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Brazilian federal government leads in open source adoption

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OSS

Open source is more common at federal level, seen in 93 percent of organizations, while 78 percent of state-level bodies use it, according to the findings of the E-Government ICT edition carried out by the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br).

The study has also found that in 2017, new open source development has taken place in 85 percent of federal government organizations to cater for their specific requirements, while 57 percent of state organizations also developed new open systems.

Of the federal organizations that have carried out open source development in Brazil, some 52 percent have also shared these platforms with other public sector bodies.

For the study, some 1686 federal and state-level organizations were surveyed by the CGI.br between July and October 2017.

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Wine 3.8

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Software

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Purism's Librem 15 v2 Laptop Now Supported By Mainline Coreboot

    While Purism had already been shipping Coreboot on their Librem 15 v2 laptop two years ago and has already succeeded by their third revision that does have mainline Coreboot support, the support was merged today to Coreboot proper for the Librem 15 v2.

    Mainline Coreboot has already supported the earlier iteration of the original Librem 15, the newer and current Librem 15 v3, as well as the Librem 13. As of today the second version of the Librem 15 is now officially supported in its Git code-base. The Librem 15 v2 was their updated Broadwell-based like the Librem 15 v1 while the current-generation Librem 15 v3 is utilizing an Intel Skylake processor.

  • Opera 53 Web Browser Hits Stable with Revamped Appearance of Tabs, Address Bar

    Opera released today a new stable version of its Chromium-based web browser for computers, Opera 53, which is a minor update revamping the look of the tabs and the address bar.
    Based on the latest Chromium 66.0.3359.139 open-source web browser, Opera 53 is now rolling out to Linux, Mac, and Windows users worldwide with optimizations to how tabs are displayed on the tab bar when you have numerous tabs opened, especially for Mac users, making it easier to find a certain tab in the multitude of opened tabs.

    "Today, we’re transitioning Opera 53 from the beta line to stable. This build revamps the appearance of tabs and the address bar," said Krystian Kolondra, EVP Desktop at Opera. "Mac users find it difficult to locate and manage a particular tab when many of them are open. We figured out a way to optimize this and made your plentiful tabs’ favicons more visible."

  • Adaptive GNOME Web

    I started working on making GNOME Web work well on the Librem 5; to be sure it fits a phone's screen I want the windows to fit in a 360 points width, which is definitely small. To do so I started with the advices from Tobias Bernard to make Web have two modes that I named normal and narrow. The normal mode is Web as you know it, while the narrow mode moves all buttons from the header bar but the hamburger menu to a new action bar at the bottom, letting the windows reach yet unreachable widths.

  • GNOME Terminal: separate menu items for opening tabs and windows

    Astute users might have noticed that the GNOME Terminal binary distributed by Fedora has separate menu items for opening new tabs and windows, while the vanilla version available from GNOME doesn’t.

  • The Grand Update – brace yourselves!

    In the remaining hours before the hdlists are regenerated, and we can all update our Mageia 6 systems with more than 400 packages, here’s some info – very important info – about the update process.

    It’s vitally important that the update completes without interruption! Here’s what you need to do:

  • CentOS 7 1804 Linux Distro Available For Download: Here’s How To Update

    While making a list of free operating systems that can be used both as a daily use system as well as a server, CentOS gets an early mention. Based on RHEL base, CentOS is known for being a stable and manageable platform. Just recently, the developers have shipped the sixth CentOS-7 release.

  • Red Hat Summit: An introduction to OpenShift.io

    Red Hat OpenShift.io is an innovative online service for development teams. Installing and configuring IDEs, libraries, and various tools is a major time sink. OpenShift.io is a cloud-native set of zero-install tools for editing and debugging code, agile planning, and managing CI/CD pipelines. It also features package analytics (an unbelievably cool feature we’ll discuss more in a minute), and has various quick starts for common frameworks. Because everyone on the team uses the exact same tools, “It works on my machine” becomes a thing of the past.

    [...]

    One more thing: package analytics is an amazing feature. In Todd’s example, he added a package (the name of which we shall not mention) and the tools flagged it as having a security vulnerability. This is done in an elegant, friendly UI as opposed to a text message you might not notice in a console. In addition, the product uses machine learning to analyze your project. If you’re using an unusual combination of packages, the tools let you know. That might not be a problem, but it’s a sign that you might want to re-examine your choices. To quote Todd, package analytics is “freaky, freaky cool.”

  •  

  • [Slackware] Moving to OpenSSL 1.1.0 and Firefox 60
  • [Slackware] May ’18 security update for Adobe Flashplayer

    Here’s the latest security update for Adobe’s Flash Player plugins.

    The version 29.0.0.171 of the flashplayer-plugin (NPAPI plugin for Mozilla based browsers) and the chromium-pepperflash-plugin (PPAPI plugin for Chromium based browsers) was released yesterday and you can find Slackware packages for it in my repository.

  • [DNG] Devuan "ASCII" 2.0 Release Candidate
  • Systemd-free Devuan Linux looses version 2.0 release candidate

    Devuan Linux, the Debian fork that offers "init freedom" has announced the first release candidate for its second version.

    Dubbed "ASCII", Devuan 2.0 uses Debian Stretch as its base, doesn't use Systemd, and reached beta in February 2018.

    This week, the developers behind the distro announced ASCII's first release candidate, along with news that the installer "now offers a wider variety of Desktop Environments including XFCE, KDE, MATE, Cinnamon, LXQT (with others available post-install)."

    "In addition, there are options for 'Console productivity' with hundreds of CLI and TUI utils, as well asa minimal base system ideal for servers," the team stated.

  • Yet Another Message Bug Crashes iPhones, iOS 11.3 and iOS 11.4 Affected

    The message bug crashing WhatsApp on Android is now hitting iPhones as well, only that in Apple’s ecosystem it breaks down Messages to a point where it’s fairly difficult to bring it back.
    Specifically, a specially crafted message that includes invisible Unicode characters causes the Messages app on an iPhone to crash completely. The app no longer launches, despite the typical workarounds like forced closes or phone reboots.

    At this point, the message bug appears to spread online with the following string of emoji, though it’s worth noting that the body can be easily modified by anyone, as long as the invisible Unicode characters are still there:

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Why it's important to get kids into public speaking

    Although she's only 16 years old, Keila Banks is already a veteran presenter at technology conferences. Her courage to get on stage in front of adults, beginning at the very young age of 11, to talk about open source technology has opened a world of opportunities for her.

    In her Lightning Talk at the 16th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE), Keila shares some of her amazing experiences, from the television studio to the White House, resulting from her conference presentations about open source, coding, and involving youth in technology.

    Watch Keila's Lightning Talk to learn more about how to leverage conference presentations to advance your career.

  • Firefox 60 and JAWS 2018 back in good browsing conditions together

    When Firefox Quantum was first released in November of 2017, it temporarily regressed users of the JAWS screen reader. I’m happy to report that both Firefox and JAWS once again deliver a first class browsing experience together!

  • These Weeks in Dev-Tools, issue 4

    Welcome to the 4th issue of these weeks in dev-tools! We've re-organised the
    teams a little bit and have been working hard towards the 2018 edition release.

    These Weeks in Dev-Tools will keep you up to date with all the exciting dev
    tools news. We plan to have a new issue every few weeks. If you have any news
    you'd like us to report, please comment on the tracking issue.

    If you're interested in Rust's developer tools and want to contribute or ask
    questions, come chat to us on Gitter.

  • How citizens become scientists with open hardware

    "Every person's piece of individual information put together gives you a cloud of real knowledge."

    Eymund Diegel, a research coordinator for Gowanus Canal Conservancy, shares this tidbit during the first clip of the new Open Source Stories documentary, "The Science of Collective Discovery." He's setting out in a canoe on an inner-city canal that is polluted and struggling to get the help it needs.

    That's the theme of citizen science it seems: people and places in need who are not getting the help and resources they deserve taking matters into their own hands. Why are they not getting the help they need in the first place? The reason is shockingly simple yet a typical problem: Where's the evidence?

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

MidnightBSD Could Be Your Gateway to FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

The Xfce desktop interface will make you feel right at home on MidnightBSD; learn how to set it up in this tutorial from Jack Wallen.
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs

FreeBSD is an open source operating system that descended from the famous Berkeley Software Distribution. The first version of FreeBSD was released in 1993 and is still going strong. Around 2007, Lucas Holt wanted to create a fork of FreeBSD that made use of the GnuStep implementation of the OpenStep (now Cocoa) Objective-C frameworks, widget toolkit, and application development tools. To that end, he began development of the MidnightBSD desktop distribution.

MidnightBSD (named after Lucas’s cat, Midnight) is still in active (albeit slow) development. The latest stable release (0.8.6) has been available since August, 2017. Although the BSD distributions aren’t what you might call user-friendly, getting up to speed on their installation is a great way to familiarize yourself with how to deal with an ncurses installation and with finalizing an install via the command line.

In the end, you’ll wind up with desktop distribution of a very reliable fork of FreeBSD. It’ll take a bit of work, but if you’re a Linux user looking to stretch your skills… this is a good place to start.

I want to walk you through the process of installing MidnightBSD, how to add a graphical desktop environment, and then how to install applications.

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Open source SDN project could let network admins duplicate production environments

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OSS

Software Defined Networking (SDN) is an increasingly attractive option for organizations looking to automate more of their data center operations. However, SDN deployments typically accompany vendor lock-in, as hardware manufacturers such as Cisco provide proprietary software solutions to go with bundles of network hardware. Similarly, turn-key software defined data center (SDDC) solutions often rely on top-down vendor integration, or have similar limitations for using products from qualified vendors.

One team is working to change that. Japanese software firm axsh is developing an open-\ source software stack—code named LiquidMetal—that combines their existing OpenVNet SDN software, with OpenVDC VM orchestration software.

With the two, the developers have made it possible to take an off-the-shelf dedicated switch, and configure it for any desired network topology, in effect making it possible to create complete identical copies of a given production network, including copying the IP and MAC addresses of each connected device. The LiquidMetal project also incorporates Terraform, Expect, and Ansible in their software stack.

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Education tech and battling stubborn Open Source myths

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OSS

When open source first hit the market, for many it was indistinguishable from The Free Software Movement. The key appeal was, indeed, that open source software was free – primarily because of the unchecked redistribution rights, where licences didn’t restrict any party from selling or giving away the software.

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A look at open source image recognition technology

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OSS

At the Supercomputing Conference in Denver last year, I discovered an interesting project as I walked the expo floor. A PhD student from Louisiana State University, Shayan Shams, had set up a large monitor displaying a webcam image. Overlaid on the image were colored boxes with labels. As I looked closer, I realized the labels identified objects on a table.

Of course, I had to play with it. As I moved each object on the table, its label followed. I moved some objects that were off-camera into the field of view, and the system identified them too.

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Is It Linux or GNU/Linux?

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GNU
Linux

After putting this question to the experts, the conclusion is that no matter what you call it, it's still Linux at its core.

Should the Linux operating system be called "Linux" or "GNU/Linux"? These days, asking that question might get as many blank stares returned as asking, "Is it live or is it Memorex?"

Some may remember that the Linux naming convention was a controversy that raged from the late 1990s until about the end of the first decade of the 21st century. Back then, if you called it "Linux", the GNU/Linux crowd was sure to start a flame war with accusations that the GNU Project wasn't being given due credit for its contribution to the OS. And if you called it "GNU/Linux", accusations were made about political correctness, although operating systems are pretty much apolitical by nature as far as I can tell.

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Kdenlive 18.04.1 released

While our team is working on the awaited refactoring, we still managed to add 2 small usability improvements in the 18.04.1. version. First the safe zone overlay was improved so you can now easily spot the center of your frame.

Then we improved the default background color for the titler so that white text can easily be read without having to make further adjustments.

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Changing the world, one line of code at a time

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Development
OSS

It's hard to beat the business case for open source: teams of motivated individuals working with intent to solve problems with software. But how do organisations attract and retain open source talent?

Increasingly, these engineers are turning up for the gig, and a good salary is no longer their only consideration.

They're also building their CVs on GitHub, which is more meaningful than their formal work experience, said Werner Knoblich, Red Hat's senior vice president and general manager for Europe, Middle East and Africa, at the company's summit in San Francisco this week.

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Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Red Hat: Whitehurst, More From Red Hat Summit, CoreOS

Filed under
Red Hat
  • IT Leaders Need To Agitate For Business Change, Says Red Hat CEO

    With the rate of technological change increasing at an overwhelming rate, organizations need to rework how they tackle and harness it, says Red Hat’s CEO.

    Red Hat CEO and president Jim Whitehurst says the rate at which innovations are now occurring across IT is now occurring at a rate most business will be able to effectively absorb unless a decision is made to fundamentally restructure how they are organized.

    In fact, Whitehurst says that IT leaders are assuming more proactive roles inside their organizations to drive business change.

  • Red Hat Summit reveals new cloud and microservice partnerships

    Several new partnerships were announced this week at the annual Red Hat Summit in San Francisco designed to accelerate enterprise adoption of microservices, cloud and containers.

    IBM and Red Hat announced a major expansion to their existing relationship designed to accelerate hybrid cloud adoption. This new partnership that will enable IBM and Red Hat users to benefit from both companies’ technologies in the private and public cloud space.

  • Red Hat celebrates ‘women of open source’ at RHS 2018

    Red Hat has announced the winners of its ‘Women in Open source’ awards at the company’s annual ‘Summit’ event, currently taking place in San Francisco.

    Dana Lewis, founder of the Open Artificial Pancreas System (OpenAPS) movement, and Zui Dighe, a Duke University student, were both formally honoured for their use of open source technologies.

    Red Hat says the awards are given out annually to women who demonstrate an innovative use of open source methodology, or those who make valuable contributions to open source communities.

  • Kubernetes and CNI: What’s Next — Making It Easier to Write Networking Plugins

    First proposed by CoreOS (now part of Red Hat) to define a common interface between network plug-ins and container execution, CNI is focused on the network connectivity and removing allocated resources when a container is deleted. CNI was released in 2016, and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Technical Oversight Committee voted last May to accept CNI as a hosted project.

Librem 5 Privacy-Focused Linux Phone Will Feature a GNOME Mobile UI Shell

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

Director of Creative at Purism, François Téchené, talks is a recent report about the first real design attempts of the user interface of Librem 5, which will be using a UI shell based on the GNOME desktop environment. The first version of this GNOME-based mobile UI shell for Librem 5 is called internally as “phosh” and will focus on efficiency and robustness, and Purism even wants to push it upstream as the "GNOME mobile shell."

"Our goal with the Librem 5 is to improve the visual identity of the Librem line while staying close to the minimalist and humble look that characterize the existing Librem line," said François Téchené, Director of Creative at Purism. "The main challenge of case design is the need to balance aesthetics, ergonomics, convenience, and technical limitations."

Read more

Also: Purism Shows Off Latest GNOME Mobile Shell Mockups For The Librem 5

GNOME 3.28.2 Released with Memory Leak Fixes for GNOME Shell, Update Now

Coming a month after the first point release, GNOME 3.28.2 is here with more bug fixes and improvements to make the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment as stable and reliable as possible. In particular, it includes fixes for the infamous GNOME shell memory leak everyone was talking about lately.

"I'm pleased to announce the release of GNOME 3.28.2, the final planned release for the GNOME 3.28 series. It includes numerous bugfixes, documentation improvements, and translation updates, notably some widely discussed memory leak fixes for GNOME shell," said Matthias Clasen in an email announcement.

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.28.2 Released With GJS Garbage Collection Fix To Address The Big Memory Leak

GNU/Linux on Laptops: Chrome OS and Pop_OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Chrome OS Now Supports Linux Apps, But Only On Google Pixelbook

    In a stunning new development, Chrome OS now supports full-fledged Linux apps, with a preview available beginning May 8 for Google Pixelbook users.

    Being able to run Linux is a drastic addition to Chrome OS, Google's proprietary operating system, which up until now has only supported web-based Chrome apps and Android apps. The arrival of Linux marks the first time Chrome OS will be able to run full desktop applications.

    As VentureBeat reports, Chrome OS product management director Kan Liu says users can use Linux-based tools, editors, and integrated development environments on a Chromebook, and the installation process is similar to that on a typical Linux machine.

  • Cats and dogs living together, Linux on Chromium, mass hysteria ...

    First we find out that Microsoft's best selling server is running on Linux and now you will be able to run Debian flavoured Linux apps such as Linux terminal, Git, Sublime, Vim and Android Studio on the Pixelbook.  This should help bridge the gap between Chromium and its far more popular and capable sibling, Android.  According to The Inquirer, Google expects this to be a seamless integration without requiring extra steps to launch the apps.  Perhaps one day we will see these two OSes start to combine as both Microsoft and Google seem to have noticed the unpopularity of skinny versions of their operating systems.

  • System76 Galago Pro Linux laptop now has two screen size options

    Just yesterday, we shared the news that System76 had refreshed its popular Oryx Pro laptop. The Linux community was abuzz with excitement over the thinner and faster notebook. After all, it offers a lot of horsepower at a very affordable price. Heck, the battery life has even doubled compared to its predecessor!

    The computer seller is apparently not ready to slow down, however, as today it also refreshes its affordable and svelte Galago Pro Linux ultrabook. What's particularly exciting about the new model is that it has two screen sizes -- 13 inch HiDPI or 14 inch 1080p (in matte). Regardless of which you choose, the overall dimensions stay the same. How can that be, you ask? Well, for the 14 inch model, the bezels are just thinner.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • ‘Crush Them’: An Oral History of the Lawsuit That Upended Silicon Valley

    The then-23-year-old giant, which ruled the personal computer market with a despotic zeal, stood accused of using monopoly power to bully collaborators and squelch competitors. Its most famous victim was Netscape, the pioneering web browser, but everyone from Apple to American Airlines felt threatened by late-’90s Microsoft. The company was big enough to be crowned America’s most valuable firm, bold enough to compare attacks on its domain to Pearl Harbor, and, eventually, bad enough to be portrayed as a (semifictionalized) cadre of hypercapitalist murderers in a major motion picture. The “don’t be evil” optics that colored the rise of today’s tech giants (and have recently lost their efficacy) were a direct response to Microsoft’s tyrannical rule.

  • Michał Górny: Empty directories, *into, dodir, keepdir and tmpfiles.d
  • FRAMED Collection, a noir-styled spy adventure where you rearrange comic tiles is now out
    It's actually a compilation of FRAMED and FRAMED 2, games that have been widely praised and previously only available on mobile platforms. It has you moving around slices of an animated comic book, to put the noir-styled spy adventure story together. It actually sounds hilarious, as it's not a basic "this one has to go here" type of game, as it changes what happens based on where you put the tiles creating some amusing sounding failures:
  • Paradox’s grand strategy titles will be getting more content soon
    At their annual convention, Paradox Interactive have announced new expansions for their current grand strategy titles. There’s a little bit of everything for fans of these games.
  • Why OpenShift Is The New OpenStack For Red Hat
  • Help the Debian kernel team to help you
    I gave the first talk this morning at Mini-DebConf Hamburg, titled "Help the kernel team to help you". I briefly described several ways that Debian users and developers can make it easier (or harder) for us to deal with their requests. The slides are up in on my talks page, and video should be available soon.
  • UbuCon Europe 2018: Analysing a dream [English|Spanish]
    The idea of organising the Ubucon in Xixon, Asturies was set two years ago, while participating in the European Ubucon in Essen (germany). The Paris Ubucon took place and in those days we uderstood that there was a group enough of people with the capacities and the will to hold an European Congress for Ubuntu lovers. We had learnt a lot from German and French colleagues thanks to their respective amazing organizations and, at the same time, our handicap was the lack of s consolidated group in Spain.
  • 19-year-old Developer at the Forefront of TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp
  • 19-years-old German developer Spearheads TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp
    No doubt that Tron community is preparing for mainnet launch, with different ideas coming in from all roads. As part of its readiness, Tron has unveiled its Opensource Wallet DApp developed by 19-year old German developer, Marius Gill, who has been programming since 13 years old. The DApp is an outcome of Project Genesis, which was launched in March 2018 purposely to encourage TRON’s community engagement in bringing in new things into Tron ecosystem. The project provides a bonus pool of 2 billion dollars for active members around the world have lent their hands in implementing ideas for the community.
  • Collabora and GStreamer spring in Sweden
    Earlier this month, a few of us from Collabora, Olivier Crête, Nicolas Dufresne, George Kiagiadakis and I attended the GStreamer Spring Hackfest in Lund, Sweden. Hosted by Axis Communications (who uses GStreamer in their surveillance cameras for many years now), it was a great opportunity for the GStreamer community to touch base and work on open bugs and pet projects. [...] As for myself, I mainly worked on (or rather started to work on) split-field interlacing support in GStreamer, adding relevant formats and modes in the GStreamer video library. In addition, as a Meson developer (Nirbheek Chauhan) was present, I took the opportunity to discuss with him the last bit of porting build system of Geoclue to Meson, a side project I've been working on. It helped me get it done faster but also helped Nirbheek find some issues in Meson and fix them! All in all, my first GStreamer hackfest was an awesome experience (even though I was not feeling well). It was also very nice to hangout and socialize with old and new friends in the GStreamer community after a long time. Many thanks again to Axis for hosting us in their offices! See you at the GStreamer Conference this fall!
  • Reality Redrawn Opens At The Tech
    The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose was filled on Thursday with visitors experiencing new takes on the issue of fake news by artists using mixed reality, card games and even scratch and sniff cards. These installations were the results of Mozilla’ Reality Redrawn challenge. We launched the competition last December to make the power of misinformation and its potential impacts visible and visceral. Winners were announced in February.
  • Tangerine UI problems
    I've been a big fan of Tangerine for a while, it's a bank that doesn't charge fees and does what I need to do. They used to have a great app and website and then it all went a bit wrong. It's now a HTML app for Desktop and mobile. This isn't the fault of the tools used, but there's some terrible choices in the app across both. [...] The overall feel of the app is that its full of spinners, far too cluttered and just to confusing. Hey not everything I've built is perfect, but even I can spot some real problems with this app. I pretty sure Tangerine can do better than this. And yes, I'm writing this while drinking a beer I recently bought, as shown on my transaction page.
  • Majority of software plagued by vulnerabilities as open source adoption soars [Ed: More of Black Duck's FUD]
  • SiFive Releases 'Expansion Board' to Build Interest in RISC-V Processor
  • FreeBSD 11.2 Beta 2 Available For Testing, Brings PTI Optimization
    The second beta release of FreeBSD 11.2 is now available for weekend testing. FreeBSD 11.2-BETA2 is now available with a variety of bug fixes, a fix to restore boot support for the Banana Pi ARM board, a context switch optimization for page table isolation (PTI), DTrace improvements, various build fixes, and a range of other system fixes.
  • Sony Is Working On AMD Ryzen LLVM Compiler Improvements - Possibly For The PlayStation 5
    One of Sony's compiler experts has taken to working on some tuning for the AMD Ryzen "znver1" microarchitecture support within the LLVM compiler stack. This begs the question why Sony is working on Ryzen improvements if not for a future product.
  • Popular YouTuber Says Apple Won't Fix His iMac Pro Damaged While Disassembled

    The damage resulted when they dropped the display while attempting to reattach it to the aluminum chassis. Towards the end of the video, Sebastian also says the iMac Pro requires a new logic board and power supply unit, suggesting there may have been a short circuit that caused damage to internal components as well.

  • Most dangerous new cyber security threats [iophk: "Windows TCO, yet neither Microsoft nor Windows get a mention"]

Steam Controller Kernel Driver Is Landing In The Linux 4.18 Kernel

The Linux 4.18 kernel will feature the initial Steam Controller kernel driver that works without having to use the Steam client or using third-party user-space applications like the SC-Controller application. A few months back we reported on a kernel driver being worked on for the Steam Controller by an independent user/developer outside of the gates of Valve. In part through reverse-engineering, Rodrigo Rivas Costa has been working on this native Steam Controller Linux kernel driver that works for both USB cable and wireless modes of the Steam Controller and is a proper HID driver. Read more

Video of AsteroidOS

KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released

KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released We today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.2.2 and 5.2.3. 5.2.2 was tagged 6 weeks ago, but we never managed to release it because we did not have the patience to fix the Windows installers in time due to a broken CI. Windows installers are provided for 5.2.3 again. We'll only provide source tarballs for 5.2.2 and we encourage everyone to just skip this release and use 5.2.3 which contains a few more bug fixes. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using KDevelop 5.2.1. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 19