideally, these will be cross-platform tools that run on other operating systems, too. There's a certain degree of personal taste, too, but I believe my choices are pragmatic, useful and fun. With the necessary expectation for a certain amount of hype, let us proceed. And do note, in some cases, you will see older and/or official screenshots, but that's mostly for aesthetic purposes.

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Also: Testing out Sumatra: a tool for managing iterations of simulations/analyses

Security: Malicious JS, Microsoft/NSA Back Doors, and Malicious Software in Ubuntu Snap Store

Filed under
Security
  • Google YOLO [iophk: "javascript"]

    Actually don't even click anything. Malicious websites can simply track your cursor's position and change the invisible button/iframe's position accordingly. So even if you make a click by mistake you will be forced to click on something else.

  • One year on from the WannaCry attack, are we more vulnerable than ever? [Ed: The ToryGraph repeats Microsoft's lies about Windows XP; all versions of Windows have NSA back doors and XP was hardly the problem in this case. The problem is Microsoft collusion with NSA.]

    The hackers, reportedly from North Korea, didn’t intentionally target the UK’s health service: it was collateral damage. WannaCry entered computers through a glitch, discovered by the US National Security Agency, in early Windows operating systems. The 33 affected NHS practices were hit because they hadn’t updated their Windows XP software for many years.

    [...]

    One of the biggest problems facing the UK, as WannaCry showed, is a lack of technical proficiency. There just aren’t enough defenders in the face of highly trained foreign criminals and state-sponsored hackers, Hannigan explains.

    [...]

    The fight doesn’t end with education. Hannigan’s other suggestions have included the creation of an international cyber war treaty. In the meantime, he welcomes the news that all NHS computers will be upgraded to Windows 10 and that the Government will spend £150 million in the next three years to improve the service’s security.

  • Malicious Package Found on the Ubuntu Snap Store

    An attentive Ubuntu user has spotted today a cryptocurrency miner hidden in the source code of an Ubuntu snap package hosted on the official Ubuntu Snap Store.

    The app's name is 2048buntu, a clone of the popular 2024 game, packaged as an Ubuntu snap —a relatively new app format for Ubuntu OS.

    According to a GitHub user named Tarwirdur, the app contained a cryptocurrency mining application disguised as the "systemd" daemon, along with an init script that provided boot persistence.

Wine-Staging 3.8 Gets Fixes For Star Citizen, Direct3D 11

Filed under
Software

For those looking to enjoy Windows-only games on Linux this weekend, Wine-Staging 3.8 has been released as the newest experimental build of Wine.

Wine-Staging 3.8 is based off Friday's release of Wine 3.8 while adding in more experimental patches. In addition to the re-basing of nearly one thousand existing patches atop the upstream Wine source tree, this Wine-Staging 3.8 release has a few more enhancements.

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Bigger than Linux: The rise of cloud native

Filed under
Linux
Server

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s first KubeCon + CloudNativeCon of the year took place in the Bella Center, Copenhagen. A giant greenhouse of a building with snaking industrial pipework and connecting concrete bridges; it's a vast container made of glass letting in light. A suitable setting for an industry that’s evolved rapidly from the release of Docker’s superstar container technology back in 2013.

Attendance has rocketed to 4,300, according to Dan Kohn, executive director of the CNCF, which almost triples attendance from a year ago in Berlin, but that’s not surprising as cloud native computing industry is meeting the business world’s demand for more scalable, agile applications and services that can be run across multiple geographical locations in distributed environments.

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A look at Scribus – Open-Source Desktop Publisher on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

As a print journalist by trade, I’ve had to use more Adobe InDesign than I care to get into. I swear I kern text in my dreams or something at this point.

The problem is that Adobe InDesign is not native to GNU/Linux and did not work as expected when running through WINE in the past (I can’t say if I have got it to work yet in Wine 3.X, as I haven’t honestly tried yet.) and so, I’ve had to learn to use alternatives from time to time when I don’t have InDesign handy – Like Scribus.

Scribus for all intents and purposes, is designed to fulfil the same role as Adobe InDesign, and can be used for all kinds of different purposes; from creating and laying out magazine or newspaper pieces, to creating a not-a-boring-word-document-resume for finding employment, or even business cards or comic strips.

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Linux-Friendly Arduino Simplifies IoT Development

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Arduino’s support for Linux IoT devices and single-board computers (SBCs) announced at the Embedded Linux Conference+Open IoT Summit NA in March cemented Arduino’s focus on cloud-connected IoT development, extending its reach into edge computing. This move was likely driven by multiple factors — increased complexity of IoT solutions and, secondarily, by more interest in Arduino boards running Linux.

In a “blending” of development communities for the masses — Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and BeagleBone — Arduino’s support for Linux-based boards lowers the barrier of development for IoT devices by combining Arduino’s sensor and actuator nodes with higher processor-powered boards like Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone. Top this with a user-friendly web wizard to connect the Linux boards via the cloud and it simplifies the entire process.

The expanded support for more architectures by the cloud-connected Arduino Create web platform is an inevitable and natural evolution of Arduino’s mission that was born out of a thought to simplify complex technologies with easy-to-use and open-source software, enabling anybody to innovate by making complex technologies simple to use.

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Games: Steam, Hyper Sentinel, Rocket League

Filed under
Gaming

KDE Frameworks 5.46.0

Filed under
KDE
  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.46.0

    KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.46.0.

    KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

    This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.46 As The Latest Add-Ons Update

    KDE Frameworks 5.46.0 is out today as the newest version of this collection of add-on libraries used by KDE applications and more for complementing the Qt5 tool-kit.

KDE vs. GNOME, X.Org vs. Wayland Radeon Linux Gaming Performance With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering how the Radeon Linux gaming performance is changed between desktop environments when testing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS out-of-the-box, here are some benchmarks. Not only is it looking at the performance between GNOME Shell 3.28.1 and KDE Plasma 5.12.4, but it's also comparing each desktop environment with its X.Org and Wayland session support. Additionally, these tests were done with both AMD Radeon Polaris and Vega graphics cards.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Mark Text: FOSS Markdown Editor With Realtime Preview

    Mark Text is a fairly new free, open source Markdown editor for Linux, Windows and Mac. Aimed at improving your editing efficiency, the editor supports the CommonMark Spec and the GitHub Flavored Markdown Spec.

    The application tries not to get in your way, by using a clean interface that tries to focus on your writing and nothing more, with a seamless live preview, while still allowing you to easily access its menu or see the current file name.

  • MySql DataTime/TimeStamp fields and Scala
  • Making Videos (that work in Firefox) from a Series of Images
  • Linux Fun – Play Old Classic Snake Game in Linux Terminal

    msnake is the Linux command line version of the most popular old classic snake game was written in C using ncurses library by Mogria and Timo Furrer. The game can be played at terminal with textual interface in almost all GNU/Linux distributions.

    The game is highly customizable and includes free/classic gameplay modes, keybindings, and even the GUI-like appearance of the application.

    To run msnake game on all modern Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, Fedora and Arch Linux, simply install it from the snapd package management software as shown.

  • Linuxfx LTS 9.0

Encryption in Gentoo and GNOME

Filed under
Gentoo
GNOME
  • On OpenPGP (GnuPG) key management

    Over the time, a number of developers have had problems following the Gentoo OpenPGP key policy (GLEP 63. In particular, the key expiration requirements have resulted in many developers wanting to replace their key unnecessarily. I’ve been asked to write some instructions on managing your OpenPGP key, and I’ve decided to go for a full blog post with some less-known tips. I won’t be getting into detailed explanations how to use GnuPG though — you may still need to read the documentation after all.

    [...]

    Signing keys are used to sign data, i.e. to prove its authenticity. Using multiple signing subkeys is rather trivial — you can explicitly specify the key to use while creating a signature (note that you need to append ! to key-id to force non-default subkey), and GnuPG will automatically use the correct subkey when verifying the signature. To reduce the wear of your main signing subkey, you can create a separate signing subkey for Gentoo commits. Or you can go ever further, and have a separate signing subkey for each machine you’re using (and keep only the appropriate key on each machine).

  • Fractal Hackfest, Strasbourg (day 2)

    The encryption is a needed feature but encryption is hard to do in rooms. Matrix uses public-key cryptography, for rooms they are using Megolm, that's a protocol to exchange encrypted messages with more than one and share that message keys in a one-to-one secure communication.

    I don't know a lot about this E2E because for me it's more important to have the client working with a basic functionality before the encryption. So you should read the official doc because maybe this that I'm writing here is completely wrong.

    To do all this E2E key sharing, client side encryption and communication, Riot has three different implementations of the same lib, so they have this code in the JavaScript SDK, the same ported to iOS version in ObjectiveC and the same ported to Android in Java. Below this lib there's the libolm that does the real encryption.

KDE: Kdenlive Sprint and Krita 4.0.3 Released

Filed under
KDE
  • Kdenlive Sprint - The Movie

    Kdenlive is KDE's advanced video-editor. This April, members of the Kdenlive project met up for five days - from 25th to the 29th - for their spring sprint. The developers Jean-Baptiste Mardelle and Nicolas Carion, along with professional community videomakers Farid Abdelnour, Rémi Duquenne and Massimo Stella, got together at the Carrefour Numérique in Paris to push the project forward.

  • Krita 4.0.3 Released

    Today the Krita team releases Krita 4.0.3, a bug fix release of Krita 4.0.0. This release fixes an important regression in Krita 4.0.2: sometimes copy and paste between images opened in Krita would cause crashes (BUG:394068).

Graphics: X.Org Server 1.20, NVIDIA 396.18.11, Mesa 18.1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Several DDX Drivers Aren't Yet Ready For X.Org Server 1.20

    If you were hoping to build the newly-released X.Org Server 1.20 on your system(s) this weekend, be forewarned that a number of the DDX drivers haven't yet been updated for supporting the API/ABI changes of this big server update.

    A number of the smaller, obscure drivers like Tseng, SiS, R128, and March64 haven't yet been updated for xorg-server 1.20 support but also the more prominent xf86-video-ati and xf86-video-amdgpu DDX drivers have not yet seen new releases with xorg-server 1.20 support.

  • NVIDIA 396.18.11 Linux Vulkan Driver Released With Fixes

    The NVIDIA 396.18.11 Vulkan beta driver for Linux was released on Friday as pulling in the latest upstream fixes to the Vulkan beta driver branch for Windows and Linux.

    The 396.18.11 Linux driver and 397.76 Windows driver pull in the latest fixes from their general release driver. For the Linux release, it comes just three days after another small beta update (396.18.08) that was released to fix Alt-Tab freezing with the DXVK Direct3D11-over-Vulkan implementation.

  • Mesa 18.1 Expected To Officially Debut Next Week

    While Mesa 18.0 debuted just about one and a half months ago, the fourth and final release candidate of Mesa 18.1 is now available for testing as the next quarterly feature installment to these primarily OpenGL/Vulkan open-source drivers.

    First time Mesa release manager Dylan Baker issued Mesa 18.1.0-RC4 this Friday evening with 25 queued patches. The affected work ranges from core Mesa fixes to Gallium3D, R600, RADV, RadeonSI, i965, and ANV fixes... Pretty much fixes across the board at least as far as the major drivers are concerned sans Nouveau.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Considering an RSAC Expo booth? Our Experience, in 5,000 words or less

     

    So we decided to try a booth for 2018, and figured we'd document our experience (and thoughts) along the way. In this post you'll find a full breakdown of all our costs for attending and boothing at RSAC, including what it takes to get a space; kitting it out with furniture, equipment, swag and more; staffing the booth; the crazy that is conference pricing; and the logistics for actually making it happen.

  • OpenStack Summit Vancouver 2018

    OpenStack Summit is the leading event in Open Infrastructure, bringing together the builders and operators for sessions and workshops on containers, CI/CD, telecom & NFV, public cloud, multi-cloud and more.

  • rr Chaos Mode Improvements

    rr's chaos mode introduces nondeterminism while recording application execution, to try to make intermittent bugs more reproducible. I'm always interested in hearing about bugs that cannot be reproduced under chaos mode, especially if those bugs have been diagnosed. If we can figure out why a bug was not reproducible under chaos mode, we can often extend chaos mode to make it reproducible, and this improves chaos mode for everyone. If you encounter such a bug, please file an rr issue about it.

  • This week in Mixed Reality: Issue 6

    The team and community continue to add new features, fix bugs, and respond to early user and developer feedback to deliver a solid experience across Firefox Reality, Hubs and the content related projects.

  • Best free and open source Microsoft Excel alternatives
  • Microsoft's Latest Excel Update Has Security Pros Anxious

     

    [...] But JavaScript also creates more interconnection and more access points—meaning more points of potential vulnerability. It's already a bit of a web security nightmare. And on top of that, attackers have long shown their willingness to exploit customization and automation features in Excel—and other Microsoft Office programs—to create malicious files for phishing and other attacks. The ubiquity of Microsoft Office files make them the perfect vector for tricking victims and wreaking havoc.

  • Windows Subsystem for Linux - Many distros!
  • $125 Million Richer, Mesosphere Tackles Big Data at the Edge [Ed: Be very careful of Mesos and Mesosphere. Microsoft people, those who participated in competition crimes, are funding it and Microsoft attempted a literal takeover.]
  • New release of eiffel-iup

    It is already available a new version of eiffel-iup, a Liberty Eiffel wrapper to IUP toolkit. So you can build your graphical application from Eiffel using Liberty Eiffel, the GNU implementation of Eiffel language. So happy hacking.

  • Gnome Login Screen Redesign, CentOS Update, VirtualBox, Mender Team and IoT

    Oracle recently announce the available of VirtualBox 5.2.12. This latest update includes support for the Linux 4.17 kernel, alongside your typical bug fixes.

  • Linux for developers comes to Chrome OS, using AR to assist surgeons, and more open source news

    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at Linux for developers coming to Chrome OS, a tool that uses AR to assist surgeons, and more.

  • Java: Executing code in comments?!

System76 vs. The LVFS Firmware Updating Service

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

This week the latest open-source drama was a differing of opinions between Richard Hughes of Red Hat who maintains Fwupd and LVFS for Linux firmware updating from the desktop and that of Linux PC vendor System76.

Richard Hughes volleyed a blog post that recommend not buying System76 hardware for those wanting firmware updates via LVFS (the Linux Vendor Firmware Service). He wrote that post based upon System76 not currently using UEFI UpdateCapsule for BIOS updates, System76 developing a Rust tool to flash the embedded controller, and them rolling out their own firmware update handler that officially targets Ubuntu and Pop!_OS. Richard then encouraged Linux users to buy Dell XPS laptops instead.

Richard's post in full can be read here.

On Friday, System76 responded to those accusations. According to System76, Richard expressed via email that the approach System76 is using for firmware updating likely wouldn't work with LVFS and also their distributing of a proprietary firmware flashing tool likely wouldn't be approved by Red Hat legal and they also found flashing the embedded controler from user-space to be sub-optimal.

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Scientific Linux 7.5 Released As RHEL 7.5 Rebuild

Filed under
Red Hat
Sci/Tech

Testing of the release candidate earlier this month went well and out now is the official Scientific Linux 7.5 release.

Scientific Linux 7.5 is the re-spin derived from upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 and its many changes/improvements.

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FreeBSD 11.2 Beta Now Available For Testing

Filed under
BSD

FreeBSD 11.2 has reached the beta milestone to succeed FreeBSD 11.1 from last year and ahead of FreeBSD 12.0 that is expected this November.

FreeBSD 11.2 is targeted for release around the end of June but before then they expect to do a total of three beta releases and up to three release candidates.

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Even Microsoft Admits Its Products Are Inherently Faulty

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft to replace Surface Pro 4 tablets affected by screen flickering

    Microsoft is formally launching a replacement program for Surface Pro 4 devices affected by screen flickering. Any Surface Pro 4 units experiencing the problem will be covered for up to three years from the time of original purchase. “We have heard your feedback and after careful examination, have determined that a small percentage of Surface Pro 4 devices are exhibiting a screen flicker that cannot be addressed with a firmware or driver update,” the company said on its support page with details on the program.

    The annoying flickering has been well-documented on Microsoft’s support forums, with some users taking drastic steps like putting their Surface Pro 4 in a freezer to temporarily fix the issue. Back in February, Microsoft said it was closely monitoring the situation, and the company came to the conclusion that there’s no convenient fix.

  • Microsoft can’t fix “flickergate” Surface Pro 4s with software, so it’s replacing them
  • Don't Skype Me: How Microsoft Turned Consumers Against a Beloved Brand

    In March tech investor and commentator Om Malik summarized the negativity by tweeting that Skype was “a turd of the highest quality” and directing his ire at its owner. “Way to ruin Skype and its experience. I was forced to use it today, but never again.”

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