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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Big Android Dev Interview: Paul Lammertsma Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 3:27pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 12:16pm
Story Fedora News Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 12:15pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 12:14pm
Story How IBM’s LinuxONE Has Evolved For the New Open Source Cloud Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:53am
Story Mozilla Logo Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:42am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:41am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:39am
Story Development: GCC, KDevelop, and GNOME Beta Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:38am
Story Ubuntu Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:36am

Towards an Efficient Linux Photographic Workflow

Filed under
GNU
Linux

digiKam is the cornerstone of my photographic workflow. This powerful and versatile photo management application has all tools and features necessary for transferring, organizing, processing, and managing photos, RAW files, and videos. But even though digiKam can handle practically any photographic task you throw at it, there is still room for optimizing and improving parts of the Linux-based photographic workflow.

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Wayland Default Fedora 25, LibreOffice Emoji, Best Servers

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-s

Red Hat's cutting-edge test bed is moving from Xorg/X11 to Wayland its next release. This is a big step even for a distribution known for adopting early technology. In other news, Akshay Deep has announced Emoji support for LibreOffice and Robin Muilwijk discusses the various Web server choices for Linux deployments.

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Trump’s campaign donation website used open-source code sloppily, risking ridicule and worse

Filed under
OSS

Like tens of millions of other websites, the campaign donation website for US presidential candidate Donald Trump relies on open-source software called jQuery. But it seems that the software is being used in a sloppy way, which could put Trump supporters at risk of identity theft or worse.

Trump’s website uses a jQuery plug-in, or a bit of ready-made code, called jQuery Mask Plug-in to handle how donors fill in their name, address, and other information. The mask plug-in restricts the types of information users can enter in forms. This is useful because it increases the chances of accurate data being submitted for payment processing, and for the campaign’s records. It’s also free and available for download from GitHub, the popular platform for open-source software.

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Microsoft Powershell Is Now Available For Linux

Filed under
Linux
News

​Powershell is a Windows command line tool and associated scripting language built on the .Net framework for performing administrative tasks on both local and remote Windows systems. Powershell has been a part of Windows systems for 10 years(November 14, 2006 ). On 18th August Microsoft announced on their blog that they have brought Powershell to Mac OSX and Linux.

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Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Updating Firmware on 8Bitdo Game Controllers

    I’ve spent a few days adding support for upgrading the firmware of the various wireless 8Bitdo controllers into fwupd. In my opinion, the 8Bitdo hardware is very well made and reasonably priced, and also really good retro fun.

  • Have you seen ChromaGun? A first-person puzzler inspired by portal, but with paint

    The developer of ChromaGun sent in a copy of the game for me to test out and while I found the idea rather cool, shooting paint around to solve puzzles it does have major issues on Linux.

    I tried the game on last weeks livestream and while it was quite interesting to play, it repeatedly crashed to the desktop in a short amount of time. I waited a week after emailing the developer these issues to post this up, but after no reply sadly this is just how the game is.

  • Motorsport Manager can now be pre-purchased on Steam with Linux support

    The very cool looking Motorsport Manager game where you run your own F1 team is now available to pre-purchase on Steam.

    You know how I personally feel about pre-orders by now, but some still like to do it. I do love seeing that little tux at the end of a video though, very nice to see.

    I'm very interested in the game myself, but I will be waiting either for a review copy or to see how it's reviewed by others if I don't get a key myself.

  • Master an angry mob in Okhlos, now on Linux with some thoughts thrown in

    Okhlos is another new released that was provided to me by GOG, I tried it properly tonight during the livestream and sadly it isn't all that good. It wasn't my first time playing it, as the developer sent me an early copy a while ago which I remember well.

    Essentially, you're in control of a mob in ancient Greece with a twin-stick shooter feel to it. You control a single character with the WASD keys and the mob with the mouse. You're able to recruit new members automatically by rolling your mob through them, and hold the left mouse button on enemies to watch hell unfold as your mob takes them down.

  • Facebook teams up with Unity to create a gaming platform to rival Steam [Ed: Microsoft Mono trap]

    Facebook is starting to take gaming far more seriously. Not content with funneling the likes of Candy Crush through its servers, the social network is now joining forces with the company behind the Unity game engine to create its own desktop gaming platform.

  • FEZ has a massive 1.2 update that switches out MonoGame for FNA & SDL2
  • Wine 1.9.17 Released
  • The Wine Development Release 1.9.17 Is Now Available

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Thursday's security advisories
  • Microsoft Windows UAC can be bypassed for untraceable hacks

    USER ACCOUNT Control (UAC), the thing in Microsoft Windows that creates extra menus you wish would just sod off, can be bypassed, allowing hackers to gain registry access.

    Security researcher Matt Nelson has discovered that the flaw allows someone to start PowerShell, access the registry and then leave no trace.

    The workaround/feature/bug/massive security hole works on any version of Windows with UAC, which was introduced in Windows Vista and later softened in Windows 7 as it proved such a spectacular pain in the Vista.

    The technique uses no files, no injections and leaves no trace. It's just pure direct access via a vulnerability. You could go off and do it to someone now.

    Don't do that, though.

  • all that’s not golden

    Several stories and events recently that in some way relate to backdoors and golden keys and security. Or do they? In a couple cases, I think some of the facts were slightly colored to make for a more exciting narrative. Having decided that golden keys are shitty, that doesn’t imply that all that’s shit is golden. A few different perspectives here, because I think some of the initial hoopla obscured some lessons that even people who don’t like backdoors can learn from.

    Secure Boot

    Microsoft added a feature to Secure Boot, accidentally creating a bypass for older versions. A sweet demo scene release (plain text) compares this incident to the FBI’s requested golden keys. Fortunately, our good friends over at the Register dug into this claim and explained some of the nuance in their article, Bungling Microsoft singlehandedly proves that golden backdoor keys are a terrible idea. Ha, ha, I kid.

    Matthew Garrett also has some notes on Microsoft’s compromised Secure Boot implementation. He’s purportedly a Linux developer, but he doesn’t once in this post call Windows a steaming pile, so he’s probably a Microsoft shill in disguise.

    Returning to the big question, What does the MS Secure Boot Issue teach us about key escrow? Maybe not a whole lot. Some questions to consider are how thoroughly MS tried to guard the key and whether they actually lost the key or just signed the wrong thing.

    Relevant to the crypto backdoor discussion, are the actions taken here the same? In a key escrow scheme, are iPhones sending encrypted data to the FBI or is the FBI sending encrypted messages to iPhones? The direction of information flow probably has a profound effect on the chances of the wrong thing leaking out. Not to say I want anything flowing in either direction, but it does affect how analogous the situations are.

    A perhaps more important lesson, for all security or crypto practitioners, is just barely hinted at in mjg59’s post. Microsoft created a new message format, but signed it with a key trusted by systems that did not understand this format. Misinterpretation of data formats results in many vulnerabilities. Whenever it’s possible that a message may be incorrectly handled by existing systems, it’s vital to roll keys to prevent misinterpretation.

  • Security against Election Hacking – Part 1: Software Independence

    So the good news is: our election system has many checks and balances so we don’t have to trust the hackable computers to tell us who won. The biggest weaknesses are DRE paperless touchscreen voting machines used in a few states, which are completely unacceptable; and possible problems with electronic pollbooks.

    In this article I’ve discussed paper trails: pollbooks, paper ballots, and per-precinct result printouts. Election officials must work hard to assure the security of the paper trail: chain of custody of ballot boxes once the polls close, for example. And they must use the paper trails to audit the election, to protect against hacked computers (and other kinds of fraud, bugs, and accidental mistakes). Many states have laws requiring (for example) random audits of paper ballots; more states need such laws, and in all states the spirit of the laws must be followed as well as the letter.

  • Security against Election Hacking (Freedom to Tinker)

    Over at the Freedom to Tinker blog, Andrew Appel has a two-part series on security attacks and defenses for the upcoming elections in the US (though some of it will obviously be applicable elsewhere too). Part 1 looks at the voting and counting process with an eye toward ways to verify what the computers involved are reporting, but doing so without using the computers themselves (having and verifying the audit trail, essentially). Part 2 looks at the so-called cyberdefense teams and how their efforts are actually harming all of our security (voting and otherwise) by hoarding bugs rather than reporting them to get them fixed.

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Writing an academic paper? Try Fidus Writer

    The Fidus Writer online editor is especially for academics who need to write papers in collaboration with other authors, and it includes special tools for managing citations, formulas, and bibliographies. If you're writing an academic paper by yourself, you have a lot of choices for tools to edit your document. Some of them even take care of making your footnotes and bibliographies come out in the right format. But writing collaboratively is harder, for lots of reasons. You could use Google Docs, ownCloud, or even Dropbox to share the document, but then you lose useful citation-management tools.

    Enter Fidus Writer: Fidus Writer is a web-based collaborative writing tool made specifically for the needs of academic writers who need to use citations or formulas. The rules for citations are complicated, so Fidus Writer takes care of the format for you; you can choose from several citation formats, including APA, Chicago, or MLA. Version 3 of Fidus Writer was just released in June, and it is a clean, well-polished application.

    At my first look, Fidus Writer is impressive. The application is written mostly in Python and Node.js, and is licensed under the AGPL V3. I installed it on a Debian virtual machine running on my Windows PC. The installation instructions are geared toward Debian and its derivative distros, and uses apt to install software. I suspect someone clever who has a real desire to run it on RPM-based distros could make it work, as the list of packages needed is not overlarge.

  • Need a tamper-proof, encrypted PC? The portable, open-source ORWL could be what you're looking for

    There are a number of choices available if you need a small, powerful but affordable mini desktop PC, from the $500 Mac Mini, to the cheaper Google Chromebox, or HP Pavillion Mini Desktop.

    But can more be done to keep these devices secure, not just from software exploits, but scenarios in which the attacker has gained physical access to the device?

    The makers of ORWL, a flying saucer-shaped mini desktop for the security-minded, think it can, providing you're willing to fork out a relatively hefty $699.

  • Nextgov Ebook: Tech Revolutions: Open Source and the Internet of Things

    Nextgov's meetup series Tech + Tequila has been an opportunity for government and private sector technologists to explore hot topics in federal IT together in a casual setting—with cocktails. Aug. 25 marks our sixth event, and we’ll be discussing artificial intelligence. Is there anything more top of mind than a robot uprising?

    In all seriousness, Tech + Tequila has tackled some awesome topics: data, cybersecurity and emerging tech. This ebook features two more recent Tech + Tequila themes: open source and the internet of things.

    On Aug. 8, the White House unveiled the final policy that requires agencies to share 20 percent of their custom-created source code. When the draft framework was announced back in March, some critics said it didn't go far enough and argued for a more sweeping “open source by default” framework. Another dissenting voice said the policy would add "more layers of confusion."

  • Cloud innovator of the Year announced

    AMADEUS, the leading provider of technology solutions for the global travel industry, has won the 2016 Red Hat Innovator of the Year award.

    This is in recognition of its innovative use of Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform as part of a new cloud services platform to help companies meet the increasingly complex demands of travelers.

  • SFD Countdown Ready!

    The Software Freedom Day countdown is ready for usage in English. We are therefore informing translators and also people willing to add a new language that translation can start right now. All the instructions are available on the wiki at this page.

  • Omega2, $5 Linux platform computer for IoT projects, exceeds $450k in Kickstarter funding

    The Omega2 set out to produce an extremely cheap, extensible Linux computer designed for Internet of Things (IoT) projects with a Kickstarter campaign asking for only $15,000. Now, with only for days remaining in the campaign, the Omega2 team is set to receive over $450,000 in funding from over 11,000 backers. Developed by the Onion Corporation, the Omega2 promises to be an interesting entry for DIY (do it yourself) and commercial projects.

  • GNU Libreboot, version 20160818 released
  • GNU Libreboot Release Adds New Chromebook & ASUS/Gigabyte/Intel Board Support

    The Libreboot project has done their first official release of this Coreboot binary-free downstream now being under the GNU project label.

    GNU Libreboot 20160818 is the new release. New board support for this de-blobbed version of Coreboot includes supporting the ASUS Chromebook C201, Gigabyte GA-G41M-ES2L, Intel D510MO, ASUS KCMA-D8, ASUS KFSN4-DRE, and ASUS KGPE-D16. Yep, all rather old motherboards (aside from the Chromebook C201) with sadly not much love these days from AMD and Intel around fully supporting modern chipsets by free software.

  • France’s Vendée shares its eGovernment platform
  • Paris Region unveils officials information system

    Île-de-France - the Paris Region - will publish as open source Babylone, its software solution to aggregate and manage information on elected officials. The region’s administration hopes other regions will reuse the software, and pool resources for updates and future versions.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Debian News

Filed under
Debian
  • [GSOC] Final report

    I’ve had the great opportunity to go to the Debian Conference 2016. I’ve been introduced to the debian community and debian developpers (“dd” in short Tongue). I was lucky to meet with great people like the president of the FSF, John Sulivan. You can have a look at my Debian conference report here.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20160819-1

    A new – and unplanned – release in quick succession. I have uploaded testing packages to experimental which incorporate tex4ht into the TeX Live packages, but somehow the tex4ht transitional updated slipped into sid, and made many packages uninstallable. Well, so after a bit more testing let’s ship the beast to sid, meaning that tex4ht will finally updated from the last 2009 version to what is the current status in TeX Live.

  • Defcon24

    I went to Defcon24 as Purism representative. It was (as usual) held in Las Vegas, the city of sin. In the same module as with DebConf, here we go with good, bad and ugly.

  • No MariaDB MaxScale in Debian
  • DebConf16 - new age in Debian community gathering

    Finally got some time to write this blog post. DebConf for me is always something special, a family gathering of weird combination of geeks (or is weird a default geek state?). To be honest, I finally can compare Debian as hacker conference to other so-called hacker conferences. With that hat on, I can say that Debian is by far the most organized and highest quality conference. Maybe I am biased, but I don't care too much about that. I simply love Debian and that is no secret. So lets dive into my view on DebConf16 which was held in Cape Town, South Africa.

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Unit Testing GTK+ libraries: has_default GtkWidget property
  • Autotools Templates for GNOME Builder for GTK+ Vala applications

    I’ve recently finished a makefile to make easy to create GTK+ applications as well as GTK+ libraries using Vala programing language.

  • Looking forward to LAS GNOME!

    I'm on the schedule for LAS GNOME this September, to share our usability test results. Diana, Ciarrai and Renata have been working hard this summer in GNOME Outreachy, doing different usability tests. Our tests include a paper prototype test of the new Settings app, a traditional usability test of other areas of GNOME development, and a first experience test where people use GNOME for the first time. This promises to be interesting!

  • First impressions of GNOME usability testing

    I am delighted to have completed usability testing on 10 participants!

    Generally speaking, the testing process went really well. There are of course some downsides to it. I’ll go ahead and share an unordered list of some things that went right and some that went wrong:

  • Flock & GUADEC 2016

    The last two weeks were pretty busy for me because I travelled to two of my most favourite conferences – Flock and GUADEC.

    Flock was held in Krakow this year, so the traveling was a sort of easy for me. Krakow is just 350 km from Brno which is about 3.5 hours by car. The conference was again organized in the hotel where almost everyone stayed. The same setup was already in Rochester last year and people appreciated it. It’s very convenient. You don’t have to travel to the venue, you can sneak out to have a nap, which is super useful if you’re fighting jet lag, and you can use hotel facilities such as a gym or swimming pool.

Desktop News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • The aristocratic desktop (part 1)

    Still, there was some issues. And I discovered that some very basic concepts are harder to understand than I thought. Double-click, a window, a folder, the desktop, the taskbar, the trayicon. I also discovered that some users were using a computer for ten years without even understanding the minimize function for a window ! The only way to switch between a web page and a word processor was to close one and then opening the other. It was seen as normal !

  • Windows 10 needs proper privacy portal, says EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has called on Microsoft to offer a “single unified screen” on which Windows 10 users can control how Windows 10 deals with their personal information and monitors their use of the OS.

    The organisation has listed the long list of nasty nagware tactics Microsoft used to get people running Windows 10, labelling some “questionable tactics to cause users to download a piece of software that many didn’t want.”

    It's not keen on the nagware bundled alongside patches, suggesting that tactic reduced trust in patches and therefore potentially exposed users who don't act promptly when important fixes arrive.

    It also rails against the telemetry Windows 10 collects and is especially harsh on Microsoft's insistence that if business users send it less data, Windows Update will be less effective and PCs will be less secure.

    The Foundation says “this is a false choice that is entirely of Microsoft’s own creation.”

    “There’s no good reason why the types of data Microsoft collects at each telemetry level couldn’t be adjusted so that even at the lowest level of telemetry collection, users could still benefit from Windows Update and secure their machines from vulnerabilities, without having to send back things like app usage data or unique Ids like an IMEI number.”

  • Microsoft wants to pay you to use its Windows 10 browser Edge [Ed: CNET's editor in chief called it "Bribery" last time Microsoft did such things. How to starve a lesser wealthy competitor, drive it out of the market...]

    Microsoft has a new browser. It launched with Windows 10 and it’s called Edge. The company says it’s faster, more battery efficient and all-round better than Chrome or Firefox. You can even draw on websites with a stylus. Trouble is, not very many people are using it. So now Microsoft’s trying to bribe you to switch.

    The newly rebranded Microsoft Rewards – formerly Bing Rewards, which paid people for using Bing as their search engine (another product Microsoft says is better than a Google product but that very few people actually use) – will now pay you for using Edge, shopping at the Microsoft store, or using Bing.

    Users of Edge who sign up to Microsoft Rewards, which is currently US-only, are then awarded points simply for using the browser. Microsoft actively monitors whether you’re using Edge for up to 30 hours a month. It tracks mouse movements and other signs that you’re not trying to game the system, and you must also have Bing set as your default search engine.

“Teensy” Arduino clone grows, with more I/O, USB, and faster CPU

Filed under
Hardware

PJRC is Kickstartering two new models of its “Teensy” Arduino compatible, featuring a faster 180MHz Cortex-M4, more memory, more pins, and a second USB.

In the world of Arduino compatibles, you can choose from bare-bones clones or value-added innovators that develop new software as well as hardware, and occasionally risk some compatibility in order to advance the capabilities of the entire Arduino platform. In the latter category is Teensy, a DIY breadboard-oriented Arduino project from Portland, Oregon based PJRC, led by Teensy inventor Paul Stoffregen, known for its superior USB-based keyboard/mouse, LED array, and audio support. The eight-year old company has now upgraded the Teensy board with a much faster MCU, more RAM and flash, many more I/O pins, and additional USB and CAN ports, making it one of the fastest Arduino clones around.

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Arch Linux Take Your Linux Knowledge To Next Level [Review]

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

This review will be a bit unconventional, probably because Arch Linux itself is a bit unconventional. Rather than having continued, numbered releases like most distros, Arch Linux follows the rolling-release model, meaning that you install Arch once and it updates forever (or at least, until you break something). There is no “Arch Linux 16.04 LTS”, there is simply Arch Linux. The philosophy of Arch, known as The Arch Way, focuses on simplicity and user centrality, rather than user friendliness.

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kdenlive 16.08.0 released

Filed under
KDE

Kdenlive 16.08.0 marks a milestone in the project’s history bringing it a step closer to becoming a full-fledged professional tool. The highlights of this release are:

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Beyond Linux: 7 Open-Source Projects the Linux Foundation Is Leading

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Linux Foundation got its start in 2007 as a home for the development of Linux and its creator Linus Torvalds. In the last decade, the mission of the foundation has expanded beyond the confines of the Linux kernel. Although the Linux kernel still remains central, the foundation's model of enabling open, collaborative software development has proven valuable to multiple groups. That's where the Linux Foundation Collaborative Projects effort comes in, enabling groups of developers to bring software projects under the Linux Foundation umbrella. By being part of the foundation, software projects benefit from its infrastructure and expertise at helping to shepherd and grow open-source software development efforts in a vendor-neutral approach. A 2014 slideshow on eWEEK looked at 10 projects beyond Linux that the foundation now manages. So far in 2016, the Linux Foundation has announced at least seven new efforts that are now collaborative projects. eWEEK takes a look at some of the efforts the foundation is leading beyond just Linux.

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New BlackArch Linux ISO Lands with Over 1,500 Penetration Testing, Hacking Tools

Filed under
Linux

The skilful team of developers and security professional behind the BlackArch Linux operating system have announced today, August 19, 2016, the general availability of a new ISO image.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta Adds NVDIMM Support, Improves Security

Today, August 25, 2016, Red Hat announced that version 7.3 of its powerful Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system is now in development, and a Beta build is available for download and testing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta brings lots of improvements and innovations, support for new hardware devices, and improves the overall security of the Linux kernel-based operating system used by some of the biggest enterprises and organizations around the globe. Among some of the major new features implemented in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 release, we can mention important networking improvements, and support for Non-Volatile Dual In-line Memory Modules (NVDIMMs). Read more Also: CentOS 6 Linux OS Receives Important Kernel Security Update from Red Hat Release of Red Hat Virtualization 4 Offers New Functionality for Workloads

Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 Released, Available to Download Now

The Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 releases are now available to download. You know the drill by now: {num} Ubuntu flavors, some freshly pressed ISOs, plenty of new bugs to find and no guarantees that things won’t go boom. Read more Also: Ubuntu 16.10 Beta Launches for Opt-in Flavors, Adds GCC 6.2 and LibreOffice 5.2

Games for GNU/Linux

PC-BSD Becomes TrueOS, FreeBSD 11.0 Reaches RC2

  • More Details On PC-BSD's Rebranding As TrueOS
    Most Phoronix readers know PC-BSD as the BSD operating system derived from FreeBSD that aims to be user-friendly on the desktop side and they've done a fairly good job at that over the years. However, the OS has been in the process of re-branding itself as TrueOS. PC-BSD has been offering "TrueOS Server" for a while now as their FreeBSD-based server offering. But around the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 release they are looking to re-brand their primary desktop download too now as TrueOS.
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 Arrives With Fixes
    The second release candidate to the upcoming FreeBSD 11 is now available for testing. FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 ships with various bug fixes, several networking related changes, Clang compiler fixes, and other updates. FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a plethora of other work. Those not yet familiar with FreeBSD 11 can see the what's new guide.