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Sunday, 25 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Leftovers (Snapcraft GUI 3.0, Ubuntu 16.10, and IBM) Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 2:25am
Story Phoronix Graphics News Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 2:23am
Story Hands-on with the quad-core ARM9 Roseapple Pi hacker SBC Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 2:05am
Story Apt 1.3 Released Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 1:59am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 1:56am
Story MATE 1.16 Desktop Environment Officially Released with More GTK+ 3 Improvements Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 1:49am
Story OSI Approved Licenses, a Foundation for Federal Source Code Policy Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 1:45am
Story Red Hat Financial News and Results Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 1:29am
Story Tizen-Running Samsung Gear Fit 2 price reduced on Amazon Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2016 - 6:38pm
Story A tiny Arduino Zero clone, and an Arduino for cosplayers Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2016 - 6:37pm

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Layout APIs don’t have to be terrible – lessons from Bokeh
  • Change in PHP 7 that may break some of Ubuntu servers on update

    Seems harmless. Administrators will see errors on test installation and fix old configs. But here comes one nasty trait of php-fpm: it refuses to start with incorrect php-fpm.conf, but it will start with incorrect php.ini, ignoring all settings there just rolling back to default values. Error is not written to php-fpm log. It can be spotted in console, but service start script hides that messages.

  • Open source C++ execution trace framework

    At froglogic, we’re big fans of open source software. A large part of our engineering (and management!) staff contributed or contributes to open source projects, and everyone visiting our offices for a job interview certainly gets a big +1 in case she can show off some open source work! We also use a lot of open source software for our daily work, ranging from obvious projects like Git or the Linux kernel to individual libraries serving very specific purposes; the Acknowledgements Chapter of the Squish manual gives an impression of how tall the giants are upon whose shoulders we’re standing.

    Over the last couple of years we contributed back various bug fixes and improvements to different projects we’re using, but we’d like to step things up a little bit. Hence, we now open-sourced an internally developed C++ framework called ‘TraceTool’ and made it available under the LGPL v3 license on our GitHub account:

  • Stripped and ready to go: Enterprise Java MicroProfile lands

    The project for a lightweight and modular enterprise Java suited to microservices has hit general release.

    MicroProfile 1.0 has now hit general availability, just over two months after the project was unveiled by representatives of IBM, Red Hat, Tomitribe, Payara and the London Java Community on June 27.

    A formal announcement is expected at Oracle’s annual JavaOne conference in San Francisco next week.

  • Untangling character sets and Unicode blocks

Emacs 25.1 released

Filed under
GNU

Version 25.1 of the Emacs text editor is now available.

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Libreboot Screwup and FSF

Filed under
OSS
  • Libreboot Screwup - 18 Sept 2016

    As one of the main "contributors" to the Libreboot project, I was contracted to work on two chipsets by Minifree.

    Given the recent kerfuffle, and in spite of my vested interest in wanting to continue being paid to continue this important work, I find it necessary to spell out a couple of facts I find important about the libreboot project and the libreboot community:

    1) I have recently noticed that Leah Rowe is the only person who has git commit access to the website, libreboot.org, and also the only person who has git commit access to the codebase, which has only become a problem recently.

    2) The codebase is a deblobbed coreboot repository, with patches from libreboot contributors (but committed by Leah), and a bunch of install scripts for ease of use.

    3) We (the contributors) are not consulted about any of the views expressed on the libreboot.org website when they are hastily published by Leah.

  • Free Software Foundation statement on 2016-09-16

    This morning, an open email circulated in which the author said that the Free Software Foundation ended a relationship with one of our employees for discriminatory reasons.

    Although it is our usual policy not to comment publicly on internal personnel matters for privacy reasons, we felt it necessary to state unequivocally that the allegations made in that email are untrue.

    It is part of our job to celebrate and improve the diversity of the free software world. We have strong anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies to help provide a safe and supportive working environment. We uphold a safe space policy at all FSF events, and we provide scholarships to help people of different identities, and from different regions, attend. The FSF's mission is to defend the freedom of all computer users.

  • GNU Autoconf Noteworthy changes in release 2016.09.16

New release: Semi-Automatic OS v. 5

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

I have released a new version of the Semi-Automatic OS v. 5, a free virtual machine based on Debian Linux, for the land cover classification of remote sensing images. It includes the Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin (SCP) and QGIS, already configured along with all the required dependencies (OGR, GDAL, Numpy, SciPy, and Matplotlib).

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Igor Ljubuncic Explores CentOS

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The hunt for the perfect CentOS theme

    Here we are, at the end of this article. It serve no purpose really. But it shows that CentOS can be as relevant, stylish, slick, and modern as any other distro. Which is even more amazing when you take into account its age, its relative conservatism, the fact it will be supported for another bunch of years, and that it still competes well and true with all the latest and greatest home distros, with infinitely more stability.

    Just remember this is a server distribution, and its purpose in life is to run code and make money and whatnot. It's not there to entertain your laptop, and yet it can do that pretty well. Everything you need Linux wise is there. Including some fireworks. Maybe this article serves no higher goal, but perhaps you are ever so slightly delighted and entertained. If you have any suggestions on how CentOS can be made even more elegant, please drop me a nice and friendly line. Meanwhile, I'm off to do some more CentOS testing, maybe even on the G50 box. Stay tuned.

    Oh, one more thing. We have only just begun. If you think this is the sum of all pretty, then I have a few surprises up my sleeve - wizard's sleeve, Borat style. You will need to exercise patience for a few more days or weeks, and then I shall reveal unto you. But it will be good. I guarantee that. Now, for real, stay tuned.

  • How to tame and pimp Xfce on CentOS 7

    There you go. This is the ordeal that I had to undergo to finally have a fully working Xfce desktop in CentOS 7.2, loaded with all the right goodies, like software, codecs, and support for my gadgets, plus the necessary aesthetics. Most people take this kind of work for granted, and expect results from distro developers and distributions, which is perfectly legitimate. So if you find this unnecessary, I totally agree with you.

    Except, CentOS is a server distro, and it brings its special perks to the desktop, for the price of some extra work on your behalf. Moreover, you won't need to be repeating yourself, and you won't be plagued with regressions, so your effort won't be wasted. In the end, it comes down to ROI. For me, the technical bits culminate in some expected look & feel tweakology, a new menu, sound and audio changes, and a few other bits and pieces. Much simpler and shorter after you've done this once and know what to expect. Perhaps then, this little exercise won't be an ordeal for you, but a pleasurable little escapade and a long-term investment. I hope you enjoy it.

GNU/Linux Review: elementary OS 0.4 Loki

Filed under
Reviews

elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" has released at 9 September 2016. I tried elementary OS Loki for 6 days and now it's time for the review. I wrote this review for beginners and first timers in GNU/Linux, especially in elementary OS. I cover shortly 18 aspects such as shortcut keys, memory usage, audio/video support, desktop experiences, and also elementary OS Loki default software applications. As overall (mentioned below), it's really exciting and comfortable experience for me to review and use elementary OS now, in Loki release. I hope this review is really helpful to you.

Read more

Also:

Samsung forgets about Chrome OS, advertises Chromebooks ‘Powered by Android’

Filed under
Android

Since Chromebooks first hit the scene, Samsung has had options available. The Samsung Series 3 Chromebook was one of the most popular Chromebooks ever, but in the time since Samsung’s Chromebooks have faded into the background a bit with the focus shifted to options from HP, ASUS, Acer, and many others. With Android apps on the horizon, it seems that Samsung is finally pushing its Chromebook lineup yet again, but it might be doing that in the wrong way…

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Slackel 6.0.7 "Live Openbox"

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Slackel Live Installer (SLI) supports installation on different filesystems (btrfs, ext2, ext3, ext4, jfs, reiserfs, xfs). You can use a different partition for /home. You can find and add Windows partitions in grub.cfg. Note that if you use eLilo as your bootloader, you will not be able to boot Windows partitions.

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Raspberry Pi With Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linux gave me one of my best gaming experiences yet

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

A few times in your life, you have a life changing experience. Maybe it’s getting married, having your first child, or finishing your college degree.

Well, I just had a life changing experience. And it was because of a video game. Not just a video game, but a video game that I played on Linux.

As I am sure many of you are aware, Linux gets the unfortunate notoriety of being a poor operating system for games (this seems to be changing in the public's eyes). Sure, we do have less games than other platforms, but that certainly doesn’t mean the games themselves are of poor quality.

I was reminded of this when I completed the recently ported game to Linux, ‘Life is Strange’ [Official Site, Steam]. Developed by Dontnod Entertainment, and ported to Linux by the awesome folks at Feral interactive. With the combined work on developing the game itself from Dontnod, and the wonderful port by Feral, I have just had one of my best gaming experiences ever. And it was all done on Linux.

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Also: Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Heads to Linux and Mac, Courtesy Feral Interactive

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • BFS Scheduler Gets "Substantial Updates" For Linux 4.7

    Con Kolivas announced this week BFS 497, a major new release of his scheduler that's now fitted for the Linux 4.7 kernel.

    Con commented about the Brain Fuck Scheduler changes for Linux 4.7, "Thanks(?) to the massive changes to the mainline kernel I'd been forced to rewrite significant components of BFS to work properly with them, specifically the cpu frequency governors. At the same time I've had quite a bit of energy and enthusiasm for working on BFS in a way I haven't had in a long time. As a result, this updated version not only addresses the remaining cgroup stub patch bug (mentioned on the previous announcement) but implements further improvements and clean ups to go with those improvements."

  • RadeonSI Now Uses The HSA ABI For Some Compute Shaders
  • X.Org Server 1.19 Is Ready To Freeze, Almost 600 Changes

Software Freedom Day Coverage

Filed under
OSS

Linux Began Its Invisible Conquest of Computing 25 Years Ago

Filed under
Linux

On September 17, 1991, a volunteer administrator for the FTP server shared by Finland’s universities uploaded the kernel of a new, open-source operating system. The administrator, Ari Lemmke, did so on behalf of his friend, a computer science student at the University of Helsinki. There was just one small problem: Lemmke didn’t like Freax, the name his friend had given the operating system. “Freax” was meant as a portmanteau of “free,” “freak,” and the operating system’s spiritual ancestor, Unix, but this didn’t sway Lemmke. Instead, he renamed Freax after its inventor, Linus Torvalds. The operating system went out into the world as Linux, and the rest is history.

It’s now exactly a quarter-century later, and Linux has won. Oh sure, it’s still a relative rarity on personal computers. Data from earlier this year shows that just 1.8 percent of desktop computers use Linux. Although Microsoft Windows crushes Linux with 89.7 percent of all desktops, Linux really isn’t that far away from the 8.5 percent of desktop computers running Mac OS. Sure, Linux is the third operating system when it comes to computers, but it’s more down to Apple’s branding than anything else that we think of this as a two-system race in the first place.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Carla Schroder: On Farming and Linux

    Carla Schroder sometimes describes herself as an “Ace Linux guru,” which is as good a way to tell you who she is as any — at least in the Linux context. She’s written so much, in so many places, that it’s easier to give you a single Google link to her work than to list a whole stack of articles, plus three O’Reilly books. The single article I’ll point you to on its own is one Schroder wrote for Opensource.com in July, 2016, titled I’ve Been Linuxing Since Before You Were Born.

    But the main thing (the “takeaway,” marketing people would say) about this interview is that it shows you how a persistent person can teach herself Linux and build a pretty good career working with it and writing about it — and still have time to do a little farming on the side.

  • And another live upgrade – 13.2 -> Leap 42.1
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/37
  • Q4OS 1.6.2 ‘Orion’ Linux Distro Released, Based On Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 ‘Jessie’

    Q4OS is a Debian-based open source Linux distribution that comes with Trinity desktop environment, which is forked from KDE. The latest release, Q4OS 1.6.2 ‘Orion’, improves the previous version and fixes the bugs reported by users. The existing Q4OS 1.6 or 1.6.1 OS users are advised to update their systems to the latest version.

  • Deepin 15.3 OS Released — A Polished and Beautiful Linux Distro That You’ll Love
  • The Router rumble: Ars DIY build faces better tests, tougher competition

    Since the original Homebrew router is in service for my office now, I built a new one. (Actually, I've built quite a few new ones since then—they've proven pretty popular.) The Homebrew 2.0 looks a lot more serious than its spunky little disco-colored predecessor; it's got a smaller form factor, rugged heavy heat dissipation fins along the top, and four Intel gigabit LAN interfaces across the front. It also has a newer processor: a J1900 Bay Trail Celeron, as opposed to the original Homebrew's 1037u Ivy Bridge Celeron. The new CPU is a mixed bag. It's got twice the cores, but it's a bit slower per thread. For most routing jobs, this gives the older Ivy Bridge CPU a slight advantage, but overall it's a wash. Either version has proven to be more than enough muscle to do the job.

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds picks Dell XPS 13 as his next laptop

    I just discovered: I was not alone.

    Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, has also chosen the Dell XPS 13 Developers Edition as his next laptop. A few weeks ago, Torvalds wrote on his Google+ page that he was looking at the replacement for his old laptop. When I met Torvalds during LinuxCon North America (for a long exclusive interview) I asked if he had selected a worthy one.

  • Highly Available & Distributed Containers by Kendrick Coleman, EMC {code}
  • [Bit]coin flipping: It’s up to the developers how soon blockchain goes mainstream

    The discussion about blockchain’s adoption is gaining momentum, but where are we now? How far are we from seeing blockchain in all industries and how can we help speed up the process? We talked to Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director of the Hyperledger Project about all this and more.

  • Beyond Bitcoin: The Potential of Distributed Ledger Technology (Part 1)

    “Blockchain”—the technology underlying the virtual currency Bitcoin—has become a hot topic in the business world. Proponents claim that Blockchain has the potential to be as disruptive to business as the internet, and businesses in many industries are investing significant resources into exploring and developing applications for it.

    In Part 1 of our two-part post on this subject, we’ll provide an introduction to the technology, its potential applications, and organizations that have been formed to foster it (similar to organizations formed during the development of the internet).

  • LinuxCon + ContainerCon Europe to Celebrate 25 Years of Linux
  • synaptics pointer acceleration

    libinput's touchpad acceleration is the cause for a few bugs and outcry from a quite vocal (maj|in)ority. A common suggestion is "make it like the synaptics driver". So I spent a few hours going through the pointer acceleration code to figure out what xf86-input-synaptics actually does (I don't think anyone knows at this point) [1].

    If you just want the TLDR: synaptics doesn't use physical distances but works in device units coupled with a few magic factors, also based on device units. That pretty much tells you all that's needed.

Server Administration

Filed under
Server
  • OpenStack Jobs Are Growing and There's Plenty of Seats at the Table

    OpenStack’s adoption by business users has created an opportunity for devs, architects, sysadmins and engineers to pay the rent by working on free software–and there’s plenty of open seats at the table.

    OpenStack has seen rapid growth since its beginnings in 2010, when 75 developers gathered to contribute to the project, to 2016, where more than 59,110 community members and 20 million lines of code. OpenStack’s maturity has been praised by analysts like Forrester, who say that, “OpenStack meets the needs of production workloads and is ready to enable CIOs in tackling the strategic requirements of their business.”

  • 14 DevOps vendors link up to simplify enterprise adoption of 'best of breed' tools
  • Building bridges with DevOps

    Five Questions for Katherine Daniels: Thoughts on adopting DevOps effectively, the importance of empathy, and new essential skills for today’s ops professionals.

  • How NV Can Increase IT Agility
  • Constructive Open Source Tools for DevOps Testing

    The success of DevOps—development and operations—is its automation and continuous integration of DevOps lifecycle—from planning, coding to testing, release and monitoring. To overcome any testing error and give 100 percent positive outcomes, organizations prefer automation in testing their product; and adopt DevOps. Recently, RightScale survey revealed that around 54 percent of the companies have adopted DevOps and the interest around DevOps is increasing rapidly. There are lots of DevOps tools available in the market, both paid and open source. However, there is a category of tools widely used across automation testing community because of its flexible software-defined platform. But the trickiest part could be in selecting the right DevOps testing tool.

Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Software Freedom Day and FOSS News

Filed under
OSS
  • Happy Software Freedom Day!

    And today is the 13th edition of Software Freedom Day! We wish you all a great day talking to people and discovering (or making them discovery) the benefits and joys of running Free Software. As usual we have a map where you can find all the events in your area. Should you just discover about SFD today and want to organize an event it is never too late. While the date is global, each team has the freedom to run the event at a date that is convenient in their area. We (in Cambodia) are running our event on November 26 due to university schedule, other conferences and religious holidays conflicting.

  • Canonical and Western Digital launch Ubuntu Linux 'Nextcloud Box' powered by Raspberry Pi

    Cloud storage is amazingly convenient. Unfortunately, the best part of the cloud can also be the worst. You see, having your files stored on someone else's severs and accessing them over the internet opens you to focused hacking, and potentially, incompetence by the cloud storage company too. As a way to have the best of both worlds, some folks will set up net-connected local storage so they can manage their own 'cloud'.

  • Run Your Own Private Ubuntu Cloud with the Nextcloud Box

    Most of us love using the cloud. It gives us on-the-go-access to our personal files, photos and documents, and helps keep our busy lives in sync.

    But loving the cloud doesn’t mean you have to love using a proprietary closed-off services like Dropbox, Google Drive or One Drive.

  • Cache in hand, Varnish cloud workload tuning goes one louder

    Content delivery firm Varnish Software has announced its Varnish Plus Cloud product — essentially, a full version of the Varnish Plus software suite that can be accessed via the AWS (Amazon Web Services) Marketplace.

  • Nexenta wins NetNordic open source storage contract

    NetNordic said it has recently chosen Nexenta to create a centralised storage repository for its customer base as well as for the company, as the operator and its customer base continue to grow. Nexenta provides open source-driven, software-defined storage, which offers extra data with compression turned on, a significant factor for NetNordic, said its operations engineer Sander Petersson.

  • Toyota, Open Source Robotics Foundation to partner on automated vehicle research
  • The scourge of LEDs everywhere: Readers speak out

    Open Source to the Rescue

    One solution to LED overload is going with open source technology.

    One Slashdot commenter going by the handle of guruevi uses OpenWrt: "You can reprogram any LED on your router for whatever purpose. Want them all on or off at the certain time of day or blink if it detected anomalous traffic."

    I also got email from Dave Taht, who happened to recently write a blog post titled "Blinkenlights: A debugging aid AND a curse" (with the subhed of "Too many LEDs! Give me back the stars!"). Taht is a busy guy as director of the Make Wi-Fi Fast project and co-founder of the Bufferbloat and CeroWrt projects, though took time out to share some LED disabling tips in his blog post.

    Taht, like many of those cited above, has made his share of manual fixes over the years, using electrical tape and just plan moving devices behind things. Only recently did he start monkeying with software to solve his problem.

  • On the importance of patient empowerment and open source: A Medicine X panel weighs in

    Speaker Karen Sadler, JD, heartedly agreed that developing open-source software for medical devices is critical. She is the executive director of Software Freedom Conservancy, a non-profit organization that develops, promotes and defends open-source software. Her life was changed when she was diagnosed with a life-threatening heart problem and implanted with a defibrillator. “I went from someone who thought open source was cool and useful to someone who thought great open-source software is essential for our society,” Sadler said.

  • Open Science Project Presents Brand New Approach for Malaria Drug Discovery
  • Unique open science project shows way for development of new antimalarial treatments
  • OICR Team Develops Open-Source Offline Base Caller for MinIon Nanopore Sequencer
  • Welcome to the age of the open-source executive

    Open-source code is no longer just for computers – it’s increasingly the code for how business gets done in a globally connected, always-on marketplace.

    Today’s marketing executive needs a skillset that is freely used, freely changed and freely shared by anyone. The modern marketer must understand return on investment like a chief financial officer, technology like a chief technology officer, product integration like a chief product officer, PR like a chief commercial officer, and bring it all together like a chief executive – all the while delivering compelling, seamless and delightful consumer experiences.

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today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Phone, Sep 2016 - Vorsprung durch Touch
    The Ubuntu Phone is getting better, and with every new iteration of the OTA, my little BQ Aquaris E4.5 is gaining more speed and functionality. Like in the air force, with an avionics upgrade, which transforms ancient wings into a powerful and modern bird of prey. Only the pace of advancement is lagging behind the market. See what Android and iOS can do, even Windows Phone, and you realize how late and insufficiently meaningful the Ubuntu Phone really is. This has to change, massively. This latest round does bring some fine goods to the table - more speed and stability, better icons, more overall visual polish, incremental improvements in the applications and the scopes. But that's not enough to win the heart of the average user. A more radical, app-centric effort is required. More focus on delivering the mobile experience, be it as it may. Ubuntu cannot revolutionalize that which is already considered the past. It can only join the club and enjoy the benefits of a well-established reality. And that is a kickass app stack that makes the touch device worth using in the first place. Still, it's not all gloomy. E4.5 is a better product now than it was a year ago, fact. Ubuntu Phone is a better operating system than it was even this spring, fact. So maybe one day we will see Ubuntu become an important if not dominant player in the phone and tablet space. It sure is heading in the right direction, my only fear is the availability of resources to pull off this massive rehaul that is needed to make it stand up to the old and proven giants. And that's it really. If you're keen on Linux (not Android) making it in the mobile world, do not forget to check my Ubuntu tablet review! Especially the convergence piece. On that merry note, you do remember that I'm running a wicked contest this year, too? He/she who reads my books might get a chance to win an M10 tablet. Indeed. Off you go, dear readers. Whereas I will now run the same set of tests we did here on the Aquaris tablet, and see how it likes the OTA-12 upgrade. The end.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Unity 8 - new window snapping feature
  • Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 is Taking Place In Mid-November
  • Ubuntu Online Summit: 15-16 November 2016

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • 10 Top Open Source Artificial Intelligence Tools for Linux
    In this post, we shall cover a few of the top, open-source artificial intelligence (AI) tools for the Linux ecosystem. Currently, AI is one of the ever advancing fields in science and technology, with a major focus geared towards building software and hardware to solve every day life challenges in areas such as health care, education, security, manufacturing, banking and so much more.
  • List of FLOSS International Conferences September 2016 Materials
  • This Week In Servo 78
    Our overall roadmap is available online and now includes the initial Q3 plans. From now on, we plan to include the quarterly plan with a high-level breakdown in the roadmap page.
  • Firefox 49 Release: Find out what is new
    Firefox 49.0 is the next major stable release of the web browser. Firefox 48.0.2 and earlier versions of Firefox can be updated to the new release.
  • Open-Source Climate Change Data From NASA, NOAA, & Others Available For 1st Time
    Climate change has many components — rising sea levels, alterations in rainfall patterns, and an increase in severe storm activity, among others. Communities around the world are faced with the need to plan for climate change but don’t have the information available to do so effectively.
  • Another Setback for 3D Printed Gun Advocate Cody Wilson as Court of Appeals Rules That National Security Concerns Outweigh Free Speech
    It’s been a long, drawn-out battle, beginning in 2013 when Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, published the open source files for his 3D printed handgun, the Liberator, online. The State Department ordered that he take the files down, and Wilson complied, but not before thousands had downloaded them and spread them elsewhere on the Internet. In 2015, with the help of gun rights organization The Second Amendment Foundation, Wilson filed a federal lawsuit claiming that the State Department had violated not only his Second Amendment but his First Amendment rights. By suppressing his right to share information online, Wilson argued, the State Department was violating his right to free speech.
  • In 3D-Printed Gun Case, Federal Court Permits Speech Censorship in the Name of Alleged National Security
  • Oracle tries playing nice with Java EE rebels
    With Oracle now trying to get back on track with advancing enterprise Java, the company is seeking rapprochement with factions that had sought to advance the platform on their own. The two groups involved are mostly amenable to patching up the relationship. Oracle's Anil Gaur, group vice president of engineering, said this week he had already been in touch with some of the concerned parties. The two factions include Java EE Guardians, led by former Oracle Java EE evangelist Reza Rahman, and Microprofile.io, which has included participation from Red Hat and IBM.

GNU News