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Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Foundation and Verizon Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 2:01am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2018 - 8:52pm
Story KDE Plasma's Discover Package Manager Gets Better Snap and Flatpak Support Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2018 - 8:48pm
Story KWin/X11 is feature frozen Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2018 - 8:42pm
Story Plasma 5.12 LTS beta available in PPA for testing on Artful & Bionic Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2018 - 8:38pm
Story Leftovers: Proprietary Software, HowTos, and GXml Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2018 - 5:20pm
Story Debian Developers: Google Summer of Code, Quick Recap of 2017 Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2018 - 5:18pm
Story Devices: Raspberry Pi and Android Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2018 - 5:17pm
Story Command Line Heroes Launched Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2018 - 5:16pm
Story NethServer, Red Hat, and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2018 - 5:12pm

7 Open-Source Serverless Frameworks Providing Functions as a Service

Filed under
OSS

With virtualization, organizations began to realize greater utilization from physical hardware. That trend continued with the cloud, as organization began to get their virtual machines in a pay-as-you-go service.

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Raspberry Pi Zero WH SBCs Are Now Available with Professionally Soldered Headers

Filed under
Linux

Meet Raspberry Pi Zero WH, the third Raspberry Pi Zero model, which offers the same features as Raspberry Pi Zero W and a professionally soldered header that might come in handy for those who don't know how to solder their own header on a Raspberry Pi Zero W board, and it's also perfect for those tiny projects of yours.

"Imagine a Raspberry Pi Zero W. Now add a professionally soldered header. Boom, that’s the Raspberry Pi Zero WH," says Alex Bate. "It’s your same great-tasting Pi, with a brand-new…crust? It’s perfect for everyone who doesn’t own a soldering iron or who wants the soldering legwork done for them."

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Linux Phones That Could Not Survive

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Though it hasn’t been sunny for Linux on smartphones. There are some interesting things to look forward to. The Librem 5 Linux phone has been creating a lot of buzz and is expected to hit the floors this year. One major reason for a Pure Linux phone not being successful could be that they haven’t been made available to the world. Most of the times they are sold only in certain regions and with lower end configuration.

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Top 3 Linux Distributions That ‘Just Work’

Filed under
Linux

Twenty years ago, when I first started using Linux, finding a distribution that worked, out of the box, was an impossible feat. Not only did the installation take some serious mental acuity, configuring the software and getting connected to the Internet was often a challenge users were reluctant to attempt.

Today, things are quite different. Linux now offers distributions that anyone can use, right out of the box. But, even among those distros that “just work,” some rise to the top to stand as the best in breed. These particular flavors of Linux are perfect for users hoping to migrate away from Windows or mac OS and who don’t want to spend hours getting up to speed on how the platform works, or (more importantly) making the system perform as expected.

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Raspberry Pi: Hands-On with the Pi Server tool

Filed under
Linux
Server

When the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced Raspbian (Debian) Stretch for x86 and Macs, there was a very brief mention of something called PiServer to manage multiple Pi clients on a network, with a promise to cover it in more detail later.

Well, 'later' has now arrived, in the form of a new Raspberry Pi Blog post titled The Raspberry Pi PiServer Tool. In simple terms, the PiServer package allows you to manage multiple Raspberry Pi clients from a single PC or Mac server. Here are the key points:

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Remove GUEST Session From Ubuntu Login Screen

Filed under
Linux

A guest session on Ubuntu allows having a temporary user account and access the Ubuntu machine. The desktop of a guest session looks like it does when a regular user logs in. Behind the scenes, Ubuntu controls the access privileges for a guest session.

Read<br />
more

KDE: Nextcloud Talk, Krita (4.0 Beta and 3.3.3) and More

Filed under
KDE
  • Meet Nextcloud Talk, World's First Self-Hosted, Encrypted Communication Platform

    Nextcloud informs Softpedia today on the general availability of Nextcloud Talk, world's first self-hosted, enterprise-ready, and end-to-end encrypted audio/video and chat communication platform.

    Meet Nextcloud Talk, the first enterprise-ready, open-source, and end-to-end encrypted, and privacy-focused self-hosted communication technology that promises to give users full control over their data while chatting with others over the communication platform.

    Developed by Nextcloud, the biggest self-hosted and fully open source enterprise file sync and share platform, Nextcloud Talk features text chat and audio/video conferencing support, and it can be hosted on-premise, accessible from the Internet through a web browser and on your mobile device.

  • This week in Usability and Productivity

    These improvements were landed by KDE Developers Kai Uwe Broulik, Albert Astals Cid, Aleix Pol, Michael Heidelbach, and myself. And that’s not all; the entire KDE community has been busy landing many more bugfixes and features too–more than I can keep track of!

    I want to especially focus on the last Discover change I mentioned above. After my last post about Discover, we got a lot of user feedback that people wanted greater density and to be able to see more apps at once.

  • Krita 4.0 Open-Source Digital Painting Tool Enters Beta, Here's What to Expect

    The developers of the Krita open-source and cross-platform digital painting software have released today the first beta version of the upcoming Krita 4.0 major release.

    Krita 4.0 will be the biggest update since version 3.0, and today's first beta release gives users early access to many of its awesome new features and improvements. Right now, Krita 4.0 is in String Freeze development stage, which means that most of the major new features are already implemented.

    "We’ve officially gone into String Freeze mode now! That’s developer speak for "No New Features, Honest." Everything that’s going into Krita 4.0 now is in, and the only thing left to do is fixing bugs and refining stuff," reads today's announcement.

  • New Stable Release: Krita 3.3.3

    Today we’re releasing Krita 3.3.3. This will probably be the last stable release in the Krita 3 series.

Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Respin ISOs Are Now Available to Download

Filed under
Ubuntu

Several users reported last month broken BIOSes on their Lenovo, Acer, and Toshiba laptops due to a bug in the Ubuntu 17.10 installation images that won't allow them to access their BIOS settings. The BIOS could be bricked even if the user ran the Ubuntu 17.10 image in live mode, without installing the OS.

Canonical was quick to temporarily disable access to Ubuntu 17.10 downloads from their ubuntu.com website warning people about the issue. A workaround and a fix for existing users were available shortly after that, as they had to update the kernel packages in Ubuntu 17.10 to disable the intel-spi driver at boot time.

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Top 5 Firefox extensions to install now

Filed under
Moz/FF

The web browser has become a critical component of the computing experience for many users. Modern browsers have evolved into powerful and extensible platforms. As part of this, extensions can add or modify their functionality. Extensions for Firefox are built using the WebExtensions API, a cross-browser development system.

Which extensions should you install? Generally, that decision comes down to how you use your browser, your views on privacy, how much you trust extension developers, and other personal preferences.

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Meltdown Patches and Problems

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu
  • [Ubuntu] Meltdown and Spectre Status Update

    On Tuesday, January 9, 2018 we released Ubuntu kernel updates for mitigation of CVE-2017-5754 (aka Meltdown / Variant 3) for the x86-64 architecture.

  • Lubuntu 17.10.1 (Artful Aardvark) released!

    Lubuntu 17.10.1 has been released to fix a major problem affecting many Lenovo laptops that causes the computer to have BIOS problems after installing. You can find more details about this problem here.

    Please note that the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities have not been fixed in this ISO, so we advise that if you install this ISO, update directly after.

    This release is no different in terms of features from the 17.10 release, and is comparable to an LTS point release in that all updates since the 17.10 release have been rolled into this ISO. You can find the initial announcement here.

  • Check Linux for Spectre or Meltdown vulnerability

    Devices running Linux are affected by Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities as much as their Windows counterparts.

    Development teams work on updated kernels for the various distributions, and users need to update browsers and other software to protect data against potential attacks.

    We talked about identifying whether your Windows PC or web browser is vulnerable already. A recently published script does the same for Linux systems. You may use it to check whether your Linux distribution is vulnerable.

  • Meltdown Patch Is Causing Problems for Some Ubuntu Linux Users

    Many Ubuntu Linux users who installed the latest kernel updates to fix the Meltdown CPU vulnerability found themselves stuck in a boot loop and had to revert back to a previous version.

    The problem affected mostly Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus), which is a long-term support (LTS) release. Soon after the 4.4.0-108 kernel update was released to fix the Meltdown vulnerability, users flooded the Ubuntu Forums and bug tracker to report booting problems.

  • Meltdown Update Kernel doesnt boot
  • Major Linux distros have Meltdown patches, but that's only part of the fix

    The Intel Meltdown security problem is the pain that just keeps hurting. Still, there is some good news. Ubuntu and Debian Linux have patched their distributions. The bad news? It's becoming clearer than ever that fixing Meltdown causes significant performance problems. Worst still, many older servers and appliances are running insecure, unpatchable Linux distributions.

Linspire 8.0 and Freespire 4.0 Slated for Release in mid-December 2018

Filed under
OS
Linux

If you think the release of Linspire 7.0 and Freespire 3.0 were just a one-off, think again because we're now in possession of the release roadmap for both operating systems, and it looks like we should be able to get our hands on the next major releases at the end of the year. But, in the meanwhile, we'll be able to test a lot of the beta versions for both Freespire 4.0 and Linspire 8.0, as well as to enjoy new incremental versions of current releases.

"Today we are releasing the release schedule and roadmap for Linspire and Freespire. These dates are not set in stone and there may be some alterations due to holidays and development mishaps. While the Freespire beta's will be available publicly the Linspire beta's will be available to subscription holders and insiders," says Roberto J. Dohnert in today's announcement.

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KDE Applications 17.12 Open Source Software Suite Gets First Point Release

KDE Applications 17.12 is the latest and most advanced version of the open source software suite used in KDE Plasma desktop environments or independently. It was released last month on December 14 with numerous improvements and new features, including HiDPI support for Okular and Dolphin enhancements.

Now, the KDE Applications 17.12.1 minor bugfix release is out and brings more than 20 improvements to various of the included applications like Ark, Akonadi, Dolphin, Filelight, Gwenview, KGet, K3b, Kate, Kdenlive, Kleopatra, KMix, KMahjongg, Kontact, Okteta, Okular, and Umbrello.

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Also: KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.12.1

Tiny solderable quad Cortex-A17 module has 4GB RAM and HDMI 2.0

Filed under
Android
Linux

Sudo’s solderable, 65 x 40mm “SudoProc” module features a 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A17 SoC with 4GB LPDDR3, up to 512GB eMMC, a GbE controller, HDMI 2.0, and -25 to 85°C support.

Slovenia-based startup Sudo Sistemi reached out to us with news of an upcoming SudoProc computer-on-module touted for being solderable and compact (65 x 40 x 4.3mm). Sudo has yet to get back to our request for confirmation that the module’s 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A17 SoC is a Rockchip RK3288, although we can’t imagine what else it might be.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Look Munich, City of Barcelona Is Dumping Windows and Switches to Ubuntu Linux

    While the City of Munich is switching back to Windows after running Linux on their public PCs, a move that will cost them over €100 million euros, the City of Barcelona is making the smart choice of dumping Microsoft's products and switch to Linux and Open Source.

    First spotted by It's FOSS, this fantastic news was reported by Spanish newspaper El País, stating that the City of Barcelona is currently in talks of migrating all of their public computer systems to Open Source software products like LibreOffice and Open-Xchange, replacing Microsoft's expensive products.

  • Clipboard Anywhere – A Multi-Platform Lightweight Clipboard App

    Clipboard Anywhere is a free, lightweight, and cloud-enabled clipboard application with which you can copy to and paste from its clipboard universally synced across all connected devices.

    It is important to remember that Clipboard Anywhere is NOT a clipboard manager app but simply a clipboard app via which you can have texts and images that you copy on your desktop available on your mobile devices and vice versa.

  • Storaji – A Free, Modern Lightweight Inventory Management System

    Storaji is a free, Electron-powered, open-source and lightweight Inventory Management System. Its development is aimed at Middle-Low Companies who might not be able to afford the license for similar applications to manage their stock.

  • How to Install Snipe-IT Asset Management Software on Debian 9
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  • Introducing a Full Self-hosted Audio/video and Chat Communication Platform: Nextcloud Talk

    We’re very proud to announce today Nextcloud Talk, the first enterprise-ready, self-hosted communication technology giving users the highest degree of control over their data and communication. Nextcloud Talk is a fully open source video meeting software, on-premise hosted and end-to-end encrypted. It features a text chat and is available for web and mobile. In related news, Nextcloud has become the vendor with the greatest momentum in the self-hosted Enterprise File Sync and Share market and increased its customer base by 7 times in 2017. And over 500 individuals contributed more than 6.6 million lines of code to Nextcloud last year!

  • Nextcloud Talk is an Open Source Alternative to Google Hangouts

    Nextcloud has launched a self-hosted open source alternative to Google Hangouts, Skype, and similar chat services.

    Called ‘Nextcloud Talk’, the feature brings audio, video and messaging features based on WebRTC to the personal cloud server software, which was forked from OwnCloud back in 2016.

  • Nextcloud Rolls Out Audio/Video/Chat Support

    The Nextcloud cloud hosting software forked from ownCloud now has audio/video/chat abilities.

  • Krita Digital Painting Program Hits The 4.0 Beta Milestone

    The KDE/Qt-aligned Krita digital painting program has released its first beta release of the major 4.0 update that also marks its string freeze. Now marks the period of bug fixing before shipping Krita 4.0 within a few months.

  • Fedora 28 Looking To Replace Glibc's libcrypt With libxcrypt

    As upstream Glibc is working on deprecating libcrypt for its eventual removal from the codebase, Fedora developers are looking at using libxcrypt for their hashing/encoding crypto library.

    Some Fedora / Red Hat developers have been working on libxcrypt as the distribution's potential replacement to libcrypt. Libxcrypt is inspired in part by Openwall Linux, supports most all password hashing algorithms, offers a faster development cycle, and makes adding new hashing algorithms easy.

  • Sleep Fast, Sleep Hard with the Pzizz Android App
  • Five Ways to Free Up Space on Your Android Device
  • New Python3, LibreOffice, Google RE2 Packages Released in Tumbleweed

    Several openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots arrive before and after the new year and this post will focus on the most recent snapshots released this week.

    Much of the efforts of developers this week have focused on patching the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. openSUSE’s rolling distribution produced four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots so far this week.

    While the Long-Term Support 4.4 Linux Kernel has patched many of the vulnerabilities associated with Meltdown and Spectre, the 4.14.12 Linux Kernel released in snapshot 20180107  hasn’t, but Tumbleweed users will likely see the vulnerabilities patched soon.

  • openSUSE Conference Registration, Call For Papers Opens Today

    openSUSE is pleased to announce that registration and the call for papers for the openSUSE Conference 2018 (oSC18), which takes place in Prague, Czech Republic, are open.

    The dates for this year’s conference will be May 25 through May 27 at Faculty of Information Technologies of Czech Technical University in Prague. Submission for the call for papers will be open until April 20. There are 99 day from today to submit a proposal, but don’t wait until the late minute. Registration will be open from today until the day oSC18 begins; make sure to answer the survey question regarding the T-Shirt size.

Red Hat on Microservices and Security

Filed under
Red Hat
Security
  • The State of Microservices

    During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat JBoss Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. From this, we were able to discover how these customers are using microservices to their advantage, what they see as some of the major benefits, what challenges exist and how to overcome them and how microservices can give respondents a competitive advantage. While these statistics are based off of a specific group of Red Hat customers, these findings give a good sense of the overall attitude toward microservices adoption and implementation. Read on to learn more about these findings.

  • What OpenShift Online and Dedicated customers should know about Meltdown and Spectre

    This past week, the technology world became aware of three significant security threats that could be used to allow cybercriminals to steal valuable data from an affected computer system. Together, these three bugs are commonly known as “Spectre” and “Meltdown” – a technical discussion of these vulnerabilities can be found here, and a non-technical explanation of the key facts is here.

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Intel Releases Linux CPU Microcodes for Processors Going Back Two Decades

OSS and Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
OSS
  • Telecommunications Infrastructure Project looks to apply open source technologies

    The Telecommunications Infrastructure Project is looking to apply open source technologies to next generation fixed and mobile networks.

    The Telecom Infra Project (TIP), conceived by Facebook to light a fire under the traditional telecommunications infrastructure market, continues to expand into new areas.

    Launched at the 2016 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, the highly disruptive project takes an open ecosystem approach to foster network innovation and improve the cost efficiencies of both equipment suppliers and network operators.“We know from our experience with the Open Compute Project that the best way to accelerate the pace of innovation is for companies to collaborate and work in the open. We helped to found TIP with the same goal - bringing different parties together and strengthen and improve efficiencies in the telecom industry,” according to Aaron Bernstein, Director of Connectivity Ecosystem Programmmes at Facebook.

  • Introducing Ad Inspector: Our open-source ad inspection tool
  • AI and machine learning bias has dangerous implications

    Algorithms are everywhere in our world, and so is bias. From social media news feeds to streaming service recommendations to online shopping, computer algorithms—specifically, machine learning algorithms—have permeated our day-to-day world. As for bias, we need only examine the 2016 American election to understand how deeply—both implicitly and explicitly—it permeates our society as well.

    What’s often overlooked, however, is the intersection between these two: bias in computer algorithms themselves.

    Contrary to what many of us might think, technology is not objective. AI algorithms and their decision-making processes are directly shaped by those who build them—what code they write, what data they use to “train” the machine learning models, and how they stress-test the models after they’re finished. This means that the programmers’ values, biases, and human flaws are reflected in the software. If I fed an image-recognition algorithm the faces of only white researchers in my lab, for instance, it wouldn’t recognize non-white faces as human. Such a conclusion isn’t the result of a “stupid” or “unsophisticated” AI, but to a bias in training data: a lack of diverse faces. This has dangerous consequences.

  • Pineapple Fund Supports Conservancy

    Software Freedom Conservancy thanks the Pineapple Fund and its anonymous backer for its recent donation of over 18 Bitcoin (approximately $250,000). The Pineapple Fund is run by an early Bitcoin adopter to give about $86 million worth of Bitcoin to various charities. Shortly after the fund’s announcement earlier this month, volunteers and Conservancy staff members applied for its support. That application was granted this week.

  • Top Programming Languages That Largest Companies Are Hiring Developers For In 2018

    Learning a programming language involves some important decisions on the part of a professional. Gone are the days when one mastered a single popular programming language and it granted job security. Highlighting these limitations of reliance on a single programming language, Coding Dojo coding school has shared the results of an interesting study.

  • Rust in 2018

    I think 2017 was a great year for Rust. Near the beginning of the year, after custom derive and a bunch of things stabilized, I had a strong feeling that Rust was “complete”. Not really “finished”, there’s still tons of stuff to improve, but this was the first time stable Rust was the language I wanted it to be, and was something I could recommend for most kinds of work without reservations.

    I think this is a good signal to wind down the frightening pace of new features Rust has been getting. And that happened! We had the impl period, which took some time to focus on getting things done before proposing new things. And Rust is feeling more polished than ever.

Linux, Linux Foundation, and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Freedreno's MSM DRM Driver Wires In DEVFREQ Re-Clocking Support

    Freedreno open-source Qualcomm Adreno driver creator Rob Clark has sent in the set of updates for the MSM DRM driver targeting the Linux 4.16 kernel.

    The MSM Direct Rendering Manager updates for DRM-Next to go into Linux 4.16 are a bit late for the DRM staging, but these changes are mostly small. Besides some bug fixes and other minor code changes, the main feature addition for MSM in Linux 4.16 is DEVFREQ support for controlling the GPU clock frequency.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces New Linux on Azure Training Course [Ed: The Linux Foundation works for Microsoft now. Corrupted by the money. Microsoft meanwhile attacks Linux with patents.]
  • Automotive Grade Linux gets support from Toyota and Amazon as it eyes autonomous driving

    Open-source software was once something that large businesses shied away from, but over the course of the last few years, it’s made inroads into virtually every enterprise company. With Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), the Linux Foundation hosts a project that aims to bring open source to the car industry. As the AGL group announced at CES in Las Vegas today, Toyota and Amazon have now signed up to support the project, as well.

    Toyota, which is using AGL in the 2018 Camry, is joining as a platinum member, while Amazon opted for the silver level. Indeed, you may have seen another Toyota and Amazon mashup today, which is probably no coincidence.

  • R600 Gallium3D Gets More Fixes, Experimental SB Tessellation Support

    If you are still running with a pre-GCN AMD graphics card, a number of R600 Gallium3D commits landed in Mesa Git over night as well as an interesting patch series on the Mesa mailing list.

    Hitting Mesa 17.4-dev Git a few hours ago were a number of R600 Gallium3D fixes. This time around the various fixes come courtesy of VMware's Roland Scheidegger, a long time Mesa developer. They are a variety of minor fixes. It's nice to see nevertheless as R600g doesn't get too much action these days.

  • xf86-video-intel Gets Coffee Lake Support

    The xf86-video-intel DDX driver now has support for the first "Coffee Lake" processors.

  • The Current CPU Driver Usage Difference Between RADV/RadeonSI & NVIDIA

    Yesterday I posted some fresh GPU/driver benchmark results for discrete AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards. These were some of the most competitive numbers yet we've seen out of the open-source RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV drivers while using the latest Linux 4.15 kernel, especially for the GTX 1060 vs. RX 580 battle. In the comments were requests to see some CPU utilization numbers, including from one of the Radeon Linux developers, so here is a look at how the CPU usage compares.

    With having some spare cycles this morning on that Core i7 8700K "Coffee Lake" desktop, I ran a CPU usage comparison with various Linux games when using the Radeon RX 580 (on Linux 4.15 + Mesa 17.4-dev + LLVM 6.0 SVN) vs. the comparable GeForce GTX 1060 (on Linux 4.15 + NVIDIA 390.12) for showing the latest CPU utilization difference for both OpenGL and Vulkan games.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Now Supports VK_EXT_discard_rectangles

    RADV co-founder Bas Nieuwenhuizen has landed support for the Vulkan VK_EXT_discard_rectangles extension within Mesa 17.4-dev.

  • RADV Gets Another Optimization For Micro-Benchmarks

    David Airlie and Bas Nieuwenhuizen's work on the RADV open-source Vulkan driver is quite relentless. David has posted yet another patch working on further optimizing the performance of this unofficial Radeon Vulkan driver living within Mesa.

  • The NVIDIA 390 Driver Is Playing Nicely With Linux 4.15 Kernel

    For those NVIDIA Linux users reliant upon the proprietary driver and wanting to upgrade to the Linux 4.15 kernel that will be officially released within the next two weeks, the 390.12 driver is playing nicely.

    Earlier NVIDIA driver releases ran into compatibility issues with the Linux 4.15 interfaces following the merge window (not due to KPTI, as some other FUD previously passed around by others). But with last week's NVIDIA 390.12 beta it has been working fine atop the Linux 4.15 Git kernel, including when Kernel Page Table Isolation is enabled for Meltdown prevention. (Retpoline support has yet to be mainlined, haven't tested the NVIDIA driver there yet to formally confirm if any breakage may happen.)

  • AMDGPU Queues More Fixes For Linux 4.16

    AMD sent in a fair number of AMDGPU updates slated for Linux 4.16 but now hitting the cut-off for major feature updates for DRM-Next code looking to make it into 4.16, AMD has submitted some fixes.

Games: Endless Horde, ERSATZ, Spartan Fist, Stellaris: Apocalypse, Feral Interactive, Unity (Mono)

Filed under
Gaming
  • Endless Horde is a Tower Defense game about protecting your base from a Zombie invasion

    I thought Endless Horde [Steam] looked like it could be a nice Tower Defense game to kill a few minutes since it's cheap, so I took a look.

    Developed by Ominous Entertainment, the game released with Linux support in April of last year. I let it bake a little longer, but even after waiting this long it's not great.

  • ERSATZ, a fast-paced hardcore action platformer with a musical twist adds Linux support

    Can't get enough hardcore platforming? Good news for you, as the colourful and musical ERSATZ [Steam, Official Site] now supports Linux.

    Originally released for Windows back in September of last year, the Linux version arrived two days ago. The developer said it does have two small differences to the Windows build, one being the "L" key being used to dash and a "shockwave" effect when you slam-hit the ground had to be removed due to graphical issues.

  • First-person puncher roguelike 'Spartan Fist' sounds hilarious and it's coming to Linux

    Spartan Fist [Steam, Official Site], a first-person puncher roguelike from Glass Bottom Games looks fantastic and the good news is that it's heading to Linux.

    It's really great to know that Glass Bottom Games will continue to support Linux, as they previously released Jones On Fire and Hot Tin Roof: The Cat That Wore A Fedora so I was hoping they would. Spartan Fist actually features two characters from those previous games too, but you won't need to play them to enjoy this.

  • Stellaris: Apocalypse expansion announced, prepare to fire the Colossus!
  • Game Porter Feral Interactive Is Up To Around 72 Employees

    For those curious about the financial aspect of porting games to Linux and macOS, Feral Interactive has published their 2017 fiscal year results.

    Well known Linux game porting company Feral Interactive that also brings games to macOS/iOS has filed their latest financial data this week with UK's Companies House for their fiscal year ending 31 March 2017.

  • Unity 2018.1 Introducing A "Scriptable Render Pipeline"

    Unity Technologies has rolled out their first public beta for the Unity 2018.1 release. Exciting us about this game engine update is their Scriptable Render Pipeline.

    The Scriptable Render Pipeline is their new real-time rendering architecture. Scriptable Rendering Pipeline (SRP) is still being developed but is designed to exploit the potential of modern systems, particularly GPUs, and to do so in an easy and efficient manner. SRP is designed to be extensible and can be extended/customized using C# code and material shaders.

Mozilla Leftovers

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Release Management Team: Firefox Release management at FOSDEM 2018
  • Mozilla Reps Community: Reps Council at Austin

    The All Hands is a special time of the year where Mozilla employees along with core volunteers gather for a week of many meetings and brainstorming. The All Hands Wiki page has more information about the general setting. During the All Hands, the Reps Council participated in the Open Innovation meetings as well as had meetings about what 2018 planning. One of our main topics was about the Mission Driven Mozillians proposal.

  • Announcing ESR60 with policy engine

    The Firefox ESR (extended support release) is based on an official release of Firefox desktop for use by organizations including schools, universities, businesses and others who need extended support for mass deployments. Since Firefox 10, ESR has grown in popularity and many large organisations rely on it to let their employees browse the Internet securely.

    We want to make customization of Firefox deployments simpler for system administrators and we’re pleased to announce that our next ESR version, Firefox 60, will include a policy engine that increases customization possibilities and integration into existing management systems.

  • Web. Period.

    Seen from here, EPUB is a technical dead end. The ebook market just cannot absorb newer versions of EPUB any more, and I’m not sure when it will be able to absorb even light incremental changes again. EPUB books based on EPUB 3.0.1 or a light and for once backwards-compatible evolution of 3.0.1, are here to stay for a very, very long time.

  • User Style for bugzilla.mozilla.org

    Yesterday, I was talking with Kohei Yoshino (the person behind the Bugzilla Quantum effort that recently landed significant UX improvements to the header strip) about some visual issues I have on bugzilla.mozilla.org which basically boil down to our default view being a bit too noisy for my taste and not emphasizing enough on the key elements I want to glance at immediately when I visit a bug (bug Status, description, comments).

    Given that I spend a significant amount of time on Bugzilla and that I also spend some time on Github issues, I decided to see if I could improve our default theme on Bugzilla with a user style to make it easier on the eyes and also closer visually to Github, which I think is good when you use both on a daily basis.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Gaming For Older/Lower-End Graphics Cards In 2018

A request came in this week to look at how low-end and older graphics cards are performing with current generation Linux games on OpenGL and Vulkan. With ten older/lower-end NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics cards, here is a look at their performance with a variety of native Linux games atop Ubuntu using the latest Radeon and NVIDIA drivers. Read more Also: Wine 3.0 open-source compatibility layer now available

Red Hat Patch Warning

  • We Didn't Pull CPU Microcode Update to Pass the Buck
  • Red Hat Will Revert Spectre Patches After Receiving Reports of Boot Issues
    Red Hat is releasing updates that are reverting previous patches for the Spectre vulnerability (Variant 2, aka CVE-2017-5715) after customers complained that some systems were failing to boot. "Red Hat is no longer providing microcode to address Spectre, variant 2, due to instabilities introduced that are causing customer systems to not boot," the company said yesterday. "The latest microcode_ctl and linux-firmware packages are reverting these unstable microprocessor firmware changes to versions that were known to be stable and well tested, released prior to the Spectre/Meltdown embargo lift date on Jan 3rd," Red Had added.

Android Leftovers

Security: Updates, SOS Fund, IR, ME, and WPA

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Seeking SOS Fund Projects
    I’m spending some time over the next few days looking for the next round of projects which might benefit from an SOS Fund security audit.
  • Strong Incident Response Starts with Careful Preparation
    Through working every day with organizations’ incident response (IR) teams, I am confronted with the entire spectrum of operational maturity. However, even in the companies with robust IR functions, the rapidly evolving threat landscape, constantly changing best practices, and surplus of available tools make it easy to overlook important steps during planning. As a result, by the time an incident occurs, it’s too late to improve their foundational procedures.
  • The Intel Management Engine: an attack on computer users' freedom
    Over time, Intel imposed the Management Engine on all Intel computers, removed the ability for computer users and manufacturers to disable it, and extended its control over the computer to nearly 100%. It even has access to the main computer's memory.
  • What Is WPA3, and When Will I Get It On My Wi-Fi?
    WPA2 is a security standard that governs what happens when you connect to a closed Wi-Fi network using a password. WPA2 defines the protocol a router and Wi-Fi client devices use to perform the “handshake” that allows them to securely connect and how they communicate. Unlike the original WPA standard, WPA2 requires implementation of strong AES encryption that is much more difficult to crack. This encryption ensures that a Wi-Fi access point (like a router) and a Wi-Fi client (like a laptop or phone) can communicate wirelessly without their traffic being snooped on.