Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 27 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story How To Setup Linux Web Server And Host Website On Your Own Computer [Part - 2] Mohd Sohail 24/07/2016 - 9:09am
Story 15 top Android smartphones we reviewed recently Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 4:57am
Story Ubuntu tablet and smartphone: a personal "mini" review Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 1:41am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 12:03am
Story Phoronix on Graphics Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 12:03am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 12:03am
Story Emulation or WINE Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 12:01am
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 12:00am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 23/07/2016 - 11:59pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/07/2016 - 11:57pm

libinput is done

Filed under
Red Hat

Don't panic. Of course it isn't. Stop typing that angry letter to the editor and read on. I just picked that title because it's clickbait and these days that's all that matters, right?

With the release of libinput 1.4 and the newest feature to add tablet pad mode switching, we've now finished the TODO list we had when libinput was first conceived. Let's see what we have in libinput right now.

Read more

$5 Linux-equipped Omega2 IoT module launches on Kickstarter

Filed under
Linux

Onion launched an “Omega2” module on Kickstarter, featuring a faster CPU, options for double the RAM and flash, and lower pricing than last year’s Omega.

Last year, Onion launched an extremely successful Kickstarter campaign for the original Omega module, with packages starting at $25. That campaign won $267,851 from 4,459 backers. Today, the company returned to the Kickstarter well seeking support for a version 2 follow-on to the Omega, appropriately dubbed Omega2. The new project has already reached more than 90 percent of its $15,000 funding goal — a modest feat, in light of the quarter of a million dollars last year’s project earned.

Read more

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora's answer to Snap Packages only begs more questions

    The universal package is the future of Linux and both Canonical and Red Hat have their own take. Which is the better solution? Or should there be a third?

  • Korora 24 (Sheldon) is Now Available

    The Korora Project has released version 24 (codename "Sheldon") which is now available for download.

  • 2016 July Elections: Interviews

    The 2016 July cycle of Elections is in full swing. Voting officially began on Tuesday, July 19, and ends Monday, July 25th at 23:59 UTC. Voting takes place on the Voting application website. As part of the Elections coverage on the Community Blog, most of the candidates running for seats published their interviews and established their platforms here. Are you getting ready to vote and looking for this information? You can find the full list of candidates and links to their interviews below.

Four Alternatives to Raspbian and Ubuntu MATE

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

It seems like every article one reads about the Raspberry Pi always makes a reference to Raspbian. If not, then the writer will probably write about how wonderful Ubuntu MATE is on the Raspberry Pi. Which begs the question: Are there any other OS options for the Raspberry Pi? While there’s nothing wrong with either distro, we should remember that the main appeal of using Linux is the freedom and amount of choice that is offered to the user. With that being said, here are four other distros that offer a great user experience on the Raspberry Pi.

Read more

Korora 24 & OpenMandriva 3.0 RC1 Released, Dell XPS 13

Filed under
-s

Jim Dean today announced the release of Fedora-based Korora 24, following just one day after their EOL announcement for version 22. Kate Lebedeff announced the release of OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 RC1 today with Linux 4.6.4, Xorg 1.18.3, and KDE 5.6.5. Two reviews of the 2016 Dell XPS 13 landed today praising the newest Ubuntu laptop and Sandra Henry-Stocker continued celebrating Linux' 25th birthday with a fairly tough quiz.

Read more

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Cosimo in BJGUG

    Last Month Cosimo came Beijing, and we had a meet up with Beijing GNOME User Group and Beijing Linux User Group in SUSE Office, Cosimo introduced ‘Looking ahead to GNOME 3.22 and beyond’, the flatpak bring lots of attention. Here I just shared some photos. Thanks for Cosimo’s coming!

  • GUADEC Flatpak contest
  • Automatic decompression of archives

    With extraction support in Nautilus, the next feature that I’ve implemented as part of my project is automatic decompression. While the name is a bit fancy, this feature is just about extracting archives instead of opening them in an archive manager. From the UI perspective, this only means a little change in the context menu:

  • Nautilus Is Adding Native Archive Extraction

    Nautilus, the GNOME file manager, is to improve support for extracting zips, tars and other compressed archives.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Ubuntu forum breach traced to neglected plugin
  • Canonical warns users after Ubuntu forum data breach
  • Flaw in vBulletin add-on leads to Ubuntu Forums database breach
  • CrypTech — Internet Engineers’ New Open Source Weapon Against ‘Creepy’ Governments

    The CrypTech project is an independent security hardware development effort that consists of an international team. CrypTech Alpha is an open source crypto-vault that stores the private/public keys and separates the digital certificates from the software using them. It has been developed as a hardware secure module (HSM) to make the implementation of strong cryptography easier.

  • Entrepreneur in £10m swoop for hacking team

    One of the northwest’s best-known entrepreneurs has splashed out about £10m on a cyber-security venture that helps businesses repel hackers.

    Lawrence Jones, who runs the Manchester-based internet hosting and cloud computing specialist UKFast, has bought Pentest, an “ethical hacking” firm whose staff help detect flaws in clients’ cyber-defences.

    Jones, 47, will merge Pentest’s 45 staff into his own cyber-security outfit, Secarma. “It’s become obvious that there is a massive need to put emphasis on cyber-security,” said the internet tycoon, whose wealth is calculated by The Sunday Times Rich List as £275m.

  • Guilt by ASN: Compiler's bad memory bug could sting mobes, cell towers

    A vulnerability in a widely used ASN.1 compiler isn't a good thing: it means a bunch of downstream systems – including mobile phones and cell towers – will inherit the bug.

    And an ASN.1 bug is what the Sadosky Foundation in Argentina has turned up, in Objective Systems' software.

    The research group's Lucas Molas says Objective's ASN1C compiler for C/C++ version 7.0.0 (other builds are probably affected) generates code that suffers from heap memory corruption. This could be potentially exploited to run malware on machines and devices that run the vulnerable compiler output or interfere with their operation.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • What is DevOps? Gareth Rushgrove Explains

    Gareth Rushgrove is known by many people as the creator and editor of the popular DevOps Weekly email newsletter, and he spent several years working for the U.K. Government Digital Service (GDS) on GOV.UK and other projects. As Senior Software Engineer at Puppet, you can find him building some of the latest infrastructure automation products when he isn't speaking at events on a wide variety of DevOps and related topics.

  • Coffee Shop DevOps: Clearly defining and communicating team goals

    Last month I interviewed the Cockpit team about team practices. We had an interesting conversation from many different angles, but most notable were the themes we kept returning to: understanding goals, the importance of feedback loops, and committing to open and transparent communication. I found I could easily correlate each of these back to other teams I have worked with in the past. When you inspect the behaviors and inner workings of a team, these themes seem to be remarkably central to team conflict.

  • Google's Magenta Seeks to Leverage TensorFlow for Art and Music

    As we've noted, artificial intelligence and machine learning are going through aamini-renaissance right now. Google recently made a possibly hugely influential contribution to the field of machine learning. It has open sourced a program called TensorFlow that is freely available. It’s based on the same internal toolset that Google has spent years developing to support its AI software and other predictive and analytics programs.

    In a related open project from the Google Brain team, dubbed Magenta, Google is calling for efforts to leverage TensorFlow and machine learning to create compelling art and music. Some of the early examples from this effort are eye-opening.

  • Nintendo NX Spec Rumors Say The Console's Games May Support Open-Source Virtual Reality

    Nintendo NX spec rumors keep coming, and the latest chatter suggests that the console may support open-source virtual reality for certain games. This would allow the 2017 machine to compete with the likes of Oculus Rift and PlayStation VR.

    The news comes to Design & Trend via Chinatimes as referenced by the sometimes-accurate Digitimes. The report should be taken with a grain of salt, but it's certainly interesting.

    As indicated by the secondary source, Nintendo allegedly has a production partnership with a certain chipmaker called Pixart. While the outfit is most known for its heart-rate monitoring hardware, mentions are also made to "tape-out chips supporting VR technology by the end of 2016." These chips "will support next-generation Nintendo NX game machines."

  • Apache Hadoop at 10 - Doug Cutting, Chief Architect, Cloudera
  • Report Shows Hadoop Growing at 53.7% CAGR, But Complexity Remains an Issue

    The latest in a string of market research reports has arrived forecasting huge growth for big data analytics platform Hadoop, but not everyone agrees that Hadoop adoption is going so smoothly. According to researchers at Stratistics MRC, the global hadoop market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 53.7% over the forecast period 2015 to 2022. " Increasing investments in data management, rising amount of structured and unstructured data, hasty growth in consumer data and rapidly increasing demand for big data analytics are the factors influencing the market growth," the study's authors report.

    Here are some of the details, and some of the warning signs coming in pointing to too much complexity required in deploying Hadoop.

  • 5 Stages of Cloud Adoption

The Importance of Following Community-Oriented Principles in GPL Enforcement Work

Filed under
GNU
Legal

The GNU General Public License (GPL) was designed to grant clear permissions for sharing software and to defend that freedom for users. GPL'd code now appears in so many devices that it is fundamental to modern technology. While we believe that following the GPL's requirements is neither burdensome nor unreasonable, many fail to do so. GPL enforcement — the process to encourage those who fail to correct problems and join our open software development community — is difficult diplomacy.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

How To Upgrade to Linux Mint 18

Filed under
Linux

Clement Lefebvre and the Linux Mint Development Team promised to come up with an in-place upgrade solution for those who are currently running Linux Mint 17.3 “Rosa.” Well, it is here and it does seem to work quite well. In this article and video, we’ll talk a bit about the pros and cons of in-place upgrades. You’ll also get to see the upgrade in action from beginning to end.

Coin-sized COM could be world’s smallest Raspberry Pi clone

Filed under
Linux

ArduCam unveiled a 24 x 24mm module with the ARM11-based core of the original Raspberry Pi, available with 36 x 36mm carriers with one or two camera links.

The promised second-generation version of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module featuring the same quad-core, 64-bit Broadcom BCM2837 SoC as the Raspberry Pi 3 will be out within a few months, according to a recent PC World interview with Raspberry Pi Foundation CEO Eben Upton. Meanwhile, if you’re looking for a smaller computer-on-module version of the Raspberry Pi and are willing to settle for the old ARM11 foundation available on the current Raspberry Pi Compute Module, ArduCam could have you covered sooner.

Read more

Fedora-based Korora 24 'Sheldon' Linux distro now available -- 32-bit ISO dead

Filed under
Red Hat

While there are many Linux-based operating systems to choose from nowadays, not all of them are great. Quite frankly, there are probably only a handful of distributions that I would truly recommend.

My absolute favorite Linux-based operating system is Fedora, but understandably, it is not ideal for all beginners. While I like the focus on free software only, some folks need some non-free stuff. Adding repos and setting up some of this software can be tricky for some. Luckily, Korora is a distro that takes the work out of setting up Fedora for beginners. Today, it achieves version 24, code-named 'Sheldon'.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Canonical Joins The Document Foundation's LibreOffice Project Advisory Board

Today, July 26, 2016, Canonical and The Document Foundation (TDF) announced that the company behind the popular Ubuntu operating system had joined the LibreOffice project Advisory Board. If you're using the Ubuntu Linux OS on your personal computer, you are aware of the fact that the award-winning LibreOffice office suite is installed by default. Canonical chose to use LibreOffice as the default office suite for its widely-used GNU/Linux operating system since the first release of the open-source software in early 2011. Now that Canonical announced the availability of Snaps as universal binary packages for Ubuntu and other supported GNU/Linux distributions, many application developers decided to offer their software in the Snap package format, and it looks like The Document Foundation is among the first to adopt the latest Snappy technologies for LibreOffice. Read more

Linux Filesystems Explained — EXT2/3/4, XFS, Btrfs, ZFS

The first time I installed Ubuntu on my computer, when I was sixteen, I was astonished by the number of filesystems that were available for the system installation. There were so many that I was left overwhelmed and confused. I was worried that if I picked the wrong one my system might run too slow or that it might be more problematic than another. I wanted to know which was the best. Since then, things have changed quite a bit. Many Linux distributions offer a ‘standard’ filesystem that an installation will default to unless otherwise specified. I think this was a very good move because it assists newcomers in making a decision and being comfortable with it. But, for those that are still unsure of some of the contemporary offerings, we’ll be going through them today. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE Plasma 5.7.2 Introduces Lots of Plasma Workspace Improvements, KWin Fixes

KDE released the second maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment series, which has already been adopted by several popular GNU/Linux operating systems. Read more