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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 8:37pm
Story Server: IBM, 'DevOps', Kubernetes, and OpenStack Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 8:36pm
Story Linux, Linux Foundation, Graphics, and BSD Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 8:34pm
Story Red Hat: Elisa, Fedora Test Day, CentOS Dojo and FOSDEM 2018 Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 8:30pm
Story Debian and Ubuntu: Readers' Choice Awards, Reproducible Builds, LXD, Servers and Ubuntu LoCo Council Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 8:28pm
Story Programming/Development: BH 1.66.0-1, Data scientists, vi, Emacs and Compilers Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 8:23pm
Story Open source: why is it such a big deal? Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 6:51pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 6:21pm
Story Security: Updates, Microsoft, Google, and Telegram Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 6:19pm
Story OSI Joins UNESCO to Grow Open Source Community Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 6:18pm

Devices: Wincomm, Mycroft, Jolla and Android

Filed under
Linux
  • Skylake box PCs ship with medical certifications

    Wincomm announced a pair of Intel 6th Gen based “WPC-766” medical box PCs with IEC-60601-1 electromagnetic certification, 6x COM, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, and 2x mini-PCIe, including a WPC-766E model with PCIe x16 expansion.

  • Mycroft Mark II Open Source Voice Assistant Speaker Launches

    If Jeff Bezos' Alexa is too creepy for you, here is an alternative. The Mycroft Mark II voice assistant speaker is on open source device and platform that has successfully launched on Kickstarter. The project reaches of $50,000 the initial funding goal in only 6.5 hours. The Kickstarter raised so far almost $250,000.

  • Mycroft Mark II - Artificial Intelligence Goes Open Source In A Voice Enabled Assistant

    A company named Mycroft is hoping to change that, by allowing everyone to create or use complex neural nets and AI, without giving over your personal lives to the gorillas named Amazon, Google, and Apple. Relax, this isn't going to end with Skynet bringing Arnold Schwarzenegger from the future to kill off Emilia Clarke or whoever, this is 700 contributors (so far) who want to free you from the kind of company that would create Skynet.

  • Meet us at Mobile World Congress 2018

    Each year we attend MWC to show the world what we have been working on hard during the past year, and this year is no exception. In fact, this year we have even more exciting things to announce! For that, visit us during the event, follow us on our social media channels such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Diaspora* in order to receive the latest and greatest from Jolla and Sailfish OS!

  • Google To Bring Android Messages To Your Computer’s Web Browser (APK Teardown)

    This has been revealed after some code digging done (or APK teardown) by Android Police. Some intriguing findings suggest features like sending messages from PC, scanning QR code, connecting PC app to phone, multiple browser support, etc.

  • Android Messages v2.9 prepares to launch Allo-like web interface, Google-enhanced chat features, and payments to businesses [APK Teardown]

    You've seen it done for Allo, and now it's going to happen for Android Messages! Google is developing a web interface to run on a desktop or laptop, and it will pair with your phone for sending messages. Internally, the codename for this feature is "Ditto," but it looks like it will be labeled "Messages for web" when it launches.

Mozilla Development

Filed under
Development
Moz/FF
  • Feasibility of low-level GPU access on the Web

    As the talks within WebGPU community group progress, it becomes apparent that the disagreements lie in more domains than simply technical. It’s about what the Web is today, and what we want it to become tomorrow.

  • Alternatives to vertical tabs

    For the longest time I've used vertical tabs in Firefox and I still find it odd that people don't use it more. It's a simple fact that a horizontal tab strip doesn't scale too well when you get lots of tabs.

  • Asking Questions

    Will posted a great article a couple weeks ago, Giving and Receiving Help at Mozilla. I have been meaning to write a similar article for a while now. His post finally pushed me over the edge.

    Be sure to read Will's post first. The rest of this article is an addendum to his post.

Security: Apple Hardware, NSA Cracks/Leaks, and Hardware Patches for Linux

Filed under
Security
  • Apple’s AirPods Catch Fire in Owner’s Ears, Eventually Explode

    If there’s something we learned in the last couple of years about smartphones, it’s that we should always keep an eye on them, especially when charging, as the current battery technologies that are being used could catch fire at any moment, eventually posing as a threat to our lives.

    And now it turns out we should do the same thing with headphones given this new wireless trend that Apple is aggressively pushing for, as the company’s new AirPods have recently been involved in a terrifying incident.

  • NSA code backported, crims cuffed, leaky AWS S3 buckets, and more

    Chris Vickery and the Upguard team have had a busy week, exposing not one but two cases where companies are storing material online in Amazon S3 buckets without proper safeguards.

    On Monday, he outed Octoly, a Paris-based brand marketing company that chucks freebie goodies at social media influencers in exchange for getting positive press coverage. Unfortunately, the agency left the contact details for 12,000 of these hipsters-for-hire online for all to see.

    (For the record, it should be pointed out that we at El Reg never provide positive coverage in exchange for freebies. We'll happy let a PR buy us a drink or six, or a slap-up steak meal, or a trip to Hawaii, but that's not reflected in our copy.)

  • ARM's Spectre & Meltdown Mitigation Being Backported To Linux 4.15

Introducing Zero-K, a Real-Time Strategy Game for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Zero-K is a game where teams of robots fight for metal, energy and dominance. They use any strategy, tactic or gimmick known to machine. Zero-K is a game for players by players, and it runs natively on GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows.

Zero-K runs on the Spring Real Time Strategy Game engine, which is the same engine that powers Evolution RTS and Kernel Panic the game. Many consider Zero-K to be a spiritual successor to Supreme Commander and Total Annihilation. Zero-K also has a large and supportive player and developer community.

When you first open the game, you'll see a panel that shows you what is going on in the Zero-K community.

Read more

Tools for GNU/Linux: Third party screenshot utilities

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I take screenshots more than I do real photos, and I’m a reporter for my college newspaper, as well as have my portfolio etc. That said, I’ve had my share of ups and downs with different software, and have come to find two programs that adore, when using a GNU/Linux system; Shutter and Gyazo.

Both of these programs take screenshots, and do various things with them, but they are drastically different and therefore serve quite different purpose in why I use them.

Shutter, I tend to use when writing articles, or any work that requires me to need the screenshot on my local drive, perhaps to be emailed off or uploaded somewhere. Gyazo, I use when I need to quickly send a screenshot of a funny thing that happened in a game, or of something I found on a website, or anything where it’s just “Hey take a look at this!”

Read more

Additional VLC Coverage

Filed under
Movies
OSS

Security: SCADA, Police, Cisco and LibreOffice

Filed under
Security
  • Water Utility in Europe Hit by Cryptocurrency Malware Mining Attack

    At this point, Radiflow's investigation indicates that the cryptocurrency mining malware was likely downloaded from a malicious advertising site. As such, the theory that Kfir has is that an operator at the water utility was able to open a web browser and clicked on an advertising link that led the mining code being installed on the system. The actual system that first got infected is what is known as a Human Machine Interface (HMI) to the SCADA network and it was running the Microsoft Windows [...]

  • In a first, cryptocurrency miner found on SCADA network

    Windows malware that mines for cryptocurrencies has, for the first time, been found in the network of an industrial control system at an operational treatment plant for a water utility, Radiflow, a security provider for critical infrastructure, says.

  • Tech site seeks probe into London cops' malware purchase

    The tech website Motherboard has asked London's Metropolitan Police Service and an independent government organisation to institute a probe into why an MPS officer bought malware that can intercept messages on Facebook, steal passwords and operate a smartphone camera remotely.

  • Motherboard Files Legal Complaint Against Metropolitan Police for Malware Purchase

    London police have refused to explain why an officer bought powerful spyware that was marketed for spying on a user's spouse.

  • That mega-vulnerability Cisco dropped is now under exploit

    When Cisco officials disclosed the bug last week in a range of Adaptive Security Appliance products, they said they had no evidence anyone was actively exploiting it. Earlier this week, the officials updated their advisory to indicate that was no longer the case.

  • libreoffice-remote-arbitrary-file-disclosure

    LibreOffice through 6.0.1 allows remote attackers to read arbitrary files via =WEBSERVICE calls in a document, which use the COM.MICROSOFT.WEBSERVICE function.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Daily Builds Now Use Xorg by Default Instead of Wayland

Filed under
Ubuntu

The decision to switch the display server from Wayland back to Xorg by default for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" was taken a few weeks ago when Canonical's Director of Ubuntu Desktop Will Cooke said the main reasons are the inability for Wayland to support screen sharing and remote desktop services, as well as recoverability from GNOME Shell crashes.

As of today, the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS daily builds are using Xorg as default display server, but you can still use the Wayland session if you manually select it from the login screen. "The default session has now been switched back to use Xorg by default. Wayland is still installed and can be selected from the login screen," says Will Cooke in a recent Ubuntu weekly update.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

KDE: Discover, GammaRay, Plasma 5.12 on FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
  • This week in Discover, part 5

    This week Discover gained a lot of little UI polish improvements, and Discover developers also fixed a major crash present in 5.12.

  • GammaRay 2.9.0 Release

    We have released version 2.9.0 of our Qt application introspection tool GammaRay. GammaRay allows you to observe behavior and data structures of Qt code inside your program live at runtime. GammaRay 2.9 introduces a number of new features interesting to Qt Quick, QWidgets, Qt 3D and non-graphical Qt users alike.

  • GammaRay 2.9 Released For Inspecting Qt Applications
  • Plasma 5.12 on FreeBSD

    “Of course it runs FreeBSD, too” is something I said a lot in the past week (regarding the Pine64, mostly, but also about my Slimbook). I also said “Of course it runs on FreeBSD, too” a lot. Naturally area51, the unofficial KDE-FreeBSD ports tree, contains the latest in released KDE software. Plasma 5.12 and KDE Frameworks 5.42, with Qt 5.9.4. We just bumped Qt to pick up a patch from KDE’s Eike Hein to fix some weird hover behavior. So we’re all up-to-date on the KDE front, and I’ve been running it as my main desktop since the build finished in poudriere.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Cross-platform development will dominate open-source this year, GitHub says

    The company also found an increase interest in deep learning. “Across multiple industries, artificial intelligence is solving a host of complex and interesting problems. You’ve helped drive that interest by upping your contributions to and visits to projects like Keras-team/Keras and Mozilla/DeepSpeech. TensorFlow/TensorFlow had 2.2 times more visits in 2017 than in 2016,” the company wrote in a post.

  • Open source project trends for 2018

    Last year, GitHub brought 24 million people from almost 200 countries together to code better and build bigger. From frameworks to data visualizations across more than 25 million repositories, you were busy in 2017—and the activity is picking up even more this year. With 2018 well underway, we're using contributor, visitor, and star activity to identify some trends in open source projects for the year ahead.

  • How writing can change your career for the better, even if you don't identify as a writer

    ut I did not start writing voluntarily. The tl;dr: of it is that my colleagues at Linux New Media eventually talked me into launching our first blog on the Linux Pro Magazine site. And as it turns out, it was one of the best career decisions I've ever made. I would not be working on Opensource.com today had I not started writing about what other people in open source were doing all those years ago.

  • Why an involved user community makes for better software

    Imagine releasing a major new infrastructure service based on open source software only to discover that the product you deployed had evolved so quickly that the documentation for the version you released is no longer available. At Bloomberg, we experienced this problem firsthand in our deployment of OpenStack. In late 2016, we spent six months testing and rolling out Liberty on our OpenStack environment. By that time, Liberty was about a year old, or two versions behind the latest build.

    [...]

    There is a solid model for how this should happen. We recently joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, part of The Linux Foundation.

  • Mozilla Thunderbird: What Thunderbird Learned at FOSDEM

    Hello everyone! I’m writing this following a visit to Brussels this past weekend to the Free and Open Source Software conference called FOSDEM. As far as I know it is one of the largest, if not the largest FOSS conference in Europe. It proved to be a great opportunity to discuss Thunderbird with a wide range of contributors, users, and interested developers – and the feedback I received at the event was fantastic (and helpful)!

    First, some background, the Thunderbird team was stationed in the Mozilla booth, on the second floor of building K. We were next to the Apache Software Foundation and the Kopano Collaborative software booths (the Kopano folks gave us candy with “Mozilla” printed on it – very cool). We had hundreds of people stop by the booth and I got to ask a bunch of them about what they thought of Thunderbird. Below are some insights I gained from talking to the FOSDEM attendees.

  • Deutsche Bank Doubles Down on Open Source with Waltz Release

    This code, named Waltz, lets firms bring together information about its applications and which data it pulls from all across its technology footprint globally. It categorizes the applications by determining the country it serves, products it trades, legal entities it reports to and other queries so banks have a clearer picture of the applications it has and what data it ingests.

  • Coinbase Introduces Open Source Fund: A Little $ Help for Some Friends

    Coinbase has launched the Coinbase Open Source Fund from which we’ll be donating $2500 each month to open source projects. According to its blog, Coinbase also began “as a humble Rails project” and has relied  on open source software to build its systems and products.

  • Sundar — a new traditional orthography ornamental font for Malayalam

    ‘Sundar’ is designed by K.H. Hussain — known for his work on Rachana and Meera fonts which comes pre-installed with most Linux distributions; and Narayana Bhattathiri — known for his beautiful calligraphy and lettering in Malayalam script.

  • An open source approach

    A new project has been launched by the University of Sydney, ErasmusMC and the Drugs for Neglected Disease Initiative to help find compounds that could lead to the treatment of fungal mycetoma.

    Mycetoma Open Source (MycetOS) will look for new ways to treat the neglected tropical infectious disease, which causes devastating deformities by attacking the skin, deep muscle and bone.

    The current antifungal treatment is reportedly expensive, toxic and ineffective, with only a 25-35% cure rate.

Security: Linux on z, Updates, and Bounty

Filed under
Security

LibreOffice 6.0 Gets First Point Release to Improve Security and Robustness

Filed under
LibO

A bit earlier than expected, the first point release of the LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite popped up today on the official channels for all supported platforms, along with the fifth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.4 series.

LibreOffice 6.0.1 and 5.4.5 are now available for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms with various bug and regression fixes. While a total of 75 issues were fixed in the first point of LibreOffice 6.0, the LibreOffice 5.4.5 update addresses about 69 bugs across several components of the open-source office suite. Also, the LibreOffice 6.0.1 includes an important security patch.

Read more

The Cost Of Home Directory Encryption & LUKS Full Disk Encryption On Ubuntu 18.04

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

With many of you likely upgrading to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS upon release and the recommendation to use disk encryption as important as ever on any important system especially laptops/ultrabooks, here are some fresh benchmarks using a development snapshot of Ubuntu 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" and looking at the current performance overhead of using the current "home directory encryption" and "full disk encryption" options available to Ubuntu Linux users.

Read more

Graphics: Nouveau Update and Mesa 18.0 RC4

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Nouveau Updates Submitted For Linux 4.16, Bringing GP108 & Kepler Clock Gating

    Last week the big DRM feature update for Linux 4.16 was sent in that included many AMDGPU updates, AMDKFD HSA updates, better Intel Cannonlake graphics support, Jetson TX2 display support, MSM DEVFREQ handling, and much more. But missing were any open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver changes. There is now a secondary DRM pull request with Nouveau updates.

  • mesa 18.0.0-rc4

    The fourth release candidate for Mesa 18.0.0 is now available.

  • Mesa 18.0-RC4 Released With More Fixes

    Mesa 18.0, the first new Mesa 3D release of 2018, is coming up quite soon while today brings the fourth release candidate.

    Mesa 18.0-RC4 has around two dozen fixes including several RADV fixes, a few R600 Gallium3D fixes, some Meson build system updates, a handful of Intel i965 OpenGL and ANV Vulkan driver updates, and various other improvements.

Games: Train Station Simulator, Attack of the Earthlings, Steam Audio 2.0 and Nintendo

Filed under
Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

How Linux became my job

I've been using open source since what seems like prehistoric times. Back then, there was nothing called social media. There was no Firefox, no Google Chrome (not even a Google), no Amazon, barely an internet. In fact, the hot topic of the day was the new Linux 2.0 kernel. The big technical challenges in those days? Well, the ELF format was replacing the old a.out format in binary Linux distributions, and the upgrade could be tricky on some installs of Linux. Read more

Linux 4.16-rc2

It's been a quiet week, and rc2 is out. I take the fairly quiet rc be a good sign for 4.16, but honestly, rc2 is often fairly calm. That's probably because people are taking a breather after the merge window, but also simply because it might take a while to find any issues. But let's be optimistic, and just assume - at least for now - that it's because all is well. The diffstat is fairly odd, but that often happens with small rc's just because then just a couple of pulls will skew things easily in one or two directions. This time the patch is about one third architecture updates (arm64, x86, powerpc), one third tooling (mostly 'perf') and one third "rest". And yes, the bulk of that rest is drivers (gpu, nvme, sound, misc), but those drivers are still distinctly *not* the bulk of the whole patch. Go out and test, it all looks fine. Read more Also: Linux 4.16-rc2 Kernel Released

OpenStreetMap in IkiWiki and Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble

  • OSM in IkiWiki
    Since about 15 years ago, I have been thinking of creating a geo-referenced wiki of pubs, with loads of structured data to help searching. I don't know if that would be useful for anybody else, but I know I would use it! Sadly, the many times I started coding something towards that goal, I ended blocked by something, and I keep postponing my dream project.
  • Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble
    That said, while I still believe in the goals of OpenStreetMap, I feel the OpenStreetMap project is currently unable to fulfill that mission due to poor technical decisions, poor political decisions, and a general malaise in the project. I'm going to outline in this article what I think OpenStreetMap has gotten wrong. It's entirely possible that OSM will reform and address the impediments to its success- and I hope it does. We need a Free as in Freedom geographic dataset.

Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11

Thanks to work done by Hans Petter Selasky and others, this drm-next-kmod port is working on FreeBSD 11 stable. What's different with this package from the ports collection versus the ported-from-Linux Direct Rendering Modules found within the FreeBSD 11 kernel is that these DRM modules are using the linuxkpi interface. Read more