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Tuesday, 23 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 3:35pm
Story GNU/Linux Review: Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Zesty Zapus Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 3:15pm
Story Eric Hameleers on Slackware Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 3:10pm
Story Security News, Notably Microsoft/NSA Catastrophe Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 9:55am
Story LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week Bodhi Linux Mohd Sohail 14/05/2017 - 4:17am
Story Linux 4.12-rc1 Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 12:20am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/05/2017 - 7:48pm
Story Leftovers: Software (Ebook Authoring Tools, Feedreader, and Wire) Roy Schestowitz 13/05/2017 - 7:47pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/05/2017 - 7:46pm
Story Fedora 25 and Fedora 26 Roy Schestowitz 13/05/2017 - 7:44pm

Mesa 17.1 Released and Other Graphics News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • GeForce Experience Picks Up OpenGL/Vulkan Support, Linux Up Next?

    NVIDIA's gaming software, GeForce Experience, now has support for OpenGL and Vulkan.

    GeForce Experience is NVIDIA's software often paired with their Windows driver for managing game updates, analyzing GPU/CPU metrics, game setting optimizations, and recently the focus on being able to record your video game sessions as well as take screenshots with NVIDIA Ansel. Experience also allows game streaming to SHIELD devices with NVIDIA GameStream.

  • Mesa 17.1 Released, Adds RADV Vulkan Conforming Patches

    Mesa 17.1.0 is now officially available as the Q2'2017 update to this important piece to the open-source 3D Linux graphics driver stack.

    Mesa 17.1 ships with many ANV and RADV Vulkan driver fixes, the OpenGL shader cache is in place and enabled by default for RadeonSI, some work on OpenGL AZDO extensions, Ivy Bridge OpenGL 4.2 support up from GL 3.3, initial Radeon RX Vega support, some performance optimizations, and a wealth of other changes.

  • Better Driver Matching For X.Org Server 1.20

    A two-year-old patch for the X.Org Server from a NVIDIA developer has finally landed.

    The xfree86: Improved autoconfig drivers matching is now in xorg-server Git. This 100+ line patch implements a new auto configuration driver matching algorithm. The benefit is the driver matching code is made easier and also doesn't end up adding duplicate drivers on the case of multiple GPUs.

  • GPUOpen's CodeXL 2.3 Brings Ryzen Support, AMDGPU-PRO Compatibility

    AMD's CodeXL utility that's open-source under the GPUOpen umbrella for graphics profiling/debugging is up to version 2.3.

    CodeXL 2.3 adds support on Linux systems for operating with the AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver. Other prominent features include Radeon Polaris GPU support as well as support for AMD Ryzen processors with the addition of supporting its performance counters, etc.

  • CodeAurora Continues Contributions To Freedreno's MSM DRM Driver

    While there are still a few days left until the Linux 4.12 merge window closes and the 4.12 release candidates for the next two months, the Qualcomm-backed CodeAurora already has lined up some new code for the reverse-engineered, community-driven Freedreno MSM DRM driver for Adreno hardware.

Linux 4.12, Linux 3.12.74, and Linux Foundation Nets SNAS.io

Filed under
Linux
  • Btrfs Gets RAID 5/6 Fixes With Linux 4.12

    There are a number of Btrfs fixes/clean-ups for the Linux 4.12 kernel.

    Btrfs on 4.12 doesn't have any big new features or major performance boosts, but it does notably have RAID5 and RAID6 fixes that are needed as outlined in that earlier article. So those wanting to run Btrfs on a RAID 5/6 array will definitely want to be using Linux 4.12+ once stable.

  • TEE Proposed For Merging In Linux 4.12: "Trusted" Execution Environment

    The ARM folks have requested that the TEE subsystem and OP-TEE drivers be included in Linux 4.12, the Trusted Execution Environment.

    The Trusted Execution Environment is is about communicating with a trusted OS running in a secure environment, separate from the Linux kernel itself. Of course, any time "trusted" computing is brought up in Linux/open-source there are a fair number of concerned individuals, especially in light of the recent major vulnerability in Intel AMT.

  • More Power Management Updates Head To The Linux 4.12 Kernel

    Last week was the main ACPI / power management updates for Linux 4.12 while Intel's Rafael Wysocki has now submitted a second set of feature updates for this next version of the Linux kernel.

  • IOMMU Updates, Optimizations For Linux 4.12

    There are a number of IOMMU optimizations queued for Linux 4.12.

    Joerg Roedel submitted the IOMMU kernel updates today for Linux 4.12. Among the changes for this important component to modern systems include code optimizations to the Intel VT-d driver, IOMMU core header optimizations, Samsung Exynos IOMMU optimizations, and ARM/SMMU optimizations.

  • Linux Kernel 3.12.74 Looks to Be the Last in the Series, Move to a Newer Branch

    Linux kernel developer and maintainer Jiri Slaby announced today the release and immediate availability of what it would appear to be the last maintenance update to the Linux 3.12 kernel series.

    Linux kernel 3.12.74 is out and it looks to be the last in the series, according to its maintainer, who urges all those using the Linux 3.12 kernel branch on their GNU/Linux distributions to start considering moving to a newer LTS (Long Term Support) Linux kernel, such as Linux 3.16, Linux 4.1, Linux 4.4, or Linux4.9.

    However, if you choose to remain on this branch at least update to Linux kernel 3.12.74, which changes a total of 78 files, with 834 insertions and 524 deletions, according to the appended shortlog. Improvements are all over the places, for various architectures, drivers, filesystems, security, and the networking stack.

  • Linux 3.12.74
  • SNAS.io, Formerly OpenBMP Project, Joins The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Networking Umbrella

    We are excited to announce that SNAS.io, a project that provides network routing topologies for software-defined applications, is joining The Linux Foundation’s Networking and Orchestration umbrella. SNAS.io tackles the challenging problem of tracking and analyzing network routing topology data in real time for those who are using BGP as a control protocol, internet service providers, large enterprises, and enterprise data center networks using EVPN.

Git 2.13 has been released

Filed under
Development
  • Git 2.13 has been released

    The open source Git project has just released Git 2.13.0, with features and bugfixes from over 65 contributors. Before we dig into the new features, we have a brief security announcement.

  • Git 2.13 Released, Adds SHA-1 Collision Detection

    Git 2.13 is now available as the latest version of this widely-used, open-source version control system.

  • Git 2.13 Source Code Management System Released with SHA-1 Collision Detection

    The Git project, through Jeff King, happily announced today the release and immediate availability of the Git 2.13 open source project management system for all supported platforms.

    As expected, Git 2.13 is a major update that adds numerous improvements, new features, and countless bug fixes from more than 65 contributors. It's now considered the new stable branch and it's a recommended update for all users on all platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. However, this version comes with a security announcement about a vulnerability in "git shell."

    "For those running their own Git hosting server, Git 2.13 fixes a vulnerability in the git shell program in which an untrusted Git user can potentially run shell commands on a remote host. This only affects you if you're running a hosting server and have specifically configured git shell. If none of that makes sense to you, you're probably fine," said Jeff King, Open Source Software Developer at GitHub.

Solus Receives Better Bluetooth A2DP Audio and Scanning Support, Other Goodies

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Solus Project's Joshua Strobl is reporting today in a new installation of the This Week In Solus (TWiS) newsletter on the latest work done by him and project leader Ikey Doherty for their beloved and very popular Solus operating system.

Last week - like many others before it - was extremely busy for the development team behind Solus, an independently-developed GNU/Linux distribution. The team finally managed to migrate the project's Git repositories and patch management system to the Diffusion and Differential apps of their Phabricator dev tracker tool.

This move has many implications for the ever-growing community and package maintainers, and you can read all about it in This Week In Solus Install #44, which brings many other good news for the regular Solus user as scanning and Bluetooth A2DP audio support has been greatly improved thanks to donators and patrons.

Read more

EIB provides EUR 25 million funding for MariaDB open-source database system

Filed under
OSS

The European Investment Bank (EIB), the non-profit lending institution of the European Union, will provide EUR 25 million in funding to the eponymous Finnish company behind the MariaDB open-source database system. MariaDB will use the money to expand its customer base in Europe, America and Asia, and to hire more developers in Helsinki.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Cisco kills leaked CIA 0-day that let attackers commandeer 318 switch models

    As previously reported, the zero-day exploit allowed attackers to issue commands that remotely execute malicious code on 318 models of Cisco switches. The attack code was published in early March by WikiLeaks as part of its Vault7 series of leaks, which the site is billing as the largest publication of intelligence documents ever.

    The bug resides in the Cisco Cluster Management Protocol (CMP), which uses the telnet protocol to deliver signals and commands on internal networks. It stems from a failure to restrict telnet options to local communications and the incorrect processing of malformed CMP-only telnet options.

  • Open source password strength meter could help boost account security

    It's no secret that most people are rubbish at choosing passwords -- it's something that's proved time and time again when the annual list of common passwords is released. To help overcome the problem, and hopefully increase the security of people's accounts, a team of researchers from the Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Chicago have created an open source password meter that provides advice about how to strengthen a password.

  • Apache OpenOffice: Not dead yet, you'll just have to wait until mid-May for mystery security fixes
  • NIST to security admins: You've made passwords too hard

    Despite the fact that cybercriminals stole more than 3 billion user credentials in 2016, users don't seem to be getting savvier about their password usage. The good news is that how we think about password security is changing as other authentication methods become more popular.

  • Google Docs Phishing Scam a Game Changer

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Fans Can Build Their Own AI Voice Assistant

    Google and AIY Projects last week launched an open source do-it-yourself artificial intelligence Voice Kit for Raspberry Pi hobbyists.

    The AIY Voice Kit includes hardware for audio capture and playback, connectors for the dual mike daughterboard and speaker, GPIO pins to connect low-voltage components such as micro servos and sensors, and an optional barrel connector for a dedicated power supply.

    The Voice Kit can use cloud services such as the recently released Google Assistant SDK, which is enabled by default, or it can use the Cloud Speech API or run completely on-device.

  • Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0 Supports Raspberry Pi Zero W, Based on Chromium 56

    After informing us last month about the release of Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0 for Raspberry Pi single-board computers, Binary Emotions is informing us today about the availability of Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0.

  • Portwell’s four new RS4U industrial PCs use a common API stack

    Portwell’s “RS4U” industrial computers feature a standard set of Portwell APIs. The first four models support Intel Apollo Lake, Skylake, and Haswell CPUs.

  • Rugged PC/104 SBC sandwich runs on Kaby Lake

    VersaLogic’s Linux-ready, sandwich-style “Liger” offers 7th Gen Core CPUs, ruggedization features, and mini-PCIe, SPI/SPX, and PC/104-Plus expansion.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • What is Docker's Moby Project?

    Being an Austinite, I enjoyed having DockerCon local, and I co-authored a guide to visiting Austin in the hopes that attendees would enjoy having DockerCon in Austin as well.

    During DockerCon 2017, a few major announcements were made, including the Moby Project.

  • Verizon taps into open source, white box fervor with new CPE offering

    Verizon this week said it would begin offering x86-based servers with OpenStack software aimed at customers looking to support all manner of advanced cloud, software defined networking and network functions virtualization-based enterprises.

  • Web-based open-source program determines protein structures

    ContaMiner is a web-based, open-source program developed by a unique interdisciplinary team in King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia. This program is already saving time for international researchers.

    "How much can you understand and repair a car if you don't have a detailed picture of what is going on under the hood?" said KAUST Associate Professor Stefan Arold. "Proteins are life's workhorses: their function and dysfunction both create life and end it. Each protein's amino acid sequence folds into a particular 3-D structure that is required to support its function. If you want to understand, affect or engineer a protein's function, you need to know its 3-D structure," he explained.

  • MapD tech open sources their Core Database

    MapD Technologies, a GPU-powered analytics company, has released their Core database to the open source community under the Apache 2 license, seeding a new generation of data applications. By open sourcing the MapD Core database and associated visualization libraries, they are making their analytics platform available to everyone.

  • MINIX 3.4 RC6 Released

    The release of MINIX 3.4 is inching closer with the availability now of its sixth release candidate.

    MINIX 3.4 will be the first update since MINIX 3.3 in 2014. We've been seeing release candidates now of MINIX 3.4 for the past year but it appears the final release is getting closer. MINIX for the uninitiated is a Unix-like microkernel-based OS started by Andrew Tanenbaum.

  • Thunderbird’s Future Home

    The investigations on Thunderbird’s future home have concluded. The Mozilla Foundation has agreed to serve as the legal and fiscal home for the Thunderbird project, but Thunderbird will migrate off Mozilla Corporation infrastructure, separating the operational aspects of the project.

  • 4 Python libraries for building great command-line user interfaces

    This is the second installment in my two-part series on terminal applications with great command-line UIs. In the first article, I discussed features that make a command-line application a pure joy to use. In part two, I'll look at how to implement those features in Python with the help of a few libraries. By the end of this article, readers should have a good understanding of how to use Prompt Toolkit, Click (Command Line Interface Creation Kit), Pygments, and Fuzzy Finder to implement an easy-to-use REPL.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Native color temperature tweaking with Night Light

    RedShift is a utility that we have previously featured here at the Fedora Magazine. It is a small utility that automatically tweaks the color temperature towards the red end of the spectrum after dark. Blue light — which is typically emitted by a monitor — is shown to negatively impact sleep patterns if you are exposed to it after dark. Night Light is a new feature arriving in Fedora 26 Workstation — thanks to it being introduced in GNOME 3.24. Night Light provides the functionality of RedShift without having to install a separate utility or extension.

  • Transfer.sh – Easy And Fast Way to Share Files From The Command-Line
  • What is YOUR Essential FOSS Program?

    We all have at least one or maybe even a handful of programs we seemingly just can't live without. You know, that program that you instantly go looking for as soon as you've installed your new shiny OS (or Linux distribution, more specifically in our case). For me, personally it's the Vim text editor.

    I decided to narrow this down to Free and Open Source Software specifically, as while it's probably not necessary given our audience, it's always possible someone would jump up and say something like 'Adobe Illustrator' is their most essential tool! Which is fine in itself, some people do depend on such tools for their occupation or hobbies.

  • GCC 6/7 Gets A Performance-Sensitive Fix

    A Phoronix reader pointed out a performance regression fix now available for GCC 6 and GCC 7 that could help some rather trivial C code perform much better.

  • Cockpit is now just an apt install away
  • Cockpit Comes To Ubuntu, Easier Linux Server Administration

    Cockpit, the open-source project providing a pleasant web-based administrative interface to Linux systems and developed significantly by Red Hat / Fedora developers, is now officially available in Ubuntu and Debian.

    Cockpit is now available in Debian unstable as well as Ubuntu 17.04 and 17.10 repositories. Details on Cockpit coming to Ubuntu/Debian were shared today on Martin Pitt's blog, a prominent Debian/Ubuntu developer. There is also work on getting the Cockpit packages added to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS backports, but as of writing that has yet to be completed.

OpenWRT and LEDE agree on LInux-for-routers peace plan

Filed under
Linux

Competing Linux-for-routers distributions OpenWRT and LEDE will soon vote on a proposal to heal the schism between the two.

OpenWRT is often used as firmware for small routers, largely SOHO WiFi kit. But in March 2016 a group of developers decided they didn't like the directions OpenWRT was taking and forked the project by creating the Linux Embedded Development Environment – LEDE – project. LEDE developers said they wanted to create a distribution that was more transparent and democratic than OpenWRT, followed a more predictable release schedule and produced stable code.

Read more

Events: Open Networking Summit, DevConf, and OSCON

Filed under
OSS

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

NVIDIA in Linux 4.12, Nvidia 381.22 Video Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • NVIDIA Tegra186/Parker/TX2 Support For Linux 4.12

    Olof Johansson has sent in his large set of pull requests for the ARM SoC/platform updates slated for the in-development Linux 4.12 kernel.

  • NVIDIA 381.22 Linux Driver Released With Updated Vulkan

    NVIDIA has released a new short-lived Linux binary driver update that jumps it ahead to the 381 release series.

    Available today is the NVIDIA 381.22 Linux driver as the newest GeForce/Quadro/Tesla proprietary Linux graphics driver. This first 381 Linux driver update mostly consists of bug-fixes but also has new Vulkan extensions that previously were just part of their "Vulkan beta" driver.

  • Nvidia 381.22 Video Driver Supports Newer Linux Kernels, More Vulkan Extensions

    Nvidia released today a new short-lived graphics driver for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris operating systems on all supported architectures, bringing various bug fixes, better Vulkan support, and some other improvements.

    Probably the most fundamental change of the Nvidia 381.22 graphics driver is support for a bunch of new Vulkan extensions, thus adding an extra layer of support for Vulkan, which in these days is more and more used in popular games. However, this was only implemented for the Linux driver.

  • NVIDIA 381.22 driver released with lots of bug fixes and newer Vulkan support

    NVIDIA have released their 381.22 driver which comes with plenty of fixes, newer Vulkan support and more.

Tizen, Fuchsia, and Android

Filed under
OS
Android
Linux

OpenStack Summit

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Why Edward Snowden loves open source

    Infamous government hacker Edward Snowden believes open source is a fundamentally better way to use technology compared to proprietary technology that he believes disempowers users.

    Snowden was interviewed at the open source cloud computing project OpenStack Summit in Boston via video from a non-descript location and spoke about his personal use of open source technology. In 2013 Snowden, then a government contractor, leaked classified information about government surveillance programs run by the National Security Agency, which brought him worldwide fame.

  • Snowden Advocates the Need for Open Source and OpenStack

    Using public cloud and proprietary software represents a "silent vulnerability" to millions of users around the world, according to National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

    Snowden appeared remotely via a video link at the OpenStack Summit here May 9 in a question-and-answer keynote with OpenStack Foundation Chief Operating Officer Mark Collier. Snowden said the average user is unaware of how the internet works.

    "For most people, the internet is magic," he said.

    According to Snowden, it's not good enough to let people mindlessly build internet and cloud services, which is where OpenStack plays an important role. He noted that while there are for-profit alternatives in the cloud space like Amazon that do a decent job, they are fundamentally disempowering.

  • OpenStack Summit Highlights Cloud Use Cases

    OpenStack started off as a cloud technology project and has evolved steadily over the last few years. In a marathon two and a half hour set of keynotes on the first day of the OpenStack Summit here, the OpenStack Foundation and the vendors and companies that use it talked about how they are using the cloud.

  • How the U.S. Army Is Using OpenStack to Train Cyber-Warriors

    The open-source OpenStack cloud platform is now being used to help train the next generation of cyber-warriors. At the OpenStack Summit here May 8, officers from the U.S. Army Cyber School explained how they are using OpenStack to train soldiers to fight in the cyber-domain.

    Major Julianna Rodriguez, director, and Chris Apsey, deputy director of the Cyber Technical College at the U.S. Army Cyber School, detailed their activities in a keynote as well as a late-day deep-dive technical session titled "Saving Millions and Achieving Education Freedom Through OpenStack. "

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat panel: Open source is the future, but only if it can expand beyond developers

    Tim Yeaton, EVP and CMO, Red Hat
    Leigh Day, VP, Corporate Communications, Red Hat
    Nick Hopman, senior director, Emerging Technology Practices in US Sales, Red Hat
    Josh Patterson, director, Field Engineering, Skymind

    These executives discussed the open source movement and how it relates to Red Hat endeavors, producing some interesting insights worth sharing.

    Nick Hopman stated the technological and delivery model for open source technology is an "overnight success that started in the eighties." The concept has roots in the university system where open source licenses promoted sharing. "Over the last ten years we've seen a metamorphosis. Every major technology that enterprises are likely to bet on - cloud, artificial intelligence, mobility - has a lot of its current innovation happening upstream in the open source community," he stated. "The small university-centric collaboration model is now a fountain of innovation."

  • ‘Slow-burn’ growth model proves a successful strategy for Red Hat, analyst says

    Red Hat Inc. has famously bucked the well-known Silicon Valley trend of tech companies that go from fast burn to fast burn-out.

  • Red Hat’s Women in Open Source Award Winners, 2017

    Red Hat is a company that does many things right, including promoting women in tech. Learn about the two winners of this year’s Women in Open Source Award, announced at the Red Hat Summit conference in Boston last week.

  • Java modularity specification opposed by Red Hat, IBM is voted down

    A Java modularity specification failed to pass in a vote by Java executive committee members, leaving the future of the technology in question. The issue could hold up the planned July 27 release of Java 9, which is slated to include modularity.

    Balloting on Java Specification Request 376 was completed on Monday. The modular plan for Java, intended to make it easier to scale the platform, has been opposed by companies, including Red Hat and IBM. Red Hat, in particular, questioned many parts of the plan, including raising issues about potential application compatibility problems.

  • Java 9 faces another delay, Oracle fires back at IBM and Red Hat

    Oracle’s chief Java architect has criticised Red Hat and IBM for the companies opposition to make Java 9 modular.

    The Java Platform Module System (JPMS) a core component of Project Jigsaw, the most likely candidate for modularity in Java 9, has received opposition from both IBM and Red Hat.

    IBM have hinted that they may vote against the changes whilst Red Hat initially agreed to the coming changes. Since then Oracle Chief Java Architect Mike Reinhold has come out and said that Red Hat worked consistently to undermine any coming changes.

  • Red Hat (RHT) PT Raised to $96 at Oppenheimer Following Summit

Will Anything Make Linux Obsolete?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Remember blogging? Hell, remember magazine publishing? Shouldn't be hard. You're reading some now.

Both are still around, but they're obsolete—at least relatively. Two cases in point: my blog and Linux Journal.

Back when blogging was a thing, in the early 2000s, about 20,000 people subscribed to RSS feeds of my original blog (1999–2007, still mothballed here). At its peak, I posted many times per day and had a strong sense of connection with my readership.

Same went, by the way, for my postings in Linux Journal, on our website and on one of our own blogs, called IT Garage—lots of readers, lots of engagement.

Most early bloggers were journalists by profession or avocation—good writers, basically. Some blogs turned into online pubs. BoingBoing, TechCrunch and TPM all started as blogs.

But blogging began to wane after Twitter and Facebook showed up in 2006. After that journalism also waned, as "content generation" became the way to fill online publications. Participating in "social media" also became a requisite function for journalists still hoping to stay active online (if not also employed)

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • 4 Best Practices for Web Browser Security on Your Linux Workstation

    There is no question that the web browser will be the piece of software with the largest and the most exposed attack surface on your Linux workstation. It is a tool written specifically to download and execute untrusted, frequently hostile code.

    It attempts to shield you from this danger by employing multiple mechanisms such as sandboxes and code sanitization, but they have all been previously defeated on multiple occasions. System administrators should learn to approach browsing websites as the most insecure activity you’ll engage in on any given day.

  • 'Crazy bad' bug in Microsoft's Windows malware scanner can be used to install malware

    Miscreants can turn the tables on Microsoft and use its own antivirus engine against Windows users – by abusing it to install malware on vulnerable machines.

    A particularly nasty security flaw exists in Redmond's anti-malware software, which is packaged and marketed in various forms: Windows Defender, Windows Intune Endpoint Protection, Microsoft Security Essentials, Microsoft System Center Endpoint Protection, Microsoft Forefront Security for SharePoint, Microsoft Endpoint Protection, and Microsoft Forefront Endpoint Protection. All are, at this moment, at risk. It is switched on by default in Windows 8, 8.1, 10, and Windows Server 2012.

    It is possible for hackers to craft files that are booby-trapped with malicious code, and this nasty payload is executed inadvertently and automatically by the scanner while inspecting the data. The injected code runs with administrative privileges, allowing it to gain full control of the system, install spyware, steal files, and so on.

    In other words, while Microsoft's scanner is searching a downloaded file for malware, it can be tricked into running and installing the very sort of software nasty it's supposed to catch and kill.

  • [Microsoft Employee:] Why your security appliance will be hacked

    I’m no world-class hacker/penetration tester, but I’ve been able to break into any organization I’ve been (legally) hired to do so in an hour or less, except for one place that took me three hours. That was on my second engagement with the customer after it had implemented many of the protections I had recommended during my first visit.

  • How the Macron campaign slowed cyberattackers
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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Nextcloud 12 Officially Released, Adds New Architecture for Massive Scalability
    Nextcloud informs Softpedia today about the official availability of the final release of Nextcloud 12, a major milestone of the self-hosting cloud server technology that introduces numerous new features and improvements. The biggest new feature of the Nextcloud 12 release appears to be the introduction of a new architecture for massive scalability, called Global Scale, which is a next-generation open-source technology for syncing and sharing files. Global Scale increases scalability from tens of thousands of users to hundreds of millions on a single instance, while helping universities and other institutions significantly reduce the costs of their existing large installations.
  • ReactOS 0.4.5 Open-Source Windows-Compatible OS Launches with Many Improvements
    ReactOS 0.4.5 is a maintenance update that adds numerous changes and improvements over the previous point release. The kernel has been updated in this version to improve the FreeLoader and UEFI booting, as well as the Plug and Play modules, adding support for more computers to boot ReactOS without issues.
  • Sprint Debuts Open Source NFV/SDN Platform Developed with Intel Labs
    AT&T has been the headliner in the carrier race to software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). But Sprint is putting its own stamp on the space this week with its debut of a new open source SDN/NFV mobile core solution.
  • Google’s New Home for All Things Open Source Runs Deep
    Google is not only one of the biggest contributors to the open source community but also has a strong track record of delivering open source tools and platforms that give birth to robust technology ecosystems. Just witness the momentum that Android and Kubernetes now have. Recently, Google launched a new home for its open source projects, processes, and initiatives. The site runs deep and has several avenues worth investigating. Here is a tour and some highlights worth noting.
  • Making your first open source contribution
  • Simplify expense reports with Smart Receipts
    The app is called Smart Receipts, it's licensed AGPL 3.0, and the source code is available on GitHub for Android and iOS.
  • How the TensorFlow team handles open source support
    Open-sourcing is more than throwing code over the wall and hoping somebody uses it. I knew this in theory, but being part of the TensorFlow team at Google has opened my eyes to how many different elements you need to build a community around a piece of software.
  • IRC for the 21st Century: Introducing Riot
    Internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC's best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There are also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC.

Tizen News: Phones and TVs

  • Tizen 3.0-powered Samsung Z4 now available with offline retailers in india
    The Samsung Z4, the fourth smartphone in Samsung’s Z series and a successor to the Z2 (and not the Z3, as many would assume), has been formally announced and made an appearance at the Tizen Developer Conference (TDC 2017) this past week. The Z4 was rumoured to make its way to India on May 19th (Friday) and it did – arriving with offline retailers after launching in the country last Monday (one week ago).
  • Samsung 2017 QLED TVs World First to support autocalibration for HDR
  • Samsung approves You.i TV video platform for Tizen TV app development
    While Samsung has developed Tizen TV apps using JavaScript, You.i TV’s Engine Video app runs on Native Client (NACL), a web technology that does not only allows C++ applications to run in a standard browser but is said to be 24 times faster than JavaScript. Now that Samsung has approved You.i TV’s video engine platform, developers can craft more video content for Tizen Smart TV owners.
  • Samsung Smart TV gets a new Glympse app that enables location sharing on the TV
    Samsung Smart TV, powered by the intuitive, self-developed Tizen operating system, has gotten a cool new app which enables consumers to view the location of their friends, loved ones or even a pizza delivery or cable technician in real-time directly from their home’s largest screen. The new app is developed by Glympse, the leading real-time location services platform.

How To Encrypt DNS Traffic In Linux Using DNSCrypt

​Dnscrypt is a protocol that is used to improve DNS security by authenticating communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. DNSCrypt prevents DNS spoofing. It uses cryptographic signatures to verify that responses originate from the chosen DNS resolver and haven’t been tampered with. DNSCrypt is available for multi-platforms including Windows, MacOS, Unix, Android, iOS, Linux and even routers. Read
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Debian-Based Untangle 13.0 Linux Firewall Tackles Bufferbloat, Adds New Features

Untangle NG Firewall, the open-source and powerful Debian-based network security platform featuring pluggable modules for network apps, has been updated to version 13.0, a major release adding new features and numerous improvements. The biggest improvement brought by the Untangle NG Firewall 13.0 release is to the poor latency generated by excess buffering in networking equipment, called bufferbloat, by supporting a queueing algorithm designed to optimize QoS and bandwidth to enforce a controlled delay. Read more