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Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 11:36am
Story Mozilla Says Goodbye to Firefox Hello in Firefox 49 Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 11:35am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 11:34am
Story FOSS in Government (US and UK) Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 11:29am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 11:27am
Story Andy Wingo on CML versus Go Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 10:19am
Story Openwashing Proprietary Software Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 9:57am
Story GNOME/GTK News Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 9:50am
Story True Love...and Microsoft Love Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 9:41am
Story Rosy Red Hat, GNOME 3.22, MS/Lenovo Barricading Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 9:39am

Ayoub Elyasir: How Do You Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Ayoub Elyasir was born and raised in Tripoli, Libya. He currently works as a data engineer at Almadar. He says he’s passionate about “humanity, technology, open source, literature and poetry,” and enjoys swimming, body building and reading. Ayoub includes Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak as childhood heroes. His favorite food is grilled chicken and hummus.

Ayoub started using Linux years ago. In fact, he told us, “My migration to Linux dates back to 2008 with openSUSE 11.” Ayoub started to use Linux as a curiosity. However, today he uses Linux and open source products completely. He gradually shifted from KDE and openSUSE to Fedora with GNOME.

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A beginner's bumpy journey to find a few good bugs

Filed under
OSS

I'd been trying to contribute to open source for about two years. Yes. Two years. And there's one thing I can tell you with a lot of certainty—it is intimidating. It's tough to get started. You have to learn how to work within a large code base. You have to learn and adhere to a project's coding style guides. Nothing makes sense: the control flow, how different modules interact, how and why the code is organized the way it is—it's all one big maze. You need to muster a lot of courage to ask questions, dive into the code base knowing next to nothing, and keep fighting with it. (This is a generalization about how some projects operate, but many have difficulty making their projects accessible to new contributors.)

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Overcoming language and distance barriers in open source projects

Filed under
OSS

Open source communities were among the first to use the Internet to make the physical distance between people irrelevant. The Internet is a great tool, since it helps us collaborate wherever we are. It doesn't matter if you're having lunch at the Eiffel Tower or waking up in sunny San Francisco, the Internet has helped us connect people on deeper levels.

I am from Peru, and have always lived in Peru. I study in Peru, and the Internet has helped me find valuable information for projects and life in general. However, when I joined the the Linux community, my life changed radically.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

#SoftwareFreedom: India’s Lukewarm Relationship with FOSS Needs to Change

Filed under
OSS

For a over decade, the third Saturday of every September has been celebrated as Software Freedom Day in dozens of countries around the world. The free and open source software (FOSS) movement, which grew in the 1980s out of frustrations with restrictions on use of copyrighted software, has changed considerably in the last decade. Barring a few exceptions, there has been a dilution in the focus on replacing Windows’ domination of mainstream computing. But FOSS, which some people may know as Linux, still forms the backbone of our technological lives. In developing countries like India, where scaling affordable access to technology is an admitted priority of the government, the promotion and adoption of FOSS seems to be a viable and pragmatic policy decision.

Whether one is aware of it or not, FOSS is behind the majority of all computing that makes modern, digital life possible. FOSS runs most of all smartphones, supercomputers, ATMs, servers and websites around the world. In India, two massive citizen-facing projects, our railway booking website IRCTC, and Aadhaar’s online infrastructure, use Linux servers too. But why should you care for FOSS?

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4MLinux 20.0 Promises to Be a Special Version, Final Release Launches November 1

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia today, September 18, about the release and immediate availability for download of the Beta development milestone of his upcoming 4MLinux 20.0 GNU/Linux operating system.

And it looks like he has some big plans for the final, stable release of 4MLinux 20.0, which should hit the streets on November 1, 2016, promising users that it will be a special version of his independent operating system for personal computers, which always includes the latest and most advanced software versions and GNU/Linux technologies.

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Linux 4.8-rc7

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.8-rc7 Kernel Released: Final In 1~2 Weeks

    Linus Torvalds announced the release of Linux 4.8-rc7 a few minutes ago and it's looking like this release cycle will likely drag on with a 4.8-rc8 release being likely next week.

  • Linux Kernel 4.8 Could Land October 2 as Linus Torvalds Announces the Seventh RC

    Linus Torvalds just made his regular Sunday announcement to inform the community about the availability of the seventh and last Release Candidate (RC) development build of the forthcoming Linux 4.8 kernel series.

    According to Linus Torvalds, Linux kernel 4.8 Release Candidate 7 is once again bigger in patches than he was expected. Last week, we reported that things are calming down and that this series will be a normal one with seven RCs, but it now looks like it won't happen, and there should be one more RC released next week, September 25, 2016.

  • Linux 4.8-rc7

    Normally rc7 is the last in the series before the final release, but by now I'm pretty sure that this is going to be one of those releases that come with an rc8. Things did't calm down as much as I would have liked, there are still a few discussions going on, and it's just unlikely that I will feel like it's all good and ready for a final 4.8 next Sunday.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

FSF/GNU

Filed under
GNU
  • Discord at Libreboot Over GNU Withdrawal

    A member of the Libreboot development team has painted a picture of a lead developer who is out-of-control.

    It will probably not come as a surprise to anyone who’s been following the news about Libreboot’s sudden withdrawal from the GNU Project that not everyone connected with the Libreboot project is in agreement with project lead Leah Rowe’s recent actions.

  • Nextcloud’s $79 Box, Vim Gets an Update & More…

    The biggest story in FOSS this week was really something of a nonstory about Libreboot suddenly leaving the GNU project. We’ve already covered the initial story, as well as responses by both RMS and the FSF, so no need to flog this horse again.

  • Emacs 25.1 Released With Cairo Drawing, Better Network Security
  • GnuCash 2.6.14 released

    The GnuCash development team announces GnuCash 2.6.14, the fourteenth maintenance release in the 2.6-stable series. Please take the tour of all the new features.

FreeBSD 11.0 Gets One Last Release Candidate Build, Final Version Is Coming Soon

Filed under
BSD

FreeBSD's Glen Barber announced the other day that the third, and hopefully the last Released Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system is now available for public testing.

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FreeBSD 11.0 RC3

Filed under
BSD

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Hyperledger and the Linux Foundation Opens Doors to the Public Blockchain Space

    Hyperledger, a cross-industry collaborative effort started by the Linux Foundation and joined by many banks, giant tech companies, blockchain specific companies and others, with the aim of developing an open source protocol for private blockchain use, has extended its hand to the public blockchain community in what appears to be an offer of partnership and closer collaboration.

  • Display compositing? What is it and which one should you use?
  • GNOME Games 3.22: the Giant Leap

    I didn't blog about Games since quite some time and the app changed a lot since 3.18. 3.20 was quite a small update featurewise: it added support for MAME and Neo Geo Pocket games, added the About dialog, allowed l10n of the application, added a Preferences window listing the available plugins and fixed other small bugs, but this release mainly saw refactoring work with the introduction of the plugins system where plugins allow to list games: the Steam plugin lists Steam games and the SNES plugin lists SNES games.

  • Elementary OS 0.4 (Overview)
  • Has HPE bought SUSE? No. But here’s what did happen…

    There are a number of articles, blogs and social media posts out with headlines like ‘SUSE’s been bought by HPE.’ Clearly, this is a misunderstanding of what was announced last week but once a meme is out there, others often follow and echo without checking out the source information carefully.

    So, lets clear things up by calling out some of the facts:

  • Earth-friendly EOMA68 Computing Devices Progress and Events

    Now, if this was any other article I would be laughing and citing it as an example of how Wikipedia is seriously failing, but in this case it’s had an adverse and detrimental effect on you, the backers of this project. There exists now a public record - an accusation by a Senior Wikipedia Administrator - that you are “sock puppets” with a “vested conflict of interest” in making statements on Wikipedia. Worse than that I have had to invest considerable time in ensuring that the Wikipedia article does not bring the EOMA68 project into disrepute, by being comprised of false and misleading statements. That’s several days worth of potential delay to fulfilling the promises that I’ve made to you. So for that and many other reasons which I’ve documented on the page, I’m supporting the “Deletion” of the Wikipedia Page. The thing is: what people actually collaboratively developed (before the COI-inspired editing began) was actually really good, so that has been preserved on the “talk” page of the elinux.org EOMA68 Specification. But what’s up there now is just… utterly misleading.

  • Skylake box-PC targets transportation applications
  • Samsung Z2 (SM-Z200F) Certified in Indonesia, likely Launching soon

    A Samsung smartphone carrying the model number SM-Z200F and manufactured in Indonesia has been officially certified today (September 16, 2016) by the Directorate General of Resources and Equipment of Post and Information (DG SDPPI), the local authority under whose purview that falls.

    The Samsung Z2 which is known to have the model number SM-Z200F had earlier landed the Indonesian agency on August 22 for evaluation and testing. The status of the Z2 changed yesterday after completion of the testing and was indicated as awaiting approval. However, that approval did drop today.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE

Slackware Updates

Filed under
Slack
  • [Slackware] Sep ’16 Security fixes for Adobe Flash
  • Adobe is making a u-turn by resurrecting Flash Player for Linux
  • LibreOffice 5.2.1 for slackware-current

    The upgraded boost package in slackware-current last week had broken LibreOffice’s “localc” program. Which is typical because I compile LibreOffice with a “–without-system-boost” flag. Apparently a dependency on the system’s boost libraries gets added nevertheless. Patches to cure this behaviour are very welcome!

    Thus it became necessary to compile new packages for slackware-current. Co-incidentally there was also a new LibreOffice release last week: a minor upgrade to the 5.2 series, check out the announcement on the Document Foundation blog . And note their designation of this release: “LibreOffice 5.2.1, targeted at technology enthusiasts, early adopters and power users, provides a number of fixes over the major release announced in August. For all other users and enterprise deployments, TDF suggests LibreOffice 5.1.5 “.

Leftovers: Debian

Filed under
Debian
  • Fixing packages for broken Gtk3

    As mentioned on sunweaver’s blog Debian’s GTK-3+ v3.21 breaks Debian MATE 1.14, Gtk3 is breaking apps all around. But not only Mate, probably many other apps are broken, too, in particular Nemo (the file manager of Cinnamon desktop) has redraw issues (bug 836908), and regular crashes (bug 835043).

  • Statistics to Choose a Debian Package to Help

    In the last week I played a bit with UDD (Ultimate Debian Database). After some experiments I did a script to generate a daily report about source packages in Debian. This report is useful to choose a package that needs help.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 8.6 Released

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • A WebKit Update for Ubuntu

    I’m pleased to learn that Ubuntu has just updated WebKitGTK+ from 2.10.9 to 2.12.5 in Ubuntu 16.04. To my knowledge, this is the first time Ubuntu has released a major WebKit update. It includes fixes for 16 security vulnerabilities detailed in WSA-2016-0004 and WSA-2016-0005.

  • Nextcloud Box – a private cloud and IoT solution for home users
  • Nextcloud Box is an $80 private cloud server kit with 1TB of storage (just add a Raspberry Pi)

    Cloud storage services like Dropbox or Google Drive make it easy to store your files online and access them across a range of devices. But if you don’t want to give Google or Dropbox that much control over your data, you can also set up your own “private cloud” by installing OwnCloud or Nextcloud software on a server.

  • Download deepin 15.3 GNU/Linux

    Here are deepin 15.3 official download links plus some mirrors. deepin 15.3 is released recently at 13 September 2016. deepin 15.3 is released for 32 and 64 bit desktop computers. And you can read about how to verify ISO file checksums at the end of article. We hope this article helps you a lot.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more