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Wednesday, 24 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 11:12pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 10:38pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 10:13pm
Story 5 Tips To Master Linux Mohd Sohail 14/05/2017 - 8:18pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 6:06pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 6:05pm
Story Linux Devices and Android Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 6:05pm
Story GNOME/GTK News Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 6:04pm
Story Ubuntu on Laptops Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 6:03pm
Story Latest of Linux 4.11 and 4.12 Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2017 - 6:02pm

Leftovers: Devices, KDE, ArchBang, Grml and More

Filed under
Misc
  • Raspberry Pi Zero W fixes networking omission

    I don't recommend trying to use the Raspberry Pi Zero W as a GUI desktop alternative. It works, but it is slow. I mean, you can watch YouTube videos on it, but for an extra $25, you could get a Raspberry Pi 3 that has double the RAM and more horsepower to give you a better and more responsive experience than the Raspberry Pi Zero W.

  • Take a sneak peek at Google's Android replacement, Fuchsia

    An enthusiast has compiled Google's infant Fuchsia OS and put the toddler through its paces.

    The open-source OS is an open secret – anyone can download the platform from Github, and one enthusiast at Hotfix, a repair shop in Texas, has done just that.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.5, Krita 3.1.3 and digiKam 5.5 Coming Soon to Kubuntu 17.04 Users

    KDE's José Manuel Santamaría Lema is informing the Kubuntu Linux community today about the upcoming availability of a multitude of updates for various KDE technologies in the Kubuntu Backports PPA.

    It's a known fact that Kubuntu developers are always working hard to bring you all the latest goodies as soon as they are released upstream, and it looks like Kubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) users will be treated with the KDE Plasma 5.9.5 desktop environment, which is the last in the series as KDE Plasma 5.10 is coming at the end of May.

  • ArchBang OpenRC Rc iso
  • Grml 2017.05 "Freedatensuppe" Distro Enters Development Based on Debian Stretch

    The Debian-based Grml GNU/Linux distribution designed for system administrators is once again in development after taking a long break of approximately two and a half years.

    Dubbed "Freedatensuppe," the next major release of the operating system is versioned Grml 2017.05, and a first Release Candidate (RC) build is now available for public testing. Development of Grml 2017.05 is currently based on the Debian Testing branch, which will soon become Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch."

  • Much ado about communication

    One of the first challenges an open source project faces is how to communicate among contributors. There are a plethora of options: forums, chat channels, issues, mailing lists, pull requests, and more. How do we choose which is the right medium to use and how do we do it right?

    Sadly and all too often, projects shy away from making a disciplined decision and instead opt for "all of the above." This results in a fragmented community: Some people sit in Slack/Mattermost/IRC, some use the forum, some use mailing lists, some live in issues, and few read all of them.

  • What Internet-Connected War Might Look Like

    A technician hurriedly slings his backpack over his shoulders, straps on his M9 pistol, and bolts out of the transport with his squad of commandos in a hail of gunfire. As soon as his team reaches the compound, he whips out a laptop and starts deploying a rootkit to the target server, bullets whizzing overhead all the while.

Proprietary Browsers and Proprietary Games

Filed under
Software
Web
Gaming
  • Vivaldi 1.10 Web Browser to Let You Control New Tab Behavior Through Extensions

    The development of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.10 web browser continues at fast pace, and today we see the availability of a new snapshot, versioned 1.10.838.7, which implements more new features, but also fixes several regressions.

    Coming only one week after the previous snapshot, which added a new way to sort downloads, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.10.838.7 is the third in this development cycle, and it attempts to implement a new functionality that promises to allow users to control the behavior of new tabs directly from extensions. It will be located under Settings -> Tabs -> New Tab Page -> Control by Extension.

  • Opera Reborn “rethinks” the browser… with integrated WhatsApp and Facebook

    Vivaldi, which was created by Opera's co-founder and former CEO, continues along its own path, focusing on privacy, security, and interesting enhancements to tabbed browsing. Vivaldi hit version 1.9 last week and now lets you "plant trees as you surf."

  • Wednesday Madness, a quick look at some good Linux gaming deals
  • Project Zomboid adds vehicles in a new beta

    I've tested it and as they mentioned in the announcement forum post, it is an early work in progress. Cars have no sound, sometimes other textures go on top of the car which looks weird and there are other issues. Even so, it's still awesome to finally be able to play around with vehicles to move around the map quicker.

GTK+ 3.22.13 and WebKitGTK+ 2.16.2

Filed under
Development
GNU
GNOME
  • GTK+ 3.22.13 Introduces More Wayland Improvements, Fixes for Some Memory Leaks

    While work on the major GTK+ 4 series advances at a slow pace, the GTK+ 3.22 stable branch is still being updated, and today we see the launch of yet another bugfix release, the thirteenth in the series.

    GTK+ 3.22.13 is a maintenance release that adds a month's worth of fixes and updated translations from various contributors. The bug fixes are typically small but significant and include a memory leak fix for the Wayland display server when exporting handle, a memory leak fix for linkbutton, and a quartz backend segfault fix, which was a regression from last month's point release, GTK+ 3.22.12.

  • WebKitGTK+ 2.16.2 Updates User Agent Quirks for New Google Login Page, YouTube

    WebKitGTK+, the open-source and full-featured port of the WebKit rendering engine to the GTK+ GUI toolkit used to build modern applications for the GNOME desktop environment was updated today to version 2.16.2.

    WebKitGTK+ 2.16.2 is just a small bugfix release that only resolves some of the issues users reported since the first maintenance update of the WebKitGTK+ 2.16 stable series. The most prominent change being improved user agent quirks to add compatibility for Google's new login page and YouTube.

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • SUSE Unveils OpenStack Cloud Monitoring & Supports TrilioVault

    Today at the OpenStack Summit 2017 in Boston, MA, SUSE, aside from celebrating its 25th anniversary, announced its new open source software solution that makes it simple to monitor and manage the health and performance of enterprise OpenStack cloud environments and workloads, SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring. In other SUSE related news, Trilio Data, announced that its TrilioVault is Ready Certified for SUSE OpenStack Cloud.

  • Students to Enhance Multiple Open Source Projects

    Five students will spend this summer putting their coding skills into practice for openSUSE and other projects during this year’s Google Summer of Code.

    The international program that matches mentors and students funded 1,315 student projects this year for 201 open source organizations, who will benefit from the active involvement from these new developers.

    “We are excited to be selected as a mentoring organization and to mentor these talented, young GSoC students,” said Christian Bruckmayer, one of the openSUSE mentors. “This year’s projects focus on enhancing the capabilities of our open source tools, so that the benefits are shared amongst the open-source ecosystem.”

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • MapD Open Sources GPU-Powered Database

    Since starting work on MapD more than five years ago while taking a database course at MIT, I had always dreamed of making the project open source. It is thus with great pleasure to announce that today our company is open sourcing the MapD Core database and associated visualization libraries, effective immediately.

  • Enterprise Open Source Programs: From Concept to Reality

    How pervasive is open source in today’s businesses? According to the 2016 Future of Open Source Survey from Black Duck and North Bridge, a mere three percent of respondents say they don't use any open source tools or platforms.

    Leveraging open source has also become a key avenue for fostering new ideas and technologies. Gartner's Hype Cycle for Open Source Software (2016) notes that organizations are using open source today not just for cost savings, but increasingly for innovation. With this in mind, major companies and industries are quickly building out their open source programs, and the open source community is responding.

  • LinuxFest Northwest report

    This weekend was LinuxFest Northwest 2017, and as usual I was down in Bellingham to attend it. Had a good time, again as usual. Luckily I got to do my talk first thing and get it out of the way. I’d post a link to the recording, but there doesn’t seem to be one – I’ll check with the organizers if it got lost or sometihng. In the mean time, here’s the slide deck. It was a general talk on Fedora’s past, present and future.

  • Aleph Objects and IC3D promote transparency with first Open Source Hardware filament

    Aleph Objects, best-known for developing the LulzBot brand of 3D printers, has announced the launch and availability of a certified Open Source Hardware 3D printing filament at RAPID+TCT.

  • What does SVG have to do with teaching kids to code?

    Jay Nick is a retired electrical engineer who volunteers at local schools in his community by using art as a creative way to introduce students to mathematics and coding. Reflecting on the frustrations that his own children experienced in college programming classes, he decided to use his own experience with Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) to create an approach to coding that combines principles of mathematics and art.

  • Microsoft's .NET-mare for developers: ASP.NET Core 2.0 won't work on Windows-only .NET

    Microsoft has made a change to its forthcoming ASP.NET Core 2.0 web framework so that it is now incompatible with the Windows-only .NET Framework, causing confusion and annoyance for some .NET developers.

Solus - how far will it go?

Filed under
Reviews

The Live run of Solus was stable, fast and smooth. I especially liked the crispness of the fonts, windows and of all the elements.

At the same time, if you want to use Solus Budgie as a production OS, I'd recommend you to think twice. The main show-stopper for me would be the unknown format for supported packages. It locks down the number of available applications to whatever is available in official repositories, and there are already some gaps. Of course, there are some doubtful decisions on default set of applications and default desktop items, but that's easy to fix.

I hope that Solus will develop further and this is not my last visit to that part of the Linux world. I hope the team will not run out of patience and resources.

Read more

Mesa 17.1 Released and Other Graphics News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • GeForce Experience Picks Up OpenGL/Vulkan Support, Linux Up Next?

    NVIDIA's gaming software, GeForce Experience, now has support for OpenGL and Vulkan.

    GeForce Experience is NVIDIA's software often paired with their Windows driver for managing game updates, analyzing GPU/CPU metrics, game setting optimizations, and recently the focus on being able to record your video game sessions as well as take screenshots with NVIDIA Ansel. Experience also allows game streaming to SHIELD devices with NVIDIA GameStream.

  • Mesa 17.1 Released, Adds RADV Vulkan Conforming Patches

    Mesa 17.1.0 is now officially available as the Q2'2017 update to this important piece to the open-source 3D Linux graphics driver stack.

    Mesa 17.1 ships with many ANV and RADV Vulkan driver fixes, the OpenGL shader cache is in place and enabled by default for RadeonSI, some work on OpenGL AZDO extensions, Ivy Bridge OpenGL 4.2 support up from GL 3.3, initial Radeon RX Vega support, some performance optimizations, and a wealth of other changes.

  • Better Driver Matching For X.Org Server 1.20

    A two-year-old patch for the X.Org Server from a NVIDIA developer has finally landed.

    The xfree86: Improved autoconfig drivers matching is now in xorg-server Git. This 100+ line patch implements a new auto configuration driver matching algorithm. The benefit is the driver matching code is made easier and also doesn't end up adding duplicate drivers on the case of multiple GPUs.

  • GPUOpen's CodeXL 2.3 Brings Ryzen Support, AMDGPU-PRO Compatibility

    AMD's CodeXL utility that's open-source under the GPUOpen umbrella for graphics profiling/debugging is up to version 2.3.

    CodeXL 2.3 adds support on Linux systems for operating with the AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver. Other prominent features include Radeon Polaris GPU support as well as support for AMD Ryzen processors with the addition of supporting its performance counters, etc.

  • CodeAurora Continues Contributions To Freedreno's MSM DRM Driver

    While there are still a few days left until the Linux 4.12 merge window closes and the 4.12 release candidates for the next two months, the Qualcomm-backed CodeAurora already has lined up some new code for the reverse-engineered, community-driven Freedreno MSM DRM driver for Adreno hardware.

Linux 4.12, Linux 3.12.74, and Linux Foundation Nets SNAS.io

Filed under
Linux
  • Btrfs Gets RAID 5/6 Fixes With Linux 4.12

    There are a number of Btrfs fixes/clean-ups for the Linux 4.12 kernel.

    Btrfs on 4.12 doesn't have any big new features or major performance boosts, but it does notably have RAID5 and RAID6 fixes that are needed as outlined in that earlier article. So those wanting to run Btrfs on a RAID 5/6 array will definitely want to be using Linux 4.12+ once stable.

  • TEE Proposed For Merging In Linux 4.12: "Trusted" Execution Environment

    The ARM folks have requested that the TEE subsystem and OP-TEE drivers be included in Linux 4.12, the Trusted Execution Environment.

    The Trusted Execution Environment is is about communicating with a trusted OS running in a secure environment, separate from the Linux kernel itself. Of course, any time "trusted" computing is brought up in Linux/open-source there are a fair number of concerned individuals, especially in light of the recent major vulnerability in Intel AMT.

  • More Power Management Updates Head To The Linux 4.12 Kernel

    Last week was the main ACPI / power management updates for Linux 4.12 while Intel's Rafael Wysocki has now submitted a second set of feature updates for this next version of the Linux kernel.

  • IOMMU Updates, Optimizations For Linux 4.12

    There are a number of IOMMU optimizations queued for Linux 4.12.

    Joerg Roedel submitted the IOMMU kernel updates today for Linux 4.12. Among the changes for this important component to modern systems include code optimizations to the Intel VT-d driver, IOMMU core header optimizations, Samsung Exynos IOMMU optimizations, and ARM/SMMU optimizations.

  • Linux Kernel 3.12.74 Looks to Be the Last in the Series, Move to a Newer Branch

    Linux kernel developer and maintainer Jiri Slaby announced today the release and immediate availability of what it would appear to be the last maintenance update to the Linux 3.12 kernel series.

    Linux kernel 3.12.74 is out and it looks to be the last in the series, according to its maintainer, who urges all those using the Linux 3.12 kernel branch on their GNU/Linux distributions to start considering moving to a newer LTS (Long Term Support) Linux kernel, such as Linux 3.16, Linux 4.1, Linux 4.4, or Linux4.9.

    However, if you choose to remain on this branch at least update to Linux kernel 3.12.74, which changes a total of 78 files, with 834 insertions and 524 deletions, according to the appended shortlog. Improvements are all over the places, for various architectures, drivers, filesystems, security, and the networking stack.

  • Linux 3.12.74
  • SNAS.io, Formerly OpenBMP Project, Joins The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Networking Umbrella

    We are excited to announce that SNAS.io, a project that provides network routing topologies for software-defined applications, is joining The Linux Foundation’s Networking and Orchestration umbrella. SNAS.io tackles the challenging problem of tracking and analyzing network routing topology data in real time for those who are using BGP as a control protocol, internet service providers, large enterprises, and enterprise data center networks using EVPN.

Git 2.13 has been released

Filed under
Development
  • Git 2.13 has been released

    The open source Git project has just released Git 2.13.0, with features and bugfixes from over 65 contributors. Before we dig into the new features, we have a brief security announcement.

  • Git 2.13 Released, Adds SHA-1 Collision Detection

    Git 2.13 is now available as the latest version of this widely-used, open-source version control system.

  • Git 2.13 Source Code Management System Released with SHA-1 Collision Detection

    The Git project, through Jeff King, happily announced today the release and immediate availability of the Git 2.13 open source project management system for all supported platforms.

    As expected, Git 2.13 is a major update that adds numerous improvements, new features, and countless bug fixes from more than 65 contributors. It's now considered the new stable branch and it's a recommended update for all users on all platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. However, this version comes with a security announcement about a vulnerability in "git shell."

    "For those running their own Git hosting server, Git 2.13 fixes a vulnerability in the git shell program in which an untrusted Git user can potentially run shell commands on a remote host. This only affects you if you're running a hosting server and have specifically configured git shell. If none of that makes sense to you, you're probably fine," said Jeff King, Open Source Software Developer at GitHub.

Solus Receives Better Bluetooth A2DP Audio and Scanning Support, Other Goodies

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Solus Project's Joshua Strobl is reporting today in a new installation of the This Week In Solus (TWiS) newsletter on the latest work done by him and project leader Ikey Doherty for their beloved and very popular Solus operating system.

Last week - like many others before it - was extremely busy for the development team behind Solus, an independently-developed GNU/Linux distribution. The team finally managed to migrate the project's Git repositories and patch management system to the Diffusion and Differential apps of their Phabricator dev tracker tool.

This move has many implications for the ever-growing community and package maintainers, and you can read all about it in This Week In Solus Install #44, which brings many other good news for the regular Solus user as scanning and Bluetooth A2DP audio support has been greatly improved thanks to donators and patrons.

Read more

EIB provides EUR 25 million funding for MariaDB open-source database system

Filed under
OSS

The European Investment Bank (EIB), the non-profit lending institution of the European Union, will provide EUR 25 million in funding to the eponymous Finnish company behind the MariaDB open-source database system. MariaDB will use the money to expand its customer base in Europe, America and Asia, and to hire more developers in Helsinki.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Cisco kills leaked CIA 0-day that let attackers commandeer 318 switch models

    As previously reported, the zero-day exploit allowed attackers to issue commands that remotely execute malicious code on 318 models of Cisco switches. The attack code was published in early March by WikiLeaks as part of its Vault7 series of leaks, which the site is billing as the largest publication of intelligence documents ever.

    The bug resides in the Cisco Cluster Management Protocol (CMP), which uses the telnet protocol to deliver signals and commands on internal networks. It stems from a failure to restrict telnet options to local communications and the incorrect processing of malformed CMP-only telnet options.

  • Open source password strength meter could help boost account security

    It's no secret that most people are rubbish at choosing passwords -- it's something that's proved time and time again when the annual list of common passwords is released. To help overcome the problem, and hopefully increase the security of people's accounts, a team of researchers from the Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Chicago have created an open source password meter that provides advice about how to strengthen a password.

  • Apache OpenOffice: Not dead yet, you'll just have to wait until mid-May for mystery security fixes
  • NIST to security admins: You've made passwords too hard

    Despite the fact that cybercriminals stole more than 3 billion user credentials in 2016, users don't seem to be getting savvier about their password usage. The good news is that how we think about password security is changing as other authentication methods become more popular.

  • Google Docs Phishing Scam a Game Changer

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Fans Can Build Their Own AI Voice Assistant

    Google and AIY Projects last week launched an open source do-it-yourself artificial intelligence Voice Kit for Raspberry Pi hobbyists.

    The AIY Voice Kit includes hardware for audio capture and playback, connectors for the dual mike daughterboard and speaker, GPIO pins to connect low-voltage components such as micro servos and sensors, and an optional barrel connector for a dedicated power supply.

    The Voice Kit can use cloud services such as the recently released Google Assistant SDK, which is enabled by default, or it can use the Cloud Speech API or run completely on-device.

  • Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0 Supports Raspberry Pi Zero W, Based on Chromium 56

    After informing us last month about the release of Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0 for Raspberry Pi single-board computers, Binary Emotions is informing us today about the availability of Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0.

  • Portwell’s four new RS4U industrial PCs use a common API stack

    Portwell’s “RS4U” industrial computers feature a standard set of Portwell APIs. The first four models support Intel Apollo Lake, Skylake, and Haswell CPUs.

  • Rugged PC/104 SBC sandwich runs on Kaby Lake

    VersaLogic’s Linux-ready, sandwich-style “Liger” offers 7th Gen Core CPUs, ruggedization features, and mini-PCIe, SPI/SPX, and PC/104-Plus expansion.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • What is Docker's Moby Project?

    Being an Austinite, I enjoyed having DockerCon local, and I co-authored a guide to visiting Austin in the hopes that attendees would enjoy having DockerCon in Austin as well.

    During DockerCon 2017, a few major announcements were made, including the Moby Project.

  • Verizon taps into open source, white box fervor with new CPE offering

    Verizon this week said it would begin offering x86-based servers with OpenStack software aimed at customers looking to support all manner of advanced cloud, software defined networking and network functions virtualization-based enterprises.

  • Web-based open-source program determines protein structures

    ContaMiner is a web-based, open-source program developed by a unique interdisciplinary team in King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia. This program is already saving time for international researchers.

    "How much can you understand and repair a car if you don't have a detailed picture of what is going on under the hood?" said KAUST Associate Professor Stefan Arold. "Proteins are life's workhorses: their function and dysfunction both create life and end it. Each protein's amino acid sequence folds into a particular 3-D structure that is required to support its function. If you want to understand, affect or engineer a protein's function, you need to know its 3-D structure," he explained.

  • MapD tech open sources their Core Database

    MapD Technologies, a GPU-powered analytics company, has released their Core database to the open source community under the Apache 2 license, seeding a new generation of data applications. By open sourcing the MapD Core database and associated visualization libraries, they are making their analytics platform available to everyone.

  • MINIX 3.4 RC6 Released

    The release of MINIX 3.4 is inching closer with the availability now of its sixth release candidate.

    MINIX 3.4 will be the first update since MINIX 3.3 in 2014. We've been seeing release candidates now of MINIX 3.4 for the past year but it appears the final release is getting closer. MINIX for the uninitiated is a Unix-like microkernel-based OS started by Andrew Tanenbaum.

  • Thunderbird’s Future Home

    The investigations on Thunderbird’s future home have concluded. The Mozilla Foundation has agreed to serve as the legal and fiscal home for the Thunderbird project, but Thunderbird will migrate off Mozilla Corporation infrastructure, separating the operational aspects of the project.

  • 4 Python libraries for building great command-line user interfaces

    This is the second installment in my two-part series on terminal applications with great command-line UIs. In the first article, I discussed features that make a command-line application a pure joy to use. In part two, I'll look at how to implement those features in Python with the help of a few libraries. By the end of this article, readers should have a good understanding of how to use Prompt Toolkit, Click (Command Line Interface Creation Kit), Pygments, and Fuzzy Finder to implement an easy-to-use REPL.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Native color temperature tweaking with Night Light

    RedShift is a utility that we have previously featured here at the Fedora Magazine. It is a small utility that automatically tweaks the color temperature towards the red end of the spectrum after dark. Blue light — which is typically emitted by a monitor — is shown to negatively impact sleep patterns if you are exposed to it after dark. Night Light is a new feature arriving in Fedora 26 Workstation — thanks to it being introduced in GNOME 3.24. Night Light provides the functionality of RedShift without having to install a separate utility or extension.

  • Transfer.sh – Easy And Fast Way to Share Files From The Command-Line
  • What is YOUR Essential FOSS Program?

    We all have at least one or maybe even a handful of programs we seemingly just can't live without. You know, that program that you instantly go looking for as soon as you've installed your new shiny OS (or Linux distribution, more specifically in our case). For me, personally it's the Vim text editor.

    I decided to narrow this down to Free and Open Source Software specifically, as while it's probably not necessary given our audience, it's always possible someone would jump up and say something like 'Adobe Illustrator' is their most essential tool! Which is fine in itself, some people do depend on such tools for their occupation or hobbies.

  • GCC 6/7 Gets A Performance-Sensitive Fix

    A Phoronix reader pointed out a performance regression fix now available for GCC 6 and GCC 7 that could help some rather trivial C code perform much better.

  • Cockpit is now just an apt install away
  • Cockpit Comes To Ubuntu, Easier Linux Server Administration

    Cockpit, the open-source project providing a pleasant web-based administrative interface to Linux systems and developed significantly by Red Hat / Fedora developers, is now officially available in Ubuntu and Debian.

    Cockpit is now available in Debian unstable as well as Ubuntu 17.04 and 17.10 repositories. Details on Cockpit coming to Ubuntu/Debian were shared today on Martin Pitt's blog, a prominent Debian/Ubuntu developer. There is also work on getting the Cockpit packages added to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS backports, but as of writing that has yet to be completed.

OpenWRT and LEDE agree on LInux-for-routers peace plan

Filed under
Linux

Competing Linux-for-routers distributions OpenWRT and LEDE will soon vote on a proposal to heal the schism between the two.

OpenWRT is often used as firmware for small routers, largely SOHO WiFi kit. But in March 2016 a group of developers decided they didn't like the directions OpenWRT was taking and forked the project by creating the Linux Embedded Development Environment – LEDE – project. LEDE developers said they wanted to create a distribution that was more transparent and democratic than OpenWRT, followed a more predictable release schedule and produced stable code.

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GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat

Debian and Derivatives

  • Reproducible Builds: week 108 in Stretch cycle
  • Debuerreotype
    The project is named “Debuerreotype” as an homage to the photography roots of the word “snapshot” and the daguerreotype process which was an early method of taking photographs. The essential goal is to create “photographs” of a minimal Debian rootfs, so the name seemed appropriate (even if it’s a bit on the “mouthful” side).
  • The end of Parsix GNU/Linux
    The Debian-based Parsix distribution has announced that it will be shutting down six months after the Debian "Stretch" release.
  • Privacy-focused Debian 9 'Stretch' Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 reaches RC status
    If you want to keep the government and other people out of your business when surfing the web, Tails is an excellent choice. The Linux-based operating system exists solely for privacy purposes. It is designed to run from read-only media such as a DVD, so that there are limited possibilities of leaving a trail. Of course, even though it isn't ideal, you can run it from a USB flash drive too, as optical drives have largely fallen out of favor with consumers. Today, Tails achieves an important milestone. Version 3.0 reaches RC status -- meaning the first release candidate (RC1). In other words, it may soon be ready for a stable release -- if testing confirms as much. If you want to test it and provide feedback, you can download the ISO now.