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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 05 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Chicken Little and Age-Appropriate Explanations srlinuxx 04/05/2005 - 2:54pm
Story ATI's Radeon X800 XL 512MB srlinuxx 04/05/2005 - 2:39pm
Story You know what I mean... maybe srlinuxx 04/05/2005 - 2:34pm
Story 'Wizard of Oz' munchkin publishes memoir srlinuxx 04/05/2005 - 2:30pm
Story Twelve new moons for Saturn srlinuxx 04/05/2005 - 2:19pm
Story Apple Releases Mega Patch srlinuxx 04/05/2005 - 2:01pm
Story M$ loses appeal to limit damage awards srlinuxx 04/05/2005 - 1:56pm
Story EBay user admits to threatening executives srlinuxx 04/05/2005 - 5:36am
Story nvidia, ati launch new GPUs at Computex srlinuxx 04/05/2005 - 5:32am
Story IBM streamlines US Navy financial ops srlinuxx 04/05/2005 - 5:27am

Linux Kernel Security is Lacking?

Filed under
Linux

Seems Jason Miller is finding fault in the Linux kernel security bug fix procedure. He goes on and on about security and how security vulnerabilities are handled. Although he mentioned that Gentoo had an accessible security contact, that really didn't apply to things like the underlying kernel. You can read the rest of his article including his thoughts on how to improve the situation here on securityfocus.

ATI has released 64-Bit drivers

Filed under
Software

According to AMDZone and ATI's own site, ATI has released 64-bit drivers for XFree86 and Xorg. Here's a link the download page.

No Case - No Problem

Filed under
Hardware
Humor
-s

Just mount every thing on the wall! LOL Here's the discussion thread with pictures. Too funny.

2004 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Announced

Filed under
Linux

Browser of the Year - Firefox (77.12%)

Distribution of the Year - Slackware (19.36%)

LiveCD Distribution of the Year - Knoppix (57.69%)

Database of the Year - MySQL (53.51%)

Desktop Environment of the Year - KDE (58.25%)

I Heard a Rumor - PCLOS 8.1 in the Works?

Filed under
PCLOS
-s

A little birdie told me that an update to the acclaimed PCLinuxOS Preview 8 is in the works and possibly due out next week. Details are a bit sketchy at this time, but it seems Tom has been hard at work updating the hardware detection and mklivecd scripts. Now don't get your hopes up, but I hear it might sport a newer 2.6.10 kernel, including patches to fix a little kvm switch problem. Of course it will include all kinds of application updates and other goodies. More on this as it develops.

Mandrake's Clustering Again

Filed under
MDV

Mandrake is apparently joining a consortium to help the advancement of what I think of as distributed computing to the point of and what they are terming clustering. Mandrake has a some previous experience in that arena so maybe they can prove to be an asset. Here's a more in depth article on the subject. They want to harness our cpu cycles, and it sounds like for commercial purposes. Show me the money then I say. Until then, I'm looking for aliens.

This months Cosmo

Woo hoo Gals, this months Cosmopolitan magazine is chocked full of nice tips and tricks to tantalize even the most frigid of geeks. Big Grin It looks like Ashley Simpson on the cover, but more importantly are the words: The Power of Pre-sex, Beyond Kama Sutra, His Butt, and 50 Ways to Have Fun With Your Man. I can't wait to try some of this stuff on my man!!!

50 gmail invites?

Filed under
Google
Software

Has anyone else noticed they now have 50 gmail invites to get rid of? I couldn't even get rid of the original 5 or 6! Well, here's a summary of this weeks google wars.

Moooore Spam!

Filed under
Security

Spam has new way to evade security

E-mails via service providers clogging system

Yep, just what we need, more spam. Apparently they aren't as concerned with hiding from their isps as getting the mail out as they are now just sending it through their isps servers. Read the gory details here.

Linux leaders at open-source summit

Filed under
OSS

Here's a long borin^H^Hserious story on how Linux was represented at last weeks open-source summit. I didn't read too much of it, but it might interest you hard core advocates.

Vin Diesel going soft on us?

Filed under
Movies
-s

Have you seen the previews for Vin Diesels's new movie? He is starring in a soon to be released Walt Disney production co-starring five children! I hope all those tattoos in XXX were stick ons! Well, here's a summary of the flick and here's a shot of the promotional poster. Heck anything with Vin Diesel has got be good!

Doom3 for those with little or no PC!

Filed under
Gaming
-s

Here's a story on a board game based on and entitled Doom: The Board Game. This is apparently not breaking news, but I just heard about and got a chuckle over it a few days ago. But hey, I think it might make a neato gift for those diehard doom series lovers, or those who wished they could have played doom3 but couldn't swing the hardware upgrade! Get yours here!

More BS from the Evil One.

Filed under
Microsoft

Seems Mr. Gates is at it again with saying one thing while trying to cleverly conceal his jabs at Linux. This time speaking of interoperability amongst differing architectures while stating that doesn't mean open source as open source is detrimental to interoperability. Does that seem backwards to anyone else besides me? This is posted all over the net, but here's one reference at Betanews.

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More in Tux Machines

Stable kernels 5.4.2, 5.3.15, 4.19.88, 4.14.158, 4.9.206, and 4.4.206

  • Linux 5.4.2
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.4.2 kernel. All users of the 5.4 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.4.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.4.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
  • Linux 5.3.15
  • Linux 4.19.88
  • Linux 4.14.158
  • Linux 4.9.206
  • Linux 4.4.206

Graphics: Mir, X.Org, Gallium3D, GPUOpen, Mesa, Lima and Libinput

  • Mir 1.6 Released With New Wayland, DispmanX Platform Support

    Mir 1.6 is out today with the latest batch of features for this Ubuntu-focused display server that offers Wayland client compatibility. The two big additions to Mir 1.6 are on the graphics platform front. First, there is now a "Wayland platform" for running Mir as a nested compositor on top of a Wayland compositor. Secondly, the rpi-dispmanx platform is for Broadcom's DispmanX API.

  • Before Ending 2019, Vintage SiS X.Org Driver Sees A New Release

    xf86-video-sis 0.12.0 is available this week as a new version of the SiS display driver for X.Org systems in supporting Silicon Integrated Systems' display hardware. This X.Org user-space mode-setting driver has seen its first update in four months but prior to that it hadn't seen any update to the open-source code in three years.

  • RadeonSI Lands SDMA Copy Support For Vega/GFX9

    The RadeonSI Gallium3D driver has finally landed SDMA copy support for Vega/GFX9 graphics hardware, which should principally benefit compute shaders and other cases.

  • AMD's GPUOpen Releases Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.3

    AMD's GPUOpen team has released their first official update to the open-source Vulkan Memory Allocator project in nearly one year. Vulkan Memory Allocator is an easy-to-use Vulkan memory allocation library that in the two and a half years since being open-sourced has been picked up for use by multiple games/engineers, Vulkan code samples, and other projects.

  • Chromium's Ozone Wayland Back-End Is Now Considered Beta, Aiming To Ship Next Year

    For years there has been work on a Wayland back-end to Ozone, the Google component for abstracting user-interface elements and input/window handling among other tasks across platforms. It looks like in 2020 the Ozone Wayland support will be in good standing and promoted out of beta. We were tipped off to a recent presentation by Igalia's Alexander Dunaev on their work contributing to the Ozone Wayland code. From consulting firm Igalia's perspective, they have been focused on bringing up Ozone Wayland support in the embedded Linux context considering the number of consumer devices now shipping that use Wayland and Chromium or CEF. But all their embedded Linux work for Ozone Wayland also benefits the Linux desktop.

  • Mesa Developers Weigh Renaming Gallium "State Tracker" To "API"

    Gallium3D state tracker terminology has been around a decade now in referring to the portions of the architecture that are ultimately implementing various graphics / compute / video APIs. Marek proposed keeping the Mesa OpenGL state tracker term but in renaming the other state trackers to being "API implementations" as that terminology is technically more accurate for the likes of Clover OpenCL, VA-API, VDPAU, and the other state trackers / APIs implemented.

  • Lima Gets Tiling While Vulkan Turnip Lands SSBO + Compute Shaders

    The Lima Gallium3D driver that supports older Mali 400/450 hardware with an open-source OpenGL driver hasn't been seeing too many improvements these days compared to the likes of the Panfrost Gallium3D driver for the newer Arm Mali Bifrost/Midgard architectures. But hitting Mesa 20.0-devel yesterday was tiling support for Lima. This should improve the performance for this open-source Mali driver and also end up working around the driver's broken mipmapping support for linear textures.

  • Libinput 1.15 Is On Approach With Various Improvements/Fixes For Linux Input Handling

    Peter Hutterer has been preparing libinput 1.15 as the next update to this open-source input handling library used by Linux systems both on X.Org and Wayland. Compared to past releases that have seen exciting changes on supporting new input devices like the Dell Totem, scrolling enhancements, and other major additions, there isn't too much of that with libinput 1.15.

Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" Installer Is Now Available for Public Testing

Unveiled earlier this year during the DebConf19 conference, Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" will be the next major release of the acclaimed Linux-based operating system used by millions of computer users around the globe. It's development kicked off a few months ago, so now it's time to test drive the very first alpha build of the Debian Bullseye Installer. "It's high time we started doing this: many components were updated, replacing “CD”/“CD-ROM” with “installation media”. Such changes are not documented individually below. That also explains why many languages are not fully translated in this alpha release," said Cyril Brulebois on behalf of the Debian release team. Read more

Python Programming and This Week in Rust

  • Adding Notifications to Long-Running Jupyter Notebook Cells

    If you use Jupyter Notebook to run long-running processes, such as machine learning training, then you would probably like to know when the cell finishes executing. There is a neat browser plugin that you can use to help solve this issue called jupyter-notify. It will allow you to have your browser send a pop-up message when the cell finishes executing.

  • #100DaysOfCode, Day 015 – Quick and Dirty Web Page Download

    I wanted to write a program that would just get the latest comic from turnoff.us and save the picture to a file.

  • Mozilla and Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to support pip
  • Creating Palindromes -- if possible -- from a string of letters.

    I don't like the idea of Union[str, int] as a return type from this function. Yes, it's valid Python, but it seems like a code smell. Since the intent is to build lists, a None would be more sensible than a number; we'd have Optional[str] which seems better overall. The solution that was posted was interesting. It did way too much work, but it was acceptable-looking Python. (It started with a big block comment with "#" on each line instead of a docstring, so... there were minor style problems, but otherwise, it was not bad.)

  • Functional programming design pattern: Nested Iterators == Flattening

    Here's a functional programming design pattern I uncovered. This may not be news to you, but it was a surprise to me. It cropped up when looking at something that needs parallelization to reduced the elapsed run time.

  • List Comprehensions in Python

    A list is one of the fundamental data types in Python. Every time you come across a variable name that's followed by a square bracket [], or a list constructor, it is a list capable of containing multiple items, making it a compound data type. Similarly, it is also a breeze to declare a new list and subsequently add one or more items to it.

  • Python if else demo

    A simple kata from codewars will show us how to use the if-else statement in python. The wide mouth frog is particularly interested in the eating habits of other creatures. He just can’t stop asking the creatures he encounters what they like to eat. But then he meets the alligator who just LOVES to eat wide-mouthed frogs! When he meets the alligator, it then makes a tiny mouth.

  • This Week in Rust 315

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.