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Sunday, 23 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Etcher - Burn Images To SD Card & Make Bootable USB Mohd Sohail 20/04/2017 - 3:55pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2017 - 10:55am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2017 - 10:55am
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2017 - 10:54am
Story Leftovers: Debian/TinkerOS, Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2017 - 10:54am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2017 - 10:53am
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2017 - 10:51am
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2017 - 10:50am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2017 - 10:48am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2017 - 10:45am

Security Leftovers and Fixes

Filed under
Security

Ten Reasons You Should Try Linux Today

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I know despite the posts about how great Linux is and why I like it, many of you are probably still hesitant to try Linux. I understand. I remember years ago when I first heard about it, even I was slow to try it at first. After all, Windows just worked. Everything I needed Windows would do, so why bother trying something else that may or may not work for me. Of course, back then, Linux was quite different from what it is today.

Over the years, Linux has evolved to become one of the most powerful operating systems in the world. In addition to computers, did you know that it powers a wide range of devices including routers, switches, your smartphones and even your televisions. That’s right, when your fancy television boots up chances are its running a customized version of Linux. Most web servers today are powered by Linux as well, including the one that is serving this site out to you.

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It’s Windows Time in Linux Land Again

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Windows being Windows, a monkey wrench was thrown into the machinery right off. I booted the laptop into Windows, which then refused to connect with the Wi-Fi. It found the on-board Broadcom Wi-Fi just fine, but every time I’d try to get it to connect, it’d throw up an “unknown error” notice and ask if I’d like to enable logging so I could figure it out myself. This was odd, considering I’d used the machine to do my taxes last year, and it connects with the Wi-Fi just fine in Linux. But I wasn’t going to spend the better part of a day trying to fix it — I had no desire to start relearning my way around Windows. Time for Plan B, which was the reverse of Plan A: boot the desktop to Windows and use the laptop in Linux for finding all my facts and figures.

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Maui Linux 17.03

Filed under
Reviews

On the whole I enjoyed using Maui, more than I had expected. There was not any one feature or program which really stood out as amazing, but I liked the overall style of the distribution. Maui provides a lot of software and features out of the box, offers a stable core based on an Ubuntu LTS release and includes cutting edge KDE Plasma software. I like that the application menu is full of useful software while avoiding overlap in functionality. I also appreciate how easy it is to use the Calamares installer and how quickly Calamares sets up the operating system. Mostly, I like that the distribution provides distinct windows, large fonts and a high-contrast theme which I found easy to look at over longer periods.

I ran into just two issues or concerns while using Maui. One was the performance of the desktop with its default settings in the virtual test environment. Maui performed well on my desktop computer, but Plasma was slow to respond when running in VirtualBox. It is possible to improve performance by adjusting some items in the System Settings panel, but it would have been nice if the desktop had defaulted to more efficient settings.

My second issue was not a bug, but rather a matter of style. Maui has a friendly look, lots of simple configuration modules and, over all, a very modern and easy to use approach. Everything looks new and tasks are typically performed through slick, graphical wrappers. The one exception I found was Synaptic. The venerable package manager works well, but is a bit cryptic compared to most modern software managers. I like Synaptic for its speed and flexibility, but I think something like GNOME Software or mintInstall might be more in line with Maui's newcomer-friendly approach.

On the whole, I like Maui. The distribution is easy to set up, friendly and generally stayed out of my way while I was working. This seems like a fairly beginner friendly desktop distribution which does a good job of making things easy without distracting the user or doing too much hand holding.

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GNU/Linux Review: Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

This is a review of Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus with both Unity 7 and 8 desktop environments. This release is beautiful as always, ready for serious use, and complete with more than 70000 packages on official repository. It will be supported for 9 months until January 2018. Finally, I hope this review helps people to find how Ubuntu is and what's interesting from 17.04. Enjoy!

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today's howtos/technical

Filed under
HowTos

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Trying AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 On Ubuntu 17.04

    In early April AMD released the AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 driver as their first hybrid proprietary driver update in some time. With this update came support for Ubuntu 16.04.2 (and also 16.10, unofficially) but to little surprise it doesn't work out-of-the-box with this week's Ubuntu 17.04 release. But it can be made to work.

  • RadeonSI Polaris: Mesa 12.0 vs. 13.0 vs. 17.0 vs. 17.1 Git

    With Mesa 17.1 branching this weekend I figured it would be a fun Easter running benchmarks of Mesa Git compared to previous branches with a Radeon RX 470 Polaris graphics card. Here are these Mesa 17.1 benchmarks while other tests and on more GPUs is forthcoming.

  • Nouveau In Linux 4.13 Will Support HDMI Stereo 3D
  • Vulkan 1.0.48 Released

    There's another weekly update available to the Vulkan API, but this Easter update is on the small side.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Comprehend X86 Assembly Language with Open Source Books

    An assembly language is a low-level programming language for a computer, or other programmable device. Assembly language is used by almost all modern desktop and laptop computers. It is as close to writing machine code without writing in pure hexadecimal. It is converted into executable machine code by a utility program referred to as an assembler.

  • Xfce Session Manager 4.13 Released, Ported To GTK3

    An updated version of the Xfce4 session manager was released this Easter weekend.

    The xfce4-session 4.13.0 package was released today and it's a significant step forward for Xfce's session manager.

  • Relm: A GTK-Based GUI Library In Rust For Async GUI Apps

    With there being many Rustlang fans reading Phoronix, many of you will probably be interested in Relm: a new GUI library for Rust.

    Relm is a new crate/library for developing asynchronous GUI applications in Rust. Using GTK up to now in Rust looks rather messy, but Relm aims to change that and also make the applications more responsive by making the user-interface asynchronous and makes use of the language's futures capability.

Linux 4.11-rc7

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.11-rc7

    You all know the drill by now. We're in the late rc phase, and this
    may be the last rc if nothing surprising happens.

    Things have been pretty calm this past week (the beginning of the week
    seemed particularly calm, and then as usual Friday happened..). We
    have a number of reverts for things that didn't work out and aren't
    worth trying to fix at this point, that's also normal (and people will
    look at it for the next version instead).

    So not too big, and things look very normal with two thirds of the
    changes being to drivers, and the rest being a mixture of arch updates
    (arm, x86, ia64, parisc), networking and filesystems (btrfs, cifs,
    orangefs). With a smattering of other stuff (tooling, header files,
    core kernel).

  • Linux 4.11-rc7 Kernel Released: Final Might Come Next Week

    Linus Torvalds has announced the seventh weekly test build of the upcoming Linux 4.11 kernel.

Devil-Linux 1.8.0 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Devil-Linux 1.8.0 has been released! This is a major overhaul of Devil-Linux. Most programs and libraries have been updated and unmaintained ones have been removed. The main file system has been switched to squashfs, to further reduce the iso size. See the changelog for additional details.

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Freedom Doesn’t Have to Be Free: Revenue and Open Source

Filed under
GNU
OSS

In 1983, Richard Stallman kicked off the free software movement with the launch of the GNU Project. From that point onwards, free software was commonly associated with being free in the monetary sense as well.

Most all open source projects, especially those in the world of Linux are available free of charge. And while this is very nice in itself, it can result in developers not being able to fully commit to their projects.

In turn fantastic open source projects going nowhere in development when the lives of the maintainers catch up to them. But there is another way to go about open source!

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Could A New Linux Base For Tablets/Smartphones Succeed In 2017?

Filed under
Linux

Over the years we have seen many mobile/smartphone focused Linux efforts come and go from OpenMoko, Moblin/MeeGo, webOS, Firefox OS, and most recently Ubuntu Touch while others like Sailfish OS and Plasma Mobile appear to be somewhat stagnate or at least not gaining much marketshare nor advancing rapidly. But what if more of these mobile Linux efforts were to collaborate on a common base? There's a new effort being worked on in this area.

A Phoronix reader involved with this new project codenamed HALIUM shared with us some early details on the work. This open-source project is trying to pool resources and developers from UBports (one of the groups forking Unity 8), Sailfish OS community developers, the open webOS Lune OS project, and KDE Plasma Mobile contributors, among other developers.

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Chris Lamb Elected As New Debian Project Leader

Filed under
Debian

Chris Lamb has unseated Mehdi Dogguy as the next Debian Project Leader.

The 2017 Debian election results were posted today. Chris Lamb managed to secure more votes than current DPL Mehdi Dogguy and these two were the only ones competing in this year's elections. The DPL term is one year.

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Guide To Finding a Home-Based Linux Job

Filed under
GNU
Linux

With the technology advancements that keep on evolving, locating a home-based Linux job is a lot of Linux engineers dream. Unfortunately, there is still a majority of engineers that work in a typical office setting, but the opportunity to work out of the house continues to increase over time. After all, why not? Not having to commute seems to make a lot of sense. If all is done right, the efficiencies that can be gained by telecommuting are significant, for both the employer and employee. Therefore, since it is of great interest to find this work arrangement for many engineers, how does one find such a position? The goal of this article is to hit on some high points that will hopefully help one locate this type of role.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Boostnote: Open Source Note Taking App For Programmers

    Boostnote is a new Open Source note taking application focused on programmers. It is available for Linux, Windows and MacOS. It is built on electron and is run offline.

  • Wireshark 2.2.6 Has Been Released

    As you already know, Wireshark is an open-source protocol analyzer software, very used for monitoring the network traffic.

    The latest version available is Wireshark 2.2.6 which has been recently released, bringing many changes.

  • Introducing Babe - History

    This is my very first post for KDE blogs and it is also my very first application. So when I sit down to think about what to write about I thought I would like to tell you all about how and why I wanted to start coding and then why I decided to create a (yet another (i know)) music player, specially made for KDE/Plasma.

UBports Update

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • UBports Community Q&A: April 15, 2017

    Today marked another Q&A session in the books. You can find it right over here on our shiny new Youtube channel! The following are the majority of asked questions and a summary of their answers.

  • More Details On UBports' Plans For Unity, Mir & Anbox

    The UBports community are among those planning to fork the work on Unity 8 and they've already made ambitious plans like porting Unity 8 to Wayland. More details were revealed today.

    The UBports team issued their latest FAQs with some interesting remarks:

AV Linux 2017.4.9 Released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

An updated 2017 ISO for AV Linux has been released, it features a new Audio Routing system,
many refinements and improvements and probably the most stable and functional collection of
Applications across the board to date! The older AV Linux 2016.8.30 ISO's are currently still
in the FTPs and will be phased out soon, make sure to download the 2017.4.9 release.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu and elementary

  • System76 wants to build its own hardware for its Linux-based computers
    System76 is building up quite a name for itself, being one of a very limited number of companies selling only computers running Linux-based operating systems. Now the aim is to branch out; System76 wants to design and build its own hardware, while representing the open source community as it does so. At the moment, the hardware used in System76 systems is outsourced, but in the future this will change. The company says that it is moving into phase three of its development cycle, and this "moves product design and manufacturing in house." And you should set your expectations high: "We're about to build the Model S of computers. Something so brilliant and beautiful that reviewers will have to add an 11 to their scores."
  • AppCenter Spotlight: Beta Testers
    Over the past month we’ve been beta testing the new AppCenter with a number of developers, from elementary OS contributors to backers of our Indiegogo campaign. After testing out the submission process and getting some apps into the store (and seeing rapid updates!), I wanted to take a moment to highlight some of the first apps.
  • elementary OS to get improved AppCenter, showing off a few new applications
    I have to hand it to the elementary OS guys, they have a massive focus on design and it does look quite incredible. It is easily one of the best looking Linux distributions, which I do admire. Their new AppCenter, for example, looks extremely clean and clear.

Beijing Zoo is No Place for Pandas

Pandas in Beijing Zoo
Photo credit: Nick Hopkins

I am a Panda lover. I work as a support engineer in an I.T company here in the United Kingdom. Most of my spare time is spent watching different Panda videos -- both old and new videos. Basically, it is my therapy; a 'stress release' for me. I find them to be adorable and precious creatures. As a matter of fact, I would like to volunteer to come to Sichuan. I want to experience and feel what it's like to be a Panda keeper, to be able to interact with them for real. The Panda is China's National Treasure, so it's a shame to watch the Panda videos from Beijing zoo, as the place is disgusting and not ideal for Pandas to live in (and for sure for all the rest of the animals who unfortunately got stuck in this prison cell).

The place looks like a ghost town. Lifeless and languished. Knowing that Pandas wear a thick fur on their body, can you imagine what it feels for them in 30C or 35C (summer temperature)? What it probably feels like all the time? Come on, if you really care, you must do something now, otherwise these Pandas will die. Please bring them back to their sanctuary where they really belong.

Linux 4.11 File-System Tests: EXT4, F2FS, XFS & Btrfs

With the Linux 4.11 kernel potentially being released as soon as today, here are some fresh benchmarks of Btrfs / EXT4 / F2FS / XFS on a solid-state drive and comparing the performance of 4.11 Git back to Linux 4.9 and 4.10. For those wondering if the block/file-system changes of Linux 4.11 have any impact on EXT4/F2FS/XFS/Btrfs for common I/O workloads or how these file-systems are comparing on this latest kernel, here are some benchmarks. Read more

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