Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 24 Oct 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 11:47pm
Story Emacs 24.4 released Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 11:16pm
Story Discourse Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 11:11pm
Story EXT4 In Linux 3.18 Has Clean-ups, Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 11:10pm
Story Free and Open Source Electronic Signature in Costa Rica Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 10:55pm
Story Rejuvenate your Fedora desktop with Moka Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:57pm
Story Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst on the impact of cloud and mobile Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:50pm
Story LIBINPUT INTEGRATION IN KWIN/WAYLAND Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:31pm
Story V is for Vivid Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:27pm
Story Elive Is an Interesting Debian-Based Distro with a Beautiful Enlightenment Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:27pm

Why I Think Unity Is the Best Desktop Environment for Productivity

Filed under
Ubuntu

There is always a question that is gnawing the Linux community, namely "which is the best desktop environment?" That is a very hard question to answer and most of the time it's all about personal preferences, but it all boils download to one thing, usability.

Read more

The Ubuntu release cycle and what it means for aging hardware

Filed under
Ubuntu

That is where the issue of the rolling release comes in. Because of the way Ubuntu does their releases, a lot of packages wind up being out of date. It's nothing major, and you can -- with the help of PPAs -- get those crucial packages updated to the latest releases. A rolling release would put an end to this, because everything would be up to date all the time.

This is probably not going to happen. Ubuntu is deeply entrenched in their release cycle, and I can't imagine they're willing to change. Believe it or not, I'm okay with that. The Ubuntu release cycle has always worked for me. And with their current focus on Unity 8 and Mir, there's really no way they could switch to a rolling release now, even if they wanted it. You see, Unity 8 and Mir are going to do to Ubuntu what Unity did when it replaced GNOME as the default (or what Windows 8 did to the Windows ecosystem) -- it's going to change... a lot.

Read more

Experience a Retrospective Future with Ubuntu MATE 14.10 RC

Filed under
Ubuntu

The first and only Ubuntu MATE 14.10 Release Candidate has been announced by its developers and is now out and ready for testing. The final version of the system is just around the corner, so this is as close to the stable version as possible.

Read more

GNOME 3.14.1 Is Out with Improvements for the Shell

Filed under
GNOME

The latest GNOME 3.14 branch was made available a few weeks ago and the developers have managed to quickly push the first update for it. The reception for GNOME 3.14 has been great, but it's normal for devs to find things to fix and improve. It shows dedication from the makers of this desktop environment and it's a good sign for the future GNOME releases.

GNOME doesn't have a good track record for releasing stuff right on time and it often happens that some of the minor versions arrive a couple of days late, but that's not true for 3.14.1. It's going to be quite interesting to see just how fast the developers will manage to integrate this version in their distros.

Read more

Do-It-Yourself Linux Machine

Filed under
GNU
Linux

What ARC does have is Linux support. In fact, Synopsys’s brand new ARC HS38 processor supports both “standard” single-core and SMP multicore implementations of Linux, something a bit new and unusual in the DIY processor arena. So just because you’ve rolled your own processor hardware doesn’t mean you have to give up on familiar operating systems.

Read more

Lollipop Could Make Android Stickier

Filed under
Android

Google on Wednesday unwrapped Android 5.0 Lollipop, officially replacing the "Android L" code name by which the latest version of its mobile platform previously had been known.

"Lollipop is our largest, most ambitious release on Android, with over 5,000 new APIs for developers," wrote Sundar Pichai, Google's senior vice president for Android, Chrome & Apps, in a blog post. "Lollipop is designed to be flexible, to work on all your devices and to be customized for you the way you see fit."

Read more

Five open source alternatives to popular web apps

Filed under
OSS

Chances are you use more than a couple of web apps in your daily life—email, storage, office applications, and more. What’s great about web apps is that you can use them anywhere and with any computer or mobile device. On the other hand, with most of those apps you’re locked in a closed ecosystem. Or worse, you may be handing over the rights to your content and your files when you agree to the terms of service. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

You can replace a number of popular web apps with solid open source alternatives. If you want to embrace your inner geek, you can even run many of them on your own web server. Or, you can use hosted versions of those apps which will only set you back a few dollars a month.

Read more

Do you want an imp under your desk? If it runs Ubuntu?

This is a preliminary look, based just on the web site and some tweets with the developer, of the imp (all lower case), a small computer somewhere in technology and power, perhaps, between a Raspberry pi (which is mainly a hobbiest toy) and the Intel Nuk (which is sort of a non-Mac Mac Mini). It is called by its makers “The Open Source Computer: Made for consumers.” It is a Linux-installed device, as is your smart phone and, well, the entire Internet. So the technology is well tested at that level.

Read more

Changes Coming For OpenBSD 5.6

Filed under
BSD

OpenBSD 5.6 is expected to be released at the start of November and with this release will come a large number of changes.

Among the slated OpenBSD 5.6 changes include:

- New qlw, qla, upd, brswphy, uscom and axen drivers.
- Suspend and resume support for the Intel and Radeon DRM/KMS drivers.
- SCSI Multi-pathing support via the mpath driver.
- New product support for existing chipsets.
- IPv6 support is turned off for new devices to instead to enable IPv6 address support when assigning it.

Read more

Quick look: PC-BSD 10.0.3

Filed under
BSD

PC-BSD 10.0.3 is based on FreeBSD 10. This release of PC-BSD includes Cinnamon 2.2.14, Chromium 37.0.2062.94, Nvidia driver 340.24, bug fixes for the AppCafe UI, support for full disk encryption, and a number of other bug fixes and improvements. You can read a full list of changes in the PC-BSD 10.0.3 release notes.

Read more

AMD Radeon R9 285 Linux GPU Scaling Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering about the maximum resolution they can run given OpenGL workloads at with the AMD Radeon R9 285 "Tonga", a new ~$250 USD graphics card, here's some Linux GPU scaling benchmarks with the Catalyst driver.

If you didn't see my review from Tuesday there's a complete review of the Radeon R9 285 Tonga under Linux as the first AMD GCN 1.2 GPU on the market using Catalyst -- since the open-source driver isn't yet compatible. Following that full 12-page review I ran some GPU scaling tests. If you're curious, here's those results.

Read more

Cost of Windows, Bit by POODLE, and Torvalds on Torvalds

Filed under
-s

The big story today is POODLE, a web vulnerability bug that could affect Linux users. Mageia 5 Beta 1 is delayed again and Linux Mint gets an improved update manager. GNOME 3.14.1 and KDE 5.1 updates were released. Libby Clark has the best quotes from Linus at LinuxCon and Zorin OS 9 "Lite" is "one of the best LXDE spins of 2014."

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Linux-Turned-FreeBSD Distro Comes Up With A New Software License

Filed under
Linux
BSD

While the likes of SprezzOS as the "most beautiful and performant" Linux and OSu as the ultimate operating system have disappeared at the end of the day and are no longer providing comic relief or interesting ambitious debates to Linux users, that other distribution based on Ubuntu and then turned into a FreeBSD distribution is still standing. They're out with an update today and have introduced their own open-source license.

The OS being talked about here for today's after-hours forum discussion fodder is Jabir OS, the operating system that now claims to be an independent fork of FreeBSD and most recently they've been trying to make their own operating system GUI.

Read more

Open source startup targeting DevOps-defined networking

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

A software startup debuted this week proposing software-defined networking to Docker, the open source software for creating Linux application virtualization containers.

SocketPlane was founded by former Cisco, Red Hat, HP, OpenDaylight and Dell officials. In the open source world, their names are well known: Madhu Venugopal, John Willis, Brent Salisbury and Dave Tucker.

Read more

Also:

  • SDN News: Flexible NEC Pricing, HP Cloud, Industry Predictions and More

    The above are just a sampling of this week's SDN and NFV news, attesting to the industry interest in the emerging technologies, interest that was further evidenced by yesterday's announcement from Dell'Oro Group that SDN datacenter sales will grow more than 65 percent this year. "With architectures ratified and production deployments under way, network security appliances and Ethernet switches will continue to comprise the majority of SDN's impact, with SDN gaining a foothold outside of the major cloud providers," the research firm said while hawking a for-sale report.

  • Setting the SDN Agenda

    So what are going to be the hot topics of debate this week? I've been here a day, sitting in on the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) workshop and chatting to a number of companies with a vested interest in SDN's future success, and there are a number of debates likely to rage all week:

Liberia: The Impact of Open Source Software in the Fight Against Ebola in Liberia

Filed under
OSS

Over the years there have been several discussions and literature over the impact of open source software (OSS) on economic development. Countries, international organizations including the United Nations, the USAID, the British DFID, have all touted the benefits of open source software on economic development, especially on developing countries. Yet, in Liberia, the discourse has not been as ubiquitous and widely embraced as it has been in other countries or in the literature. While open source software has made some progress in permeating the Liberian society over the years (Mozilla Firefox, Apache Webserver, PHP, Java, MySQL), its impact has not been felt as much as it has been in recent times.

Read more

Is open source really harder work? Munich's experience shows it's more complicated than that

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Georg Greve is CEO of Kolab Systems, the company that recently began implementing groupware software to manage mail, calendar, task, and contact lists for the council.

The reason the mayor was unable to access email through his smartphone is due to how a legacy server had been set up, he explained, and would still have been a problem if the council had stuck with Microsoft.

"They had a system in place which was a plain old mail system, an IMAP server, the same system they've been using for a very long time," he said.

"It's behind a firewall and the firewall is configured in a way that a mobile phone shouldn't be able to access it, because all of this goes back to pre-mobile phone days.

Read more

Linus Torvalds Regrets Alienating Developers with Strong Language

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds talked today at LinuxCon and CloudOpen Europe, a conference organized by the Linux Foundation that reunites all the big names in the open source world. He answered a lot of questions and he also talked about the effects of the strong language he uses in the mailing list.

Read more

Syndicate content