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Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 6:12pm
Story How To Setup A Web Server And Host Website On Your Own Linux Computer Mohd Sohail 22/07/2016 - 6:12pm
Story Embedded News Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 6:11pm
Story Mozilla News Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 6:10pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 5:18pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 5:17pm
Story GNOME 3.21.4 Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 4:25pm
Story Ubuntu 16.04.1 Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 4:22pm
Story Wine 1.9.15 Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 4:21pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 4:17pm

Linux Kernel/Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Qt WebBrowser 1.0

Filed under
OSS
Web

We have recently open sourced Qt WebBrowser!

Read more

Also: Qt WebBrowser 1.0 Open-Sourced

Enter new tool for newbie: Handy Linux

Filed under
Debian

Handy Linux has come out with handy Linux its new weapon in its arsenal. It is quite a simplified version to use the Linux operating system on desktop. The Handy Linux surfaced at around three years ago, however in June the latest version was released.

The developers have made it easy to remove the layers of Handy Linux to reveal the more standard Linux environments which the users can learn. The users who do not need the IT installation tools included in the initial installation can delete them using Handy2Ddebian app from Handy’s main menu.

Handy Linux is a standard Debian based OS which is light and shows some mix of Xfce desktop ecosystem. The remixed desktop is the signature mark for the Handy Linux.

Read more

Also: Video: Systemd in Debian, a status update

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Splice Machine Open Sources Dual-Engine Big Data Technology
  • Splice Machine's New Open-Source RDBMS Sandbox Goes Live on Amazon Web Services (AWS)
  • As Splice Machine's Database Goes Open Source, Apache Spark Could Spur it On

    Around the time that Splice Machine announced a milestone version of its RDBMS, which it bills as "the first hybrid in-memory RDBMS powered by Hadoop and Spark," its fortunes were starting to rise along with Hadoop's and Spark's. In the big data space, there is tremendous need to marry powerful data analytics tools with powerful database tools. If you're focusing on the Big Data and NoSQL arenas, along with relational databases, Splice Machine is worth a look.

    Now, Splice Machine is going open source, and it is also going live in a sandbox version on Amazon Web Services (AWS), so you can easily give it a try.

    Splice Machine aims to be a database solution that incorporates both the scalability of Hadoop, ANSI SQL, ACID transactions, and the in-memory performance of Spark.

  • How Open Source Guides Digital Transformation

    Almost everyone can agree the digital era is being fueled by five primary forces — mobile, social, sensor technologies, big data and the cloud. But doesn't open source play a role in digital transformation as well?

    That was one of the topics discussed last week during a roundtable discussion sponsored by MIT Technology Review Custom and EnterpriseDB (EDB). The explored how open source software is helping organizations transform their infrastructures to meet today's data-driven demands.

  • This Open Source Tool Can Map Out Bitcoin Payments

    Bitcoin is not anonymous. Anyone who has followed the dark web or the continuing regulation of the cryptocurrency should be familiar with that idea. If someone manages to link a real identity to a wallet—something that we’ve seen is possible—they can then follow other transactions around the public blockchain to see where else that person’s money has traveled.

  • CIR’s open-source Impact Tracker is live

    Almost two years ago, I began the process of building an Impact Tracker at The Center for Investigative Reporting to help us better understand the results of our work. Flash forward to today, and we have a custom-built platform that is being used by more than 20 organizations around the world.

    Today, we are releasing an open-source version, available to any organization.

  • OpenWest conference emphasizes importance of open-source technology

    Over 2,000 individuals wearing circuit board badges learned and talked about all things open source this past weekend at the South Towne Expo Center. The OpenWest conference is the largest regional tech conference promoting all things open— hardware, software, data, standards and more.

    The conference is put on by Utah Open Source and sponsored by V School, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Podium and Protocol, among others.

    Open source refers to software that anyone can see and edit. Open-source code is typically created in collaboration with both online and real-life communities. Liz Sands-Adams, OpenWest’s Director of the Privacy Education Track, said, “OpenWest survives because of a volunteer community that believes in empowering the open-source communities around them.”

  • Getting Exposure for Your Open Source Project

    With so many great open source projects spreading like wildfire, it is a great time to be a developer! I spend a considerable amount of time looking for great ideas across the open source community. For me, I'm always searching for modules we might include in our distributions, projects that could be enhanced and commercialized, or even crossovers into other areas for innovations. If something really resonates with our business we will apply resources to furthering that project.

    Generally, the first thing I do is hit the project description to see if it makes a connection with me. If it does, I’ll try it out or tag it for further research, perhaps even mention it on Twitter or discuss internally on a relevant Slack channel. Note, I did not look at your code, I looked at the idea. If you want your code to get out into the community, and actually ignite something bigger, you need to make sure your project is discoverable.

  • Prometheus unbound: Open source cloud monitoring

    Prometheus, an open source system for monitoring and alerting a wide spectrum of enterprise IT events, including containers, released its 1.0 revision this week.

    It's also the second product in what amounts to a portfolio assembled by the CNCF (Cloud Native Computing Foundation) for realizing the promise of a container-powered cloud built entirely on open source and open standards.

  • Simplify your OpenStack installation with open source tools

    To avoid any confusion, let's make this clear: OpenStack is a cloud-operating system. OpenStack is not a VM, but rather sits on top of VMs. Also, OpenStack is written in Python.

    As you install each component, OpenStack installs a command-line tool that works in tandem with it. The problem is that each component -- of which there are dozens -- has its own command-line tool, each with its own name and parameters. For example, you run Keystone to install users and roles in the Identity Service. Then you run Glance to load VM images. You would then use Nova to deploy those images. After a while, the sheer number of components and their respective command-line tools can get overwhelming.

    So, other than the command line, what options do we have to simplify the OpenStack installation process? Let's have a look.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • GDC Europe survey shows 17% of developers plan to release Linux titles

    GDC Europe ran a survey of 800 games industry professionals who attended a previous GDC event and about 17% stated they plan a game for Linux.

    It's a really weird survey, as it pulls Windows/Mac together, but has Linux by itself. It would make more sense to have all three separated. They also say PC when they mean Windows, which is always annoying to see. Still, it's a pretty healthy percentage considering only a few years ago it would have probably been 0-1%.

    It's also amusing to see them do the survey, have Linux as an option which beats out multiple other platforms, yet they don't mention anything about Linux in the text.

  • Tyranny, the new RPG from Paradox and Obsidian is looking great in this new video
  • Ballistic Overkill FPS updated, lots of changes and still works great

    Ballistic Overkill is the fast paced FPS game I have fallen in love with and it just gained a tasty update.

    The game has down away with a single health station on the map, to now have health packs spread throughout the map. An interesting and needed change, but I feel they respawn far too quickly.

    The map voting system is much better. Instead of always being on a single mode, you pick a single map and each map comes with a different game mode. That makes the game feel a lot fresher in my opinion and helps stop me getting bored in longer sessions.

  • Lost Sea action and adventure game released for Linux, some thoughts

    Lost Sea is a really nice idea, mixing up action, adventure, RPG and random generation together to create something interesting. You also lose almost all progress when you die, so there's the punishment factor here. You don't lost everything, you get a bit of gold and XP for each tablet you get on the previous run.

    You sail from island to island collecting treasures, killing monsters and collecting stone tablets that enable you to move further along in your journey. It all sounds pretty good, but I've found the game to be rather lacking in every aspect of its design.

    The combat just seems so basic and lifeless it really lets down what could have been a very exciting game. You can upgrade your skillset to have a few nice extras but even so, it still feels a bit empty. It's not terrible though, just not really all that challenging at all, no real excitement factor to the combat. It's literally mash X a few times, maybe use a skill if you need too and—done.

  • Kingdom Rush Frontiers coming to Linux after the initial Windows launch
  • Darkest Dungeon updated, has some needed Linux fixes
  • Undertale now available for Linux on GOG

    Undertale recently released on Steam, but this weird 2D RPG is now also available DRM free on GOG. I know a few of you were waiting for this!

    My friends at GOG sent over a key and I can confirm it seems to work fine, I didn't encounter any obvious issues in my testing of the GOG build.

Top 6 Desktop Linux Blunders

Filed under
Linux

Ever since I first tried Linux on my desktop years ago, I've found myself wincing at what I felt were avoidable blunders. This observation doesn't affect one distro more than another, rather it's ongoing issues I've watch in utter amazement happen time and time again.

No, I'm not giving a free pass to proprietary operating systems as they also have their share of epic blunder moments. But with Linux on the desktop, I guess you could say it just hits a bit closer to home. Remember, these are not merely bugs – I'm also talking about avoidable issues that affect folks even if they don't realize it.

Read more

Bryan Lunduke and Matt Hartley – The Boys Are Back

Filed under
News

After some “going back and forth”, Bryan and I have decided it was high time we did a proper show together. Here are the details you need to know. Yes, it’s actually happening!

New show, baby! New weekly show!

I’ve teamed up with the ever-adorable +Matt Hartley to create a video-only show we call “Lunduke & Whatnot (with Matt)”.

A few things worth noting:

Red Hat Shoots to Solve Container Storage with Gluster and OpenShift

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat is the newest organization to take a stab at the persistent storage challenge for containers. Last month, the open source giant announced a new Gluster-based storage option for OpenShift, the company's open source platform for running containerized apps.

Gluster and OpenShift are two key parts of the Red Hat technology stack. Gluster provides open source distributed storage, while OpenShift offers an integrated, one-stop platform for deploying and managing containers using Docker and Kubernetes.

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Splice Machine 2.0 combines HBase, Spark, NoSQL, relational...and goes open source

Filed under
OSS

Splice Machine is a well-kept secret though; Zweben told me the company has about 10 customers. Although he hails from the world of commercial software, Zweben believes that open sourcing the Splice Machine product will help spread the word more widely. So version 2 of the product will be available in a free and open source Community Edition with the full database engine. A paid Enterprise Edition, that includes professional support and DevOps features like integration with LDAP and Kerberos as well as backup and restore, will provide the monetization model for the company.

Read more

Canonical and Proprietary Forums Software (Again Cracked)

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Prometheus unbound: Open source cloud monitoring

Filed under
OSS

Prometheus 1.0 is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation's effort to assemble a product portfolio for a container-based, open source cloud

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A Linux Kernel Wizard’s Adventures in Embedded Hardware

Filed under
Linux

Sometimes the best tutorials come not from experts, but from proficient newcomers who are up to date on the latest entry-level technologies and can remember what it’s like to be a newbie. It also helps if, like Grant Likely, the teacher is a major figure in embedded Linux who understands how hardware is ignited by software.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft blocks Linux installations

    Microsoft has closed a backdoor left open in Windows RT even though the OS is pretty much dead in the water as Vole can’t be bothered with it any more.

    This vulnerability in ARM-powered locked down Windows devices was left by Redmond programmers during the development process. Exploiting this flaw, a hacker could boot operating systems of his/her choice, including Android or GNU/Linux.

  • “Windows 10 Is A Failure” — According To Microsoft’s Own Metric [Ed: in spite of very dirty if not illegal tricks]

    Microsoft has accepted that Windows 10 has failed to perform as expected. The software giant hoped that by mid-2018, Windows 10 will be running on 1 billion devices. Now, this number seems far-fetched due the constantly shrinking PC market and poor performance of Windows 10 Mobile.

  • KDEPIM ready to be more broadly tested

    As was posted a couple of weeks ago, the latest version of KDE has been uploaded to unstable.

    All packages are now uploaded and built and we believe this version is ready to be more broadly tested.

  • Builder Happenings

    Over the last couple of weeks I’ve started implementing Run support for Builder. This is somewhat tricky business since we care about complicated manners. Everything from autotools support to profiler/debugger integration to flatpak and jhbuild runtime support. Each of these complicates and contorts the problem in various directions.

    Discovering the “target binary” in your project via autotools is no easy task. We have a few clever tricks but more are needed. One thing we don’t support yet is discovering bin_SCRIPTS. So launching targets like python or gjs applications is not ready yet. Once we discover .desktop files that should start working. Pretty much any other build system would be easier to implement this.

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • New guidelines for Fedora Ambassadors and Design

    This week, some Ambassadors, CommOps, and Design Team members collaborated on improving and redefining the guidelines for how to request artwork and other art assets. As the advocates and representatives of Fedora across the globe, the Ambassadors often need many tools and resources for demonstrating Fedora. Examples of this might be fliers, banners, tablecloths, stickers, badges, and more. Until recently, the process for requesting artwork assets was not well-defined and somewhat unclear. This can cause problems when Ambassadors need something designed for an event. Sometimes it can draw out the request or end up in an accident, such as purple DVD media covers!

  • GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Documentation and upgrades

    This week and the last were busy, but I’ve made some more progress towards creating the last, idempotent product for managing WordPress installations in Fedora’s Infrastructure for GSoC 2016. The past two weeks had me mostly working on writing the standard operating procedure / documentation for my final product as well as diving more into handling upgrades with WordPress. My primary playbook for installing WordPress is mostly complete, pending one last annoyance.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

3 open source data visualization tools for Hadoop

Filed under
OSS

Looking for ways to draw meaningful conclusions from big data?

In his lightning talk at Great Wide Open 2016, Rommel Garcia gives us quick takeaways for three open source tools that help Hadoop users do just that:

Read more

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • About my GSoC project

    My mentor gave me a task (it was one of the first ones) to refactor QMap structure, which was holding archive entries metadata, into an Archive::Entry class, which would use QProperty system. Such refactoring would bring more extensibility and allow to pass and manipulate data in more convenient ways. And of course QProperty is a big step forward for possible future using QtQuick and other nice modern Qt stuff. Today I’m finished with it. That was a huge amount of work in order to complete that task. It was not hard itself, but rather routine, because this structure was used by large part of code. Though after that I faced a tough challenge to fix all the bugs I’ve done with that refactoring. Now I’m happy I can proceed to other important things.

  • Accelerating Vector Tile Creation

    Late summer brings a couple of interesting dates for the Marble community: On the Desktop we’ll release Marble 2.0 and around the same time our Android app Marble Maps will have its first stable release. Later on in September it’s time to celebrate the 10th birthday of the Marble project!

    The common theme to the upcoming release is the introduction of the Vector OSM map: A beautifully styled map based on data from the OpenStreetMap project that spans the entire world from globe to street zoom level. In order to make this possible we’re working very hard behind the scenes to optimize both the tile data and the rendering in Marble to give you a smooth experience.

  • 17th FISL, KDE Brazil and cake!

    In this last week happened in a cold city called Porto Alegre, in Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil, the 17 edition of FISL, the Free Software International Forum.

    Well… KDE has always participated in this forum, and the organization gave to us all day in a room, so the KDE Community could make a lot of talks.

Linux Lite 3.0

Filed under
Reviews

Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Linux Lite 3.0 is a lightweight distribution with the Xfce 4.12 desktop. In addition to being lightweight, it is also aimed at providing a familiar user experience for users transitioning from Microsoft Windows. In the wide array of Ubuntu derived distributions, Linux Lite has a lot of competition, so what sets Linux Lite apart from the other options? I downloaded the 955MB 64-bit install media to find out and below I share my experience with this very nice, polished distribution.

Booting and installing the distribution is a very familiar experience for anyone who has used Ubuntu or any distribution based on Ubuntu. The standard Ubiquity installer walks the user through the install experience providing guidance and making the experience pretty straight forward. In this regard, Linux Lite 3.0 is almost identical to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

Because Linux Lite 3.0 is based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, it features version 4.4 of the Linux kernel and supports a wide variety of hardware out of the box using open source drivers. If the user needs proprietary drivers, all the drivers that are available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS can be installed. Unfortunately users who need to use the proprietary ATI Catalyst drivers will run into problems because Linux Lite 3.0, just like Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, does not support the Catalyst drivers. One other hardware related issue to note is that the Linux Lite documentation recommends switching the computer's BIOS to Legacy mode instead of using UEFI mode and Secure Boot. The documentation states that "Linux Lite does not support or advocate the use of Secure Boot" and it notes that the distribution can be made to work with UEFI booting, but "The solution requires intermediate knowledge of Linux" and provides a link to a YouTube video which provides instructions.

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