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Sunday, 11 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New CloudLinux 7 Kernel Released, Rebased to Red Hat's OpenVZ Linux 3.10 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:49am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:32am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:32am
Story Office Suites Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:26am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:25am
Story Kernel Space/Linux Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:24am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:23am
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:22am
Story Server Administration Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:22am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:21am

Shuttleworth Foundation/Mozilla Foundation Overlap

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

  • Helen Turvey Joins the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors

    Today, we’re welcoming Helen Turvey as a new member of the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors. Helen is the CEO of the Shuttleworth Foundation. Her focus on philanthropy and openness throughout her career makes her a great addition to our Board.

    Throughout 2016, we have been focused on board development for both the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation boards of directors. Our recruiting efforts for board members has been geared towards building a diverse group of people who embody the values and mission that bring Mozilla to life. After extensive conversations, it is clear that Helen brings the experience, expertise and approach that we seek for the Mozilla Foundation Board.

  • Why I’m joining Mozilla’s Board, by Helen Turvey

    For the last decade I have run the Shuttleworth Foundation, a philanthropic organisation that looks to drive change through open models. The FOSS movement has created widely used software and million dollar businesses, using collaborative development approaches and open licences. This model is well established for software, it is not the case for education, philanthropy, hardware or social development.

Games for GNU/Linux

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Mesa 12.0.4 Promises 15% Performance Boost for Radeon Users on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    The Mesa problem in Ubuntu Linux is about to be resolved very soon, after the game developers behind the UK-based Feral Interactive video game publishing company urged Canonical to update the software to a most recent version.

    The Mesa 3D Graphics Library is a unique open-source implementation of the OpenGL graphics API for Linux-based operating systems, and it includes drivers for Intel, Radeon, and Nvidia graphics cards. But it looks like Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) was shipping with a pretty old version of Mesa.

  • Canonical to sue cloud provider over Ubuntu images

    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has said it plans to sue an European cloud provider for distributing unofficial images of its cloud distribution despite several warnings.

    The company offers certified cloud images of Ubuntu that are guaranteed to run on specific cloud platforms such as AWS, Azure or Google.

    Performance is optimised and integrated with underlying cloud requirements, with input from the host's cloud engineers.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Eight great Linux gifts for the holiday season

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Do you want to give your techie friend a very Linux holiday season? Sure you do! Here are some suggestion to brighten your favorite Tux fan's day.

Read more

Also: More Random Gift Ideas For Linux Enthusiasts & Others Into Tech

Which open source gift is at the top of your holiday wish list?

Ubuntu-Based ExTiX OS Updated for Intel Compute Sticks with Improved Installer

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton announced this past weekend the release of an updated build of his Ubuntu-based ExTiX Linux distribution for Intel Compute Stick devices.

Last month, we reported on the initial availability of a port of the ExTiX operating system for Intel Compute Sticks, boasting the lightweight and modern LXQt 0.10.0 desktop environment and powered by the latest Linux 4.8 kernel, tweaked by Arne Exton for Intel Atom processors.

And now, ExTiX Build 161203 is out as a drop-in replacement for Build 161119, bringing a much-improved Ubiquity graphics installer that should no longer crash, as several users who attempted to install the Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distro on their Intel Compute Stick devices reported.

Read more

Also: Debian-Based SparkyLinux 4.5 Brings Support for exFAT Filesystems, systemd 232

4MLinux 20.1 Linux Distro Released with Kernel 4.4.34 LTS to Restore PAE Support

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.23 Snap Creator for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and 16.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Snappy development team have released a new maintenance version of the Snapcraft 2.x tool that lets applications developers package their apps as Snap packages for Ubuntu and other GNU/Linux distributions that support Snaps.

Read more

Mandriva Fork Mageia 5.1 Lets Users Install the Linux OS on NVMe-Based Drives

Filed under
MDV

The development team behind the Mandriva fork Mageia Linux distribution are announcing the release and general availability of the first, and probably the last, point release of the Mageia 5 series.

Read more

Linux 4.9-rc8

Filed under
Linux

So if anybody has been following the git tree, it should come as no
surprise that I ended up doing an rc8 after all: things haven't been
bad, but it also hasn't been the complete quiet that would have made
me go "no point in doing another week".

Extra kudos to Arnd, who actually root-caused the incredibly annoying
"modversions do not work with new versions of binutils", bisecting it
to a particular change to symbol handling in binutils, and then adding
a small one-liner patch to the kernel to work around the issue. We
already had other workarounds in place, but it's always good to know
exactly what in the tool chain changed to cause things like this.

Read more

Also: Linux Kernel 4.9 Slated for December 11 Release as Linus Torvalds Outs RC8

Linux 4.9-rc8 Kernel Released

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • China builds world’s fastest supercomputer without U.S. chips

    China on Monday revealed its latest supercomputer, a monolithic system with 10.65 million compute cores built entirely with Chinese microprocessors. This follows a U.S. government decision last year to deny China access to Intel's fastest microprocessors.

    There is no U.S.-made system that comes close to the performance of China's new system, the Sunway TaihuLight. Its theoretical peak performance is 124.5 petaflops, according to the latest biannual release today of the world's Top500 supercomputers. It is the first system to exceed 100 petaflops. A petaflop equals one thousand trillion (one quadrillion) sustained floating-point operations per second.

    The most important thing about Sunway TaihuLight may be its microprocessors. In the past, China has relied heavily on U.S. microprocessors in building its supercomputing capacity. The world's next fastest system, China's Tianhe-2, which has a peak performance of 54.9 petaflops, uses Intel Xeon processors.

  • More Benchmarks From The 2016 MacBook Pro (Mac-A5C67F76ED83108C)
  • A Look At The Many Different Vulkan Engine/Renderer Projects On GitHub
  • Trisquel 8.0 Alpha Pairs A Linux-Libre Experience With MATE

    This past week marked the availability of the first alpha release of Trisequel 8.0 "Flidas", the latest installment of the Free Software Foundation endorsed GNU/Linux distribution.

    Among the changes coming for Trisquel 8.0 is using the Linux-Libre 4.4 kernel, MATE 1.12.1 is the default desktop over GNOME, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is used as the base.

  • It's official: Kondik is gone from the Cyanogen that bore his handle [Ed: Microsoft deal killed them. As usual.]

    STEVE KONDIK, the original founder of Cyanogen, has been officially ousted from the company following the closure of its Seattle base.

    As reported yesterday, Kondik told developers that he "f*cked up and was f*cked over" and that he was considering what to do next given that he had lost control of rights to the Cyanogen name when he and his co-founder had moved from developer group to business.

    Kondik, aka CyanogenMod, relinquished all control over the operation of the business taking on the moniker of chief science officer, which may or may not have been a simple honorific.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Ransomware: Windows is the elephant in the room

    Ransomware has slowly become the most common and most difficult threat posed to companies and individuals alike over the last year.

    And there is one common thread to practically all ransomware attacks: Windows.

    Microsoft acolytes, supporters and astro-turfers can scream till they are blue in the face, but it is very rare to see ransomware that attacks any other platform.

    Of course, these Redmond backers are careful to say that ransomware attacks "computer users", not Windows users.

    But statistics tell the truth. In 2015, the average number of infections hitting Windows users was between 23,000 and 35,000, according to Symantec.

    In March, this number ballooned to 56,000 with the arrival of the Locky ransomware. And in the first quarter of 2016, US$209 million was paid by Windows users in order to make their locked files accessible again.

  • GCC Tackling Support For ARMv8-M Security Extensions

    GCC developers have been working to support the compiler-side changes for dealing with ARMv8-M Security Extensions.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies

    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake.

    But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept.

    “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”

  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux

    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.

  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day

    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.

  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background

    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?

  • Productivity++

    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!

  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report

    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise.

    I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?

    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability.

    The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux.

    If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.

  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)

    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently .
    All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.

  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill

    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.”

    The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.

  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter

    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost.

    Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • What's the most secure operating system?

    Deciding what operating system (OS) to keep your computer running smoothly—and with the highest level of security—is a controversial yet frequent question many business owners, government officials, and ordinary Joes and Janes ask.

    There are many different operating systems—the software at the base of every computer, controlling the machine's array of functions—like Mac OS10, which comes pre-loaded on Apple laptops and desktops, and Microsoft Windows that's on the majority of personal computers. Google's Android and Apple's iOS for mobile devices are designed specifically for devices with smaller touchscreens.

    Whatever OS you use—and many users are very loyal to their operating system of choice and will argue that their's is the best—it's not entirely secure or private. Hackers are still infiltrating systems every day, and they can easily target victims with malware to spy on users and disable their operating system altogether.

    Because of this, choosing a secure system is essential to staying secure online. Below are the top three secure operating systems that will help users take the next step to ensure proper cyber and hardware security.

  • New IoT Botnet, Attackers Target Tor, and More…

    Firefox’s emergency security patch: If you use Firefox at all, and I’m assuming that most of you do, you might want to run an update to get the latest security patch from Mozilla. The patch was rushed to market on November 30 to fix a zero day vulnerability that was being exploited in the wild to attack the Firefox based Tor browser.

    In a blog post on Wednesday, Mozilla’s security head Daniel Veditz wrote, “The exploit in this case works in essentially the same way as the ‘network investigative technique’ used by FBI to deanonymize Tor users…. This similarity has led to speculation that this exploit was created by FBI or another law enforcement agency. As of now, we do not know whether this is the case. If this exploit was in fact developed and deployed by a government agency, the fact that it has been published and can now be used by anyone to attack Firefox users is a clear demonstration of how supposedly limited government hacking can become a threat to the broader Web.”

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More in Tux Machines

OpenShift and Google

  • Red Hat launches 'OpenShift' dedicated on Google Cloud Platform
    World's leading provider of open source solutions Red Hat has announced the general availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform.
  • Red Hat and Google join forces on containers
    Red Hat and Google are set to offer enterprise customers a managed OpenShift service hosted on Google's cloud to make the build, launch and management of applications a less time-consuming process. OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform will speed up the adoption of containers, according to Red Hat, giving developers the guidance they need to create applications and deploy them faster.
  • Red Hat’s Container Platform Lands on Google Cloud
    Red Hat’s OpenShift Dedicated container platform will now be available on Google Cloud Platform, the companies announced yesterday. OpenShift Dedicated is a managed version of Red Hat’s OpenShift container platform, targeting enterprises. Launched in December, the Dedicated version puts Red Hat in the role of a service provider, taking care of infrastructure and operations.

Security News

  • A 'mystery device' is letting thieves break into cars and drive off with them, insurance group says
    Insurance crime investigators are raising alarms over a device that not only lets thieves break into cars that use keyless entry systems but also helps start and steal them. Investigators from the National Insurance Crime Bureau, a not-for-profit organization, said in an interview they obtained what they called the “mystery device” from a third-party security expert at an overseas company. So far, the threat here may be mostly theoretical. The crime bureau said it heard of the device being used in Europe and had reports that it had entered the U.S., but said there are no law enforcement reports of a car being stolen using it in the United States.
  • Turkish hacking group offers tiered points rewards program for DoS attacks
    A TURKISH HACKING GANG is taking an unusual approach to funding denial of service attacks, and is soliciting for, and offering hackers rewards for taking down chosen pages. This is unusual, as far as we know, and it has led to the creation of comment from the security industry. Often these things do.
  • German judges explain why Adblock Plus is legal
    Last month, Adblock Plus maker Eyeo GmbH won its sixth legal victory in German courts, with a panel of district court judges deciding that ad-blocking software is legal despite German newsmagazine Der Spiegel's arguments to the contrary. Now, the reasoning of the Hamburg-based panel of judges has been made public. According to an unofficial English-translated copy (PDF) of the judgment, Spiegel Online argued it was making a "unified offer" to online consumers. Essentially, that offer is: read the news content for free and view some ads. While Internet users have the freedom "not to access this unified offer," neither they nor Adblock Plus have the right to "dismantle" it. Eyeo's behavior thus amounted to unfair competition, and it could even wipe the offer out, Spiegel claimed. "The Claimant [Spiegel] argues that the Defendant’s [Eyeo's] business model endangers the Claimant’s existence," reads the judgment, which isn't final because it can be appealed by Spiegel. Because users aren't willing to pay for editorial content on the Web, "it is not economically viable for the Claimant to switch to this business model." Spiegel asked for an accounting of all the blocked views on its website and a fine to be paid—or even for managers Wladimir Palant and Till Faida to be placed in "coercive detention" of up to two years.
  • Op-ed: I’m throwing in the towel on PGP, and I work in security [Ed: Onlya tool would drop PGP for Facebook-controlled Whatsapp. The company back-doors everything under gag orders.]
    In the coming weeks I'll import all signatures I received, make all the signatures I promised, and then publish revocations to the keyservers. I'll rotate my Keybase key. Eventually, I'll destroy the private keys.
  • 90 per cent of NHS Trusts are still running Windows XP machines
    90 PER CENT of the NHS continues to run Windows XP machines, two and a half years after Microsoft ditched support for the ageing OS. It's Citrix who is ringing the alarm bells, having learnt that 90 per cent of NHS Trusts are still running Windows XP PCs. The firm sent Freedom of Information (FoI) requests to 63 NHS Trusts, 42 of which responded. The data also revealed that 24 Trusts are still not sure when they'll migrate from Windows XP to a newer version of Microsoft's OS. 14 per cent said they would be transitioning to a new operating system by the end of this year, while 29 per cent pledged to make the move sometime next year.
  • Ransomware blamed for attack that caused Lincolnshire NHS Trust shutdown
    RANSOMWARE is to blame for an attack which saw an NHS Trust in Lincolnshire that forced to cancel operations for four days in October. In a statement, Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust said that a ransomware variant called Globe2 was to blame for the incident.
  • Researchers Find Fresh Fodder for IoT Attack Cannons
    New research published this week could provide plenty of fresh fodder for Mirai, a malware strain that enslaves poorly-secured Internet of Things (IoT) devices for use in powerful online attacks. Researchers in Austria have unearthed a pair of backdoor accounts in more than 80 different IP camera models made by Sony Corp. Separately, Israeli security experts have discovered trivially exploitable weaknesses in nearly a half-million white-labeled IP camera models that are not currently sought out by Mirai.
  • Your data is not safe. Here's how to lock it down
    But some people worry that government surveillance will expand under a Donald Trump presidency, especially because he tapped Mike Pompeo, who supports mass surveillance, for CIA chief.
  • Tor at the Heart: Library Freedom Project
    Library Freedom Project is an initiative that aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries by teaching librarians and their local communities about surveillance threats, privacy rights and responsibilities, and privacy-enhancing technologies to help safeguard digital freedoms.
  • PowerShell security threats greater than ever, researchers warn
    Administrators should upgrade to the latest version of Microsoft PowerShell and enable extended logging and monitoring capabilities in the light of a surge in related security threats, warn researchers [...] Now more than 95% of PowerShell scripts analysed by Symantec researchers have been found to be malicious, with 111 threat families using PowerShell.
  • Five-Year-Old Bait-and-Switch Linux Security Flaw Patched
    Maintainers of the Linux Kernel project have fixed three security flaws this week, among which there was a serious bug that lingered in the kernel for the past five years and allowed attackers to bypass some OS security systems and open a root shell.
  • The Internet of Dangerous Auction Sites
    Ok, I know this is kind of old news now, but Bruce Schneier gave testimony to the House of Representatives’ Energy & Commerce Committee about computer security after the Dyn attack. I’m including this quote because I feel it sets the scene nicely for what follows here. Last week, I was browsing the popular online auction site eBay and I noticed that there was no TLS. For a moment, I considered that maybe my traffic was being intercepted deliberately, there’s no way that eBay as a global company would be deliberately risking users in this way. I was wrong. There is not and has never been TLS for large swathes of the eBay site. In fact, the only point at which I’ve found TLS is in their help pages and when it comes to entering card details (although it’ll give you back the last 4 digits of your card over a plaintext channel).

Android Leftovers

Linux 4.8.14

Turns out I'm going to be on a very long flight early tomorrow morning, so I figured it would be good to get this kernel out now, instead of delaying it by an extra day. So, I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.14 kernel. All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.8.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.4.38 Linux Kernel 4.8.14 Hits the Streets with Numerous Networking Improvements, More