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Saturday, 21 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 8:05am
Story Ubuntu 18.04 Beta - The good, the bad and mostly ugly Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 8:02am
Story The Enjoyable Ubuntu MATE 18.04 Beta 2 Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 7:58am
Story Top 5 Most Useful Linux tools for Programmers Rianne Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 7:54am
Story 5 Things to understand before switching to Linux – For The Record Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 7:31am
Story Launching Netrunner 18.03 for the Pinebook Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 7:21am
Story Android: Google Play, Sony Xperia XZ2, OnePlus 5 Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 7:14am
Story Programming/Development: That’s How C Does It, LLVM, Java EE Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 7:12am
Story GIMP 2.10.0 Release Candidate 2 Released Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 6:55am
Story Kernel (Linux 4.17), the Linux Foundation, and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 6:52am

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Ubuntu: 10 Years Since Ubuntu 8.04 LTS and Plans for Ubuntu Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • On the road to lean infrastructure

    On April 24 2008, Ubuntu 8.04 LTS Hardy Heron was released. That was a decade ago, when the modern cloud computing era was dawning: Amazon’s EC2 was still in beta, Google had just released the Google App Engine and the word “container” was dominating the plastics industry rather than IT. A lot has changed since then, but it’s not uncommon to come across organizations with machines still running Hardy or other equally dated distributions.

    The Gordian Knot of traditional, pre-DevOps IT infrastructure encompasses meticulously crafted, opportunistically documented and precariously automated “snowflake” environments. Managing such systems induces a slow pace of change, and yet in many cases rip and replace is not a justifiable investment. Invariably though, unabated progress dictates the reconciliation of today’s best practices with the legacy artifacts of the past. Lift and shift can be an efficient, reliable and automated approach to this conundrum.

  • Ubuntu Desktop weekly update – 13 April 2018

    Wow, only two weeks to go until the Beaver is born, this cycle seems have flown by.  So what’s been going on in the last couple of weeks, and what can we expect to change in the run up to release day?

    We’re still working on adding a new first-login experience to guide people through configuring LivePatch and making decisions about sharing system information.  That work has landed in the archive and been reviewed for inclusion but we have to finalise the designs and get the last couple of bugs out. In the meantime you can configure LivePatch through the “Software & Updates” tool in the “Updates” tab.  

  •  

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Five Most Popular Open Source Frameworks Used in Machine Learning

    Machine language a branch of artificial intelligence which enables system the ability to learn from data without being programmed. Machine learning got evolved from pattern recognition and computational learning theory in artificial intelligence. It has revolutionized the conventional way through developing algorithms that can learn and make predictions on data. There are innumerable factors that have improved the contribution of machine learning. Open source frameworks are one of the major reasons for the boost in machine learning. A framework is a collection of programs, libraries and languages evolved to use in application development. A library is a collection of objects or methods used by the applications which avoid rewriting of same codes.

    The article lists five most popular frameworks that significantly help data scientists and engineers in their big data analytics journey.

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: Ravada

    Ravada is an open-source project that allows users to connect to a virtual desktop.

    Currently, it supports KVM, but its back end has been designed and implemented in order to allow future hypervisors to be added to the framework. The client's only requirements are a web-browser and a remote viewer supporting the spice protocol.

  • VC Guy Kawasaki contemplates fringe ideas, open source and social

    He also views the open-source community in the same light: a benefit to businesses and society rather than a negative. “I believe in open source. I believe that … the more intelligent people pounding on your stuff, the better it is,” he said.

  • Open Source Election System Certified

    OSI Affiliate Member, The National Association of Voting Officials (NAVO), announced this week the certification of the Prime lll open source election system for the State of Ohio.

    NAVO spokesperson Brent Turner stated the ballot delivery system is, “the first step toward appropriately secure voting systems replacing the ‘secret software‘ systems that have plagued our democracy“. Turner summarized the current proprietary vendor sold U.S. voting systems as, “antiquated, insecure, and a threat to national security,“ and referenced New Hampshire's recent deployment of the “All for One“ open source system based on Prime lll, as further momentum. “We have been focused on Florida, California, and New York to upgrade security and reduce costs as well. Now is the historic moment for all the states to step up and defend our democracy. Paper ballots and audits are a plus, but the essence of vote counting security is the public software.” said Turner.

  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 2

    We’ve made great progress this week in the three broad areas of Browsers, Social and the Content Ecosystem.

  • working post-creepy ads, and stuff

    What's next for web advertising after browser privacy improvements and regulatory changes make conventional adtech harder and harder?

    The answer is probably something similar to what's already starting to pop up on niche sites. Here's a list of ad platforms that work more like print, less like spam: list of post-creepy web ad systems. Comments and suggestions welcome (mail me, or do a GitHub pull request from the link at the bottom.)

  • L10N Report: April Edition

    In the past weeks we have completed the migration to Fluent of all XUL panes in Preferences. Today we landed one more major bug, migrating about 150 strings that cover the XUL portion of all the subdialogs (Fonts, Languages, Proxy, Colors, etc.). This leaves out only a few edge cases that require code changes in Fluent itself, and some strings in .properties files used also outside of Preferences. As of today, only 14 strings remain in DTD files, and 115 in .properties.

  • Five Questions for Cloudera

    On Monday and Tuesday of this week, Cloudera held its annual gathering for industry analysts. The setting was lovely Santa Monica, though the packed schedule didn’t exactly accommodate time at the beach just outside. Over the course of two days, a room full of analysts covering the company were walked through the past, present and future of Cloudera the business.

    The timing of the event was probably less than ideal from the company’s perspective, given that the market dropped a hammer on it last week – a subject we’ll come back to momentarily. But the show must go on, and to Cloudera’s credit, just as with the reduced guidance that precipitated the drop, the company was candid about what it perceived the issues to be as well as plans for their mitigation.

  • Coming up: the Month of LibreOffice, May 2018!
  • How to set up an open source scholarship at your university

    Have you ever considered helping the next generation of developers take their first steps into the wonderful world of open source?

    By offering a scholarship or award, you can help students—some of whom may have never considered sharing their work—join the open source community. Whether these students are aspiring open source software developers or enthusiasts of music, movies, beehives, or buildings, sharing a little upfront can help foster the open source talent of tomorrow.

  • 3 enterprise GitHub projects from Microsoft
  • Pivotal Software IPO: Successful Offering May Trigger More Open Source Software IPOs

    Pivotal, the cloud software company spun out of Dell-EMC and VMware, plans to go public next week. At the high-end of its price range, Pivotal’s IPO would net $700 million at a $4 billion valuation. It would be the second largest IPO of 2018 behind Dropbox. (We excluded Spotify from this analysis because its IPO did not include any primary share sales.) Pivotal’s IPO could pave the way to a public offering from other Unicorns with open source software business models such as Docker and SugarCRM. Or, it could inspire SaaS firms such Palantir to also consider a large public offering.

  • Private Internet Access: VPNs, education, and software freedom

    Private Internet Access (PIA) was a generous supporter of LibrePlanet 2018 and the Free Software Foundation as a patron. As one of the largest VPN services available, they have customers all around the world. Their VPN works with free software VPN clients like OpenVPN. They recently announced their intention to release some of the software they produce under a free license.

  • Xiaomi promises to release kernel sources for its devices but there's a catch

    Xiaomi has a terrible history with releasing kernel sources—a direct violation of the General Public License. The company looks to have seen the light, with a company spokesperson declaring that devices will now have their sources released to the public, albeit with a slight caveat.

  • Open Source Brain

    With the inspiring tagline “Modeling the brain, together” largely displayed on the homepage, the Open Source Brain (OSB) resource embodies the collaborative scientific spirit. OSB comprises a number of (you guessed it) open-source projects consisting of computational models of neurons or circuits. The site interfaces with GitHub, which houses the models themselves in its repositories. OSB contains information about how to create projects and write project documentation, and it also gives users the ability to explore current projects and run simulations with specific models. The homepage provides site visitors with suggested models to explore, including a Hodgkin–Huxley neuron and a primary auditory cortex network. Alternatively, users can browse all projects (totaling 81 at the time of this writing), which are organized by organism and brain region. Primary citations for each dataset are also provided.

  • Turris MOX Modular, Open Source Router $149

    If your router could do with a upgrade you may be interested in the new Turris MOX router, which builds on the company’s first open source router the Turris Omnia. Offering a high performance modular router which can be configured to your exact requirements. The company has created and developed four modules for the open source router which can be combined to meet your needs and requirements. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the Turris MOX router.

  • The Future of Open Source Desktop 3D Printers
  • RISC-V 8th Workshop Agenda

    The RISC-V 8th Workshop is happening in Barcelona next month and the agenda and speakers have been announced...

  • W3C WebAuthn to Advance FIDO Protocols for Strong Authentication

    The new WebAuthn standard is coming to the web as the W3C is working to bring the latest generation of the FIDO strong authentication specifications forward into the standards realm.

    The FIDO (Fast Identity Online) Alliance has been building strong authentication specifications including the Universal Second Factor (U2) and Universal Authentication Framework (UAF) since 2012. With the W3C, FIDO is evolving its FIDO2 specification to become an official web standard that will be supported by all the major web browsers.

A Privacy & Security Concern Regarding GNOME Software

Filed under
GNOME
Security

GNOME Software is the default application in the GNOME desktop environment to manage software. It also allows you to receive firmware updates through an underlaying daemon called “fwupd“, which is based on an platform called “LVFS“.

In order to understand the relationship in a clearer way, you can think of LVFS as the online platform where hardware vendors come and upload new versions of their firmware which will be later available to download via fwupd. GNOME Software utilizes the fwupd daemon in order to download and install these updates. fwupd is a dependency for GNOME Software.

The whole ecosystem is developed mainly by Richard Hughes, who is working currently for Red Hat, and who’s also the original creator of PackageKit. But it’s worthy to mention that Red Hat doesn’t develop/manage the project directly, but rather, contributes to it with financial & logistic support.

Read more

Qt for Python

Filed under
Development
  • Qt for Python is coming to a computer near you

    Some of you – ok, probably most of you – know that Qt is a great C++ framework, enabling developers to create magnificent user interfaces with technologies like QML, Qt Quick Controls, and Qt Widgets. I will further claim that no one is knocked out of their socks when I say that C++ is one of the most widely used programming languages in the world today. The fact that Python is one of the fastest growing programming languages, measured in popularity, is probably also old news in most communities. So, what’s this blog post all about? Well, give it two more minutes.

  • The Qt Company Has Been Overhauling Qt's Support For Python

    Following next month's release of Qt 5.11, The Qt Company will be introducing as a technology preview the new Qt for Python.

    Qt for Python is the re-branded and overhauled PySide2, the module providing Qt integration for the Python programming language.

Events: Digital Born Media Carnival, SCaLE16x, NZ Open Source Awards and More

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OSS
  • Digital Born Media Carnival July 2017

    As described in their website, Digital Born Media Carnival was a gathering of hundred of online media representatives, information explorers and digital rights enthusiasts. The event took place on 14 – 18 July in Kotor, Montenegro. I found out about it as one of the members of Open Labs Hackerspace shared the news on our forum. While struggling if I should attend or not because of a very busy period at work and at the University, the whole thing sounded very interesting and intriguing at the same time, so I decided to join the group of people who were also planning to go and apply with a workshop session too. No regrets at all! This turned out to be one of the greatest events I’ve attended so far and had a great impact in what I somehow decided to do next, regarding my work as a hacktivist and as a digital rights enthusiast.

  • SCaLE16x with Ubuntu, CI/CD and more!

    Saturday and Sunday brought a duo of keynotes that I wouldn’t have expected at an open source conference five years ago, from Microsoft and Amazon. In both these keynotes the speaker recognized the importance of open source today in the industry, which has fueled the shift in perspective and direction regarding open source for these companies. There’s certainly a celebration to be had around this, when companies are contributing to open source because it makes business sense to do so, we all benefit from the increased opportunities that presents. On the other hand, it has caused disruption in the older open source communities, and some have struggled to continue to find personal value and meaning in this new open source world. I’ve been thinking a lot about this since the conference and have started putting together a talk about it, nicely timed for the 20th anniversary of the “open source” term. I want to explore how veteran contributors stay passionate and engaged, and how we can bring this same feeling to new contributors who came down different paths to join open source communities.

  • Nominate your pick now for the NZ Open Source Awards

    Nominations have opened for the seventh New Zealand Open Source Awards.

    The awards began in 2007 as a way to formally celebrate New Zealand's contribution and advocacy for free and open source software and to raise the awareness of its very broad and deep benefits.

  • JFrog Artifactory and Canonical’s Distribution of Kubernetes

GNOME Desktop/GTK: Google Maps, GTK3 and Compilers

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Avoid Google Maps with GNOME Maps on GNU/Linux

    So, it’s not really any secret nowadays, that Google saves pretty well anything you ever do using their services. It’s also no secret nowadays, that many people try and avoid using Google services, and would prefer to use alternatives to many of their popular tools, such as Google Maps.

    Sometimes, alternatives are available that provide similar functionality, Startpage for search or another email provider for your email needs. As far as Google Maps is concerned, it is a great product but there are alternatives available online and locally.

    GNU/Linux users have the handy GNOME Maps application at their disposal.

  • A font update

    At the end of march I spent a few days with the Inkscape team, who were so nice to come to the Red Hat Boston office for their hackfest. We discussed many things, from the GTK3 port of Inkscape, to SVG and CSS, but we also spent some time on one of my favorite topics: fonts.

  • Compiler complexities

    The other day I found myself perusing through some disassembly to get an idea of the code’s complexity. I do that occasionally because I find it the quickest way to determine if something is out of whack.

    While I was there, I noticed a rather long _get_type() function. It looked a bit long and more importantly, I only saw one exit point (retq instruction on x86_64).

  • More compiler fun

    Basically, the workaround I had at the time was to just disable -fstack-protector for the get_type() functions. It certainly made things faster, but it was a compromise. The get_type() functions can have user-provided code inserted into them via macros like G_DEFINE_TYPE_EXTENDED() and friends.

    A real solution should manage to return the performance of the hot-path back to pre-stack-protector performance without sacrificing the the protection gained by using it.

OpenAFS 1.8 Released, Drops Pre-2.6 Linux Support

Filed under
Linux

It's been a number of years since the last major update to the OpenAFS Andrew distributed file-system but there's a Friday the 13th release today introducing the shiny new v1.8 release.

OpenAFS continues to support all major operating systems from Windows to BSDs to Linux and macOS, but the OpenAFS 1.8 release does finally drop support for pre-2.6 Linux kernels. OpenAFS 1.8 also brings RPM packaging improvements.

Read more

Wine 3.6

Filed under
Software

GNOME 3.28 Desktop Gets First Point Release, It's Ready for Mass Deployment

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GNOME

GNOME 3.28 is the latest version of the open source desktop environment used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions, including the Ubuntu, Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and others. It was officially released last month on March 14, but it usually takes a couple of weeks for it to land in the stable software repositories of these distros.

This usually happens when the first point release is out, GNOME 3.28.1 in this case, which was announced a few moments ago by Javier Jardón of the GNOME Release Team via an email announcement on Friday, noting the fact that the GNOME 3.28.1 packages should arrive shortly in the repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distribution.

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.28.1 Released With Several Refinements

Lights, camera, Actian! Open-source database biz sold for $300m

Filed under
OSS

HCL Technologies and Sumeru Equity Partners have slurped privately-owned database (DB) supplier Actian for £330m from current owner Garnett Helfrich Capital.

Indian-based IT services biz HCL, will own 80 per cent ($264mn) of Actian with SEP having the other 20 per cent ($66m). Actian will operate as a separate entity, led by current CEO and President, Rohit De Souza.

Actian's tech assets include Vector, which it claimed is the world’s fastest columnar DB; hybrid cloud data integration platform DataConnect; and hybrid DB, X, which merges Ingres relational and Vector analytics.

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Stable kernels 4.9.94, 4.4.128 and 3.18.105

Compact aircraft computer takes flight with Ubuntu

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Kontron’s “ACE Flight 1600 Gateway Router” avionics computer runs Linux on a Bay Trail Atom, and provides a 5-port, L2-managed GbE switch, 4G LTE Advanced-Pro, 802.11ac, and DO-160G compliance.

Kontron’s has added to its ACE Flight product line with a compact low-end router computer designed for small commercial jets and business jets. The fanless ACE Flight 1600 Gateway Router is a small form factor avionics networking platform that consolidates wireless connectivity, switching, routing, and security features. “A typical routing application is the secure interface from client devices onboard the aircraft to SATCOM or Air-To-Ground connectivity links,” says Kontron.

Read more

Games: Ryan Gordon, Voxel Turf, System Shock

Filed under
Gaming
  • Ryan Gordon Is Working On MojoAL, Adds Spatialized Audio Support

    Ryan Gordon's new MojoAL sound library now supports audio spatialization.

    MojoAL is the newest open-source project being maintained by macOS/Linux game porter Ryan "Icculus" Gordon. MojoAL is an SDL-based OpenAL implementation that aims to be a drop-in replacement to this long-standing, cross-platform audio API library that was originally started by his former employer, Loki Entertainment. While OpenAL continues to be maintained by the likes of Apple and Creative, MojoAL is a new replacement being hacked on by Icculus.

  • Voxel Turf just had a huge update, the AI can now build cities and hired goons can be given orders

    Voxel Turf [Steam], the urban sandbox that's a little like Minecraft with elements of a city-builder and GTA has just had a huge update.

  • Nightdive Studios show off how System Shock is returning to the original vision

    I'm sure plenty were worried about the break Nightdive Studios were taking with the new System Shock reboot, however this latest Kickstarter update sounds promising.

    In the update, Stephen Kick, CEO of Nightdive Studios notes how they've let go a few developers while keeping a "concentrated team" full of people who worked on the original Unity demo. Kick himself has even taken over as game director, so hopefully he can get everyone to stick to their vision of the original System Shock.

Free Software Foundation's Conference and Free Software Directory Meetup

Filed under
GNU
  • Free Software Awards

    The president and founder of the Free Software Foundation will speak about pressing issues in free software today, and will present the winners of the 2018 Free Software Awards.

  • Incompossibilities: Ubiquitous Engineering Tradeoffs

    Many things in life come with limitations -- often because we don't have unlimited time, energy, or other resources. But software often feels like it should be an exception, because it's immaterial and weightless, built from scratch out of logic. It doesn't literally rust or rot. So idealistic software developers have consistently envisioned software systems that will escape the shortcomings that frustrate users.

    Meanwhile, researchers keep discovering kinds of tradeoffs that seem to be built into the very structure of certain problems; as the Rolling Stones said, "You can't always get what you want." Inherent tradeoffs have popped up in political science, computer science, and even ethical philosophy, with conjectures and often formal proofs that, in various regards, can't be wedged into any system that will give people all that they want out of it. Limitative theorems are now a major research theme, and more are being found all the time.

    These tradeoffs seem to have very practical consequences, among other things, for privacy and anonymity software, and for social networks: each design may have to give up things some users value in order to achieve other goals.

    Thinking about these limitations and what they do or don't mean can help inform discussions of software design, especially for communications tools whose value depends on broad adoption. And we're having to get used to the idea that in some ways, we'll never create perfect software.

  • Copyleft, Diversity & Critical Infrastructure

    GPL enforcement and Outreachy are the two most visible and controversial programs that Conservancy undertakes. In this talk, Karen will explore how the programs fit together in the context of software freedom generally. Karen will review her work around medical devices and critical infrastructure and show how seemingly disparate initiatives fit into a single advocacy narrative.

  • Freedom. Embedded. Vehicles?

    Modern vehicles are nodes on a network with a high degree of autonomy. As they've become more connected, they've incorporated more free software. But the fundamentally proprietary nature of car and truck manufacturers has led to regulatory and compliance issues that have unclear outcomes. The outcomes are increasingly pertinent to software freedom, especially as the use of free software shifts domains from consumer-focused to safety-critical.

  • The ethics void

    Many communities have widely adopted codes of ethics governing the moral conduct of their members and professionals. Some of these codes may even be enshrined in law, and for good reason—certain conduct can have enormous consequences on the lives of others.

    Software and technology pervade virtually every aspect of our lives. Yet, when compared to other fields, our community leaders and educators have produced an ethics void. Last year, I introduced numerous topics concerning privacy, security, and freedom that raise serious ethical concerns. Join me this year as we consider some of those examples and others in an attempt to derive a code of ethics that compares to the moral obligations of other fields, and to consider how leaders and educators should approach ethics within education and guidance.

  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: April 13th starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC

    Help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. Every Friday we meet on IRC in the #fsf channel on irc.freenode.org.

    Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

    When a user comes to the Directory, they know that everything in it is free software, has only free dependencies, and runs on a free OS. With over 16,000 entries, it is a massive repository of information about free software.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Virtual Reality in Mixed Reality, Taskcluster Development

  • Building Bold New Worlds With Virtual Reality
    From rich text to video to podcasts, the Internet era offers an array of new ways for creators to build worlds. Here at Mozilla, we are particularly excited about virtual reality. Imagine moving beyond watching or listening to a story; imagine also feeling that story. Imagine being inside it with your entire mind and body. Now imagine sharing and entering that experience with something as simple as a web URL. That’s the potential before us.
  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 3
    This week we’re heads down focusing on adding features in the three broad areas of Browsers, Social and the Content Ecosystem.
  • New to me: the Taskcluster team
    At this time last year, I had just moved on from Release Engineering to start managing the Sheriffs and the Developer Workflow teams. Shortly after the release of Firefox Quantum, I also inherited the Taskcluster team. The next few months were *ridiculously* busy as I tried to juggle the management responsibilities of three largely disparate groups.
  • Taskcluster migration update: we're finished!
    Over the past few weeks we've hit a few major milestones in our project to migrate all of Firefox's CI and release automation to taskcluster. Firefox 60 and higher are now 100% on taskcluster!

OSS Leftovers

  • After the First US Transaction, Propy Announces an Open Source Developer Program
    California-based blockchain startup Propy, is bringing the commercial use of blockchain technology to the US. After facilitating the first US Blockchain-based real estate deed in Vermont, Propy announced a new open source Developer Program. The idea behind Propy: it allows anyone to buy or sell real estate, anywhere, online. Propy provides an efficient crypto and fiat payment and an immutable record on the blockchain, ensuring that title deeds and property rights will be there forever.
  • Titus, the Netflix container management platform, is now open source
    Titus powers critical aspects of the Netflix business, from video streaming, recommendations and machine learning, big data, content encoding, studio technology, internal engineering tools, and other Netflix workloads. Titus offers a convenient model for managing compute resources, allows developers to maintain just their application artifacts, and provides a consistent developer experience from a developer’s laptop to production by leveraging Netflix container-focused engineering tools.
  • Netflix's Container Management System Is Now Open Source
    On Thursday Netflix announced it's made its home grown container management system, Titus, open source.
  • Lumina Networks on delivering open source SDN
    What kinds of companies should consider open source SDN, and what are the associated challenges in using such open source deployments? Lumina Networks has unrivalled expertise in working with customers and partners to deliver implementations, and explains its processes and outlines the benefits of using open source SDN.
  • Luxoft launches PELUX 1.0 open source platform for automotive
    Luxoft’s automotive division has launched PELUX 1.0, an open source platform available to developers. This has been developed from its PELUX software suite as used by carmakers and tier 1 suppliers to build converged infotainment, autonomous driving, communication, HMI and car body control systems.
  • Dev Preview: MongoDB Enterprise Running on OpenShift
    In order to compete and get products to market rapidly, enterprises today leverage cloud-ready and cloud-enabled technologies. Platforms as a Service (or PaaS) provide out-of-the-box capabilities which enable application developers to focus on their business logic and users instead of infrastructure and interoperability. This key ability separates successful projects from those which drown themselves in tangential work which never stops. In this blog post, we’ll cover MongoDB’s general PaaS and cloud enablement strategy as well as touch upon some new features of Red Hat’s OpenShift which enable you to run production-ready MongoDB clusters. We’re also excited to announce the developer preview of MongoDB Enterprise Server running on OpenShift. This preview allows you to test out how your applications will interact with MongoDB running on OpenShift.
  • Is Open Source The AI Nirvana for Intel? [Ed: openwashing a malicious company using buzzwords and urban myths]
  • Writing Chuck – Joke As A Service
    Recently I really got interested to learn Go, and to be honest I found it to be a beautiful language. I personally feel that it has that performance boost factor from a static language background and easy prototype and get things done philosophy from dynamic language background. The real inspiration to learn Go was these amazing number of tools written and the ease with which these tools perform although they seem to be quite heavy. One of the good examples is Docker. So I thought I would write some utility for fun, I have been using fortune, this is a Linux utility which gives random quotes from a database. I thought let me write something similar but let me do something with jokes, keeping this mind I was actually searching for what can I do and I landed up on jokes about Chuck Norris or as we say it facts about him. I landed up on chucknorris.io they have an API which can return different jokes about Chuck, and there it was my opportunity to put something up and I chose Go for it.

today's howtos

Security: Updates, IBM, Elytron and Container Vulnerability Scanning

  • Security updates for Friday
  • IBM Security launches open-source AI
    IBM Security unveiled an open-source toolkit at RSA 2018 that will allow the cyber community to test their AI-based security defenses against a strong and complex opponent in order to help build resilience and dependability into their systems.
  • Elytron: A New Security Framework in WildFly/JBoss EAP
    Elytron is a new security framework that ships with WildFly version 10 and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7.1. This project is a complete replacement of PicketBox and JAAS. Elytron is a single security framework that will be usable for securing management access to the server and for securing applications deployed in WildFly. You can still use the legacy security framework, which is PicketBox, but it is a deprecated module; hence, there is no guarantee that PicketBox will be included in future releases of WildFly. In this article, we will explore the components of Elytron and how to configure them in Wildfly.
  • PodCTL #32 – Container Vulnerability Scanning