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Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Liberating PCs and "Mac"-branded PCs Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 10:23pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 10:20pm
Story LinuxCon and Linux at 25 Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 10:09pm
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 9:33pm
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 9:32pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 9:24pm
Story EXT4, Btrfs, XFS & NILFS2 HDD File-System Tests On Linux 4.8 (and More Linux Kernel News) Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 9:21pm
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 9:03pm
Story FOSS content management systems (CMS) Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 8:53pm
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 8:47pm

5 reasons professors should encourage students to get involved in open source projects

Filed under
OSS

I've been supporting student participation in humanitarian free and open source software (HFOSS) projects for over a decade. I've seen students get motivated and excited by working in a professional community while they learn and mature professionally. Out of the many reasons for supporting student participation in open source, here are five of the most compelling reasons.

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Linux 4.8-rc3

Filed under
Linux

After last weeks somewhat unusual patch statistics (only 1/6th
drivers), we're not back to the normal programming with rc3, and we
have the usual situation with roughly ~60% of the patch being driver
updates. It's spread out, but most of it tends to be networking, GPU,
USB and a new EDAC driver. But all of it is fairly small.

Outside of the driver department, we've got core networking, some
filesystem updates (mainly xfs, although in the diffstat afs shows up
too, but that's really from the networking changes) and a smattering
of updates all over: documentation, scheduler, some miinor arch
updates etc.

Read more

Also: Linus Torvalds Announces a Fairly Small Third Linux Kernel 4.8 Release Candidate

Linux 4.8-rc3 Kernel Is Out

10 Linux Distros You Should Know About

Filed under
Linux

These distributions prove that the Linux community is still full of creativity and good ideas, and prepared for whatever the future might bring. There are many more similar projects worth checking out, such as Trenta OS and the Clear Linux Project.

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Intel's New Joule IoT Development Board Is Powered by Snappy Ubuntu Core

Filed under
Development
Ubuntu

Canonical, through Amrisha Prashar, has had the pleasure of announcing that their popular Snappy Ubuntu Core operating system is now available for Intel's recently launched Joule development board.

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SparkyLinux 4.4 "Tyche" Arrives Powered by Linux Kernel 4.6.4, Debian Testing

Filed under
Linux

The SparkyLinux developers are announcing the release and general availability of the SparkyLinux 4.4 GNU/Linux operating system for personal computers as the latest stable and most advanced version of the project.

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10-Way Radeon/AMDGPU Benchmarks On Linux 4.8 + Mesa 12.1 Git

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Continuing off from the fresh open-source AMDGPU test data from yesterday's AMDGPU-PRO vs. open-source Polaris + Fiji comparison, here are more AMD graphics cards tested from the Linux 4.8 development code paired with Mesa 12.1 Git.

The GPUs tested for this weekend benchmarking fun were the Radeon HD 6870. HD 7950. R7 260X. R9 270X, R9 285, R7 370, R9 Fury, RX 460, RX 470, and RX 480. All tests happened from Mesa 12.1-dev via the Padoka PPA this week on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS paired with the Linux 4.8 kernel from 18 August. Note that with Mesa Git on pre-GCN GPUs there is only OpenGL 4.4 support for the Radeon HD 5800/6900 series while all other cards such as the HD 6870 are still currently bound to OpenGL 3.3 due to lacking FP64 emulation support.

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4MRescueKit 19.0 Enters Beta, Gets Antivirus Live CD 19.0-0.99.2 & 4MParted 19.0

Filed under
Development

Softpedia was informed by 4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki about the availability for public beta testing of the Beta build of his upcoming 4MRescueKit 19.0 system rescue Live CD project.

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Linux Kernel 4.7.2 Is a Big Update with Numerous AMDGPU and ARM64 Improvements

Filed under
Linux

Linux kernel developer and maintainer of several kernel branches, Greg Kroah-Hartman, announced the release of the second maintenance update for the Linux kernel 4.7 series.

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Linux Event

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • Bus1: a new Linux interprocess communication proposal

    It is early days yet for bus1. Though it has been under development for a least eight months (based on Git history) and is based on even older ideas, there has been little public discussion. The follow-up comments on the kernel-summit email thread primarily involved people indicating their interest rather than commenting on the design. From my limited perspective, though, it is looking positive. The quality of the code and documentation is excellent. The design takes the best of binder, which is a practical success as a core part of the Android platform, and improves on it. And the development team appears to be motivated towards healthy informed community discussion prior to any acceptance. The tea-leaves tell me there are good things in store for bus1.

  • [Older] Open vSwitch Moves to the Linux Foundation

    Open Source usage and participation has increased across the industry in the last few years, driving the spotlight towards the technology powering the future of open collaboration. Similarly, with the rise of software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV), networking is going through its own star studded moment. As an early pioneer in the SDN space, Open vSwitch has been at the forefront of both of these trends, and has helped pioneer not only the concepts we all understand as SDN, but in the open cloud platform as well. Open vSwitch enables developers to easily connect and move between separate cloud environments. We at IBM have contributed heavily to Open vSwitch as part of our dedication to building the cloud as an open, accessible foundation for innovation – not a destination in and of itself.

  • Kernel 4.4.19 Has Been Released

    Kernel 4.4.19 has been released, bringing an impressive number of fixes.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Security and reproducible-build progress in Guix 0.11

    The GNU Guix package-manager project recently released version 0.11, bringing with it support for several hundred new packages, a range of new tools, and some significant progress toward making an entire operating system (OS) installable using reproducible builds.

    Guix is a "functional" package manager, built on many of the same ideas found in the Nix package manager. As the Nix site explains it, the functional paradigm means that packages are treated like values in a functional programming language—Haskell in Nix's case, Scheme in Guix's. The functions that build and install packages do so without side effects, so the system can easily offer nice features like atomic transactions, rollbacks, and the ability for individual users to build and install separate copies of a package without fear that they will interfere. Part of making such a system reliable is to ensure that builds are "reproducible"—meaning that two corresponding copies of a binary built on different systems at different times will be bit-for-bit identical.

  • VeraCrypt Audit Under Way; Email Mystery Cleared Up

    To say the VeraCrypt audit, which begins today, got off to an inauspicious start would be an understatement.

    On Sunday, two weeks after the announcement that the open source file and disk encryption software would be formally scrutinized for security vulnerabilities, executives at one of the firms funding the audit posted a notice that four emails between the parties involved had been intercepted.

  • Cryptocurrency Mining Virus Targets Linux Machines
  • Why The Windows Secure Boot Hack Is a Good Thing

    Most coverage of the subject has been written in that panicky, alarmist prose that makes for exciting news, but the problem is that the invalidation of Secure Boot is a very positive development for everyone concerned, except for Microsoft. Yes, it shows why backdoors for “the good guys” are a terrible idea — yes, it even has far-reaching implications for every piece of computing technology using the UEFI standard. However, I maintain that it will have a positive influence on the direction of security and tech standards moving forward.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • mutt 1.7.0 released
  • Vim 8 pre-announcement

    Work on Vim 8.0 is coming close to an end. I hope version 8.0 can be released in about two weeks.

    This is a last chance to modify new features in a way that is not backwards compatible. Once 8.0 is out we can’t make changes that would break plugins.

  • digiKam 5.x Photography Application Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    digiKam is digital photo management application for specially designed for KDE desktop environment. Digital photo management program designed to import, organize, enhance, search and export your digital images to and from your computer. It provides a simple interface which makes importing and organizing digital photographs a "snap". The photos are organized in albums which can be sorted chronologically, by folder layout or by custom collections. digiKam enables you to manage large numbers of digital photographs in albums and to organize these photographs for easy retrieval using tags (keywords), captions, collections, dates, geolocation and searches. It has many features for viewing, organizing, processing and sharing your images. Thus, digiKam is a formidable digital asset management (DAM) software including powerful image editing functions. An easy-to-use camera interface is provided, that will connect to your digital camera and download photographs directly into digiKam albums. More than 1000 digital cameras are supported by the gphoto2 library. Of course, any media or card reader supported by your operating system will interface with digiKam.

  • 5 Tools for Monitoring Disk Activity in Linux
  • What is BPF and why is it taking over Linux Performance Analysis?

    The newest tool for observing the Linux operating system is the “Berkeley Packet Filter” (BPF). BPF allows users to run a small piece of code quickly and safely inside the operating system. Originally used for packet filtering, it has since been enhanced from its eponymous use-case to support dynamic tracing of the Linux operating system. For example, it is possible to write a small BPF program that prints every time a particular file was accessed by a user.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Release management in Open Source projects

Filed under
Development
OSS

Open source software is widely used today. While there is not a single development method for open source, many successful open source projects are based on widely distributed development models with many independent contributors working together. Traditionally, distributed software development has often been seen as inefficient due to the high level of communication and coordination required during the software development process. Open source has clearly shown that successful software can be developed in a distributed manner.

The open source community has over time introduced many collaboration systems, such as version control systems and mailing lists, and processes that foster this collaborative development style and improve coordination. In addition to implementing efficient collaboration systems and processes, it has been argued that open source development works because it aims to reduce the level of coordination needed. This is because development is done in parallel streams by independent contributors who work on self-selected tasks. Contributors can work independently and coordination is only required to integrate their work with others.

Relatively little attention has been paid to release management in open source projects in the literature. Release management, which involves the planning and coordination of software releases and the overall management of releases throughout the life cycle, can be studied from many different aspects. I investigated release management as part of my PhD from the point of view of coordination theory. If open source works so well because of various mechanism to reduce the level of coordination required, what implications does this have on release management which is a time in the development process when everyone needs to come together to align their work?

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FarmBot, the open-source CNC farming robot

Filed under
OSS

The FarmBot structure fixes directly on top of any standard raised planter box. You can think of it like a 3D printer, but instead of extruding plastic, the tool head deposits seeds, delivers water and rids the box of weeds, all by moving across a gantry. Powered by a Raspberry Pi 3, an Arduino Mega and a motor control shield, the FarmBot brings agricultural automation within the reach of the committed hobbyist.

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Linux Mint 18 “Sarah” KDE – BETA Release

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Linux Mint 18 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

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The Philosophy of Open Source in Community and Enterprise Software

Filed under
OSS

Open source software is alive and well, backing most of the systems we take for granted every day. Communities like Github have paved the way for more open collaboration and increased contributions. More software today is branded with the marketing gimmick of being moved “into the cloud”, and into subscription models were people perpetually rent software rather than purchase it. Many of the websites we use are walled gardens of free services that are not open, and which make it intentionally difficult to move your data should you become unsatisfied with the service provider. Much of the opens source software being released today is backend technology or developer tools. We are still a far cry away from having the day to day software we use being truly free, not only in cost, but being able to modify it to our needs and run it anywhere we want.

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Performance Benchmarks Against Other Linux/BSD Distributions

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 was released last week and since then many Phoronix readers have inquired about benchmarks of it since it's the first major GNU/Linux distribution using the LLVM Clang compiler by default over GCC.

Thus in continuing my recent BSD and Linux OS performance comparison, here are results of OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 out-of-the-box compared to many other distributions using the same Xeon Skylake hardware platform.

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LinuxCon to Highlight How Linux Has Changed in Its 25 Years

Filed under
Linux

When Linus Torvalds first got started on Linux 25 years ago, it was all about the kernel. For Torvalds today, in conversation after conversation, he will almost always reiterate that the kernel is still his primary focus. The difference between Linux today and Linux 25 years ago is that Linux is about much more than just Torvalds, or even the Linux kernel. Linux today is about the wider world that Linux enables. It's a world where the collaborative development model that Linux pioneered has been extended into every realm of software development.

Ten years ago, when I first met Jim Zemlin, his message was about trying to prevent the fragmentation of Linux by having the Linux Standards Base. While fragmentation is still a concern, it's no longer at the top of the list for Linux. Today Linux and the wider ecosystem it helps enable is the basis of the modern world, from the internet of things to smart phones, servers and everything in between.

As Zemlin has said many times in his state of Linux address at LinuxCon events over the years, "Linux is awesome."

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Android makers try to make their phones eye-catching

Filed under
Android

It’s getting rarer for phone launches to generate excitement these days — especially in the Android world, where all models use the same underlying Google software. Every year, phones get routine refreshes such as faster processors, better cameras and longer battery life.

But Android phone makers haven’t given up trying to stand out. Samsung, for instance, hopes to encourage upgrades by giving its new Galaxy Note 7 phone an eye scanner for identification and related security features. Other manufacturers are looking beyond the phone entirely, pinning their hopes on innovative accessories. Motorola offers mix-and-match modules that let you upgrade your phone on the fly, while Alcatel is focused on adding virtual-reality features, including a headset.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • First FSFE Summit Will Focus on Social Issues and Strategies
    Free Software advocates from all over Europe will be meeting in Berlin Sept. 2-4 at the first ever Free Software Foundation Europe's summit. This 2016 event, besides being long overdue, also marks 15 years since the creation of the FSFE. Throughout its history, the FSFE has had its fair share of landmark achievements. It has been instrumental in a successful antitrust-case against a big software corporation that intended to dominate the market of personal computers. It managed to keep software patents unenforceable in Europe, thereby avoiding a veritable apocalypse for European small and medium-sized tech companies. And, it worked alongside gpl-violations.org to get free licenses vindicated in German courts, setting ground-breaking precedents for the whole of the EU. One of the main missions of the Free Software community in general, and the FSFE in particular, is to put users back into the driver's seat, so that people control technology and not the other way around. This may seem like a lofty goal, but it would likely not be an exaggeration to say that the FSFE has transformed the foundations of IT in Europe and that it has had a deep impact on anybody who has used a computer, a smartphone, or a tablet in the last decade or so.
  • Facebook's computer vision tool, Linux at 25, and more news
  • Is energy industry ready to join open source world?
    Halliburton is moving to foster cooperation in processing of data
  • ‘Show-and-Tell’ Cool Maker Projects on Hangouts
    Wow! This live Hangout show looks a lot like a DIY version of one of the morning shows on over-the-air TV — and if there’s any doubt that the maker movement thrives on open source, the first guest’s project is all about Python and Arduino. Be sure to check out the cool Star Trek combadge. Beam us up, Mr. Shapiro!

Microsoft 'Loves' (Pays) Linux

  • Microsoft at LinuxCon: Building Open Source Cred One Conference at a Time [Ed: Wim Coekaerts received just one salary from Microsoft and now he's being painted as "Microsoft", which still attacks Linux. Microsoft is just purchasing the illusion that it is loved by Linux and vice versa.]
    Coekaerts came to Microsoft after some off campus meetings at a Redmond area Starbucks with Scott Guthrie and Mike Neil, two vice presidents with the cloud and enterprise group, who convinced him that "open source is very important to Microsoft."
  • How Cloud Native Computing Is Evolving
    "Cloud native" is a relatively new term that isn't particularly well understood, but the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) aims to change that. At the Cloud Native Day here following LinuxCon, Dan Kohn, CNCF executive director (pictured), detailed what his organization does and how the cloud native approach is now evolving. The CNCF was formed in July 2015, as an effort to help unify and define the Cloud Native era. Kohn started off his keynote with a brief history of the cloud and the movement of workloads from physical servers.
  • Are You a Linux Expert?
  • Common hardware causes Windows 10 Anniversary Update crashes, again
    Microsoft’s Anniversary Update is causing headaches yet again, this time for owners of Kindle e-readers. Some Kindle Paperwhite and Voyager devices are causing PCs running the Anniversary update to lock up and display the dreaded blue screen of death (BSOD) whenever the e-readers are connected via USB, as first reported by The Guardian. The reason for this odd behavior is unclear, but Microsoft says it’s working on it. “We are aware of an issue with a small number of Kindle Voyager and Paperwhite e-Readers causing an unexpected behavior when plugged into Windows 10 devices after installing the Anniversary Update,” Microsoft said on its support forums. The impact on you at home: For now, there isn’t a solid workaround for anyone who’s experiencing this problem. Some users are reporting, however, that leaving the Kindle plugged in to the PC while rebooting will allow them to use the Kindle normally and transfer files. Rebooting the PC and plugging the Kindle back in again just causes another lock-up.

5 Reasons to Switch to Ubuntu Phone

You’ve had Android phones, and you’ve had iPhones. Buying a smartphone for most people is a polarized, A/B choice. And for some, the experience of choosing a new phone is becoming… jaded. You might think that Android and iOS have the mobile market sewn up, but what if I was to tell you that you don’t need to look at Windows 10 Mobile or BlackBerry as alternatives? Various others are available, but perhaps the most impressive of them all is the Ubuntu Phone, which uses the Ubuntu Touch platform, and can be found on devices such as the Meizu Pro 5. Read more Also: Ubuntu Linux 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Beta 1 now available for download (don't talk back)

Bodhi Updates, KaOS & Antergos Reviews, Another 25?

Today in Linux news, Jeff Hoogland posted a short update on the progress of Bodhi Linux 4.0 and reported on the updates to the project's donations page. In other news, An Everyday Linux User reviewed Arch-based Antergos Linux saying it was "decent" and Ubuntu-fan Jack Wallen reviewed "beautiful" KDE-centric KaOS. makeuseof.com has five reasons to switch to the Ubuntu phone and Brian Fagioli asked if Linux can survive another 25 years. Read more