Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 20 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nomadic Working with NomadBSD 1.0.1 - BSD on a stick Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 7:38pm
Story Deepin 15.6 Linux OS Launches with Improved HiDPI Support, Light and Dark Themes Rianne Schestowitz 1 17/06/2018 - 6:51pm
Story Linux 4.18 Outline Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 6:33pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 6:04pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 12:19pm
Story KDE: OpenSUSE Leap 15 KDE Edition, Falkon in GSoC, Plasma in Slackware and Future KWin Work Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 11:55am
Story Events: Linux Accra Users Group (LAUG), SouthEast LinuxFest 2018 and BSDCan 2018 Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 10:50am
Story BSD: FreeBSD's New RC and Latest in OpenBSD Development Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 10:44am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 10:30am
Blog entry Tux Machines Turns 14 Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 10:28am

KDE: KDE Plasma 5.13.0 review and GSoC Work on Okular

Filed under
KDE
  • Hands on: KDE Plasma 5.13.0 review

    The good people of the KDE Foundation have just released the latest version of the Plasma desktop environment. Plasma 5 has been in active development since July 2014 and is maintained as a separate software project which follows its own release schedule. It has an excellent reputation for rich graphics, an intuitive and customizable interface, as well as excellent performance.

    However, the Plasma team hasn’t relied only on its reputation in this latest version: clear effort has been made to enhance the desktop environment with more features and a smoother running experience.

  • Plasma 5.13, a new version of KDE's desktop environment, is here

    Feature-wise, Plasma 5.13 comes with Browser Integration. This means both Chrome/Chromium and Firefox web browsers can be monitored and controlled using your desktop widgets. For example, downloads are displayed in the Plasma notification popup, so even if your browser is minimized or not visible, you can monitor the download progress. Likewise with media playing in a tab: you can use Plasma's media controls to stop, pause and silence videos and audio playing in any tab – even the hidden ones. This a perfect solution for those annoying videos that auto-start without your permission. Another Plasma-browser feature is that links can now be opened from Plasma's overhead launcher (Krunner), and you can also send links directly to your phone using KDE Connect.

  • GSoC :: Coding Period – Phase One (May 14th to June 12th): Initial implementation of typewriter annotation tool in Okular

    The phase one of the coding period is now completed and I’m done with the initial implementation of typewriter annotation tool in Okular along with writing the integration tests for the same. I have created the revision on Phabricator and it is currently under review. Some review comments by my mentor are still to come.

    As per the agreed timeline, I have implemented the fully functional typewriter tool that creates the annotation with the transparent background in all the supported document formats and the text input UI in the current implementation is the popup QInputDialog window which is in accordance with the inline note.

Qt and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Qt Contributors’ Summit 2018 wrap-up

    Qt Contributors’ Summit 2018 is over. Two days of presentations and a lot of discussions during presentations, talk of Qt over coffee and lunch and in restaurants in the evening.

  • Qt 6.0 Might Be Coming After Qt 5.14, Could Depend Upon C++17

    Since last year there has been more talk and early planning around the eventual Qt 6.0 milestone. It's looking now like Qt 6.0 might happen after Qt 5.14, or likely in 2020.

    Last year there were developer discussions about starting Qt6 work after Qt 5.11, which was released at the end of May. Previous discussions of Qt6 have entailed QIODevice support, a Qt Quick scene graph, improved accessibility, and a Vulkan back-end for Qt Quick.

  • Qt For Python 5.11 Released As The First Official Build

    The past few months The Qt Company has been overhauled PySide2 as Qt For Python, a big improvement to the Python bindings to the Qt tool-kit. Out today is Qt For Python 5.11 as the first official release under the new branding.

  • Qt for Python 5.11 released

    As the version tag implies, it is based on Qt 5.11 and therefore the first release that supports the Qt 5 series. At large the project will follow the general Qt release schedule and versions. Although this is still a Technical Preview we will support the release with the usual support pattern (except the compatibility one). Unfortunately, earlier versions of Qt than 5.11 are not supported. It is available for open source and commercial Qt for Application Development users. Note that there is only one package for commercial and open source users. We hope we can receive plenty of feedback on what works and what does not. We want to patch early and often.

  • Python 3.7 Release Candidate Arrives, Final Expected At The End Of June

    Python 3.7.0 RC1 is available today as the last step prior to issuing this next feature release of Python 3 at month's end.

    The Python 3.7.0 release candidate was issued today along with the Python 3.6.6 RC1. The current plan is to release both of these new Python versions on 27 June unless some blocker bugs come about that would delay the release.

  • Python 3.7.0rc1

    This release, 3.7.0rc1, is the final planned release preview. Assuming no critical problems are found prior to 2018-06-27, the scheduled release date for 3.7.0, no code changes are planned between this release candidate and the final release.

Debian and Devuan Leftovers

Filed under
OS
  • Debian Policy call for participation -- June 2018

    I’d like to push a substantive release of Policy but I’m waiting for DDs to review and second patches in the following bugs. I’d be grateful for your involvement!

    If a bug already has two seconds, or three seconds if the proposer of the patch is not a DD, please consider reviewing one of the others, instead, unless you have a particular interest in the topic of the bug.

  • Microsoft fixed the Open R Debian package

    Thanks Microsoft for the quick fix, it is good news that those playing with Open R will not be left with a hosed system.

  • Google Summer of Code 2018 with Debian - Week 4

    After working on designs and getting my hands dirty with KIVY for the first 3 weeks, I became comfortable with my development environment and was able to deliver features within a couple of days with UI, tests, and documentation. In this blog, I explain how I converted all my Designs into Code and what I've learned along the way.

  • Debian variant offers safe homeland for systemd haters

    The Devuan project has released a v2.0 ASCII version of its Devuan fork of Debian that replaces the systemd init with OpenRC, and let’s you load other inits of your choice. The release supports several major Linux hacker boards.

    The Devuan project was announced in 2014 as a Debian fork for those who prefer other init systems to Red Hat’s systemd. Since then, systemd has seen even greater adoption in Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, which last year replaced its Upstart init in favor of systemd as part of its retreat from its Unity8/Mir desktop and convergence initiative. Yet Devuan has persisted, and has now released a more mature, Devuan v2.0 ASCII version of its systemd-free Debian distro.

Graphics: Wayland, Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) by Intel Inside Linux, and VFIO Drivers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Wayland's Weston 5.0 Moved Up To An August Release

    Following the recent discussions of moving Wayland's Weston compositor to a 4-month release schedule and possibly doing away with time-based Wayland releases itself, Weston 5.0 will now be coming out in August.

    Feature development on Weston is as busy as ever while Wayland (libwayland) is quite mature and not seeing too much churn. Upstream Wayland developers now appear to be in agreement to carrying out the next Weston release at least on a four-month release cycle.

  • Librem 5 progress report #14

    On the nuts and bolts level, our phone shell (phosh) has seen several usability improvements mostly around the lockscreen. One important change is that the lockscreen unlocking has been switched to PAM to better handle the PIN to lock the device. There have also been some additions to the code to better handle multiple outputs (screens). Also, Libhandy is our “handy” UI library for developing GTK+ apps. There has been a recent addition of an arrows widget (HdyArrows) to indicate swiping direction which will be very useful to many applications, especially the lockscreen. Additionally, libhandy has seen some bug fixes and a slight rework of the keyboard handling support. Since graphics are important, we have added Etnaviv support to weston-simple-dmabuf (a Wayland client to test Linux DMA-BUF protocol implementations). We also extended it’s NV12 format support. It’s being used over here to test wlroot’s linux-dmabuf implementation which we wrote a couple of weeks ago. We’d like to especially thank the wlroots and Weston projects for their code reviews, recommendations, and support.

  • Librem 5 Continues Working On Its Wayland Software Stack, Testing Vibration Motors, Chargers

    Purism has published their latest progress report on the Librem 5 privacy-minded Linux-powered smartphone that they still hope to begin shipping next January.

  • Intel Developers Working On HDCP Content Protection Protocol For Wayland [Ed: This is basically “Linux Vista”. First Web DRM (EME). Now LF sells out as well.]

    With Intel's DRM kernel driver now supporting HDCP for High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection with work done by Intel and Google developers, there is now work underway for allowing HDCP to work in a Wayland-based environment.

    As with the work done on the Direct Rendering Manager side, these Wayland patches aren't enforcing any restrictions on users by itself but is simply making the support available should any applications come along that wish to enforce HDCP usage on the Linux desktop.

  • VFIO Adds Sample Mediated Device Display Drivers

    The VFIO framework that allows exposing direct device access to user-space in a secure, IOMMU-protected fashion is gaining some new sample drivers in Linux 4.18.

Linux 4.18 Development Progress

Filed under
Linux

Openwashing and Microsoft EEE Methods

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Linux Foundation: Microsoft Entryism, Open Network Automation Platform

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • Session Agenda Announced for The Linux Foundation's Open Source Summit North America [Ed: Another "Linux" event has been infiltrated by Microsoft. So while Microsoft is blackmailing Linux users and bribes officials to dump GNU/Linux it's now "part of us".]

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the schedule of sessions and speakers for Open Source Summit North America, taking place August 29-31 in Vancouver, BC, including expanded pre-event lighting talks, workshops and tutorials on August 28.

  • Open Source and Standards Organizations Collaborate to Enable Digital Transformation

    TM Forum Catalyst projects showcased during the recent Digital Transformation World event in Nice France have highlighted the value of combining open source with open standards and contributed valuable improvements to The Linux Foundation’s Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Beijing Release, availability of which was announced on the 12th June.

  • Linux Foundation seeking ONAP rollout boost

    The Linux Foundation unveiled the second software release of its Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) project, which it said delivers improvements in terms of scalability and ease of deployment.

    ONAP Beijing also includes enhancements covering security and performance in real-world deployments, new training for Virtual Network Functions (VNF) developers and backing for operators commencing rollouts.

    Mazin Gilbert, chair of ONAP’s Technical Steering Committee and VP of Advanced Technology at AT&T Labs, said in a statement the upgrades are another step toward “establishing ONAP as the de facto standard for automation”.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Living the Linux Laptop Lifestyle Revisited, Chromebooks' GNU/Linux Experience Improves

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Living the Linux Laptop Lifestyle Revisited

    One Cause at a Time revisits the advantages - and experiences - working with a Linux-powered laptop...

  • Chromebooks with Linux can run Windows apps but it’s not easy

    It really seems that Chrome OS is being groomed to be the one OS that runs them all. Well almost all. In addition to its native Chrome-based platform, it now supports Android through Google Play Store and, just recently, Linux. Because of those two, it is also possible to run Windows programs to some extent. CodeWeavers, which develops software for running Windows programs on Mac and Linux, has just shown what could be a better way to run those same programs on a Chromebook.

  • Upcoming Chrome OS Files ‘refresh’ highlights Android, Linux files w/ redesigned navigation

    Earlier this month, Google began testing a way to surface files created by Android apps in the Chrome OS Files application. Given upcoming Linux support, the company is now planning a broader “Navigation UI Refresh” for how users view and manage files in Chrome OS.

    This “Refresh” — currently targeted for Chrome OS 69 — is centered on the navigation drawer of the Files app. At the moment, this list of folders is cluttered and becoming increasingly so in light of Android apps and soon Linux software generating user-created files, like PDFs, images, and more.

  • Chromebook Files app getting revamped to better organize Android and Linux apps

    Chrome OS has got a ton of love from Google lately. We’re seeing the OS gain native support for Linux apps starting with the Google Pixelbook and the Samsung Chromebook Plus, and possibly the upcoming Acer Chromebook 13 and Acer Chromebook Spin 13. The interface is also receiving touch optimizations for tablets and detachables like the HP Chromebook X2 and Acer Chromebook Tab 10. Then there’s the Google Material Theme revamp that’s in testing. Now, it seems that the Chromebook Files app will be getting some major structural changes to help users keep track of all their Downloads, Google Drive files, Android apps, Linux apps, and more.

  • Chrome OS Getting Better Organization For Linux/Android Apps

    Chrome OS is getting better organization for Linux and Android apps in the near future by way of an improvement to the Files app on Chromebooks. The improvement is coming via some changes to the app that Google is currently in the process of working on and eventually implementing so that it can push the changes out to users. The rework of sorts will see a new file tree show up in the app labeled as “my files,” under which users will be able to see Linux Files and Linux Drive under their own sub-menu that is separate from the Android apps.

Mozilla: WebVR and Rust

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • WITHIN creates distribution platform using WebVR

    Virtual Reality (VR) content has arrived on the web, with help from the WebVR API. It’s a huge inflection point for a medium that has struggled for decades to reach a wide audience. Now, anyone with access to an internet-enabled computer or smartphone can enjoy VR experiences, no headset required. A good place to start? WITHIN’s freshly launched VR website.

    From gamers to filmmakers, VR is the bleeding edge of self-expression for the next generation. It gives content creators the opportunity to tell stories in new ways, using audience participation, parallel narratives, and social interaction in ever-changing virtual spaces. With its immersive, 360-degree audio and visuals, VR has outsized power to activate our emotions and to put us in the center of the action.

    WITHIN is at the forefront of this shift toward interactive filmmaking and storytelling. The company was one of the first to launch a VR distribution platform that showcases best-in-class VR content with high production values.

  • This Week in Rust 238
  • What do you think are the most interesting/exciting projects using Rust?

    Jonathan Turner suggested I write up the responses as a blog post, and here we are.

FreeBSD Lands Support For pNFS

Filed under
BSD

For FreeBSD 12.0-CURRENT in development there is now kernel support for pNFS while the user-space components are landing soon for this Parallel NFS support.

Present since the NFS v4.1 protocol in 2010 has been the ability to provide scalable, parallel access to files across multiple servers via the pNFS extension. Since yesterday's FreeBSD SVN code, the pNFS kernel-side support has been merged for their NFS v4.1 server.

Read more

Canonical on So-called 'Private Cloud'

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu
  • 451 Research benchmarks public and private infrastructure cost

    451 Research’s latest report, ‘Busting the myth of private cloud economics ’, found that Canonical’s managed private OpenStack offering, BootStack, delivers private cloud with a TCO that matches public clouds. For multi-cloud operations, enterprise can benefit from a cost effective infrastructure by combining competitive public cloud services with Canonical’s managed private OpenStack cloud on-premise.

  • Private Cloud May Be the Best Bet: Report

    News flash: Private cloud economics can offer more cost efficiency than public cloud pricing structures.

    Private (or on-premises) cloud solutions can be more cost-effective than public cloud options, according to "Busting the Myths of Private Cloud Economics," a report 451 Research and Canonical released Wednesday. That conclusion counters the notion that public cloud platforms traditionally are more cost-efficient than private infrastructures.

    Half of the enterprise IT decision-makers who participated in the study identified cost as the No. 1 pain point associated with the public cloud. Forty percent mentioned cost-savings as a key driver of cloud migration.

    "We understand that people are looking for more cost-effective infrastructure. This was not necessarily news to us," said Mark Baker, program director at Canonical.

How Red Hat Linux is helping reclaim the fastest supercomputer title for the US

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

All the world's fastest supercomputers now run Linux, so it's no surprise that the US Department of Energy's Summit supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratories runs Linux. Specifically, it runs Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

Of course, Summit's 200-petaflop speed -- that's 200 quadrillion (peta-) floating point operations per second (flops) -- comes largely from its hardware. How fast is that? By comparison, China's Sunway TaihuLight, the official fastest supercomputer in the world, according to November 2017's Top 500 list, has a speed of 93.01 petaflops.

Read more

Top 5 games you can play on your favorite Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

I’ve never really been into gaming, that is, the shoot-em-up type of gaming, but in the early days of Linux, even just a few years ago, most default installations of desktop Linux came with a bunch of games installed. They were mostly card games and some simple strategy games, but they were enough to satisfy the casual gamer. Not sure why, but that practice seems to have gone the way of the dodo.

So if you want to play those same games that used to come preinstalled on practically every desktop Linux distribution just a few years back, you’ll need to install them yourself. That’s not such a big problem since they’re still available in the default repositories. What if you want more than just simple card and strategy games? No problem there too, because there are some very advanced strategy and first-person shooter games that you can install and play on Linux.

Read more

FSF: International Day Against DRM, New Interns and Friday Free Software Directory IRC Meetup

Filed under
GNU

Red Hat Responds to New Speculative Execution Vulnerability, Patches Coming Soon

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Red Hat is the top open-source software company known for their Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) operating system, and they're always quick to address newly discovered security vulnerabilities that not only affect its enterprise-ready operating system but the entire Open Source and Free Software community.

Many modern microprocessors leverage the "lazy restore" function for floating point state (FPU), which is used when needed for improving the overall performance of the system when saving and restoring the state of apps in the internal memory when switching from one application to another.

Read more

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Users Can Now Install Mesa 18.1.1 to Improve Their Linux Gaming

Filed under
Ubuntu

Implementing OpenGL 3.1 with ARB_compatibility on RadeonSI, r600, NV50, NVC0, Softpipe, LLVMpipe, and SVGA graphics drivers, the Mesa 18.1 graphics stack series debuted on May 18, 2018, with support for new OpenGL extensions, including GL_EXT_semaphore, GL_EXT_semaphore_fd, GL_ARB_bindless_texture, and GL_ARB_transform_feedback_overflow_query.

Additionally, it adds support for the GL_EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch and GL_EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch_non_coherent extension for the Intel i965 OpenGL graphics driver, support for the GL_KHR_blend_equation_advanced extension for the RadeonSI graphics driver, and enables disk shader cache support for the Intel i965 OpenGL graphics driver by default.

Read more

Winepak and Game on GNU/Linux Using Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • winepak, a project to get Windows games packaged with Wine & Flatpak for an easy Linux installation

    winepak [Official Site] is another interesting Wine-related project. One that aims to package up an assortment of Windows-only games that work in Wine using the power of Flatpak packages.

    I'm not going to get into the politics of Snap vs Flatpak, mostly because I don't care for the arguments surrounding it and end-users shouldn't care as long as they work and work well.

    Much like today's previous post about Track Mania Nations Forever having an easy to use Snap package, winepak seems to aim a bit higher and offer a repository of games. The advantage of using such packages (Snaps or Flatpaks), is that it should come with everything you need to get the Windows game running on Linux, without having to mess around with configurations. It's a new project though, so there's likely a fair amount of kinks to work out.

  • Want to play Track Mania Nations Forever on Linux using Wine? There's a snap for that

    I actually played one of the Track Mania games years ago before being a Linux user and I had a serious amount of fun with it, so things brings back some good memories.

    I'm not often one to advocate the use of Wine, but taking into account that it's free, old and likely never to be ported to Linux, making use of Wine for a game that works so well seems like a perfect fit. Having it all configured for you with a single package like this, certainly makes it a lot easier too.

RK3399 SBC has 9-36V DC and optional 4G, WiFi, serial, and HDMI-in modules

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

ICNexus’ “SBC3100” SBC runs Ubuntu or Android on a Rockchip RK3399 with up to 4GB RAM and 16GB flash plus HDMI 2.0, DP, eDP, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, 9-36V power, optional WiFi/BT, and a mini-PCIe slot with optional 3G or 4G.

Taiwan-based ICNexus’ SBC3100 joins a growing list of SBCs that feature, the hhigh-end Rockchip RK3399 SoC, and like most, it taps the high-end SoC to provide an extensive feature list. Unlike most we’ve seen, however, it is not publicly priced and appears to be a proprietary product, such as Aaeon’s Pico-ITX based RICO-3399.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more