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Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux's Big Bang: One Kernel, Countless Distros Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 1:45am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 1:41am
Story GNOME Development Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 1:40am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2017 - 12:57am
Story openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Linux Kernel 4.10.10, Updated Fonts, and More Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 9:38pm
Story Linux 4.10.13 Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 6:08pm
Story Linux-on-Sitara embedded computer triplets offer mini-PCIe expansion Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 6:01pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 3:18pm
Story more of today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 3:18pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 3:17pm

Containers News

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • How Kubernetes is making contributing easy

    As the program manager of the Kubernetes community at Google, Sarah Novotny has years of experience in open source communities including MySQL and NGINX. Sarah sat down with me at CloudNativeCon in Berlin at the end of March to discuss both the Kubernetes community and open source communities more broadly.

    Among the topics we covered in the podcast were the challenges inherent in shifting from a company-led project to a community-led one, principles that can lead to more successful communities, and how to structure decision-making.

  • How Microsoft helped Docker with LinuxKit and Moby Project [Ed: Microsoft 'helped'... embrace, extend, coerce; haven't Docker employees learned from history?]

    Today, supporting Linux is as critical to Microsoft as it is to Red Hat and SUSE.

  • How to make branding decisions in an open community

    On April 18, Docker founder Solomon Hykes made a big announcement via a pull request in the main Docker repo: "Docker is transitioning all of its open source collaborations to the Moby project going forward." The docker/docker repo now redirects to moby/moby, and Solomon's pull request updates the README and logo for the project to match.

    Reaction from the Docker community has been overwhelmingly negative. As of this writing, the Moby pull request has garnered 7 upvotes and 110 downvotes on GitHub. The Docker community is understandably frustrated by this opaque announcement of a fait accompli, an important decision that a hidden inner circle made behind closed doors. It's a textbook case of "Why wasn't I consulted?"

Ubuntu 17.04: Unity's swan song?

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

For the most part, not much has changed on Ubuntu's Desktop edition in the past year. Unity 7 has more or less remained the same while work was progressing on the next version of the desktop, Unity 8. However, now that both desktops are being retired in favour of the GNOME desktop, running Ubuntu 17.04 feels a bit strange. This week I was running software that has probably reached the end of its life and this version of Ubuntu will only be supported for nine months. I could probably get the same desktop experience and most of the same hardware support running Ubuntu 16.04 and get security updates through to 2021 in the bargain. In short, I don't think Ubuntu 17.04 offers users anything significant over last year's 16.04 LTS release and it will be retired sooner.

That being said, I could not help but be a little wistful about using Unity 7 again. Even though it has been about a year since I last used Unity, I quickly fell back into the routine and I was once more reminded how pleasant it can be to use Unity. The desktop is geared almost perfectly to my workflow and the controls are set up in a way that reduces my mouse usage to almost nothing. I find Unity a very comfortable desktop to use, especially when application menus have been moved from the top panel to inside their own windows. While there are some projects trying to carry on development of Unity, this release of Ubuntu feels like Unity's swan song and I have greatly enjoyed using the desktop this week.

While there is not much new in Ubuntu 17.04, the release is pretty solid. Apart from the confusion that may arise from having three different package managers, I found Ubuntu to be capable, fairly newcomer friendly and stable. Everything worked well for me, at least on physical hardware. Unity is a bit slow to use in a virtual machine, but the distribution worked smoothly on my desktop computer.

Read more

FOSS in European Public Services

Filed under
OSS
  • France: How a high school association finally obtained a source code

    In October 2016, the association Droit des Lycéens, which represents French high school students and helps them assert their rights, finally obtained the source code of an algorithm that influences students’ choice of university after the Baccalauréat exam. This puts an end to a conflict lasting more than seven months between the association and the Ministry of Education, which until then had refused to publish the source code of its tool.

    The opening of algorithms and calculators is a flagship measure in the French law for a digital republic that was passed in 2016. Since then, France has started to publish some source codes, such as the personal tax calculator in April 2016. This may have created a precedent for the present case, according to the association.

    The algorithm in question forms the core of the APB (Admission Post-Bac) online platform, which is used by all students in France. It allows them to enter their preferences in terms of universities and syllabus, and helps match applicants to available places. But Droit des Lycéens believes that the calculation method has been kept secret by the Ministry, and lacks transparency.

  • OFE welcomes continued emphasis on openness in EIF

    The OpenForum Europe (OFE) think tank welcomes the publication of the European Interoperability Framework (EIF). This document continues to emphasise the importance of openness, the organisation writes on its blog.

  • Czech Finance Ministry app boosts open data, source

    A data visualisation application developed in 2015 by the Czech Ministry of Finance, is helping to promote the publication of open data, and is making the case for open source software development across the government. The tool, called Supervizor, was one of the winners of the European Commission’s Sharing and Reuse Award. At the Sharing and Reuse Conference in Lisbon (Portugal), on 29 March, Supervizor was awarded EUR 15,000 - to help the project expands its reach.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat

Enlightenment Development

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Enlightenment image viewer Ephoto 1.0 released

    The fancy looking Ephoto 1.0 [Official Site, Git] for Enlightenment has been officially released recently with lots of useful features to manage your image library.

  • Enlightenment Working On OpenGL-Accelerated Evas Filters

    An Enlightenment developer has been working on support for accelerating EFL Evas filters with OpenGL shaders.

    Evas is Enlightenment's display canvas API. Those wishing to learn about Evas before reading this article can see this Enlightenment.org page.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 OpenCL vs. NVIDIA Shows Problems

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I began posting a number of AMD Radeon RX 580 Linux benchmarks but not covered so far has been the OpenCL compute performance considering the Clover-based compute stack isn't good enough for benchmarking and is basically unmaintained these days by AMD. Meanwhile, their ROCm stack is still being brought up and is not yet fully-opened nor optimized yet for performance. Thus for those with desktop cards looking for basic OpenCL support are left with the AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver with its closed-source OpenCL driver. In this article are some fresh OpenCL benchmarks of AMDGPU-PRO on the RX 580 and other Radeon GPUs compared to NVIDIA with its Linux OpenCL driver.

Read more

Dark times for OmniOS – an Oracle-free open-source Solaris project

Filed under
OS
OSS

Development of OmniOS – an Oracle-free open-source variant of Solaris – is being killed after five years of work.

Active development of OmniOS by OmniTI is being suspended, we're told, with its current beta being the final release. OmniOS is a distribution of Illumos, which is derived from OpenSolaris, Sun's open-source flavor of Solaris.

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Ubuntu Phone security updates end in June, app store closing

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

When Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical (the company behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution), announced his company would not only be abandoning their custom desktop environment (Unity), but also halting development on their phone/tablet operating system, many questions were left unanswered.

One of those questions: What happens to the existing phones and tablets running Ubuntu Touch that have already been sold?

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OpenRA C&C Reimplementation Gets New Stable Release, Here Is What's New

    Oliver Brakmann from the OpenRA project, an open-source and cross-platform initiative to offer a reimplementation of the popular Command & Conquer games, announced the availability of a new stable release.

  • Pisi-Linux-2.0-Beta-KDE5
  • Arch-Based arkOS Linux Being Discontinued

    arkOS, the Arch-based Linux distribution focused on "securely self-hosting your online life" with aims to make it easy to deploy servers for web-based services, is being discontinued.

    ArkOS since 2012 had been working to make it trivial to deploy your own Linux web server, your own personal cloud (ownCloud), and making it easy for other services to be deployed while being done so securely and easily. You probably haven't heard of arkOS making the news in a while and sadly now it's making news again, but only because it's being discontinued by its lead developer.

  • SUSE Hack Week 15

    Back in February the fifteenth SUSE Hack Week took place. As always this was a week of free hacking, to learn, to innovate, to collaborate, and to have a lot of fun. I didn't have the full time, so I worked on a couple of small things and a few projects I maintain. I did want to summarize that, so here you go.

  • How To Use SD Card As Internal Storage On Android | Adoptable Storage On Android
  • Anbox - Android in a Box
  • Your CEO’s Obliviousness about Open Source is Endangering Your Business [Ed: Jeff Luszcz says nothing about the risk of proprietary components with back doors etc. and instead 'pulls a Black Duck']

    But what caused these issues? Itis what happens when an open source component is integrated into a commercial software product and violates its open source license, or when it contains a vulnerability that was previously unknown. As technology evolves, open source security and compliance risk are reaching a critical apex that if not addressed, will threaten the entire software supply chain.

  • Mentor tips Azure IoT support and Linux-driven self-driving tech [Ed: Azure is a patent trap with back doors]

    Mentor announced Azure Certified for IoT compliance for Mentor Embedded Linux, and unveiled a Linux-based “DRS360” self-driving car platform.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 3 signs your Kubernetes distro is built to last

    It's hard to turn around these days without bumping into a Kubernetes distribution. For example, Mirantis recently buffed its OpenStack distribution to use Kubernetes as an internal component and for container management. Major Linux server distributions include it now.

    For Kubernetes adopters, it's all good news. It means the most remarkable development in the container world since, well, containers themselves is enjoying strong uptake and acceptance.

  • Cockpit – An Easy Way to Administer Multiple Remote Linux Servers via a Web Browser

    Cockpit is a free and open source web-based system management tool where users can easily monitor and manage multiple remote Linux srvers. It is very thin and light weight utility & directly interacts with the operating system from a real Linux session and doesn’t require any difficult configuration so just install it, it is ready for use.

  • Some Useful Indicators: Ayatana, Clipboard-Autoedit, Diskstat, Files, Bulletin and Udisks

    Panel Indicators always comes in handy when you have to do some productive work on your desktop computer, to access quick functions of different applications these indicators saves you a lot of time, some indicator give you information you want to receive, it all depends on your needs. Today presenting you some useful indicators which may help you and makes your desktop experience much better. Following all the indicators are developed by just one guy and available through his PPA.

  • SRT Video Transport Protocol Open-Sourced

    In aiming to enhance online video streaming, the SRT video protocol has been open-sourced and an alliance forming around that for low-latency video.

    SRT is short for Secure Reliable Transport and is a low-latency video transport protocol developed by Haivision. The SRT protocol is being opened under the LGPL license.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

Debian Family

Filed under
Debian
  • Devuan GNU/Linux 1.0.0 "Jessie" Just Around the Corner, Release Candidate Out

    It's been five almost five months since the developers behind the Debian-based Devuan GNU/Linux operating system launched the second Beta version towards the first stable release of the OS, and they now announced the Release Candidate.

    The Devuan project continues its vision of providing a libre Debian fork without using the systemd init system, and the Release Candidate (RC) version brings the GNU/Linux distribution closer to a final release. The interesting fact is that this RC appears to be stable enough to be used for production work.

  • Budgie 10.3 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu

    A new version of the Budgie desktop is available to install on Ubuntu. Budgie 10.3 adds a new Alt+Tab switcher, and brings a stack of bug fixes to the table.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Codename Released "Artful Aardvark"
  • openHAB

    Partners Canonical, openHAB Foundation and Azul Systems have collaborated hard to drive development of the new openHAB 2.0 smart-home platform as a snap package. An alternative to Apple Homekit and Samsung SmartThings, openHAB from openHAB Foundation is completely free and open source, and acts as a control hub for home IoT setups.

Development News

Filed under
Development

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • More Windows PCs infected with NSA backdoor DoublePulsar [Ed: Look what Microsoft's back doors for the NSA are causing this month; recall Snowden's leaks about it.]

    Although the exact number varies among security researchers, the DoublePulsar infection rate is climbing

  • NSA-linked hacking tools released by Shadow Brokers have compromised almost 200,000 Windows PCs
  • 'Beautiful' NSA hacking tool DoublePulsar infects almost 200,000 Windows PCs

    Tools supposedly developed by the US National Security Agency (NSA) leaked early this month by the Shadow Brokers hacking group are being used in attacks on Windows PCs.

    The tools, released to the open-source developer website Github, have been gratefully scooped up by malware writers of varying levels of competency and pimped via phishing emails across the internet.

    And researchers at Swiss security company Binary Edge claim to have found 183,107 compromised PCs connected to the internet after conducting a scan for the DoublePulsar malware. Conducted every day over the past four days, the number of infected PCs has increased dramatically with each scan, according to Binary Edge.

  • Three months on, no Linksys router patches for remote holes

    More than three months after being informed about remotely exploitable vulnerabilities in 25 router models, Linksys is yet to issue patches to remedy them.

  • [Older] Tracing Spam: Diet Pills from Beltway Bandits

    Here’s the simple story of how a recent spam email advertising celebrity “diet pills” was traced back to a Washington, D.C.-area defense contractor that builds tactical communications systems for the U.S. military and intelligence communities.

  • Top-ranked programming Web tutorials introduce vulnerabilities into software

    “[Our findings] suggest that there is a pressing need for code audit of widely consumed tutorials, perhaps with as much rigor as for production code,” they pointed out.

  • [Old] PHP: a fractal of bad design

    PHP is an embarrassment, a blight upon my craft. It’s so broken, but so lauded by every empowered amateur who’s yet to learn anything else, as to be maddening. It has paltry few redeeming qualities and I would prefer to forget it exists at all.

  • The Cloud Foundry Approach to Container Storage and Security

    Recently, The New Stack published an article titled “Containers and Storage: Why We Aren’t There Yet” covering a talk from IBM’s James Bottomley at the Linux Foundation’s Vault conference in March. Both the talk and article focused on one of the central problems we’ve been working to address in the Cloud Foundry Foundation’s Diego Persistence project team, so we thought it would be a good idea to highlight the features we’ve added to mitigate it. Cloud Foundry does significantly better than what the article suggests is the current state of the art on the container security front, so we’ll cover that here as well.

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More in Tux Machines

QNX 7 Can Be Fitted With A Qt5 Desktop

  • QNX 7 Can Be Fitted With A Qt5 Desktop
    While QNX remains targeted as an operating system for mobile/embedded solutions, a BlackBerry developer in his spare time has fitted QNX 7 with a Qt5 desktop. QNX 6 and prior had a desktop option, but was removed in QNX 7, which was released this past March. QNX 7.0 also brought support for 64-bit (and maintaining 32-bit) Intel x86 and ARM platforms along with C++14 support. For those wanting to experiment with QNX 7, a BlackBerry kernel developer has been working on making this operating system more desktop friendly.
  • Building a BlackBerry QNX 7 Desktop
    Having Qt allowed me to port one of my favourite applications, SpeedCrunch. It was a simple matter of running ‘qmake’ followed by ‘make’. Next, I ported the QTermWidget library so that I could have terminal windows.

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Kernel explained
  • [Older] [Video] Audio on Linux: The End of a Golden Age?
  • State of Sway April 2017
    Development on Sway continues. I thought we would have slowed down a lot more by now, but every release still comes with new features - Sway 0.12 added redshift support and binary space partitioning layouts. Sway 0.13.0 is coming soon and includes, among other things, nvidia proprietary driver support. We already have some interesting features slated for Sway 0.14.0, too! Today Sway has 21,446 lines of C (and 4,261 lines of header files) written by 81 authors across 2,263 commits. These were written through 653 pull requests and 529 issues. Sway packages are available today in the official repos of pretty much every distribution except for Debian derivatives, and a PPA is available for those guys.

Supporting Burning Platforms

  • Surface revenue does a U-boat, and dives

    Revenue generated by Microsoft's Surface hardware during the March quarter was down 26% from the same period the year before, the company said yesterday as it briefed Wall Street.

    For the quarter, Surface produced $831 million, some $285 million less than the March quarter of 2016, for the largest year-over-year dollar decline ever.

  • Acer said to me: "do not use our products with Linux. Find another manufacturer"
    Last year, I bought an Acer notebook and it came with Windows 10. As I didn't want spyware neither bloatware, I got Linux installed and asked for a refund of the OEM license. After a little of talking, they were wanting to charge me US$100 (to remove the license, which I already had wiped, as I got FDE Linux installed) to refund US$70 of the OEM license. This year, wondering to buy a new Acer notebook, I asked them again if they would refund me the OEM license without all the hassle (as they did pay me the US$70, without me having to pay the US$100).

today's howtos