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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 20 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Audiobook retailer Audible infringed on patent srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:24am
Story Jury awards Lexar $465.4 million srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:24am
Story Blockbuster withdraws Hollywood merger bid srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:19am
Story Amazon knows what you want srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:18am
Story HIGHlights of SXSW 2005 srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:18am
Story Sony responds to PSP dead-pixel reports srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:18am
Story Rolling out next generation's net srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:17am
Story The battle to be the fastest fetcher on the Web srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:17am
Story Microsoft woos new pals in D.C. srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:16am
Story Michael Dell ahead of Bill Gates on most admired list srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:16am

Linux leaders at open-source summit

Filed under
OSS

Here's a long borin^H^Hserious story on how Linux was represented at last weeks open-source summit. I didn't read too much of it, but it might interest you hard core advocates.

Vin Diesel going soft on us?

Filed under
Movies
-s

Have you seen the previews for Vin Diesels's new movie? He is starring in a soon to be released Walt Disney production co-starring five children! I hope all those tattoos in XXX were stick ons! Well, here's a summary of the flick and here's a shot of the promotional poster. Heck anything with Vin Diesel has got be good!

Doom3 for those with little or no PC!

Filed under
Gaming
-s

Here's a story on a board game based on and entitled Doom: The Board Game. This is apparently not breaking news, but I just heard about and got a chuckle over it a few days ago. But hey, I think it might make a neato gift for those diehard doom series lovers, or those who wished they could have played doom3 but couldn't swing the hardware upgrade! Get yours here!

More BS from the Evil One.

Filed under
Microsoft

Seems Mr. Gates is at it again with saying one thing while trying to cleverly conceal his jabs at Linux. This time speaking of interoperability amongst differing architectures while stating that doesn't mean open source as open source is detrimental to interoperability. Does that seem backwards to anyone else besides me? This is posted all over the net, but here's one reference at Betanews.

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