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Monday, 23 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 5:19pm
Story 4.9 is a longterm kernel Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 5:02pm
Story openSUSE Package Management Cheat Sheet Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 4:57pm
Story Mozilla News Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 4:40pm
Story GNU/Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 3:42pm
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 3:40pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 12:49pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 12:48pm
Story Raspberry Pi: A closer look at Raspbian PIXEL Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 12:37pm
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 12:36pm

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Google's open-source Draco promises to squeeze richer 3D worlds into the web, gaming, and VR

    Google has published a set of open source libraries that should improve the storage and transmission of 3D graphics, which could help deliver more detailed 3D apps.

  • Why every business should consider an open source point of sale system

    Point of sale (POS) systems have come a long way from the days of simple cash registers that rang up purchases. Today, POS systems can be all-in-one solutions that include payment processing, inventory management, marketing tools, and more. Retailers can receive daily reports on their cash flow and labor costs, often from a mobile device.

    The POS is the lifeblood of a business, and that means you need to choose one carefully. There are a ton of options out there, but if you want to save money, adapt to changing business needs, and keep up with technological advances, you would be wise to consider an open source system. An open source POS, where the source code is exposed for your use, offers significant advantages over a proprietary system that keeps its code rigidly under wraps.

  • Can academic faculty members teach with Wikipedia?

    Since 2010, 29,000 students have completed the Wiki Ed program. They have added 25 million words to Wikipedia, or the equivalent of 85,000 printed pages of content. This is 66% of the total words in the last print edition of Encyclopedia Britannica. When Wiki Ed students are most active, they are contributing 10% of all the content being added to underdeveloped, academic content areas on Wikipedia.

  • AMD HSA IL / BRIG Front-End Still Hoping To Get Into GCC 7

    For many months now there's been work on an AMD HSA IL front-end for GCC with supporting the BRIG binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). It's getting late into GCC 7 development and onwards to its final development stage while this new front-end has yet to be merged.

    Developer Pekka Jääskeläinen has been trying to get in the finishing reviews and changes for getting approval to land this BRIG front-end into the GNU Compiler Collection. It's a big addition and with GCC 7 soon just focusing on wrong-code fixes, bug fixes, and documentation fixes starting on 19 January, there would be just a few days left to land this new front-end for GCC 7 to avoid having to wait until next year for it to debut in stable with GCC 8.

  • Rcpp 0.12.9: Next round

    Yesterday afternoon, the nineth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp made it to the CRAN network for GNU R. Windows binaries have by now been generated; and the package was updated in Debian too. This 0.12.9 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, and the 0.12.8 release in November --- making it the thirteenth release at the steady bi-montly release frequency.

    Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing GNU R with C or C++ code. As of today, 906 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further. That is up by sixthythree packages over the two months since the last release -- or about a package a day!

Q4OS 1.8.2 Is the First Linux OS to Be Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie"

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Debian

Softpedia was informed today, January 16, 2017, by the developers of the Debian-based Q4OS GNU/Linux distribution about the availability of a new stable build of the 1.8 series.

Read more

OSS in the Back End

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Target CIO explains how DevOps took root inside the retail giant [Ed: Don’t ever make/give Target any payments, certainly not digitally. They use a lot of Microsoft Mindows i.e. back doors]

    When I arrived at Target in mid-2015, I was excited to find an active grassroots DevOps and agile movement in pockets of the technology team. We’d already seen some great results with our digital teams and our enterprise architecture group moving to agile and DevOps. And we had a lot of engineers and team members who were hungry to start working this way.

  • OpenStack Vendor Mirantis Offers Managed OpenContrail SDN Services

    The open-source OpenContrail Software Defined Networking (SDN) technology is one of the most widely used and deployed networking approaches in the OpenStack cloud market. That's a fact that is not lost on OpenStack vendor Mirantis, which is why today Mirantis is announcing commercial support for OpenContrail.

  • Cloud Kindergarten preps students for OpenStack careers

    Cloud Kindergarten began this year to offer students a chance to learn about OpenStack and how to work with it. The students taking part in this program have access to Devstack so that they can learn about different commands and how to best utilize them in practice. Students are also able to create a tenant or network with routers and host an application like WordPress with databases and web servers.

  • OpenStack private cloud: benefits, challenges and what the future holds

    Many businesses in the UK have turned to private cloud to run mission-critical applications, with 80 percent of senior IT professionals having moved, or planning to move, to the OpenStack private cloud.

    The impact and adoption rates of this “cloud of choice” were explored in a recent study by SUSE, looking into the key benefits of private cloud and the effect its growth is having on UK businesses.

  • Navigating OpenStack: community, release cycles and events

    Hopefully last week we piqued your interest in a career path in OpenStack. Like any other open source project, if you’re going to use it—professionally or personally—it’s important to understand its community and design/release patterns.

  • Containers on the CERN cloud

    We have recently made the Container-Engine-as-a-Service (Magnum) available in production at CERN as part of the CERN IT department services for the LHC experiments and other CERN communities. This gives the OpenStack cloud users Kubernetes, Mesos and Docker Swarm on demand within the accounting, quota and project permissions structures already implemented for virtual machines.

  • Effective OpenStack contribution: Seven things to avoid at all cost

    There are numerous blogs and resources for the new and aspiring OpenStack contributor, providing tips, listing what to do. Here are seven things to avoid if you want to be an effective OpenStack contributor.

  • Tips for contributors, managing containers at CERN, and more OpenStack news

    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.

Puppy Linux Fork Quirky 8.1.6 "Xerus" Is Built From Ubuntu 16.04 Binary Packages

Filed under
Ubuntu

Puppy Linux's creator Barry Kauler is kicking off 2017 with a new stable release of the Quirky "Xerus" operating system, which is built from the binary packages of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Terrible Ideas in Git

Filed under
Development
Movies
  • Terrible Ideas in Git

    "Git does let you do some extraordinarily powerful things. Powerful, of course, in this talk, is a polite euphemism for stupid," says Corey Quinn of FutureAdvisor at LinuxCon North America. Who hasn't experienced at least one moment of feeling like a complete dunce when using Git? Sure, Git is wonderful, everyone uses it, and you can do most of your work with a few basic commands. But it also has mighty powers to make us feel like we have no idea what we're doing.

  • Terrible Ideas in Git by Corey Quinn, FutureAdvisor

    In this presentation at LinuxCon, Corey Quinn takes you on a magical tour through the (mis)use of Git to do things its creators never intended.

RADV Improved

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV Vulkan Driver Support For Multiple Devices

    Open-source driver developer Bas Nieuwenhuizen has posted a patch for allowing the open-source Radeon Mesa Vulkan driver (RADV) to support multiple devices.

  • The open source Vulkan driver for AMD 'radv' now supports using multiple GPUs

    A commit that just landed in Mesa-git allows for 'radv', the open source Vulkan driver for AMD GPUs to use multiple devices.

    This will likely be useful in future for people who have two (or maybe even more) GPUs to really push their games.

    Support for things like that on Linux should improve as Vulkan evolves and is adopted by more developers. Just how useful this will end up being is the real question.

From Windows to GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Turn an old laptop into a Chromebook-Linux hybrid

    Common scenario: You buy a new laptop, thinking you'll sell, donate or hand down the old one... but it never happens. Maybe you don't want to deal with the hassles of Craigslist or Ebay, not to mention wiping all your data, reinstalling Windows and so on.

    Whatever the case, now it's just taking up space. But it doesn't have to: You can give that old laptop new life.

    With Linux, right? Wrong! I mean, yes, you could install Linux, which has always been the go-to option, but not everybody needs or wants the complexity of that operating system. For some, Chromium might be the better choice.

    Chromium is the OS that's at the heart of Chromebooks -- those fast-booting, cloud-powered devices that are so popular these days. Think about it: For whatever reason, no one buys Linux laptops. They buy Chromebooks.

    If you like the idea of giving your old system a Chromebook-like lease on life, good news: It's fast, free and easy. And it's not even permanent unless you want it to be.

  • When Peer Pressure Nukes Linux for Windows

    Several months ago, my 16-year-old grandson decided he wanted a powerful computer for gaming. I showed him Steam and some other stuff in Linux and he thought that looked good, so I started accumulating parts. If it was substantially more powerful than anything I have for myself, it was on the list. Sorry I don’t have the details list nearby, but it had a motherboard with a name I had heard, a fairly fast AMD processor with six cores, maxed out RAM, 1TB hard drive, video that took up two slots and had two fans, power supply you could use for welding, and a pair of 22″ monitors.

    I installed Mint 17.3 KDE in less than half an hour (the usual), including separate swap and home partitions (it’s a neurotic thing), setting wallpaper and the like, and doing whatever came to mind at the time. It ran flawlessly and I was happy, so I played with it a while. I really liked it. If I could think of a use, I’d build one for myself.

  • That Other Operating System Continues Its Decline

    The big winner is the Linux kernel. The vociferous opponents of GNU/Linux who haunt this blog can’t have it both ways. If GNU/Linux is not “GNU” and is Linux, then Android/Linux can’t be just Android. It’s Linux underneath.

Linux Mint 18.1 'Serena' KDE Edition Beta is available for download now

Filed under
Linux

A Beta release for Linux Mint 18.1 'Serena' KDE is here. There are already versions available featuring other desktop environments, such as Cinnamon, Mate, and Xfce. You'd think that would be enough, but no! Apparently a fourth edition is needed. Some people feel that a KDE version is a waste of resources, but either way, here we are.

So what is new? The KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment is the star of the show -- after all, if you do not want KDE, you wouldn't choose this version. The shipping Linux kernel is 4.4.0-53, which is surprisingly outdated. Ubuntu-based operating systems are never known for being bleeding-edge, however.

Read more

64-bit Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 ships for $25 to $30

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 has arrived with 1GB RAM and the same quad-core -A53 SoC as the RPi 3, available for $30, or $25 without 4GB eMMC.

Raspberry Pi Trading’s first 64-bit computer-on-module version of their flagship single board computer has finally arrived. Despite the name, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) is only the second generation of the CM1. Its name syncs up with the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B SBC, which uses the same quad-core, 64-bit Broadcom SoC. The CM3 is now shipping in $30 Standard (4GB eMMC) or $25 Lite versions, while the CM1 drops in price to $25.

Read more

Panasonic Toughpad Rugged Tablet Muscles into Android Space

Filed under
Android

Panasonic Jan. 12 unveiled a new tablet in its Toughpad series of devices designed for the corporate world. But unlike so many other rugged Panasonic machines, the FZ-A2 doesn’t run Windows. Instead, the device is running on Google’s Android Marshmallow, an operating system not typically associated with rugged PCs and mobile devices designed for rough-and-tumble field-service work. But the FZ-A2 is just the latest model in Panasonic's expanding line of Android tablets. This new Toughpad includes several corporate-friendly features such as robust security, a hot-swappable battery and plenty of ports that allow connection to a wide range of accessories. The Toughpad is launching at a time when market reports have consistently shown a steady decline in popularity of tablets. But Panasonic says its device is coming along at the right time. This slide show will take a look at the Toughpad to see whether its features will convince field-service workers and corporate hardware buyers that the tablet really is as appealing a buy as Panasonic claims it is. Read on to learn more about Panasonic’s FZ-A2 Toughpad.

Read more

LXQt Spin Proposed For Fedora 26

Filed under
Red Hat

A new spin/flavor has been proposed for Fedora 26, one integrating the LXQt desktop environment.

For those late to the party, LXQt is the formation of the LXDE and Razor-qt projects and built around the Qt5 tool-kit. Fedora currently has an LXDE spin while this proposed Fedora LXQt would continue to co-exist alongside the existing LXDE version. Christian Dersch who proposed the LXQt spin explained, "LXDE spin will exist until its maintainer will stop it, LXQt is independent from LXDE spin. So nobody is forced to change Wink Also both projects are maintained upstream so there is no reason to drop anything here."

Read more

Also: F26 Self Contained Change: LXQt Spin

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Raspberry Pi 1 and Zero: Hands on with Manjaro ARM and PiCore Linux

Filed under
Linux

In the previous two posts I wrote about SUSE Linux and Fedora/Manjaro ARM/Ubuntu MATE for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The results were mixed, at best.

This time I'm taking on even more of a challenge because I'm going to be looking at the original Raspberry Pi Model B and B+, and the Raspberry Pi Zero. These models all have much more limited CPU power and memory than the Pi 2 and 3, so it will be interesting to see what can be done with them.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Launched

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation this morning announced the Compute Module 3 (CM3) as the successor to their original Compute Module.

    The Raspberry Pi Compute Module remains targeted as a offering for those manufacturing customized products based upon the Raspberry Pi. The Compute Module uses a DDR2 SO-DIMM interface and makes it easy and low-cost to integrate within custom hardware designs.

  • Giveaway: Win a Linux-friendly Raspberry Pi 3 and Eleduino Aluminum Case with Heatsinks!

    If you have been wanting one, I have good news. We here at BetaNews are giving away the best version -- the Raspberry Pi 3. We aren't stopping there, however, as we are also including a very nice aluminum case -- including heatsinks for overclocking. It is the exact Raspberry Pi 3 and case as seen in the video above. In other words, the case has already been installed by yours truly. Want to enter to win? There are multiple ways to enter. Just click the link below!

Linux Kernel and Linux Event

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
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More in Tux Machines

Google seeks dev feedback for putting AI on Raspberry Pi

Google will bring its AI and machine learning technology to the Raspberry Pi this year, and has posted a survey seeking input. Google is planning to deliver tools for the Raspberry Pi later this year built around its artificial intelligence and machine learning technology, according to a Raspberry Pi Foundation blog entry. The announcement links to a Google survey that seeks to determine what kind of tools RPi developers would find most useful. Read more

Hands-On: Installing openSUSE Tumbleweed, Manjaro, and Debian GNU/Linux on my new notebook

In my previous post about installing Linux on my new, very low-priced laptop (the Asus X540S), I went through the initial setup of Windows 10 Home. My first impressions of the laptop were very mixed. The size and weight are nice, but the overall construction doesn't feel very good. The case feels like very thin plastic, the keyboard doesn't feel good at all, it has a particularly cheesy version of the dreaded "clickpad" (a touchpad with integrated buttons), and the power connection didn't feel very stable. Read more

Rugged, compact IoT gateway runs Linux on Apollo Lake

Axiomtek’s DIN-rail ready “ICO100-839” IoT controller offers an Atom x5-E3930, 8-bit DIO, mini-PCIe, mSATA, extended temp support, and a compact footprint. The ICO100-839 is one of the first embedded computers to use Intel’s recent “Apollo Lake” generation of 14nm-fabricated Atom SoCs. Like the Advantech UTX-3117, the fanless ICO100-839 is referred to as an IoT gateway, and runs on a dual-core Atom X5-E3930 clocked from 1.3GHz to 1.8GHz. The ICO100-839, which is also called an industrial IoT controller, is a stripped down, but updated version of the Bay Trail Atom based ICO300 DIN-rail controller. Last year, the ICO300 was followed by an almost identical ICO300-MI gateway, which added Intel IoT Gateway Technology and Wind River Intelligent Device Platform software. Read more

today's leftovers

  • GoboLinux 016
    GoboLinux is available for 64-bit x86 computers exclusively. The ISO I downloaded for GoboLinux 016 was 958MB in size. Booting from the installation media brings up a text-based menu system where we are asked to select our preferred language from a list of six European languages. We are then asked to select our keyboard's layout from another list. At this point, the system drops us to a command prompt where we are logged in as the root user. The default shell is zsh. A welcome message lets us know we can run the startx command to launch a desktop environment or run the Installer command to begin installing the distribution.
  • Solus Linux Working On A Flatpak-Based, Optimized Steam Runtime
    The Solus Linux developers have been working on their "Linux Steam Integration" for Steam and improvements around the Steam runtime, with this being one of the distributions interested in good Linux performance and making use of some Clear Linux optimizations, while their next step is looking at Flatpak-packaging up of libraries needed by the Steam runtime to fork a Flatpak-happy Linux gaming setup.
  • It’s ‘Best Linux Distro’ Time Again
    It’s time to start the process of choosing the FOSS Force Reader’s Choice Award winner for Best Desktop Linux Distro for 2016. This is the third outing for our annual poll, which began in a March, 2015 contest that was won by Ubuntu, which bested runner-up Linux Mint by only 11 votes. Last year we moved the voting up to January, in a contest which saw Arch Linux as the overall winner, with elementary OS in second place. Just like last year, this year’s polling will be a two round process. The first round, which began early Friday afternoon when the poll quietly went up on our front page, is a qualifying round. In this round, we’re offering a field of 19 of the top 20 distros on Distrowatch’s famous “Page Hit Ranking” list. Those whose favorite distro isn’t on the list shouldn’t worry — your distro’s not out of the game yet. Below the poll there’s a place to write-in any distro that’s not in the poll to be tallied for possible inclusion in the second and final round of polling to follow.
  • Tracktion NAMM 2017 Preview [Ed: Raspberry Pi with Ubuntu]
  • Snapdragon 410E SBC offers long lifecycle support at $85
    The Linux/Android-ready Inforce 6309L is a cheaper version of the DragonBoard 410c-like Inforce 6309. It sacrifices GbE and LVDS, but has 10-year support. Inforce Computing has released a more affordable and slightly less feature rich version of its commercial-oriented, circa-2015 Inforce 6309 SBC. Like the Inforce 6309, the new Inforce 6309L has the same 85 x 54mm footprint and much the same feature set as Arrow’s Qualcomm-backed, community-backed DragonBoard 410c SBC. It also offers the same Linux and Android BSPs used by the DragonBoard 410c, one of the first SBCs to adopt Linaro’s 96Boards form-factor.
  • It’s time to spring-clean your IT contracts
    The start of a new year is a time for review and planning, in business, as well as in our personal lives. It’s likely that you will be focused on finalising your company’s objectives and strategy for the year ahead. But it’s also important to consider whether the tools and processes that you have in place remain fit for purpose – and that includes your contract templates and contractual risk and compliance processes. When it comes to the law, “the only thing that is constant is change”. Without fail, each year brings the introduction of new legislation, case law and regulatory guidance that may have an impact on your contracts – whether it’s the terms of use or privacy policy for your website or app, or the contract terms that you use when supplying or purchasing technology services. Therefore, it’s important to carry out a regular review of your contract terms (and any existing contracts) to make sure that they remain compliant with law and are future-proofed as much as possible in terms of new legal and regulatory developments that you know are around the corner.
  • Chinese investors buy owner of PCWorld, IDC
    International Data Group, the owner of PCWorld magazine, several other tech journals and the IDC market research organisation, has been bought by two Chinese investors. China Oceanwide Holdings Group and IDG Capital (no affiliate of IDG) have paid between US$500 million and US$1 billion for IDG sans its high-performance computing research businesses. The two Chinese entities had made separate bids but were told by investment banker Goldman Sachs to join hands. The sale of IDG has been cleared by the US Committee on Foreign Investment and should be completed by end of the first quarter this year. China Oceanwide Holdings Group, founded by chairman Zhiqiang Lu, is active in financial services, real estate, technology, and media among others.