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Tuesday, 21 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2017 - 8:50am
Story 5 open source fonts ideal for programming Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2017 - 8:36am
Story Firefox Quantum Now Rolling Out to All Ubuntu Linux Users, Update Now Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2017 - 8:32am
Story GNU/Linux Laptops for Developers Roy Schestowitz 17/11/2017 - 5:43am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:23pm
Story Graphics: Intel, Mesa, Wayland and Bosch Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:21pm
Story Software: Nuclide, QEMU, Mailspring, GNOME Calendar and To Do, LibreOffice Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:20pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:18pm
Story Red Hat: OpenShift Container Platform and Financial News Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:16pm
Story Tizen News Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:14pm

Software: Papis, Cozy, OpenShot, NeuVector, Latte Dock and More

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME
  • Papis – A Command-line Based Document And Bibliography Manager

    A while ago, we wrote about Mendeley – an academic social network for researchers and educators. Using Mendeley, the researchers, lecturers, educators and librarians can connect with each other, share data, discuss ideas about their research, follow inspirational researchers around the world, collaborate and lots more. Today, we are going to discuss yet another useful tool for research scholars. Meet Papis, a powerful and highly extensible command-line based document and bibliography manager. Unlike Mendeley, Papis is not just for a particular research community but for every one who wants to manage their documents easily and effectively. Also, you can retain the full ownership to your data, because all data will be stored in your local drive.

  • Linux Audiobook Player ‘Cozy’ Adds Sleep Timer, m4a Support

    Cozy, the open-source audiobook player for Linux desktop, has a new version out. The app adds a sleep timer and improves the interface.

  • OpenShot 2.4.1 Released with Various Improvements

    A new version of the OpenShot video editor is available to download.

    OpenShot 2.4.1 follows a stability-focused release of the non-linear editor made back in September.

    Among the big changes OpenShot 2.4.1 features is improved image quality. You should now see sharper images in the preview window when editing thanks to an “improved image processing pipeline”.

    There’s also improved playback smoothness when working with high frame-rate videos at 50fps, 60fps, and 120fps.

  • NeuVector 1.3 Boosts Container Security with Improved Threat Detection

    Security startup NeuVector announced version 1.3 of its container security platform on Nov.13, providing advanced capabilities to help organizations detect threats that can be hidden in container workloads.

    NeuVector's platform provides a container firewall that can filter application layer traffic to help identify anomalous behavior and traffic. Among the new features in the NeuVector 1.3 release, is the ability to get visibility into tunnelled traffic, as well as advanced privilege escalation detection capabilities. NeuVector is also expanding its portfolio with an enhanced enterprise edition that provides additional capabilities.

  • Latte Dock v0.7.2 arrives in KDE and Kubuntu backports PPA

    Latte Dock, the very popular doc/panel app for Plasma Desktop, has released its new bugfix version 0.7.2. This is also the first stable release since Latte Dock became an official KDE project at the end of August.

  • Latte bug fix release v0.7.2

    Latte Dock v0.7.2 has been released containing many important fixes and improvements!

  • Interview with Lars Pontoppidan

    I’d like to thank everyone involved with Krita for making this great open source and free software available to the world. I hope to soon get enough time on my hands to help the project grow.

  • GNOME Shell 4 Proposal Published To Be More Wayland-Focused

    Jonas Adahl of Red Hat has volleyed his initial proposals for how a "future" GNOME Shell could be architected on a page entitled GNOME Shell 4. This GNOME Shell 4 would potentially break compatibility with GNOME Shell 3 extensions while being more designed around Wayland rather than X11.

    GNOME Shell 3 started out as an X11 compositing manager and has then been fitted for Wayland and other modern input/display features on Linux. With GNOME Shell 4, it would be more of a Wayland-first design and perhaps we could see it do away with X11/X.Org support entirely.

    The new GNOME Shell would be better fitted for low-latency input forwarding, low-latency visual input event feedback (namely pointer cursors), low-latency/zero-copy client forwarding, input methods within the shell UI, and eliminating stalls on the main compositor thread during frame redraws.

Server: Containers, ARM Servers, and China's HPC Lead

Filed under
Server
  • OCI Update: v1.0.1 Release and New Maintainer

    The OCI community continues to be hard at work, having just issued the first update to OCI v.1.0, after five months of focusing on stability. OCI 1.0.1 contains updates to both the image format and runtime specifications.

    We’re still growing and expanding, with even more collaboration since the launch of v 1.0. For example, we are now up to over 5,000 commits from 184 authors across 42 different organizations. Organizations like AWS, Docker, Cloud Foundry, CoreOS, Intel, Mesosphere, Oracle, Red Hat and Kubernetes have already taken advantage of the OCI v1.0 specifications, and with v1.0.1 now available, the industry is on the precipice of true portability and standardization. We had a strong showing on site at recent industry events, at both DockerCon Europe in Copenhagen and Open Source Summit Europe in Prague.

  • How enterprise IT uses Kubernetes to tame container complexity

    Running a few standalone containers for development purposes won’t rob your IT team of time or patience: A standards-based container runtime by itself will do the job. But once you scale to a production environment and multiple applications spanning many containers, it’s clear that you need a way to coordinate those containers to deliver the individual services. As containers accumulate, complexity grows. Eventually, you need to take a step back and group containers along with the coordinated services they need, such as networking, security, and telemetry.

    That’s why technologies like the open source Kubernetes project are such a big part of the container scene.

  • ARM emulator in a VM? Yup, done. Ready to roll, no config required

    Hacking low-level code on ARM processors just became a little easier after a researcher who operates under the name Azeria Labs put together virtual machines that emulate common hardware.

  • AMD Rolls Out ROCm 1.7 Platform For Supercomputing 17

    AMD has unveiled the Radeon Open Compute platform (ROCm) 1.7 release as part of their wares at this week's Supercomputing 17 (SC17) conference in Denver.

    The ROCm 1.7 update introduces multi-GPU support for "the latest Radeon GPU hardware" (presumably referring to Vega) while also supporting TensorFlow and Caffe via AMD's MIOpen libraries.

  • Red Hat introduces Arm server support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM64
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM Hits General Availability

    Red Hat now considers their ARM support on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL7) to be supported under general availability "GA" terms.

  • Orange and Red Hat push open source NFVi development

    At the OpenStack Summit 2017, operator Orange has joined forces with equally colourful open-source software vendor Red Hat to promote NFVi innovation.

    Sadly the two companies have missed a trick by declining to name their mutual endeavour Orange Hat, but we mustn’t let that detract from the underlying cleverness. Orange seems to reckon network functions virtualization infrastructure is best done in the open-source environment and Red Hat unsurprisingly agrees.

  • China Pulls Ahead of U.S. in Latest TOP500 List

    The fiftieth TOP500 list of the fastest supercomputers in the world has China overtaking the US in the total number of ranked systems by a margin of 202 to 143. It is the largest number of supercomputers China has ever claimed on the TOP500 ranking, with the US presence shrinking to its lowest level since the list’s inception 25 years ago.

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Fujitsu Demonstrates Real-World Applications of Multivendor, Open Source Technology
  • Autodesk’s Shift to Open Source and Inner Source

    To help create an open source culture, the right tools must be in place and, oddly enough, those tools sometimes aren’t open source. For example, Martin created a single instance of Slack rather than use IRC, because Slack was more comfortable for users in other lines of the business who were already using it. The intent was to get teams to start talking across their organizational boundaries.

    Another tool Martin is working with is Bitergia Analytics to monitor and manage Autodesk’s use of GitHub Enterprise.

  • "The Revolution of Open Source Science: Calculating Tree Heath

    If a functional value for trees is achieved, trees as natural assets will far exceed the value of an engineered footpath. Those who demonstrate expertise in tree health can contribute to a global initiative to put a premium on world best practice urban forestry. We are on the cusp of providing following generations with an impressive legacy based on scientific environmental baseline knowledge.

  • Croatian Innovator Creates 'Linux of Music Industry'

    The global music industry has been on the rise for two consecutive years now. Some of the major innovators in this sector, people who are literally shifting paradigms on which the business is based, attended the latest conference on corporate innovations CORP2IN 2017 that took place in Zagreb last Thursday, November 9, 2017.

    While Sofie Lindblom, the former head of innovations at Spotify, spoke about streaming as the innovation that saved the music industry, another professional provided a glimpse into the future of the business. Michela Magaš, a Croatian entrepreneur who was born in Zagreb and is currently living in Sweden, created and launched a platform named #MTFLabs, securing the title of the EU innovator of 2017.

  • Open-source microscope tracks neurons and behaviour

    The simultaneous observation of neuron activity and animal behaviour has long been a goal of the neuroscience community. By revealing correlations between the two, measurements can enable a better understanding of brain function, allow more effective drug testing and inspire advances in neural networks.

  • PHP 7.2 Benchmarks, Performance Of PHP 5.3 To PHP 7.2 On AMD EPYC

    With PHP 7.2 due for release before month's end and the final release candidate (RC6) already available that in essence is very close to the final build, here are some fresh benchmarks from PHP 5.3 through PHP 7.2 RC6 while using an AMD EPYC Tyan server.

    Back during PHP 7.2's beta stage I ran some PHP benchmarks and found the performance of this PHP update improving, albeit not as significant as the change from PHP 5 to PHP 7. Now with having PHP 7.2-RC6 that should be almost identical to v7.2.0, I carried out some more benchmarks over the weekend.

Mozilla: Firefox 57 and WebAssembly

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Quantum-ized Firefox 57 Ready For Download

    Firefox 57.0 is being officially released this week and its stable download is now available.

    Firefox 57 is arguably the biggest update ever with pulling in the Project Quantum work, at least the initial pieces of it. Firefox 57/Quantum is twice as fast as Firefox from 2016 with better multi-threading, the Rust-written CSS engine, and other components pulled in from Servo. Mozilla is referring to Firefox 57 as "Firefox Quantum" for branding.

  • WebAssembly support now shipping in all major browsers

    While Mozilla has been preparing to launch Firefox Quantum, its fastest browser yet, some notable developments have happened with WebAssembly, the binary file format (“wasm”) that works with JavaScript to run web applications at near-native speeds.

  • Firefox 57 Brings Better Sandboxing on Linux

    Firefox 57, set to be released tomorrow, will ship with improvements to the browser's sandbox security feature for Linux users.

    The Firefox sandboxing feature isolates the browser from the operating system in a way to prevent web attacks from using a vulnerability in the browser engine and its legitimate functions to attack the underlying operating system, place malware on the filesystem, or steal local files.

Events: Netconf, Netdev, Percona Live amd More

Filed under
OSS

Split Screen is Coming to Google's Pixelbook Chromebook, Here's a Sneak Peek

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Good news for PixelBook owners today as Chromium evangelist at Google François Beaufort informs the community via his Google+ page that split screen support is coming to the Chromebook Pixel.

In an attempt to improve the multitasking capabilities of Chromebooks, Google implemented split screen support in the latest Chrome OS Dev channel via a new flag called "Split view in Tablet mode," which can be enabled only on the Google Pixelbook.

Read more

Btrfs Zstd Compression Benchmarks On Linux 4.14

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Of the many new features in Linux 4.14, one of the prominent additions is initial support for Zstd compression that is initially wired in for transparent file-system compression with SquashFS and Btrfs. Here are some benchmarks of Zstd Btrfs compression compared to the existing LZO and Zlib compression mount options.

Read more

Security: Kaspersky, Shadow Brokers, Core Infrastructure Initiative, Face ID

Filed under
Security
  • The Daily Mail whisks up Kaspersky fears - but where's the meat?

    Make a note. Whenever you see the Daily Mail publish a headline which asks a question, the correct answer is invariably "no". If they had any reason to believe it was "yes", then they wouldn't have posed it as a question.

    The truth is that newspapers post these "Is the Loch Ness Monster on Tinder?"-style headlines because they know they'll get more clicks than if they use a headline which reflects the actual conclusion of the article.

  • NSA Cyber Weapons Turned Against Them in Hack

    A hack on the National Security Agency, claimed by a group called the “Shadow Brokers,” has caused a chilling effect on agency staffers, as they wonder whether it was a foreign hacker or someone on the inside.

  • Why the cybersecurity industry should care about Open Source maintenance

    In June of this year, Thales eSecurity joined the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), a project both founded and managed by The Linux Foundation, with the aim of collaboratively enhancing and strengthening the security and resilience of critical Open Source projects. Many of the world’s largest technology companies already belong to the CII, with Thales being officially recognised as the first global security firm to join the initiative.

  • You Can Easily Beat iPhone X Face ID Using This 3D-Printed Mask

    When it launched the iPhone X, Apple said that the company has worked with professional mask makers and Hollywood makeup artists. It was to make sure their facial recognition tech doesn’t fail when someone attempts to beat it.

Collabora's Role in Linux Development

Filed under
Development
Linux
  • Nine Collabora Developers Have Contributed 46 Patches to the Linux 4.14 Kernel

    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today on the contributions made by the Collabora developers to the recently released Linux 4.14 kernel series.

    Linux kernel 4.14 is the newest long-term supported (LTS) kernel series, bringing exciting new features like support for AMD Secure Memory Encryption, bigger memory limits, Heterogeneous Memory Management to support upcoming GPUs, faster TBL flushing, asynchronous non-blocking buffered reads, and much more.

  • Collabora & Linux Kernel 4.14

    Linus Torvalds has released Linux 4.14, so it's time to take a look at the Collaborans' contributions to this release. On total, we had 9 developers who authored 46 patches all around the kernel. In addition, 7 Collaborans contributed their time to review and test 40 patches. Finally, over a hundred patches found their way to Linus tree via our team, who provided over 108 non-author sign-offs during this development cycle.

    Taking a deeper look at the contributions, Sebastian Reichel continued on his role as the Power Supply maintainer. Aside from several improvements for the da9052 PMIC driver, he added a driver for PWM controllable vibrators, which will be used by the Motorola Droid 4. Romain Perier, who recently left Collabora, touched several users of the PCI DMA Pool wrappers, which is currently deprecated, and updated them to use the DMA Pool API directly, making it one step closer to complete his proposal to remove the pci_poll_*() macros.

Samsung Demo of GNU/Linux on Phones

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets
  • Watch: Ubuntu Linux Running on Galaxy S8 with Samsung DeX - Concept Demo

    Samsung recently published a new video on its YouTube channel demoing the recently launched "Linux on Galaxy" concept it introduced last month for Galaxy S8, S8+, and Note8 smartphones.

    Promising to bring the full Linux PC experience to your mobile device, the "Linux on Galaxy" concept relies on the Samsung DeX dock station, which transforms a Samsung Galaxy S8, S8+, or Note8 smartphone into a full-fledged desktop or workstation if you attach a monitor, keyboard, and mouse.

    Basically, Samsung DeX offers convergence for your Galaxy smartphone, something that Canonical wanted to create with its Ubuntu Linux operating system and the Unity 8 user interface that it's no longer under development. And now, Samsung wants to give you the full Linux PC experience on your smartphone.

  • Samsung Demos Ubuntu Running on a Galaxy Smartphone

    Samsung has shared a video of its 'Linux on Galaxy' app that lets developers run full desktop Linux distributions on select Galaxy smartphones.

  • Samsung cuts Windows from the loop, shows Ubuntu Linux running on the Samsung Galaxy Note 8

    Now Samsung has uploaded a concept video of what they want Linux on Galaxy to be like when it matures, allowing the sophisticated development of Android apps on an Android phone itself (and cutting Windows and MacOS completely out of the loop.)

Automation controller runs Linux on a NanoPi Neo SBC

Techbase launched a “ModBerry M300” automation controller built on a NanoPi Neo, and added M-Bus and M-Bus Wireless support to its ESP32-based Moduino.

Gdansk, Poland based Techbase has added another member to its Linux-driven ModBerry family of automation controllers. The latest ModBerry is built around FriendlyElec’s open source NanoPi Neo SBC. The company has also updated its ESP32-based Moduino device to run mBus10/60/400 converter modules for M-Bus support, as well as M-Bus Wireless modules.

Read more

Also: In-vehicle computer runs Marshmallow on Snapdragon

Linux Kernel 4.14 Features Breakdown

Filed under
Linux
  • LTS Linux Kernel 4.14: No Regressions

    Linus Torvalds released version 4.14 of the Linux kernel on Sunday, Nov. 12 -- which was a week later than expected. The delay was due to some reverts that would have made the projected Nov. 5 release too early.

    One of the unsettling reverts was regarding an AppArmor patch that was causing a regression, a big no-no according to Torvalds, who stated the first rule of Linux kernel development: “we don't cause regressions.” After some back and forth, Linus reverted the offending commit himself and the problem was temporarily solved.

    And now the new kernel is here: Linux 4.14 is the 2017 Long-Term Stable (LTS) release of the kernel and will be supported for about two years. Greg Kroah-Hartman made the announcement in his blog and added that he would be supporting 4.14 with stable kernel patch backports "unless it is a horrid release," which, despite the delaying issues, doesn't seem to be the case.

  • The new long-term Linux kernel, Linux 4.14, has arrived

    Linus Torvalds quietly released the latest Linux 4.14 kernel on Nov. 12. It won't be a quiet release, though. The Linux developers had previously announced that 4.14 would be Linux's next long-term support (LTS) version of the Linux kernel. That's important because Linux LTS version now has a six-year life span.

    That changes everything for Linux device developers. As Google senior staff engineer Iliyan Malchev recently said, "All Android devices [...] are based of the LTS kernel. The problem with LTS is it's only two years. And so, by the time the first devices on a SoC [System on a Chip] hit the market, you have maybe a year, if you're lucky, of LTS support. And, if you're not, it's over." Now, Internet of Things (IoT), smartphone, and embedded Linux device developers can build gear knowing that it's operating system will be supported until 2023.

  • Linux Kernel 4.14 Announced, Adds Support for AMD Secure Memory Encryption and More

    Linux, the best-known and most-used open source operating system, got a major upgrade on Sunday. Linus Torvalds announced the latest version of the Linux kernel, version 4.14, and the many new features and tweaks packed inside it.

    One involves reverting code that improved the accuracy of the displayed CPU frequency on modern, dynamically-clocked processors in /proc/cpuinfo. It worked as intended in most cases, but there were lingering issues with overhead on machines with tens or hundreds of CPU cores. There’s a plan to bring the feature back, but not anytime soon.

    Another change is AMD Secure Memory Encryption, an optional feature that can be used to protect the contents of DRAM from physical attacks on the system, and a new “unwinder” which prints the list of functions (i.e.. stack trace, callgraph, call stack) that have been executed before reaching a determinate point of the code. Linux already had an unwinder, but it wasn’t as efficient as ORC unwinder, which doesn’t need to insert code anywhere and so doesn’t affect text size or runtime performance.

Cloud Native Computing Foundation's Conformance Certification

Filed under
OSS
  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Launches Certified Kubernetes Program with 32 Conformant Distributions and Platforms
  • Cloud Native launches Certified Kubernetes program

    Open source software organization Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) announced the launch of the Kubernetes Software Conformance Certification program alongside an announcement of the first 36 approved distributions and platforms, including companies like Google and Alibaba Cloud. The foundation aims for the program to ensure portability and consistency across Kubernetes vendors.

  • IBM, Google, Microsoft, and 33 more partner to ensure Kubernetes workload portability
  • 36 companies agree to a Kubernetes certification standard

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) announced today that 36 members have agreed to a set of certification standards for Kubernetes, the immensely popular open source container orchestration tool. This should make it easy for users to move from one version to another without worry, while ensuring that containers under Kubernetes management will behave in a predictable way.

    The group of 36 is agreeing to a base set of APIs that have to underly any version of Kubernetes a member creates to guarantee portability. Dan Kohn, executive director at CNCF, says that they took a subset of existing Kubernetes project APIs, which are treated as a conformance test that the members who have signed on, are guaranteeing to support. In practice this means that when you spin up a new container, regardless of who creates the version of Kubernetes, it will behave in a consistent way, he said.

Cray and Red Hat Spread ARM, Red Hat Financial News

Filed under
Red Hat

Linux Lite Users Are Among the First to Get Linux 4.14, Here's How to Install It

Filed under
Linux

As you know, Linus Torvalds released the Linux 4.14 kernel series on Sunday, November 12, 2017, and while most GNU/Linux distro maintainers are waiting for it to be marked as stable on kernel.org, which will happen when the first point release is out, namely Linux kernel 4.14.1, Jerry Bezencon prepared the new kernel for his users.

Linux kernel 4.14 is the new long-term supported (LTS) kernel series and introduces features like larger memory limits, zstd compression for the Btrfs and SquashFS file systems, Heterogeneous Memory Management for future GPUs, support for AMD Secure Memory Encryption, better cpufreq behavior, and much more.

Read more

Firefox 57 "Quantum" Web Browser Now Available to Download, Here's What's New

Filed under
Moz/FF

The biggest new feature of the Firefox 57.0 "Quantum" web browser is a major visual redesign that was developed by Mozilla as the Photon project and active on the Nightly channel until now. This makes the web browser two times faster than Firefox 49.0, according to Mozilla's development team.

"Firefox Quantum is roughly 2X faster than Firefox 49 on the Speedometer 2.0 benchmark, thanks to its new CSS engine, its “just right” multi-process architecture, the way it prioritizes your active tab, and much more," reads the preliminary release notes for Firefox 57.0 beta.

Read more

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 Operating System Is Now Available for ARM Servers

Filed under
Red Hat

Marking the culmination of a multi-year long collaboration between Red Hat and ARM, Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM is debuts today as part of Red Hat's multi-architecture strategy as the company plans to support as many hardware architectures as possible for its commercial Linux-based operating system. As such, ARM server support has been added to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4.

"Our goal was to develop a single operating platform across multiple 64-bit ARMv8-A server-class SoCs from various suppliers while using the same sources to build user functionality and consistent feature set that enables customers to deploy across a range of server implementations while maintaining application compatibility," said Red Hat in the press release.

Read more

Also: Red Hat Enterprise Linux gets ARM server support

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Is your company an open source parasite?

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LibreELEC Embedded Linux OS Now Compatible with Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

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Canonical Releases Major Kernel Update for Ubuntu 16.04 to Fix 13 Security Flaws

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Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD