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Tuesday, 05 May 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Btrfs RAID Testing Begins With Linux 4.0 Roy Schestowitz 01/05/2015 - 5:23pm
Story Arch Linux 2015.05.01 Is Now Available for Download with Linux Kernel 4.0.1 Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2015 - 11:10am
Story Linksys WRT1200AC: A fast, full-featured, open-source-friendly router Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2015 - 10:59am
Story Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet Review Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2015 - 10:48am
Story How containers will shape the Drupal ecosystem Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2015 - 10:43am
Story After OpenStreetMap - OpenSeaMap Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2015 - 10:35am
Story Ubuntu Make 0.7 released with Visual Studio Code support Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2015 - 8:02am
Story GNOME Shell 3.17.1 Makes it Easy to Move to a Different Monitor Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2015 - 4:48am
Story Mozilla: Deprecating Non-Secure HTTP Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2015 - 4:44am
Story Linux-ready i.MX6 SBC is loaded with wireless options Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2015 - 4:39am

World's largest open source health information technology project tackles Ebola

Filed under
OSS

An accurate, up to the minute, accessible medical record system is fundamental to effective treatment and tracking of the Ebola virus. But how to create this type of system in the rudimentary, overwhelmed Ebola care centers of West Africa where paper records or computers—even if they were available—couldn't be carried in and out of treatment areas?
As Ebola surged in resource-constrained Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea in the fall of 2014, the ingenious concept of a tablet computer usable by individuals in bulky protective gear and encased in polycarbonate enabling simple and repeated disinfection was developed and implemented by Google and Doctors Without Borders teams, solving the hardware part of the problem.
But what software to use on the specialized tablets and on the server where critical information is stored? Enter the OpenMRS community, who drives the world's largest open source project to develop health information technology for resource-constrained environments.

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Bazel, Google’s Open Source Build System

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OSS

One of the most important, yet unsung, applications in a software developer’s life is the Make utility, or its equivalent. Make first appeared in 1977 and has been with us ever since. There are a very large number of build utilities, some based on Make, others completely different. The principle remains the same. The build system has a set of rules that tell it how to build an application from source files, usually fetched from a version control system. The Make utility reads the rules, then runs the compilers and linkers to do the build. The really good ones will run tests, as well.

Google has been using their own system, called Blaze, and open-sourced part of it as the anagrammatically named Bazel — recently released at alpha status. In this article I’ll give a general overview of Bazel.

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A MAN WITH HIS FINGERS IN MILLIONS OF PIES

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Over 5 million Raspberry Pis have been sold. That’s the same as the number of ZX Spectrums sold in the 80s. And like the Spectrum, the Pi is likely to have a far-reaching and transformative legacy, helping the next generation of games designer and computer scientists find their feet. There are countless numbers of people who have helped make this happen, but Eben Upton has been there from the beginning. He’s the founder and the CEO, and he’s still shaping every aspect of the Raspberry Pi, from its hardware to the software, albeit now with a little more help than when the foundation started. We met with Eben a couple of weeks before the launch of the monumental model 2 where he generously answered our questions despite a terrible cold.

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BackBox Linux 4.2 Is a Complete Penetration Testing Distro Based on Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS

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Ubuntu

BackBox Linux, a distribution based on Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS, developed perform penetration tests and security assessments has just received a new update and is now ready for download.

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Imagination to release open MIPS design to academia

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Linux

Imagination is releasing a free version of its Linux-ready MIPS MicroAptiv CPU to universities called “MIPSfpga,” which will offer fully transparent RTL.

Imagination Technologies has developed a Linux-ready academic version of its 32-bit MIPS architecture MicroAptiv processor design, and is giving it away free to universities for use in computer research and education. As the MIPSfpga name suggests, the production-quality RTL (register transfer level) design abstraction is intended to run on industry standard FPGAs.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • newsFish news client for ownCloud

    While I was using my Nexus 7, I missed the convenience of my news client, so I polished up the code a bit and ported it to Qt5/QtQuick2. Due to the excellent cross platform support of Qt, testing was done on the desktop, and it seems like it wouldnt be completely unusable as a desktop application, so, when I post the code to Github later, feel free to build yourself a desktop version!

  • Cantor in KDE Applications 15.04

    I started the Cantor port to Qt5/KF5 during previous LaKademy and I continued the development along the year. Maybe I had pushed code from 5 different countries since the beginning of this work.

    The change for this new technology was successfully completed, and for the moment we don’t notice any feature missed or new critical bug. All the backends and plugins were ported, and some new bugs created during this work were fixed.

  • What are good command line HTTP clients?

    The whole is greater than the sum of its parts is a very famous quote from Aristotle, a Greek philosopher and scientist. This quote is particularly pertinent to Linux. In my view, one of Linux's biggest strengths is its synergy. The usefulness of Linux doesn't derive only from the huge raft of open source (command line) utilities. Instead, it's the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with larger applications.

It Doesn't Look Like KDBUS Will Make It For Linux 4.1

Filed under
Linux

While Linux 4.1 is bringing many new features and improvements, there's one addition that's noticeably absent.

To frequent Phoronix readers, the missing feature is, of course, KDBUS. KDBUS developers had been planning to land it in 2014 but that didn't pan out and now most likely they're looking at a H2'2015 arrival for this feature.

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Also: The Many Features Of The Linux 4.1 Kernel

With Linux 4.1 You Can Play With The Chrome OS Lightbar

Dell Keyboard Backlight Support In Linux 4.1

Intel Bay Trail & Cherry Trail CPUs To Run Faster With Linux 4.1

An open source, e-commerce friendly CMS

Filed under
OSS

Developers Peter Ivanov, Alex Raikov, and I came up with the idea for Microweber about five years ago, when we were all having problems building sites with the existing solutions.

Microweber aims to take the complexity out of building a website, online shop, or blog, through a combination of drag-and-drop UI and real-time, WYSIWYG site edits.

From the beginning, it's been an open source project. The earliest versions were licensed under GPL, but we switched to Apache License version 2.0 to allow the developers to protect their work and have commercial merits.

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Change a Ton of Unity Features in Ubuntu 15.04 with Unsettings

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Ubuntu

Unsettings is a graphical configuration program that can be used to change a large number of Unity settings. A new update has been released and now Ubuntu 15.04 is also supported.

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What is open source? Licensing, history, and more

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OSS

Another example of open source: You wouldn’t buy a car with the hood welded shut, so why do we buy proprietary software? If you can’t see what’s going on and see what’s happening under the hood then you’re stuck with the car exactly the way it is and that might not be so great. While some people are fine with that, computer geeks shouldn’t be. We should want to get in there and tinker with it.

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Top Features of Ubuntu MATE 15.04, Latest Member of the Ubuntu Family

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE 15.04 is the first edition of this operating as an official member of the Ubuntu family, but it's been around for longer than just a development cycle. Users might appreciate if we pointed out some of the cool features that have been added in the Vivid branch.

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Debian 8 Jessie Cinnamon Live CD Screenshot Tour

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Debian

As you might know, the Debian GNU/Linux 8.0 (Jessie) operating system has been announced on April 25, 2015, and it is the first ever release to include optional Cinnamon and MATE desktop environments that users can test via Live CDs.

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CHROMIXIUM 1.0 – FINAL STABLE VERSION IS OUT NOW!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Chromixium combines the elegant simplicity of the Chromebook with the flexibility and stability of Ubuntu’s Long Term Support release. Chromixium puts the web front and center of the user experience. Web and Chrome apps work straight out of the browser to connect you to all your personal, work and education networks. Sign into Chromium to sync all your apps and bookmarks. When you are offline or when you need more power, you can install any number of applications for work or play, including LibreOffice, Skype, Steam and a whole lot more. Security updates are installed seamlessly and effortlessly in the background and will be supplied until 2019. You can install Chromixium in place of any existing operating system, or alongside Windows or Linux.

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Fedora-Based Qubes OS 3.0 Release Candidate 1 Linux Distro Now Available for Testing

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Joanna Rutkowska announced the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Release Candidate version of the forthcoming Qubes OS 3.0 computer operating system based on the Fedora Linux distribution.

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Debian GNU/Linux 9.0 Will Be Named Stretch

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GNU
Linux
Debian

On April 26, the Debian Release Team, through Niels Thykier, announced that the next major release of the acclaimed Debian GNU/Linux computer operating system will be named Stretch.

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Linux 4.1-rc1

Filed under
Linux

It's been a normal merge window, and I'm releasing according to the
normal schedule. The few days of travel didn't seem to matter, as I
had internet access at all times.

The merge window is pretty normal in terms of what got merged too.
Just eyeballing the size, it looks like this is going to fit right in
- while 4.0 was a bit smaller than usual, 4.1 seems to be smack dab in
the middle of the normal range for the last couple of years. And all
the patch statistics look normal as well: the bulk of the changes are
to drivers (just under 60% of the patch), with arch updates being
about 20% of it all, and the rest is spread all over.

No earth-shattering new features come to mind, even if initial support
for ACPI on arm64 looks funny. Depending on what you care about, your
notion of "big new feature" may differ from mine, of course. There's a
lot of work all over, and some of it might just make a big difference
to your use cases.

So go out and test. Even -rc1, as raw as it may sometimes be, has
tended to be pretty good. It's not that scary. Promise.

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Quad-core ARM TV-PC dual boots Android and Ubuntu

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

Ugoos launched a $179 “UT3S” TV-PC that dual boots Android 4.4 and Ubuntu 14.10 on a 1.8GHz quad-core Cortex-A17 Rockchip RK3288, and supports 4Kx2K video.

Finding a media player or mini-PC that runs Android is easy, but finding one that ships with other species of Linux pre-installed is a bit trickier. Now Ugoos has released a TV-focused Ugoos UT3S mini-PC that can run either Android 4.4 or Ubuntu 14.10 in dual-boot mode.

Whereas Ugoos’s earlier Android-based UM2 stick-PC and UT2 mini-PC used the quad-core, Cortex-A9 Rockchip RK3188 SoC clocked to 1.6GHz, the UT3S moves up to the quad-core, Cortex-A17 RK3288 at 1.8GHz. The RK3288, which ships with ARM’s Mali-T764 GPU, is also found in new Android media players including the Tronsmart Orion R28.

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Q4OS 1.2 final

We are proud to announce the immediate availability of the new Q4OS 1.2 release, codenamed 'Orion', supported until 1st May 2020 at least.

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Also: Q4OS 1.2 Arrives with the Trinity Desktop Environment, Based on Debian 8.0 Jessie

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