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Thursday, 23 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 2:12pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 2:11pm
Story First Hint at Ubuntu 17.10 Codename Revealed? Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 1:40pm
Story EC study recommends that policies emphasise open source Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 1:06pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 1:04pm
Story Yap Wen Jiun - the Android scientist Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:33am
Story Open source seen as door to digital innovation by decision-makers in Malaysia, survey finds Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:17am
Story Linux, not Microsoft, the real winner of Windows Server on ARM Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:05am
Story 10 BEST OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE IN 2017 Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 8:20am
Story Solus Users Get MATE 1.18 and Linux Kernel 4.9.16, Budgie 10.3 Coming Very Soon Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 8:07am

Threaded OpenGL Dispatch

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

An introduction to GRUB2 configuration for your Linux machine

Filed under
GNU
Linux

When researching my article from last month, An introduction to the Linux boot and startup process, I became interested in learning more about GRUB2. This article provides a quick introduction to configuring GRUB2, which I will mostly refer to as GRUB for simplicity.

Read more

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • QEMU 2.9 Is Being Prepped With New Functionality

    QEMU 2.9-rc0 was tagged yesterday as this important piece of the open-source Linux virtualization stack prepares for its next major release

  • Flatpak 0.9.1 Introduces New, Ninja-Based Build System, Flatpak-Builder Changes

    Less than a week since the launch of the fourth maintenance update to the Flatpak 0.8 series of the open-source Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework (formerly XGD-App), Alex Larsson announced today Flatpak 0.9.1.

    Flatpak 0.9.1 appears to the be the first point release to the major Flatpak 0.9 series, and we say major because this milestone adds numerous improvements compared to the 0.8 branch, especially to the build system. The biggest change appearing to be a new Ninja-based build system called "cmake-ninja".

  • GCC 7.1 Will Likely Be Released In Mid-April

    Richard Biener has issued a new status report concerning the state of GCC 7 and that it should be released the middle of next month.

    GCC 7 remains in regression and documentation fixing mode with trying to nail down the rest of the P1 (highest priority) regressions. As of yesterday there are 17 P1 regressions remaining. For the other regressions there are 108 P2 regressions, 19 regressions of P3 level, 138 regressions of P4, and 30 of P5.

  • guile 2.2 omg!!!

    Oh, good evening my hackfriends! I am just chuffed to share a thing with yall: tomorrow we release Guile 2.2.0. Yaaaay!

    I know in these days of version number inflation that this seems like a very incremental, point-release kind of a thing, but it's a big deal to me. This is a project I have been working on since soon after the release of Guile 2.0 some 6 years ago. It wasn't always clear that this project would work, but now it's here, going into production.

  • IBus 1.5.15 is released

DragonFlyBSD and NetBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD's HAMMER File-System Gets Important Write Performance Boost

    Matthew Dillon has discovered an important bug in the DragonFlyBSD kernel's VFS cluster code affecting the HAMMER file-system write performance.

    Dillon explained in the commit that landed in DragonFly last week, "A bug in the cluster code was causing HAMMER to write out 64KB buffers in 32KB overlapping segments, resulting in data being written to the media twice."

  • NetBSD 7.1 Is Out with Support for Raspberry Pi Zero, Better Linux Compatibility

    The development team behind the BSD-based NetBSD free operating system were proud to announce the official and general availability of the NetBSD 7.1 release.

    NetBSD 7.1 entered development only two months ago, when we reported the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) build, which brought various improvements and bug fixes. It's the first point release to the stable NetBSD 7 series and comes with a bunch of exciting new features.

New Release of Parted Magic

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Parted Magic 2017_03_14 News

    For the most part this is a maintenance release with a few nice feature additions. We created a GUI to extract embedded Windows product keys. It’s located in the Rescue menu. The output is also saved to a text file so you can just copy it to a USB drive. Some of the newer machines like the DELL XPS 13 are now freezing the NVMe drives at boot. The machine needs to be put to sleep and woken up just like standard SSD drives. We added a sleep button to the NVMe Secure Erase program to overcome this.

    As always, Parted Magic was released with the latest Xorg drivers and Linux Kernel 4.10.1.

  • Parted Magic 2017_03_14 Adds Tool to Extract Embedded Windows Product Keys, More

    Parted Magic creator Patrick Verner is announcing the release of Parted Magic 2017_03_14, a brand-new ISO snapshot of the commercial GNU/Linux distribution designed for disk partitioning, cloning, and rescue operations.

    Parted Magic 2017_03_14 comes more than two months after the Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release, which was also the first to kick off the new year, and implements a bunch of interesting new features, such as a graphical tool that promises to let users extract embedded Windows product keys.

The Opening of the First KDE Slimbook

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
  • The Opening of the First KDE Slimbook

    Fresh off the production line from 101’s factory in València is the first KDE Slimbook which I opened today at FLOSS UK conference here in Manchester.

  • The First KDE Slimbook Unboxing Video Appears Online

    If you’ve been itching to see more of the KDE Slimbook, the ultra-thin laptop announced by Spanish company Slimbook back in January, then you’re in luck.

    KDE developer (and all-round awesome chap) Jonathan Riddell snagged some one-on-one time with the bespoke KDE-branded laptop at the FLOSS Spring 2017 conference taking place in Manchester.

    “Fresh off the production line from 101’s factory in València is the first KDE Slimbook which I opened today at FLOSS UK conference here in Manchester,” he writes in a short blog post.

6-Way Linux Distribution Comparison On AMD's Ryzen

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given AMD's Ryzen is a very new platform, some Phoronix readers have inquired whether a given distribution is a faster and better-supported than others. Here are tests of Ubuntu, Clear Linux, Debian, Antergos, Fedora, and openSUSE tested with an AMD Ryzen 7 1800X system.

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Next Tizen powered smartphone Samsung Z4 makes appearance at FCC

Filed under
Gadgets

Samsung’s next Tizen Smartphone, the Samsung Z4 SM-Z400F, has made its appearance at the FCC. Looking through the details of the filing we can see that there will be dual-SIM variant of the device with model number SM-Z400DS. The Samsung Z4 will now be the fourth smartphone powered by Tizen that the Korean tech giant will release. Previous models were the Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3.

Read more

Also: Smartphone App: Astroscope: a new horoscope app added to Tizen Store

GNOME/GTK News

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.24rc2 (3.23.92) RELEASED
  • GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment Launches March 22, Release Candidate Out Now

    With a one-day delay, the GNOME Project, through Javier Jardón, announced the availability of the last milestone in the development cycle of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, the Release Candidate (RC).

    Versioned 3.23.92, the RC build of the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment is here only to polish the new features and improvements implemented in various of the core components and applications that will be distributed as part of the GNOME 3.24 Stack across numerous GNU/Linux distributions starting next week.

  • GNOME Builder 3.24 Is Just Around the Corner, Supports Exporting of Flatpak Apps

    The developers behind the GNOME Builder open-source IDE (Integrated Development Environment) application designed specifically for the GNOME desktop environment are about to wrap things up for the final release of GNOME Builder 3.24.

  • GNOME to participate in Google Summer of Code 2017

    We are happy to announce that GNOME has been accepted to participate in Google Summer of Code 2017. GNOME has participated in the program every year since its inception in 2005 and it’s a pleasure to be participating once again!

  • Work on GTK4 Continues with Support for Full-Screen CSD Windows, More Bug Fixes

    The development of the major GTK+ 4 GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit continues with the release of a new milestone, versioned 3.89.5, which adds more improvements and bug fixes.

    GTK+ 3.89.5 is the fifth development build of the GTK+ 4 stable series, which should hit the stable channel sometime after the release of the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment next week on March 22, 2017.

Linux Foundation and Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Docker Donating ContainerD to Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    In December 2016, Solomon Hykes, the founder of Docker, announced a re-focused containerd (Con-tay-ner-D) initiative, spinning out the core container runtime from the Docker Engine community project. At the time, it wasn't entirely clear where containerd would land, but now the picture has come into focus, as Docker is sending containerd to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

  • Canonical Releases Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS to Patch 2 Flaws

    Canonical published a few moments ago a new security notice to inform users of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) users about the availability of a kernel update for their systems.

    Two kernel vulnerabilities are affecting Ubuntu 16.04, 16.04.1, and 16.04.2 users that are still using a kernel from the long-term supported Linux 4.4 series, including the Linux kernel for Raspberry Pi 2 devices, Snapdragon processors, as well as Google Container Engine (GKE) and Amazon Web Services (AWS) systems.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.54 LTS Is a Small Patch with Updated GPU and InfiniBand Drivers

    After releasing the Linux 4.10.3 and Linux 4.9.15 LTS kernels, renowned Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the availability of the fifty-fourth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series.

  • Linux Kernel 4.9.15 LTS Released with Updated GPU Drivers, Various Improvements

    Immediately after announcing the availability of Linux kernel 4.10.3, renowned Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman released the fifteenth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.9 kernel series.

    That's right, we're talking about Linux kernel 4.9.15 LTS, which comes only three days after the release of the Linux 4.9.14 patch, which shipped with numerous improvements. Linux kernel 4.9.15 LTS is half of the previous update, and according to the appended shortlog, it changes a total of 82 files, with 690 insertions and 342 deletions.

Accenture, Microsoft Proxy

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Row over 'very limited' Linux PCs escalates in Munich [Ed: Microsoft and Accenture working together to undermine GNU/Linux and 'make an example' or send out a warning]

    With the controversy now escalating into a very public debate, it's currently unknown which operating system Munich will be using for the next decade. Linux is currently deployed on 20,000 computers across the city. Converting them all back to Windows will take months of further work.

    While it's attracted the most attention, Munich isn't the only city to have shunned Windows in favour of open-source software. Last September, Moscow abandoned Microsoft's Outlook email program in favour of its own system. Concerns about the use of proprietary software in government departments have also been raised across the world, including in the UK where a long-running but slowly progressing campaign is encouraging Linux usage

  • Accenture and Docker Team on Container Services

    Accenture has expanded its relationship with Docker to enhance its existing multicloud Container as a Service solutions. The company will leverage Docker Datacenter to provide enterprises with the capabilities needed to secure the software supply chain, expand workload portability, and improve application resilience.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Security News

Filed under
Security

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Hyper Knights, a surprisingly fun and cheap mix of strategy and action
  • Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 "Goedel" Released to Support LUKS Encrypted Partitions

    Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux distribution was proud to announce a few moments ago the release and immediate availability of the Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 "Goedel."

    Dubbed Goedel, in the memory of the mathematician, philosopher, and logician Kurt Goedel, Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 is the first ISO snapshot of the KDE Plasma oriented distribution originally based on Arch Linux. The new release comes with a revamped Heritage theme and the Calamares installer with support for LUKS encrypted partitions.

  • Parrot Security OS 3.5 Improves Linux Security Tools Distribution
  • Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE 2 Betsy) Gets Updated ISO Images, Download Now
  • MATE Desktop 1.18 Released, Is Now GTK3 Only

    MATE Desktop 1.18 is now available to download. The release completes the migration to GTK3, and adds a splash of improvements to many of its core apps.

  • Five issues that will determine the future of Internet Health [Ed: It would be awesome if not rather bitter-sweet and ironic now that Mozilla helps make the WWW less 'sanitary' with DRM]

    In January, we published our first Internet Health Report on the current state and future of the Internet. In the report, we broke down the concept of Internet health into five issues. Today, we are publishing issue briefs about each of them: online privacy and security, decentralization, openness, web literacy and digital inclusion. These issues are the building blocks to a healthy and vibrant Internet. We hope they will be a guide and resource to you.

    We live in a complex, fast moving, political environment. As policies and laws around the world change, we all need to help protect our shared global resource, the Internet. Internet health shouldn’t be a partisan issue, but rather, a cause we can all get behind. And our choices and actions will affect the future health of the Internet, for better or for worse.

  • FSFE Newsletter - March 2017
  • Solving Monitoring in the Cloud With Prometheus

    Hundreds of companies are now using the open source Prometheus monitoring solution in production, across industries ranging from telecommunications and cloud providers to video streaming and databases.

  • An Exploration of Citrix Delivery Networks

    While many of us may be more familiar with the virtualization and remote access products from Citrix, Danny Phillips was talking about their products in the networking space during his keynote presentation at LinuxCon Europe.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • How to build an IoT project with Mongoose OS

    It could be a small single-board computer like the Raspberry Pi, which costs around US $30, BeagleBone for approximately US $60, Intel Edison for US $70, or other similar devices. These computers usually run Linux. These are suitable for some tasks, like being a gateway device, but again they are quite large, very power hungry, and too expensive to run on things like sensors, wearables, and small appliances.

  • A Look at MINIBIAN: A Minimalist Image for Raspberry Pi

    My way of celebrating Pi Day (March 14th = 3.14) was to take a look at an awesome little image for the Raspberry Pi called Minibian. A new edition of Minibian was released on 12 March 2017, updating the image with support for the latest RPi 3B and other improvements.

    Minibian is based on and fully compatible with the official Raspbian “Jesse” software. It is meant to be used for embedded linux and server type situations, and that is great for IoT scenarios. There is no desktop environment and much effort has gone to providing a minimalist operating system that conserves system resources. The 12 March release of Minibian boasts a 15 second boot time, 31 MB of RAM usage, 477 MB of disk space usage, and is small enough to fit on a 1GB SD card. My test install and inspection of Minibian shows that these claims are indeed correct.

  • Tough, 84 x 55mm Intel Atom COM offers soldered memory

    Eurotech’s rugged, Linux-friendly “CPU-163-15” is an 84 x 55mm COM Express Type 10 Mini module with Bay Trail Atoms and soldered ECC and eMMC.

    Eurotech’s Intel Atom E3800 “Bay Trail” based CPU-163-15 COM Express Type 10 Mini module continues the Amaro, Italy based company’s tradition of offering rugged embedded boards with support for its cloud-based Everyware Software Framework (ESF) IoT platform. Other recent Intel-based COM Express modules from Eurotech include the CPU-161-18, a headless COM Express Type 6 Compact module with a 12-core Xeon-D1500 from the Broadwell generation.

  • BQ Deutschland releases Android 7.1.1 OTA for the Aquaris X5 Plus (while most of us still haven't received 7.0)
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

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Nobody likes an impossibly long URL. They're hard to decipher. But sometimes, between a deep directory structure on a site, plus a large number of parameters tacked on to the end, URLs just begin to get unwieldy. And back in the days before Twitter added their own link shortener to their service, a long URL meant taking precious characters away from your tweets. Read more

Ubuntu Server: The smart person's guide

Ubuntu Server is an open source platform that does more than you might think. With its ability to serve as an internal company server or to scale all the way up and out to meet enterprise-level needs, this operating system can do it all. This smart person's guide is an easy way to get up to speed on Ubuntu Server. We'll update this guide periodically when news and updates about Ubuntu Server are released. Read more

Rockstor 3.9.0 NAS Distro Adds Big Enhancements to the Disk Management Subsystem

Suman Chakravartula from the Rockstor project, an open-source NAS (Network-attached storage) solution using the Linux kernel and Btrfs file system, announced the general availability of Rockstor 3.9.0. Read more