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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Rugged 3.5-inch SBC runs Linux or Android on i.MX6 Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 7:08pm
Story Qt 5 based Colorpick Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:57pm
Story Raspberry Pi Foundation's Code Club teaches kids skills to compete in our digital world Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:56pm
Story The long-awaited Maru OS source release Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:48pm
Story KaOS Brings Serious Relevance Back to KDE Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:46pm
Story Another Set of Updated Fedora 24 Linux Live ISO Images Are Now Ready to Download Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:43pm
Story LinuxConsole 2.5 Gaming Distro Out Now with Minecraft, SuperTux, and Many Games Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:42pm
Story KDE Connect 1.0 is here! Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:40pm
Story City of Bern starts open desktop proof of concept Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:38pm
Story F25 Wallpaper Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:37pm

KDE Plasma 5.7.4 Desktop Environment Is Out with Plasma Desktop and KWin Fixes

Filed under
KDE

Today, August 23, 2016, KDE announced the release of the fourth maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment, bringing multiple improvements and bug fixes.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel Development Report 2016
  • Celebrating 25 years with Linux

    Linux has become the world’s most popular operating system, and over half of the worldwide device shipments are based on Linux.

    – The Linux kernel was invented at our department. It is definitely the most influential software coming from the Department of Computer Science having significant global impact, says Professor Sasu Tarkoma, head of the department at the University.

    Linus Torvalds, the inventor of the Linux kernel used to study and work at the department and simultaneously work on the kernel. The kernel work started in 1991 and the 1.0 of the operating system was released in 1994.

  • LINUX 25 YEARS
  • How Intel's open source Data Plane Development Kit enables high-performance Linux networking

    Linux is a general purpose operating system. This comment may sound like an obvious statement, but it's sometimes easy to forget. Because it's a general operating system, it is used across a variety of use cases.

    The OS is used in Internet of Things (IoT) devices, smartphones, tablets, servers, and data center appliances. However, it sometimes takes a reminder that using Linux for specialized use cases, such as a network or even network function devices, takes some customization of the kernel or the acceptance that performance may be uneven or limited. The Intel-sponsored open source Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) project hopes to extend the usefulness of Linux to include high-performance networking devices.

Linux/FOSS Events: LinuxCon, ContainerCon, Software Freedom Day, and More

Filed under
Linux
  • Updates from LinuxCon and ContainerCon, Toronto, August 2016

    The first 25 years of Linux has transformed the world, not just computing, and the next 25 years will continue to see more growth in the Open Source movement, The Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin said during the opening keynote of LinuxCon/ContainerCon in Toronto on Monday, August 22, 2016.

    "Linux is the most successful software project in history", Zemlin said, noting that the humble operating sytem created by Linus Torvalds 25 years ago this week is behind much of today's software and devices.

  • 2016 SFD Registration is on!

    The Digital Freedom Foundation is very happy to announce that registration of its thirteenth edition of Software Freedom Day has just opened. While the wiki has been back online for about a week we were still lagging on the registration. Fear no more, it is now fixed and you can all register your events!

  • Advanced Linux System Administration and Networking is designed for IT professionals

    This Course includes some of the course materials, with access to LFS211 Linux operating system and networking and administration for 1 year, also registration includes a printed course manual.

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Linux Devices

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • Rugged 3.5-inch SBCs run Linux on Bay Trail and Broadwell

    Perfectron unveiled a pair of 3.5-inch SBCs: one with a quad-core Atom and the other with Broadwell Core SoCs. Both support extended temperatures.

    Perfectron, which recently tapped Intel’s 6th Gen “Skylake” SoCs on its INS8349A Mini-ITX board, has also announced two 3.5-inch form-factor boards with older Intel processors. The OXY5322A is equipped with a quad-core, 1.91GHz Atom E3845 from the 22nm “Bay Trail” generation while the OXY5338A offers a choice of dual-core, 9.5W TDP Core i7-5650U (up to 3.2GHz) and Core i5-5350U (up to 2.90GHz) Broadwell-U CPUs with 14nm fabrication. These same Broadwell processors were supported by Perfectron’s EPIC form-factor OXY5638A SBC from 2015.

  • 5 best new features in Android 7.0 Nougat

    Android 7.0 Nougat is finally here! Well, sort of… Nougat has indeed finally been released to the public, but it’s only available on a handful of Google’s Nexus-branded devices. If you own anything else — and odds are very good that you do — you’re in for a bit of a wait before an Android 7.0 update is made available for your smartphone. Owners of the latest and greatest flagships can likely expect an update to roll out sometime in the next few months, maybe even before the New Year rolls around if you’re lucky.

    The good news, Android fans, is that Android 7.0 Nougat is worth the wait. It might not seem like the new update has much flash and flair on its surface, but the truth is that Android N is a massive update packed full of terrific new features. In this post, we’ll cover the five best additions to Google’s brand new version of Android.

  • Android 7.0 Nougat: 11 tips and tricks

    Google’s latest version of Android is already rolling out to the company’s Nexus and Pixel devices and will begin launching on new smartphones starting with the new LG V20.

    If you’re still waiting, Google is pushing Nougat to those on the Android beta programme first, so if you must have it right now, join the beta quickly to get it updated to the final version of Android 7.0.

  • Yandex applies AI to filter annoying ads on Android, powered by user reports
  • Game: Plants Vs. Zombies Released in the Tizen Store

    Finally the famous game Plants VS Zombies has been released in the Tizen Store. This is an highly addictive game about zombies that are trying to breach your home! You have to plant a variation of 49 plants, that you collect at the end of each level, that fight off the zombies.

Nouveau Open-Source NVIDIA Tests On Linux 4.8, Mesa 12.1-dev

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

I haven't run any Nouveau driver benchmarks recently for looking at the open-source NVIDIA Linux performance since there hasn't been too much progress, particularly when it comes to re-clocking of the desktop GPUs for delivering better performance. However, with all the testing I've been doing on the Radeon side with Linux 4.8 and Mesa 12.1-dev Git, I decided to do a comparison with a few NVIDIA GeForce GPUs under this latest open-source driver stack.

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Proprietary licences both frustrating and pushing move to PostgreSQL

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OSS

Proprietary licences that are very complex, impossible to comply with, and abused to squeeze customers are frustrating public agencies in their effort to make IT infrastructures more open and interoperable. On the other hand, these licensing problems are motivating the same agencies to move to open source software. The Swedish National Heritage Board, the Dutch City of Ede, and the Dutch DUO agency all mention complex licences from their traditional proprietary suppliers as an important reason to deploy PostgreSQL as an open alternative for their database systems. At the same time, suppliers are abusing their inscrutable licensing models to hinder public agencies in their migration and consolidation efforts.

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The Big Android Dev Interview: Paul Lammertsma

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Android
Interviews

That's a really interesting question. I started in 2010, I think it was. I was actually in a molecular biology startup, and we were doing software for scientists, virologists, to basically plan experiments about cloning and genetic research and stuff like that. And a colleague of mine, he came into the office one day and he had bought an HTC Desire. He was really excited about it, and said "hey, over the weekend I made this app."

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Security News

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Security

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 25 Linux OS to Arrive on November 15, Ship with Wayland by Default

    The Fedora Project is currently working very hard on the next major version of the popular GNU/Linux computer operating system, Fedora 25, bringing you all the latest and modern technologies.

    Wayland is a modern technology, the next generation display server designed as a drop-in replacement for the old X.Org Server or X11 as many of you out there might want to call the display server almost all GNU/Linux distributions are currently using by default. But there are many security-released issues with X11 that for some reason can't be fixed, so it's time for the open-source ecosystem to adopt Wayland.

  • New role as Fedora Magazine editor in chief

    Today, I am pleased to announce my new role as the Fedora Magazine editor-in-chief. After deciding to shift focus to other areas of the Fedora Project, I am receiving the torch from Ryan Lerch. Ryan has helped lead the Magazine, edit pieces from other contributors, contribute his own pieces, and decide strategic direction for the Magazine.

    He leaves big shoes to fill, but I hope to offer my own leadership, creativity, and direction in coming years as well. I’d like to thank both Ryan, Paul Frields, and Remy DeCausemaker for their mentorship and guidance towards becoming involved with Fedora and the Magazine. I’m excited to have the opportunity to help guide the Fedora Magazine in how it fits with the rest of Fedora.

  • FOSS Wave: Delhi, India

    After the introductory session on FOSS, we went ahead with our agenda and introduced the Fedora Project and the community behind it: what the Fedora Project is, what its mission is, and how the participants can get started with Fedora. The participants were guided upon how they can create their identity on the Fedora Project by signing up on FAS. They could then use that identity to get access to various Fedora applications and resources. The session on Fedora moved on with the introduction on how the contributors can get to the mailing list and introduce themselves to the community. There, they can get help about starting their contributions. The main focus during the session on Fedora was to introduce the participants to the Fedora Quality Assurance (QA) team and release validation testing.

Android Leftovers

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Android

How IBM’s LinuxONE Has Evolved For the New Open Source Cloud

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

LinuxONE is IBM’s Linux Server. The LinuxONE server runs the major distributions of Linux; SUSE, Red Hat and Canonical’s Ubuntu. The server also runs open source databases like Mongo DB , PostgreSQL and MariaDB allowing for both horizontal growth and vertical scale, as demonstrated by running a 2TB Mongo database without sharding. Several of the features built into this system support the constant innovation inherent in the open source movement while maintaining the performance and reliability required by Enterprise clients; for example, Logical Partitions (LPARs) allow clients to host a development environment on the same system as production with zero risk.

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Mozilla Logo

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Johnson Banks reveals first designs for “open-source” Mozilla rebrand

    Johnson Banks has unveiled seven potential brand identities for Mozilla, as part of its ongoing “open-source” rebrand.

    The search for the not-for-profit software company’s new identity was first announced in June, and it has been taking feedback from the Mozilla community and members of the public since then.

    Seven initial themes were created by Johnson Banks, all exploring different facets of Mozilla’s advocacy for shared and open-source internet access and software.

  • Mozilla's new logo ideas

    The folks over at Mozilla (makers of Firefox) are redesigning their logo—because apparently just having a wordmark isn't good enough. That said, maybe it's time to retire the dinosaur head.

    In the spirit of openness, Mozilla has posted a series of logo concepts to their blog and invited the public to review and share their opinions. I am doing so here.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Powerful Rhythmbox 3.4 Music Player Arrives with New Web Remote Control Plugin

    Rhythmbox developer Jonathan Matthew announced the release of the Rhythmbox 3.4 open-source music player and organizer software for GNU/Linux operating systems, a version that introduces several enhancements and a bunch of bugfixes.

    The biggest new features of Rhythmbox 3.4 are a new plugin that promises to let users remotely control the application via a web browser, a much-improved SoundCloud plugin that now fetches more search results and supports pausing, and the playback keyboard shortcuts were slightly improved.

  • How to organize your scholarly research with Docear

    The Docear academic literature suite blends Freeplane and JabRef to make a comprehensive academic paper-writing application, with support for mind-mapping, citations, notes, and many other features.

    Writing a major scholarly paper can be a daunting undertaking. Turning a collection of scholarly research into a coherent paper requires a great deal of organizing and planning. To simplify that task, there are many tools available to assist a researcher with keeping track of their bibliographic citations, and there are also plenty of tools to help a user organize their thoughts. Often those programs are distinct pieces of software that do not always work well together. One exception to this Docear, a single, well integrated, tool that handles mind-mapping, works as a citation manager, and does even more.

    Docear describes itself as "The Academic Literature Suite," and works by combining the Freeplane mind-mapping software and the JabRef reference manager into a single cohesive tool. By leveraging the power of these two open source applications, Docear creates something that is greater than the sum of its parts. Researchers can keep track of their citations and notes, and easily include them when mapping the structure of their paper. Docear provides a single platform that can support almost every aspect of the research process.

  • AppRecommender - Last GSoC Report

    My work on Google Summer of Code is to create a new strategy on AppRecommender, where this strategy should be able to get a referenced package, or a list of referenced packages, then analyze the packages that the user has already installed and make a recommendation using the referenced packages as a base, for example: if the user runs "$ sudo apt install vim", the AppRecommender uses "vim" as the referenced package, and should recommend packages with relation between "vim" and the other packages that the user has installed. This work is done and added to the official AppRecommender repository.

  • Simple Weather Indicator Adds Hide Location, Temperature Rounding Options

    Another month, another update to the simple weather indicator we first featured back in July.

Development: GCC, KDevelop, and GNOME Beta

Filed under
Development
  • GCC 6.2 Compiler Released

    GCC 6.2 is now available as the first stable update to this year's GCC 6/6.1 compiler release.

    GCC 6.1 shipped earlier this year as their first stable version of GCC 6 (per their unique versioning scheme...) while GCC 6.2 is out this morning as the first point release.

  • KDevelop 5.0 Appears Ready For Release

    We haven't yet seen any official release announcement, but since yesterday a source package and AppImage binary have been out in the wild for KDE's KDevelop 5.0 integrated development environment...

  • GNOME 3.22 Beta Released

    The first beta of GNOME 3.22 beta is now available for testing ahead of the planned official desktop release around this time next month.

    Some of the recent package changes for the GNOME 3.22 Beta include sharing support for GNOME Photos, various Mutter and GNOME Shell improvements (including Wayland improvements!), and GTK improvements.

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical and QTS Team on Private, Managed OpenStack Cloud Solution

    For several years running, OpenStack Foundation surveys have revealed that Ubuntu is the most common platform for OpenStack deployments to be built on. Organizations report that they choose OpenStack and Ubuntu to save money and avoid vendor lock-in. These themes have been emphasized by Canonical at OpenStack Summit.

    Now, responding to what they describe as "increasing demand for flexible, open source and cost-predictable cloud solutions, QTS Realty Trust, Inc. and Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, have announced a private, fully managed OpenStack cloud solution. It will be available from any of QTS' secure data centers in mid-September.

    Built on Ubuntu OpenStack and using Canonical's application modeling service Juju as well as Canonical's Bare Metal as a Service (MaaS), QTS' OpenStack cloud will be fully managed. Essentially, organizations can treat it as a turnkey cloud solution.

  • Rotate Screen on Ubuntu Easily With This Indicator Applet

    Sam, our backend web hamster, makes occasional use of a portrait monitor. He says it makes reading long terminal sessions easier.

  • Peppermint OS explained

    In the childhood many of us must have eaten peppermint tablets. Well, just the name gives us some nostalgic moments. So today on the 12th segment of "Introduction with Linux Distro" we are having Peppermint OS as our guest. Peppermint OS is a lightweight option for those with old machines or those who loves fast and light OS.

  • Linux Mint Rounds Out 18 'Sarah' Releases With Beta KDE Edition

    Earlier this month, the Linux Mint developer team released the Xfce edition of Linux Mint 18 'Sarah', which followed the main release at the end of June. But now it's time for some Plasma action, with a beta release of the upcoming Linux Mint 18 KDE edition.

    It's worth noting that all three Linux Mint 18 editions are LTS releases (long-term support), with a promise to be supported until 2021. For that reason, these releases don't include bleeding-edge software, but instead software that can be assured to be stable right-out-of-the-box.

Desktop Linux Absent from Zemlin’s LinuxCon Pep Rally

Filed under
GNU
Linux

“As all of you may know, Thursday, August 25 is the 25th anniversary of Linux,” he said during the opening portion of the address. “It’s the day when Linus Torvalds, 25 years ago, sent out his note introducing this funny little operating system that wouldn’t amount to much of anything.”

“Linux at 25 is a big thing,” he added. “Most things in life just don’t last as long and are as enduring as Linux. And Linux has gone so far beyond what anyone who has participated in this community could have ever expected. Linux today really is…the most successful software project in history.”

After this opening, he pointed to the enormity of the Linux project by citing numbers, like its 53,000 source files and 21 million lines of code, and the fact that each day 10,800 lines of code are added to Linux, 5,300 lines of code removed and 1,800 lines of code modified.

“This pace is only accelerating,” he said. “Linux now changes seven [or] eight times an hour. There is no single software project by any single person or organization that rivals the breadth, pace, depth and adoption of Linux. What an incredible run.”

As with any good pep rally, Zemlin gave the fans plenty of reason to be happy to support the home team by pointing to Linux’s wins. Trouble is, all of those wins had to do with making “billions of dollars” — a phrase he used often — for the enterprise.

“Linux has become the world’s most widely adopted software,” he said and rattled off a list of uses that included high performance computing, weather forecasting, climate modeling, economic modeling, mobile devices and embedded systems. “It runs the global economy. Quite literally, it runs the vast majority of stock exchanges. It runs the vast majority of the Internet and powers things like Google, Facebook, Amazon and much, much more.”

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Openwashing

Filed under
OSS
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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more