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Friday, 20 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Debian Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 2:24pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 2:17pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 2:06pm
Story German government goes open source with cloud firm Nextcloud Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 2:03pm
Story KDE: Kdenlive Video Editing in France and Spain, Modern Akonadi and KMail on FreeBSD, Qt 5.12 Schedule Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 1:54pm
Story Openwashing: Mac 'Apps', Microsoft Linux and More Roy Schestowitz 1 17/04/2018 - 12:54pm
Story Ubuntu: BotsAndUs, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age, Lubuntu and Ubuntu Studio Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 12:38pm
Story The IoT Hacker's Toolkit Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 12:34pm
Story What's New in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Since Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 12:28pm
Story Security and FUD Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 12:25pm

0.1 Release of Elisa

Filed under
KDE
Software

The Elisa team is happy to announce our first release, version 0.1.

Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users.

We focus on a very good integration with the Plasma desktop of the KDE community without compromising the support for other platforms (other Linux desktop environments, Windows and Android).
We are creating a reliable product that is a joy to use and respects our users privacy. As such, we will prefer to support online services where users are in control of their data.

Read more

Also: KDE Elisa 0.1 Music Player Released

Benchmarking Amazon Linux 2 LTS Candidate 2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Back in December Amazon rolled out Amazon Linux 2 as a big upgrade to its Linux distribution intended for the EC2 compute cloud as well as on-site via VMware/VirtualBox/Hyper-V virtualization. Amazon Linux 2 rolled out an upgraded Linux kernel, compiler, and many other packages as well as switched to using systemd. Coming out this week was Amazon Linux 2 Candidate 2 as the next installment of this long-term support Linux platform.

Read more

Five benefits of open source software

Filed under
OSS

The telecommunications industry and beyond is increasingly embracing open source software. Just this year, for example, the Linux Foundation established the LF Networking Fund (LFN) in an effort to host its many open source projects focused on developing an open telecom ecosystem under a single umbrella. These sorts of projects enable participants to make changes and potentially improve software code through a process known as upstreaming. This article explores the reasons several enterprises are adopting open source software.

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3 open source apps for Windows

Filed under
OSS

When switching from one kind of computer to another, use open source tools to continue working with ease.

For me, I worked on a Mac for many years, and now I have to work on a Windows machine at my job. I really miss a few of the MacOS features, so I set out to find open source solutions to these and other Windows conundra. Here are three to get you started.

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Google Fuchsia is not Linux: So, what is it and who will use it?

Filed under
Android
Google

SDR module runs Linux on Zynq

Filed under
Linux

Epiq Solutions has launched a 51 x 30mm “Sidekiq Z2” module for SDR that runs Linux on a Zynq-7010 and integrates an Analog AD9364 RF transceiver for 70MHz to 6GHz operation.

Epiq Solutions, the makers of the Linux-driven Matchstiq SDR RF transceiver devices, has added a new member of its Sidekiq line of SDR add-on cards called the Sidekiq Z2. Measuring only 51 x 30 x 5mm, the size of a full-size mini-PCIe card, the Sidekiq Z2 computer-on-module is billed as “the world’s smallest wideband RF transceiver + Linux computer in a product-ready module.” The module is designed for handheld RF test and measurement, remote RF sensing, wireless security applications, and CubeSat/UAS datalinks, says Epiq. A carrier board is also available.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Streaming the Norwegian ultimate championships

    As the Norwegian indoor frisbee season is coming to a close, the Norwegian ultimate nationals are coming up, too. Much like in Trøndisk 2017, we'll be doing the stream this year, replacing a single-camera Windows/XSplit setup with a multi-camera free software stack based on Nageru.

  • Spaces – uncomplicating your network

    For past 5-6 years I’ve been in business of deploying cloud solutions for our customers. Vast majority of that was some form of OpenStack, either a simple cloud or a complicated one. But when you think about it – what is a simple cloud? It’s easy to say that small amount of machines makes an easy, and large amount of machines makes a complicated cloud. But, that is not true. Complexity of a typical IaaS solution is pretty much determined by network complexity. Network, in all shapes and forms, from the underlay network to the customer’s overlay network requirements. I’ll try to explain how we deal with the underlay part in this blog.

  • System76 Gets On The GNOME Advisory Board

    With Linux PC vendor System76 getting more involved in the open-source software game since they began developing their Ubuntu-derived Pop!_OS operating system last year, their latest step forward is joining the GNOME Advisory Board.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E06 – Six Feet Over It - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we review the Dell XPS 13 (9370) Developer Edition laptop, bring you some command line lurve and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 11 Episode 06 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Of course it runs NetBSD
  • DRM, DRM, oh how I hate DRM...

    After waiting for a couple of weeks, it arrived in a nonexciting little envelope straight from Hong Kong. If you look closely, you can even appreciate there's a line (just below the smaller barcode) that reads "Lenovo"). I soon found how to open this laptop (kudos to Lenovo for a very sensible and easy opening process, great documentation... So far, it's the "openest" computer I have had!) and installed my new card!

  • Entries for the Catalog of Missing Devices, courtesy of EFF supporters like you

    The Catalog of Missing Devices is a tour through some of the legitimate, useful and missing gadgets, tools and services that don't exist but should. They're technologies whose chance to exist was snuffed out by Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998, which makes tampering with "Digital Rights Management" into a legal no-go zone, scaring off toolsmiths, entrepreneurs, and tinkerers.

    We're still adding our own designs to the Catalog, but we've also been honored by EFF supporters who've come up with their own additions. One such supporter is Dustin Rodriguez, who sends us these five great ideas for future entries. If you have great ideas for additions, send them to me and maybe you'll see them here on Deeplinks!

Software and howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Events: OpenStack, DebConf18, Percona

Filed under
OSS
  • Lessons from OpenStack Telemetry: Incubation

    The rigidity of the process discouraged anyone to start a new project for anything related to telemetry. Therefore, everyone went ahead and started dumping its idea in Ceilometer itself. With more than ten companies interested, the frictions were high, and the project was at some point pulled apart in all directions. This phenomenon was happening to every OpenStack projects anyway.

    On the one hand, many contributions brought marvelous pieces of technology to Ceilometer. We implemented several features you still don't find any metering system. Dynamically sharded, automatic horizontally scalable polling? Ceilometer has that for years, whereas you can't have it in, e.g., Prometheus.

    On the other hand, there were tons of crappy features. Half-baked code merged because somebody needed to ship something. As the project grew further, some of us developers started to feel that this was getting out of control and could be disastrous. The technical debt was growing as fast as the project was.

  • Bursary applications for DebConf18 are closing in 48 hours!

    If you intend to apply for a DebConf18 bursary and have not yet done so, please proceed as soon as possible!

  • Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018 Keynotes Tackle Open Source in the Enterprise, Future of Databases, Cloud Adoption and More

    Percona, the company that delivers enterprise-class MySQL®, MariaDB® and MongoDB® and other open source database solutions and services, today announced the keynote addresses for the seventh annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018, taking place April 23-25, 2018 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, Calif. Limited sponsorship opportunities for the conference are still available.

Devices: Librem 5, Sidekiq, Android

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Tap Systems Releases Open Source Software Development Kit

    Tap Systems, Inc., the company behind the Tap wearable keyboard and mouse, announced today they have released a developer SDK. The released software kit enables interested developers to design applications that incorporate and/or include the Tap wearable and its functionality. The Tap device is a comfortable wearable that sits at the base of your fingers and senses finger taps as input. Connecting to any Bluetooth enabled device, Tap users can currently compose text, play games, point, click and scroll using just about any available surface.

  • If You’re Interested In Open Source Development, Wingify’s Paras Chopra Is Ready To Fund Your Projects

    After leading Wingify to success, founder Paras Chopra has been constantly tweeting about his interest in open source and his willingness to support open source development in India.

  • GitLab now offers native integration into Google Kubernetes
  • Google, Netflix launch new IT risk analysis tool Kayenta
  • Kayenta: An Open Source Canary Analysis Tool from Netflix and Google
  • Google, Netflix Team Up To Launch New Open Source Canary Analysis Tool
  • 4 enterprise GitHub projects from Google

    Open source is everywhere, and is quickly becoming the new norm for how companies approach software development. Here, we take at a look at some of the open source projects on GitHub created by Google that can help make life easier for IT teams in organizations.

  • Idera Acquires Webyog to Enable the Open Source Relational Database Systems

    Idera, Inc. recently announced that it has acquired Webyog - a company that provides database management and administration tools for MySQL. It will be Idera's second acquisition in under a year that will join the latter's Database Management Tools business that currently includes AquaFold and IDERA.

    Webyog delivers MySQL management and monitoring offerings and serves customers in a wide range of industries. SQLyog, its flagship MySQL GUI and administration product, delivers migration tools, query profiling tools, backup, synchronization tools, scheduling and reporting tools, as well as several other power tools that enhance developer, data architect, and DBA productivity.

  • LibreOffice certification for FSF members

    The FSF and The Document Foundation have worked together to offer LibreOffice Certification to FSF Members, for developers, migrators, and trainers. This session will provide all of the relevant information about LibreOffice Certification, in order to make it easier for FSF Members to apply and prepare for the certification review.

  • Promote Drupal Initiative Announced at DrupalCon

    Yesterday's Keynote from Drupal project founder, Dries Buytaert, kicked off the annual North American gathering of Drupalists from around the world, and also kicked off a new Drupal community initiative aimed at promoting the Drupal platform through a coordinated marketing effort using funds raised within the community.

    The Drupal Association hopes to raise $100,000 to enable a global group of staff and volunteers to complete the first two phases of a four-phase plan to create consistent and reusable marketing materials to allow agencies and other Drupal promoters to communicate Drupal's benefits to organizations and potential customers quickly and effectively.

  • Algorithmic bias: Where it comes from and what to do about it

    Slides from Andy Oram's talk from LibrePlanet 2017: Algorithmic bias: Where it comes from and what to do about it.

  • Xiaomi to Release Kernel Sources ‘Within 3 Months’ Of Launching New Phones

    Xiaomi may have grown leaps and bounds as a tech company over the past decade, but it still receives a lot of flak for its failure to abide by the GNU General Public License v2 license, which governs open source software such as Android. The company has often either completely failed to release kernel sources for its smartphones and tablets, or released them long after the release of the device, both of which are an outright violation of the GNU GPL license, which mandates that all software licensed under its terms must have its source code available publicly.

  • Difference between various open-source software licenses

    An open-source license is a computer software license that allows the source code, blueprint or design to be used, modified and/or shared under defined terms and conditions. This license allows end users and commercial companies to review and modify the source code, blueprint or design for their own customization, curiosity or troubleshooting needs.

  • MIT students create and circulate open source, covert RFID rings to subvert campus tracking system

    A reader writes, "A couple years ago MIT changed their dorm security/student tracking policy. They hired security contractors to work in dorms and required everyone to tap their RFID cards upon entry (no vouching for friends/guests). Most students complied. Some moved out. Some got in trouble ;)"

    "Fast forward to this week. There was a student-run 'ring delivery' event on campus where roughly 100 students received programmable RFID capable devices. Most of these were rings that could be mistaken for class rings. Students also received documentation on 125 kHz RFID systems, how to make inexpensive reader/writer devices, and how to produce more rings.

  • This open source viewer that runs on Raspberry Pi can share city’s geospatial data

    At GITA 2018 in Phoenix, Bob Basques, GIS Systems Developer at the City of St Paul, described a system called COMPASS he and his team have developed that provides a shared, easy to use tool that allows city employees and the public access to all of the city’s spatial and associated data including, for example, scans of surveyors’ notebooks, 2.2 million street level photos, and permitting and licensing information from 200 different applications. Based completely on open source components the system is compact and efficient enough to run on a Raspberry Pi.

    One of the problems that hampers efficient operations at municipalities is accessing geospatial data originating from multiple sources such as infrastructure maintenance, planning and zoning, property ownership, engineering, permitting, licensing and code enforcement. Spatial data is generated by CAD drafters, GIS users, surveyors and even users with smart phone apps. Imagery data can come from a variety of sources including earth observation satellites, aerial overflights, street photography, and drones. This data is constantly changing which means that any process that involves making copies such as converting it to a common format creates a bigger problem than it solves.

  • Using Open Source Designs to Create More Specialized Chips

    The open source movement changed how companies build software. Facebook, Twitter, and Yahoo employees pitched in during the early days of the data-crunching software Hadoop. Even after the relationship between Apple and Google soured, the companies' coders kept working together on an obscure but important piece of software called LLVM. Microsoft now uses and contributes to the Linux operating system, even though it competes with Windows.

    The embrace of open source isn't about altruism. Facebook started using Hadoop because there was no commercial off-the-shelf software that met the company's needs as it grew. Because Hadoop is open source, Facebook could customize and extend it to solve its specific problems; sharing its changes allowed others to innovate further, making the software better for Facebook and all other users. Collaborating on freely available code enables companies and programmers to pool resources to solve common problems and avoid reinventing the wheel. Companies build competing products and services from these open source foundations that they might never have been able to build otherwise.

Security Leftovers and Lots of Self-Serving FUD Pieces

Filed under
Security

Want your sweet PS3 Linux settlement cash? Sunday's your last day

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you bought an original "fat" Sony PlayStation 3 game console, you'll want to know this:

Sony may owe you up to $65 -- and you've only got until this Sunday, April 15, to postmark the form that'll let you claim that cash.

Yes, tax day.

That's because April 15 also happens to be the deadline for Sony's "OtherOS" class-action settlement. Sony originally promised the PS3 could become a Linux computer, but removed that feature in 2010, and now it's paying $3.75 million to resolve the lawsuits that followed.

So: How do you qualify to get that money, how much money can you actually expect to get, and why is this only happening now?

Read more

Stable kernels 4.16.2, 4.15.17 and 4.14.34

Filed under
Linux

Open spec router SBC has M.2 and a pair each of SATA, GbE, and HDMI

Filed under
Android
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

SinoVoip has launched a $93 “Banana Pi BPI-W2” multimedia router and NAS board that runs Android or Linux on a quad -A53 Realtek RTD129, and offers 2x GbE, 2x SATA 3.0, 3x M.2, HDMI in and out, and a 40-pin RPi connector.

After starting off its Spring collection earlier this week with a pair of ESP32 based Banana Pi boards, SinoVoip has returned to the Linux/Android world to release a Banana Pi BPI-W2 “multimedia network” and “smart NAS” router SBC. Available for $93 on AliExpress, the BPI-W2 has a faster processor and more advanced features than last year’s similarly sized (148 x 100.5mm) Banana Pi BPI-R2, which is available for $89.50 on AliExpress. However, the new model has only two Gigabit Ethernet ports instead of four.

Read more

Raspberry Digital Signage 11 released, Pi 3b+ compatible

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

Raspberry Digital Signage is an operating system designed for digital signage installations on the Raspberry Pi: it displays a full-screen browser view restricted to a specified (web) resource.

It shows web pages from Internet, LAN or internal sources (a WordPress installation comes already installed by default on the SD card); there is no way to escape this view but rebooting the machine.

Raspberry Digital Signage 11 has been released today, which comes with the latest raspberrypi-bootloader, so that it is compatible with the new Raspberry Pi 3 b+ board line.

Read more

Sparky 4.8 RC

Filed under
Debian

There is a new, testing live/install iso image of SparkyLinux 4.8 RC “Tyche” available to download. Sparky 4 is based on Debian stable line “Stretch”.

Sparky 4.8 RC is a release candidate to upcoming next 4.8 stable release.

Read more

Graphics: AMDVLK's XGL Vulkan API, Vulkan On GitHub, Mesa 17.3.9, Libinput Getting Support For Custom Acceleration Profiles

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMDVLK's XGL Code Updated With Int16 & Shader Ballot Improvements

    AMD's XGL Vulkan API layer for their "AMDVLK" driver has been updated this week with a number of enhancements.

    The latest code drop for this AMDVLK XGL code includes supporting 16-bit integers "int16" within the AMD_shader_ballot and AMD_trinary_minmax extensions. There are also pipeline improvements, AMD_shader_ballot extension enhancements, a consistent dispatch table mechanism is now used throughout the driver, and a number of other code fixes.

  • There Are Now More Than 2,000 Projects Referencing Vulkan On GitHub

    As another milestone for the Vulkan API, as of today there are more than 2,000 projects referencing Vulkan on GitHub!

    It was nearly one year ago to the day (19 April) that Vulkan had 1,000 project mentions on GitHub while overnight that threshold crossed 2,000.

    Granted, the GitHub search isn't looking at projects necessarily offering a full Vulkan code implementation, but could be a Vulkan mention within code documentation saying it's coming soon, etc. But for comparison, "Direct3D 12" has just 39 hits on GitHub (or 101 for D3D12), 207 for D3D11 / 99 for Direct 3D 11, or 33,741 for OpenGL. Overall, not bad for Vulkan's continued rise and this graphics/compute API just over two years old.

  • Mesa 17.3.9 Is Coming With About Two Dozen Fixes To End Out Mesa 17.3

    Mesa 17.3.9 is expected to be released at the start of next week as the final point release for the Mesa 17.3 driver series that was introduced back in Q4'2017.

    With Mesa 18.0 now in good shape and being out for a few weeks, the Mesa 17.3 series is wrapping up. Juan Suarez Romero of Igalia who has been serving as the 17.3 series stable release manager today announced the 17.3.9 release candidate. There are currently 23 patches for this final point release, including fixes for the RADV Vulkan driver, GL/GLES version overriding fixes, GLSL patches, NIR fixes, and other minor work.

  • Libinput Getting Support For Custom Acceleration Profiles

    The latest libinput hackery being worked on by Linux input expert Peter Hutterer at Red Hat is custom profile support for pointer acceleration.

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More in Tux Machines

FoundationDB Source Code Shared

​Learn to use GitHub, ​GitHub Releases Atom 1.26

  • ​Learn to use GitHub with GitHub Learning Lab
    The most popular open-source development site in the world is GitHub. It's used by tens of millions of developers to work on over 80 million projects. It's not just a site where people use Linus Torvalds' Git open-source distributed version control system. It's also an online home for collaboration, a sandbox for testing, a launchpad for deployment, and a platform for learning new skills. The GitHub Training Team has now released an app, GitHub Learning Lab, so you can join the programming party. GitHub Learning Lab is not a tutorial or webcast. It's an app that gives you a hands-on learning experience within GitHub. According to GitHub, "Our friendly bot will take you through a series of practical, fun labs that will give you the skills you need in no time--and share helpful feedback along the way."
  • Atom 1.26
    Atom 1.26 has been released on our stable channel and includes GitHub package improvements, fuzzy-finder support for Teletype and file system watcher improvements.
  • Atom Hackable Text Editor Gets GitHub Package, Filesystem Watcher Improvements
    GitHub announced the release of the Atom 1.26 open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor for Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms with more improvements and bug fixes. In Atom 1.26, the GitHub package received various improvements and new features, among which we can mention the ability of the ’s Git pane to display a read-only list of recent commits for quick reference, and support for storing your GitHub username and password credentials in the Git authentication dialog.

Games Leftovers

Linux and Linux Foundation

  • V3D DRM Driver Steps Towards Mainline Kernel, Renamed From VC5
    The Broadcom VC5 driver stack is being renamed to V3D and developer Eric Anholt is looking at merging it into the mainline Linux kernel. The VC5 DRM/KMS and Mesa code has been for supporting the next-generation Broadcom VideoCore 5 graphics hardware that's only now beginning to appear in some devices, well, it seems one device so far. Though as I pointed out a few months back, there's already "VC6" activity going on too as the apparent successor to VC5 already being in development.
  • Azure Sphere Makes Microsoft an Arm Linux Player for IoT [Ed: Microsoft marketing at LF (only runs on/with Windows and Visual Studio etc.)]
  • Keynotes Announced for Automotive Linux Summit & OS Summit Japan [Ed: "Senior Software Engineer, Microsoft" in there; LF has once again let Microsoft infiltrate Linux events; in the words of Microsoft’s chief evangelist, “I’ve killed at least two Mac conferences. […] by injecting Microsoft content into the conference, the conference got shut down. The guy who ran it said, why am I doing this?”]
    Automotive Linux Summit connects those driving innovation in automotive Linux from the developer community with the vendors and users providing and using the code, in order to propel the future of embedded devices in the automotive arena.