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Wednesday, 19 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2018 - 4:46pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/09/2018 - 4:23pm
Story The Current Linux Performance With 16 ARM Boards Rianne Schestowitz 17/09/2018 - 4:14pm
Story Apache SpamAssassin 3.4.2 released Rianne Schestowitz 17/09/2018 - 4:09pm
Story International Day Against DRM takes action for a Day Without DRM on September 18th Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2018 - 3:52pm
Story Bulgaria prepares to build its own central code repository Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2018 - 9:40am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2018 - 9:19am
Story Software and howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2018 - 9:16am
Story KDE: KDE Repository Proposal, Belated Akademy Coverage, and Krita Interview With Alyssa May Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2018 - 9:14am
Story Linux Accessibility For The Visually Impaired – For The Record Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2018 - 9:12am

Why Python is so popular with developers: 3 reasons the language has exploded

Filed under
Development

Python is the fastest-growing programming language in the world, as it increasingly becomes used in a wide range of developer job roles and data science positions across industries. But how did it become the go-to coding language for so many tasks?

"Python is very popular because of its set of robust libraries that make it such a dynamic and a fast programming language," said Kristen Sosulski, clinical associate professor of information, operations, and management sciences in the Leonard N. Stern School of Business at New York University, and author of Data Visualization Made Simple. "It's object-oriented, and it really allows for everything from creating a website, to app development, to creating different types of data models."

Read more

Programming: Codetribute, Rust, HHVM ending support for PHP

  • Bugs Ahoy: The Next Generation

    Bugs Ahoy’s time is over, and I would like to introduce the new Codetribute site. This is the result of Fienny Angelina’s hard work, with Dustin Mitchell, Hassan Ali, and Eli Perelman contributing as well. It is the spiritual successor to Bugs Ahoy, built to address limitations of the previous system by people who know what they’re doing. I was thrilled by the discussions I had with the team while Codetribute was being built, and I’m excited to watch as the project evolves to address future needs.

  • Announcing Rust 1.29

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.29.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

  • HHVM ending support for PHP

    The HHVM project has announced that the Hack language and PHP will truly be going separate ways. The HHVM v3.30 release, due by the end of the year, will be the last to support code written in PHP.

Valve Increases Wine Usage, Blizzard Bans Wine Users

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve have now pushed out all the recent beta changes in Steam Play's Proton to everyone

    For those of you sticking with the stable channel of Steam Play's Proton system, Valve have today rolled out all the recent beta changes for everyone.

    Previously, you had access to Proton 3.7-3 which was what everyone used by default and you could also use the "Compatibility tool" dropdown in the Steam Play options section to switch to a beta to have the latest updates. Valve must now consider all the changes stable enough, as Proton 3.7-6 is now the default. There's another beta channel now, which is still currently at 3.7-6 but it should remain where the latest changes go.

    There's quite a lot of improvements included since the initial release, like: automatic mouse capturing in fullscreen windows by default, performance improvements, certain game compatibility improvements, an updated build of DXVK, more display resolution support and so on. You can see the full changelog here.

  • Some Linux Gamers Using Wine/DXVK To Play Blizzard's Overwatch Reportedly Banned

    Multiple individuals are reporting that they have been just recently banned by Blizzard for playing their games -- seemingly Overwatch is the main title -- when using Wine with the DXVK D3D11-over-Vulkan translation layer.

    Blizzard support has said they are not banning Linux gamers for using these "emulation" techniques but not officially supported.

    However, per this Reddit thread with one of the users writing into Phoronix, there have been recent bans to Linux gamers and the only expressed common denominator seems to be the use of Wine and DXVK.

Canonical and Ubuntu: Fresh Snaps, Design; Lubuntu Switching To VLC, KDE 5 LibreOffice Frontend

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Fresh Snaps from August 2018

    Another month passes and we’ve got a collection of applications which crossed our “desk” (Twitter feed) during August 2018. We have a mix of social tools, music creation and curation software, password storage systems, developer tools and some fun too. Take a look down the list, and discover something new today.

  • Financial services: escaping the burning platform

    The financial services industry is standing on a burning platform, it’s time to jump to safety or suffer the consequences.

    The platform in this picture is the legacy infrastructure that dominates their IT organisations. From ageing servers and a dwindling workforce that’s even capable of running these monoliths, the pressure to change, for many, would have already forced a leap to safety.

    Unfortunately for banks, that’s not the only pressure they are under. Challengers have emerged where there were none before and changes in regulation are forcing a dramatic rethink of how infrastructure can be approached and what technologies are available for them to use. Compounded by a growing demand from customers for services that are modern, always-on, safe, and simple to use, and you’ve got a perfect storm that FS is having to navigate.

  • Leading the Vanilla design system

    We currently have 47 websites from marketing to cloud applications under our suite of products here at Canonical, the Vanilla squad are working through migrating these sites to our latest release.

    We’ve completed 60% of the migration and are making good headway. Once complete, our codebase will be unified across our sites making it easier for our front-end developers to jump between projects. And from a design perspective we will have a consistent look and feel.

  • Lubuntu Switching To VLC, KDE 5 LibreOffice Frontend

    Lots of changes are happening in the Lubuntu camp.

    It's been busy in the Lubuntu space recently, the Ubuntu derivative that's historically shipped with the LXDE desktop environment. Most notably, Lubuntu 18.10 switching to LXQt by default over LXDE, while the LXQt spin has been experimental up to this point.

    Lubuntu is also planning to switch to Wayland and as part of that to port Openbox to run on the Mir-Wayland code. But this work isn't happening overnight but rather is a goal to have done by Lubuntu 20.10 in 2020.

Robots that run Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

The home for innovators, Ubuntu is a place where developers can create what previously lived solely in the realms of fiction. The internet of things, the cloud, and robots are world changing technologies and they’re all running Ubuntu.

With an estimated worldwide spending figure of $103bn by 2020, according to IDC, the field of robotics is one of those transformative industries that is really gaining traction, and it’s not just the manufacturing industry that’s using them, robots are everywhere.

From collecting tennis balls, to social robots, agriculture and retail. Robots are making our lives easier and it turns out that a large amount of them are an Ubuntu robot.

Don’t just take my word for it though, below is a list of of just some of the cool and brilliant ways Ubuntu is being used in the field of robotics.

Read more

Also: Key considerations when choosing a robot’s operating system

Plasma 5.14 Beta Updates Discover, KWin and Adds New Widgets

Filed under
KDE

Thursday, 13 September 2018. Today KDE launches the beta release of Plasma 5.14.

Plasma is KDE's lightweight and full featured Linux desktop. For the last three months we have been adding features and fixing bugs and now invite you to test the beta pre-release of Plasma 5.14.

A lot of work has gone into improving Discover, Plasma's software manager, and, among other things, we have added a Firmware Update feature and many subtle user interface improvements to give it a smoother feel. We have also rewritten many effects in our window manager KWin and improved it for slicker animations in your work day. Other improvements we have made include a new Display Configuration widget which is useful when giving presentations.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop Environment Enters Beta with New Features, Improvements

Graphics: Vulkan, NVIDIA, RADV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Former Compiz Developer Creating New Window Animation Library

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME

Sam Spilsbury who was the former Compiz lead developer at Canonical and involved in the Unity desktop shell development is creating a new library spun out of Compiz.

Since leaving Canonical six years, he's spent a good portion of that time since working for Endless Computer on their GNOME Shell driven Linux desktop environment. Initially he wrote a "libwobbly" library at Endless for implementing support for "wobbly windows" and other animation logic spun out of the former Compiz code.

Read more

Original: libanimation for everyone

GNU/Linux Version of Life is Strange: Before the Storm

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm is now officially available on Linux

    Life is Strange: Before the Storm, the three-part prequel to the original Life is Strange ported to Linux by Feral Interactive is now available. After very much enjoying the first game, I can't wait to dive into this!

    While the original was made by DONTNOD Entertainment, this time around it was developed by Deck Nine and published by Square Enix.

  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm Is Out Now for Linux and macOS

    UK-based video games publisher Feral Interactive announced today the availability of the Life is Strange: Before the Storm adventure video game for the Linux and macOS platforms.

    Developed by Deck Nine and published by Square Enix, Life is Strange: Before the Storm was launched on August 31, 2017, as the second installment in the BAFTA award-winning franchise. The all-new three-part standalone story features new and beautiful artwork set three years before the events of the first Life is Strange game.

  • Life Is Strange: Before The Storm Is Now Out For Linux

    Feral Interactive released today Life is Strange: Before the Storm for Linux and macOS.

    Life is Strange: Before the Storm is the latest in this episodic game series from Deck Nine and ported to macOS and Linux by Feral Interactive. Before the Storm was released for Windows in late 2017.

Mozilla: Firefox Focus with GeckoView, WebRender, DNS over HTTPS (DoH)

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox Focus with GeckoView

    Firefox Focus is private browsing as an app: It automatically blocks ads and trackers, so you can surf the web in peace. When you’re done, a single tap completely erases your history, cookies, and other local data.

  • WebRender newsletter #22

    The closer we get to shipping WebRender, the harder it is for me to take the time to go through commit logs and write the newsletter. But this time is special.

    Yesterday we enabled WebRender by default on Firefox Nightly for a subset of the users: Desktop Nvidia GPUs on Windows 10. This represents 17% of the nightly population. We chose to first target this very specific configuration in order to avoid getting flooded with driver bugs, and we’ll gradually add more as things stabilize.

  • Mozilla Future Releases Blog: DNS over HTTPS (DoH) – Testing on Beta

    DNS is a critical part of the Internet, but unfortunately has bad security and privacy properties, as described in this excellent explainer by Lin Clark. In June, Mozilla started experimenting with DNS over HTTPS, a new protocol which uses encryption to protect DNS requests and responses. As we reported at the end of August, our experiments in the Nightly channel look very good: the slowest users show a huge improvement, anywhere up to hundreds of milliseconds, and most users see only a small performance slowdown of around 6 milliseconds, which is acceptable given the improved security.

GNOME: Google Code-in and Canta Theme

Filed under
GNOME
  • Google Code-in 2018 and Wikimedia: Mentors and smaller tasks wanted!

    Google Code-in will take place again soon (from October 23 to December 13). GCI is an annual contest for 13-17 year old students to start contributing to free and open projects. It is not only about coding: We also need tasks about design, documentation, outreach/research, and quality assurance. And you can mentor them!

  • Give Your Ubuntu a Fresh Look Using Canta Theme and Icons

    We have seen some cool themes earlier, like Paper, Arc themes which comes with Dark and light version. However none of them having the Green as base color.

    Canta theme is a Green color based GTK theme which is available for GTK 2 and GTK 3 based desktop environments. You can install in in latest Ubuntu GNOME Shell along with all distributions which supports GTK 2 and 3.

    This theme comes with 11 variants classifying in base, light, dark, round, square and compact version for each.

Microsoft is Playing Dirty Again

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Windows 10 Tries to Push Firefox and Chrome Over the Edge

    Windows 10 now “warns” you not to install Chrome or Firefox when you download them. It’s just one of the many annoying ways Microsoft pushes Edge, which only has 4% market share despite Microsoft’s increasing desperation.

    Microsoft will probably start using this “app recommendations” feature to push other apps in the future, too. Imagine Windows warning you not to install LibreOffice because you could pay for Office 365 instead.

  • Microsoft: You don't want to use Edge? Are you sure? Really sure?

    Microsoft really wants you to use Edge in the latest Windows Insider builds, and the software giant is not afraid to let you know it.

    Windows Insider Sean Hoffman took to Twitter last night to express his displeasure at a pop-up shown by Windows 10 when he attempted to install an alternative browser. When he ran the Firefox installer, a pop-up showed up suggesting perhaps he'd like to stick with Edge. It is safer and faster, after all (according to Microsoft).

    Hoffman, running build 17744.1004, the current slow ring version of the next release of Windows 10, pulled no punches in his reaction.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

KDE Plasma 5.13 Desktop Reaches End of Life, KDE Plasma 5.14 Arrives October 9

Filed under
KDE

KDE Plasma 5.13.5 arrived a week ago, on September 4, 2018, as the last point release for the short-lived KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment series, which won't receive further updates or security fixes. It brought a total of 35 changes across various core components and apps.

"Plasma 5.13 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds a month's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads the announcement.

Read more

LibreOffice 6.1 Gets First Point Release with More Than 120 Bug Fixes

Filed under
LibO
Security

Coming more than a month after the launch of the major LibreOffice 6.1 series, which introduced a revamped and much faster image handling feature, a new Page menu and reorganized Draw menus, a new icon theme for Windows users, new Online Help pages, and a much-improved LibreOffice Online, LibreOffice 6.1.1 adds more than 120 bug and regression fixes.

"LibreOffice 6.1.1 represents the bleeding edge in term of features for open source office suites, and as such is targeted at technology enthusiasts, early adopters and power users," said The Document Foundation. "For any enterprise class deployment, TDF maintains the more mature LibreOffice 6.0.6, which should be sourced from a company providing a Long Term Supported version of the suite."

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A Look at KDE's KAlgebra

Filed under
KDE

Many of the programs I've covered in the past have have been desktop-environment-agnostic—all they required was some sort of graphical display running. This article looks at one of the programs available in the KDE desktop environment, KAlgebra.

You can use your distribution's package management system to install it, or you can use Discover, KDE's package manager. After it's installed, you can start it from the command line or the launch menu.

When you first start KAlgebra, you get a blank slate to start doing calculations.

Read more

Security: Back Doors, Russian Botnet/Botmaster and Tesla's Utter Fail

Filed under
Security
  • California Eyes Questionable Legislation In Bid To Fix The Internet Of Broken Things

    If you hadn't noticed, the much-hyped internet of things is comically broken. WiFi connected Barbies that spy on your kids, refrigerators that cough up your Gmail credentials, and "smart" televisions that watch you as often as you watch them are all now the norm. And while this has all been the focus of a lot of humor (like the Internet of shit Twitter feed), security experts have been warning for a while about how introducing millions of security flaws into millions of homes and businesses is, sooner or later, going to come back and bite us all on the ass.

    As security analysts like Bruce Schneier have pointed out, few people in this dance of dysfunction really care, so things tend to not improve. Customers often aren't even aware (or don't care) that their device has been compromised and hijacked into a DDOS attacking botnet, and hardware vendors tend to prioritize sales of new devices over securing new (and especially older) gear.

    Efforts to regulate the problem away are the option for many. That's what California lawmakers are considering with the recent passage of SB-327, which was introduced in February of last year, passed the California Senate on August 29, and now awaits signing from California Governor Jerry Brown. If signed into law, it would take effect in early 2020, and mandates that "a manufacturer of a connected device shall equip the device with a reasonable security feature or features," while also taking aim at things like default login credentials by requiring devices auto-prompt users to change their usernames and passwords.

  • Labor unwilling to commit either way on encryption bill

    The Australian Labor Party appears to be hesitant about ruling out support for the government's Assistance and Access Bill, a draft of which was put up for comment on 14 August.

  • Russian man pleads guilty, admits he ran notorious Kelihos botnet

    The 38-year-old Russian’s botnet, which dated back to 2010, spanned more than 10,000 machines, and was primarily used to send out spam, steal logins, distribute ransomware, and more. Federal authorities shut it down in 2017.

  • 2-bit punks' weak 40-bit crypto didn't help Tesla keyless fobs one bit

5 Open-Source Trends to Watch

Filed under
OSS

Open-source software use in business has come a long way since the first LinuxWorld Conference & Expo was held in San Jose, California, in March 1999. Linux had been around as an operating system since its invention in 1991 by Finnish-American developer Linus Torvalds, but its use in business computing was just beginning to germinate by the early 2000s.

Fast-forward to 2018. Open-source software powers the internet, much of the world’s cloud computing infrastructure, thousands of companies around the globe and a wide range of technologies, including software used in motor vehicles, consumer devices, in-home systems and more. Channel partners are increasingly involved in open source today, selling services, offering advice and helping clients use open source effectively.

And despite that phenomenal growth, millions of developers continue to devote countless hours to projects. By the end of 2017, more than 24 million developers in more than 200 countries had contributed to some 67 million GitHub project repositories. Many more projects are also used by more developers on code repositories offered by GitLab, Bitbucket, SourceForge and others.

For almost every customer software need, there is likely an open-source project working on the problem.

With all of this activity around the world, some open-source trends could become even more important to partners in the future.

Read more

Red Hat Business News

Filed under
Red Hat
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Kernel: Virtme, 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference and Linux Foundation Articles

  • Virtme: The kernel developers' best friend
    When working on the Linux Kernel, testing via QEMU is pretty common. Many virtual drivers have been recently merged, useful either to test the kernel core code, or your application. These virtual drivers make QEMU even more attractive.
  • 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference
    As in previous years we’re trying to organize an audio miniconference so we can get together and talk through issues, especially design decisons, face to face. This year’s event will be held on Sunday October 21st in Edinburgh, the day before ELC Europe starts there.
  • How Writing Can Expand Your Skills and Grow Your Career [Ed: Linux Foundation article]
    At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, I participated in a panel discussion called How Writing can Change Your Career for the Better (Even if You don't Identify as a Writer. The panel was moderated by Rikki Endsley, Community Manager and Editor for Opensource.com, and it included VM (Vicky) Brasseur, Open Source Strategy Consultant; Alex Williams, Founder, Editor in Chief, The New Stack; and Dawn Foster, Consultant, The Scale Factory.
  • At the Crossroads of Open Source and Open Standards [Ed: Another Linux Foundation article]
    A new crop of high-value open source software projects stands ready to make a big impact in enterprise production, but structural issues like governance, IPR, and long-term maintenance plague OSS communities at every turn. Meanwhile, facing significant pressures from open source software and the industry groups that support them, standards development organizations are fighting harder than ever to retain members and publish innovative standards. What can these two vastly different philosophies learn from each other, and can they do it in time to ensure they remain relevant for the next 10 years?

Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions
    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.
  • Security Embargos at Red Hat
    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them. When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.
  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards
    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.