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Tuesday, 19 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story How an open source tool is helping hurricane victims Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 7:26am
Story Initial Benchmarks Of The AMD EPYC 7601 On Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 7:21am
Story Linux drone controller has HDMI input and long-range WiFi Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 7:09am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2017 - 10:45pm
Story Red Hat, CentOS and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2017 - 10:44pm
Story Devices: Purism’s Librem 5, ASUSTOR, and Tizen Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2017 - 10:42pm
Story OSS: Comcast, Small Businesses, Cloudera, Windows, and DragonFly Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2017 - 10:37pm
Story FOSS Licensing News Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2017 - 10:34pm
Story FOSS and Oracle Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2017 - 10:33pm
Story Wipro and Linux, Free Software Associations Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2017 - 10:31pm

Linux Development Statistics, Linux Foundation News, and Technical Changes Explained

Filed under
Linux
  • Twelve Collabora Developers Have Contributed 72 Patches to the Linux 4.13 Kernel

    Now that the Linux 4.13 kernel series is out, and it's ready for production use, it's time to look at the contributions made by some of Collabora's developers, which always bring goodies during each development cycle.

    Linus Torvalds unveiled the Linux 4.13 kernel branch last week, a release that brought support for Intel's Cannon Lake and Coffee Lake processor family, among lots of other improvements. For the Linux kernel 4.13 cycle, it looks like a total of twelve Collabora developers have contributed no less than 72 patches, reviewed 25 patches, tested 10 patches, and signed-off 83 patches.

  • Development statistics for the 4.13 kernel

    As of this writing, the 4.13 kernel appears headed toward release on September 3, after a nine-week development cycle. It must, therefore, be about time for a look at the statistics for this development cycle. The picture that results shows a fairly typical kernel cycle with, as usual, few surprises.

    Midway between 4.13-rc6 and 4.13-rc7, 12,677 non-merge changesets had found their way into the mainline. That makes 4.13 the smallest cycle since 4.7, which finished with 12,283 changesets. Chances are, though, that this cycle will surpass 4.11 (12,724) by the time it is done. So, while there may be signs of a (northern hemisphere) summer slowdown, 4.13 remains generally comparable with its predecessors with respect to patch volume.

  • Samsung Joins EdgeX Foundry to Accelerate Open Source Development of Industrial IoT Edge Platform

    EdgeX Foundry, an open source project building a common framework for Internet of Things (IoT) edge computing, today announced Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. has joined as a Platinum member. Participating in EdgeX Foundry will support Samsung's emerging efforts in the industrial sector while expanding the market of EdgeX compatible components and devices.

    [...]

    EdgeX Foundry is a collaborative project of The Linux Foundation that is building an open interoperability framework hosted within a full hardware- and OS-agnostic reference software platform to enable an ecosystem of plug-and-play components that unifies the marketplace and accelerates the deployment of IoT solutions. Designed to run on any hardware or operating system and with any combination of application environments, EdgeX can quickly and easily deliver interoperability between connected devices, applications, and services, across a wide range of use cases.

  • The Linux Foundation Releases Open Source Guides for the Enterprise

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has released the first six in a series of Open Source Guides for the Enterprise, created to help executives, open source program managers, developers, attorneys and other decision makers learn how to best leverage open source.

  • printk() and KERN_CONT [Ed: these three LWN articles (more below) no longer behind paywall]
  • Goodbye to GFP_TEMPORARY and dma_alloc_noncoherent()

BakAndImgCD 23.0 Data Backup & Disk Cloning Live CD Released Based on 4MLinux 23

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki‏ has informed us about the release and immediate availability of BakAndImgCD 23.0 data backup and disk cloning/imaging live system based on the latest 4MLinux Backup Scripts.

Based on 4MLinux Backup Scripts 23.0, the BakAndImgCD 23.0 release is here to add support for the latest GNU/Linux and Open Source technologies that have been implemented so far in the upcoming 4MLinux 23.0 operating system release, which is expected to launch this fall.

"BakAndImgCD is an official 4MLinux fork, which has been designed to perform the following two tasks: data backup (the supported filesystems are: btrfs, ext2, ext3, ext4, f2fs, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, nilfs2, ntfs, reiser4, reiserfs, and xfs) and disk imaging (using Partimage, Partclone, and GNU ddrescue)," said Zbigniew Konojacki‏.

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Open Source Means Choice Of Insurance

Filed under
OSS

Some say that companies don’t want open source because they want the security of a relationship with a big business. But this outlook reflects misunderstandings of the real values of open source. It’s yet another consequence of the “price frame”.

There is an overall price-related message-frame that proprietary software companies like to use around open source. In each instance, an idea completes the phrase “open source may come with free licenses but…” in creatively manipulative ways. In many cases, the resulting statement conceals a weakness of proprietary software by casting it as a weakness of open source.

In the case of software investment protection, the phrase gets completed “… but you need a proprietary vendor for long-term investment protection”. That’s a deceptive statement that embodies an incorrect view of open source as a “knock-off copy”. The open source model – done well – offers more security than the proprietary model.

It’s a powerful and persistent myth because it builds on at least two misconceptions:

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System76's Pop!_OS Linux Installer to Ship by Default with Ubuntu 18.04 Rebase

Filed under
OS

System76 devs continue to work on the first release of their Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS Linux distro, which is expected to land on the same day as Canonical's Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, on October 19, 2017.

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Ubuntu 17.10 to Bring Support for Indicators, Notification Badges to Ubuntu Dock

Filed under
Ubuntu

Work on the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system continues, and Canonical's Will Cooke is back with more information on the Ubuntu Desktop team bakes for the final release, which will land on October 19, 2017.

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An open source toolkit for measuring project health

Filed under
OSS

Red Hat's product offerings are all built upon open source projects—they all are derived from one or more upstream, community-based open source projects. Red Hat's product managers need to have a good sense of what is going on in their respective upstream open source projects to enable the product's continued evolution based on the strength of the community and collaboration in the project. In addition to Red Hat's own needs, the explosion of products and services that use the hundreds of thousands of open source projects to drive the technology revolution calls for a coherent, repeatable and objective tool/method to ascertain how a project is doing.

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elementary OS Loki Users Get August's App Improvements and Security Updates

Filed under
OS

Daniel Foré, founder of the elementary OS project, an open-source initiative to provide a general use computer operating system based on the popular Ubuntu Linux distro, announced August's security and stability updates for Loki users.

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Debian-Based Univention Corporate Server 4.2 Linux Gets Second Security Update

Filed under
Debian

Univention's Maren Abatielos is pleased to inform us about the availability of the second point release of the Debian-based Univention Corporate Server (UCS) 4.2 operating system for servers and the cloud.

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How companies can make the most from open source

Filed under
OSS

It's 2017, and some people still don't understand why open source is vital for business and how to really make the most of it. The Linux Foundation and its corporate partners are ready to explain it to you.

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Slackware-Based SlackEX Distro Updated with Linux Kernel 4.12, KDE 4.14.35 LTS

Filed under
Slack

After informing us of the release of his CruxEX 3.3 2017 GNU/Linux distribution, developer Arne Exton recently brought to our attention that his SlackEX distro got a new important update.

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Zorin OS 12.2 Arrives as the Most Advanced Zorin Operating System Ever Released

Filed under
OS

The Zorin OS team announced the release and general availability of Zorin OS 12.2, the second maintenance update to the Zorin OS 12 series, and also the most advances Zorin OS version ever released.

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Why Mobile Linux Fails

Filed under
Linux

Mobile Linux is, to be sure, a challenged sector. Over the past few years we've seen a few attempts at bringing a "proper Linux experience" over to the mobile space. Sadly, these efforts haven't met with the success we had hoped for.

This article will take a hard look at why mobile Linux has failed and whether or not it will ever be something relevant for the masses.

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Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 11

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Let’s talk today about collaboration (with System76 in this case) and how we give more benefits to both Ubuntu and the upcoming Pop! OS user base. For more background on our current transition to GNOME Shell in artful, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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GNOME 3.26: Wayland vs. X.Org Performance - Boot Times, Power Use, Memory Use & Gaming

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While testing out the near-final GNOME 3.26 this weekend I also ran some benchmarks of it comparing the boot time, memory use, power consumption, and gaming performance when comparing GNOME Shell / Mutter running on Wayland and then an X.Org session.

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Stackable Raspberry Pi add-on card aims for maximum I/O

Filed under
Linux

On Kickstarter: a stackable “Raspberry Pi Mega-IO Expansion Card” for home automation offers a 12-bit DAC, 8x ADC, 8x relays, 8x opto-inputs, and 6x GPIO.

A startup by Mihai Beffa called Sequent Microsystems has launched a Kickstarter campaign for a Raspberry Pi add-on card that is loaded with inputs, outputs, and relays designed for home automation. The stackable Raspberry Pi Mega-IO Expansion Card is an attempt to “integrate as many Home Automation functions as possible into a Raspberry Pi platform,” says the KS page.

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KStars 2.8.3 Released and a Look at Pithos

Filed under
Software
  • KStars 2.8.3 aka Tommy is out!

    The bugfix release of KStars 2.8.3 is available for all major platforms. In this version, we finally managed to release translations for Windows & MacOS users, thanks to the efforts of Hannah and Kevin over at Craft, and the KDE translation team.

  • Pithos, the Linux Pandora Radio App, Adds 10-Band Equalizer + More!

    A new version of Pithos, the open-source Pandora Radio client for Linux desktops, is available to download. Pithos 1.4.0 introduces a number of new plugins that extend its feature set, including a 10-band equalizer, a screensaver/lock screen inhibiter, and a volume normalizer.

  •  

Leftovers: OpenSourcePC, Brutal Legend on Ubuntu MATE, and SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 3

Filed under
Misc
  • OpenSourcePC is Open for Business

    At OpenSourcePC you can customize your computer and hardware as much as you can customize your software. They offer wraps, laser etching, custom paint, custom branding, and hydro dipping to get that exact look you want and upgrades for Ram, CPU, GPU, solid state drives, storage, cooling, and overclocking. OpenSourcePC uses Linux based operating system Ubuntu. Linux gives the user complete control while Ubuntu is secure and user friendly offering the best of both worlds. In the future, OpenSourcePC will be adding Linux based desktops and servers to their line-up, so make sure to check in for new product updates.

  • Brutal Legend on Ubuntu MATE

    Today I solicit help from the YouTube chat room (in my LIVE stream) for help playing Brutal Legend. I’ve made it up to just before meeting with Ozzy. Thankfully, the chat room offers up helpful advice that gets me farther than ever before!

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 3 Debuts to Boost Efficiency and Security

    SUSE, through Raj Meel, was pleased to announce the release and general availability of the third Service Pack of the SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 commercial operating system designed for enterprises.

    The SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 release has a 13-year life cycle, and SUSE promises to offer ten years of general support, as well as three years of extended support for all customers. And SP3 is here to boost the efficiency and security of the operating system, on which the free and open-source OpenSuSE Leap OS is based, as well as to add several new features and the latest GNU/Linux technologies.

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More in Tux Machines

Oracle: New VirtualBox 5.2 Beta, SPARC M8 Processors Launched

  • VirtualBox 5.2 to Let Users Enable or Disable Audio Input and Output On-the-Fly
    Oracle announced new updates for its popular, cross-platform and open-source virtualization software, the third Beta of the upcoming VirtualBox 5.2 major release and VirtualBox 5.1.28 stable maintenance update. We'll start with the stable update, VirtualBox 5.1.28, as it's more important for our readers using Oracle VM VirtualBox for all of their virtualization needs. The VirtualBox 5.1 maintenance release 28 is here to improve audio support by fixing various issues with both the ALSA and OSS backends, as well as an accidental crash with AC'97.
  • SPARC M8 Processors Launched
    While Oracle recently let go of some of their SPARC team, today marks the launch of the SPARC M8. The initial SPARC M8 line-up includes the T8-1, T8-2, T8-4. M8-8, and SuperCluster M8-8 servers.

Wikileaks Releases Spy Files Russia, CCleaner Infected, Equifax Has a Dirty Little Secret

  • Spy Files Russia
    This publication continues WikiLeaks' Spy Files series with releases about surveillance contractors in Russia. While the surveillance of communication traffic is a global phenomena, the legal and technological framework of its operation is different for each country. Russia's laws - especially the new Yarovaya Law - make literally no distinction between Lawful Interception and mass surveillance by state intelligence authorities (SIAs) without court orders. Russian communication providers are required by Russian law to install the so-called SORM ( Система Оперативно-Розыскных Мероприятий) components for surveillance provided by the FSB at their own expense. The SORM infrastructure is developed and deployed in Russia with close cooperation between the FSB, the Interior Ministry of Russia and Russian surveillance contractors.
  • Malware-Infected CCleaner Installer Distributed to Users Via Official Servers for a Month
    Hackers have managed to embed malware into the installer of CCleaner, a popular Windows system optimization tool with over 2 billion downloads to date. The rogue package was distributed through official channels for almost a month. CCleaner is a utilities program that is used to delete temporary internet files such as cookies, empty the Recycling Bin, correct problems with the Windows Registry, among other tasks. First released in 2003, it has become hugely popular; up to 20 million people download it per month. Users who downloaded and installed CCleaner or CCleaner Cloud between Aug. 15 and Sept. 12 should scan their computers for malware and update their apps. The 32-bit versions of CCleaner v5.33.6162 and CCleaner Cloud v1.07.3191 were affected.
  • Equifax Suffered a Hack [sic] Almost Five Months Earlier Than the Date It Disclosed
  • This is why you shouldn’t use texts for two-factor authentication

    For a long time, security experts have warned that text messages are vulnerable to hijacking — and this morning, they showed what it looks like in practice.

Amazon Changes Rental ('Cloud') Model on GNU/Linux

Devices/Hardware: Embedded/Boards, CODESYS, and EPYC Linux Performance

  • Linux friendly IoT gateway runs on 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC
    While the MB-80580 SBC lists SATA II, the gateway indicates SATA III. Also, the gateway datasheet notes that the RS232 ports can all be redirected to RS232/422/485. Software includes Windows IoT Core and Server, as well as Yocto, Ubuntu Snappy Core, and CentOS Linux distributions.
  • Rugged panel PC scales up to a 19-inch touchscreen
    The fanless, IP65-rated WinSystems “PPC65B-1x” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 10.4 to 19-inch resistive touchscreens.
  • CODESYS announces CODESYS-compatible SoftPLC for open Linux device platforms
  • EPYC Linux performance from AMD
    Phoronix have been hard at work testing out AMD's new server chip, specifically the 2.2/2.7/3.2GHz EPYC 7601 with 32 physical cores.  The frequency numbers now have a third member which is the top frequency all 32 cores can hit simultaneously, for this processor that would be 2.7GHz.  Benchmarking server processors is somewhat different from testing consumer CPUs, gaming performance is not as important as dealing with specific productivity applications.   Phoronix started their testing of EPYC, in both NUMA and non-NUMA configurations, comparing against several Xeon models and the performance delta is quite impressive, sometimes leaving even a system with dual Xeon Gold 6138's in the dust.  They also followed up with a look at how EPYC compares to Opteron, AMD's last server offerings.  The evolution is something to behold.
  • Opteron vs. EPYC Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Watt: How AMD Server Performance Evolved Over 10 Years
    By now you have likely seen our initial AMD EPYC 7601 Linux benchmarks. If you haven't, check them out, EPYC does really deliver on being competitive with current Intel hardware in the highly threaded space. If you have been curious to see some power numbers on EPYC, here they are from the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Making things more interesting are some comparison benchmarks showing how the AMD EPYC performance compares to AMD Opteron processors from about ten years ago.