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Wednesday, 21 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: Mir, NVIDIA, AMD, and Mesa 17.3.4 Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 9:58am
Story Linux Foundation: CNCF, Linux Foundation Networking Fund (LFN), Open FinTech Forum (OFTF) Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 9:40am
Story The knitting printer and more art with open source Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 9:34am
Story Fedora Might Begin Having A Release Manager Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 7:21am
Story Canonical Under Fire for Ubuntu Data Collection Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 7:16am
Story Raspberry Pi Projects: Things Gateway by Mozilla, Bang and Olufsen and HiFiBerry Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 6:59am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 11:13pm
Story Debian and Canonical’s Juju Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 11:09pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 11:03pm
Story Openwashing Databases: iRODS, ArangoDB, Altibase Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 11:00pm

Project crowdfunds effort to bring Allwinner VPU support to the Linux kernel

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Linux

Free Electrons changed its name to Bootlin, and funded a Kickstarter campaign to bring support for the Allwinner VPU to the Linux kernel, building upon earlier work done in collaboration with the Linux Sunxi community called sunxi-cedrus.

It’s been a long hard slog to improve Linux support on Allwinner’s ARM-based SoCs, and now a French development firm called Bootlin wants to plug in the last piece of the puzzle. Bootlin has successfully crowdfunded a project to upstream support for the Allwinner video processing unit (VPU) into the Linux kernel. Over $30,000 has been raised on Kickstarter — well over the $21,566 goal — and there are 37 days left to expand the project on its way to a completion goal of June.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of PCLinuxOS

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PCLOS

​I have reviewed a very good Linux distribution that I first used full-time as opposed to just playing around with it 8 years ago. You could say that I was suckled on it so to speak. What attracted me to PCLinuxOS distribution was mainly how simple to use it was. They released a new ISO to download in November so I decided to give this release a go.

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Events: SCaLE 16X Discount, Fosdem 2018 Reports

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OSS
  • Visit Combined Booths at SCaLE 16X, Save $ With Promo Code

    People who register between now and the event can get a 50 percent discount on their standard registration price using the promo codes SUSE, GNOME or KDE50.

  • Fosdem 2018 – and a very little roundup

    Since Mageia was born, FOSDEM has been a very important event for us. Six times we had a booth and our General Assembly during the event, we’ve always had a Mageia dinner and there were always more ways to enjoy meeting one another.

    This blog post was almost not written, though, because until less than a week before FOSDEM, it was only sure of one council member, akien, that he’d be there. However, he’d mainly be there for another really nice project, the Godot Engine. Apart from that, our application for a stand was turned down (again).

    Six days before FOSDEM, names started to get added to our FOSDEM 2018 Wiki page. One day later, it became certain that ennael would be at FOSDEM and on Wednesday, the number of council members who’d go increased from 2 to 4. It was only after that, that we tried to find volunteers to help organise various ways to meet one another in Brussels.

  • FOSDEM 2018

    The GNOME Foundation advisory board meeting was happening on Friday the 2nd so I travelled to Brussels on Thursday. Years ago, there were two train routes from Strasbourg to Brussels: the direct one was using slow trains, through a large part of Belgium and Luxembourg, and took a bit more than 5 hours; the other one meant taking a TGV from Strasbourg to Paris (~2 hours), changing stations (5 minutes walk from Gare de l’Est to Gare du Nord) and taking a Thalys to Brussels (~2 hours). I was pleased to learn that there was now a direct TGV route. Even if the announced time of 3 hours and 50 minutes was only a tiny bit shorter than the indirect one, the confort of a journey with no connection adds real value. Of course I wasn’t expecting a direct route to go through the Charles de Gaulle airport train station, but well… still better than the alternative! This nice journey was made possible thanks to the financial support of the Foundation.

Red Hat: .NET Promotion, Leaving Red Hat to Join Linaro, Supplemental Wallpaper for Fedora 28 and More

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Red Hat

An open source Instagram desktop photo uploader

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OSS

One of my tasks at my new communications job is to re-activate and improve our social media channels. I've used Twitter and Facebook for many years, so that was easy. Now, I need to work on Instagram.

I've never really been into Instagram (or Pinterest), but I needed to learn and start Instagramming. I had a few pictures from a recent event, and I was all set to upload them onto Instagram from my Windows 10 desktop, but Instagram is a mobile-driven application. I couldn't find an upload button on the browser; I tried Chrome, Firefox, and Brave. Hmmm. OK. Let's try the Microsoft Store and install the handy app. Uh-oh, same problem.

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MX Linux 17: An upgraded distro made for beginners

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Linux

There are tons of operating systems coming out all the time, from free laptop systems like EasyPeasy to Manjaro, Mandriva, and Kubuntu. But all of them have their share of kinks.

Naturally, many of us are scared of change, and not everyone is an early adopter when it comes to these kinds of things. While operating systems like MacOS and Chrome OS still claim larger market shares in 2018, it bears mentioning that newer operating systems have a lot to offer.

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Review: Solus 3 and the Budgie desktop

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Reviews

Solus is an independent, rolling release distribution. Solus's design is mostly aimed at home users who want a friendly desktop operating system. The distribution is available in three editions (Budgie, GNOME and MATE) and runs on 64-bit x86 computers exclusively. Each edition's installation media is approximately 1.2GB in size.

The project's latest release is Solus 3 which features support for Snap packages as well as more traditional packages managed by Solus's eopkg package manager, which is a fork of the PiSi package manager. There were many tweaks in this release with a number of improvements made to the application menu and searches. The Budgie edition also includes the ability to place the desktop panel on any of the four sides of the screen. There are more changes and tweaks listed, with accompanying screen shots, in the project's release announcement.

One of the reasons I wanted to try out Solus 3 and do it now is because I typically test rolling release distributions immediately after a new snapshot has been released. Solus 3 was made available back in August of 2017 and I was curious to see how well the distribution would handle being rolled forward several months and what changes might be visible between the August snapshot and Solus's current packages.

I decided to try out the Budgie edition of Solus. Booting from the Solus live media brings up the Budgie desktop with a panel placed along the bottom of the screen. The panel houses an application menu, task switcher and system tray. On the desktop we find a single icon for launching the project's system installer. I did not see any welcome screen or encounter any immediate issues so I jumped straight into the installer.

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What’s New in Linux Lite 3.8

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Reviews

Linux Lite 3.8 has been released by Linux Lite developer Jerry Bezencon, It’s the final release of Linux Lite 3.x series. This release brings various package updates and improvements, include implementation of the TLP power management tool for laptops in the Lite Tweaks utility, better support for the LibreOffice office suite, a new font viewer and installer, and regional support for DVDs.

Linux Lite 3.8 also ships with Xfce 4.12 series as default desktop environment, powered by the Linux 4.4.0-112 kernel from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), features Google-based search page as default homepage in the Mozilla Firefox web browser. Inludes the New Lite Tweaks, New Lite Welcome, New Lite Help Manual, New Lite Upgrade and New Wallpapers.

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Also: EzeeLinux Show 18.8 | A look at elementary OS and KDE Neon

Linux On Nintendo Switch? Hackers Show That It’s Possible

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Every popular hardware in today’s times that tries to bind users to a particular software or operating system, becomes a target of hackers. They make continuous attempts to find ways to exploit the security measures. Along the similar lines, hacker group Fail0verflow has claimed to have found a Nintendo Switch hack.

The group has posted the picture of Switch booting a Debian GNU/Linux installation. The picture also shows a serial adapter connected to one Joy-Con docks. Notably, Fail0verflow is the same group that hacked Nintendo Wii and PlayStation 3.

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Are you an open-sorcerer or free software warrior? Let us do battle

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GNU
OSS

The Open Source Initiative, a non-profit that advocates for open-source software and coined the term, celebrates its 20th anniversary this month. It's difficult to conceive of where the internet, indeed the world, would be today were it not for open-source software and, perhaps more importantly, the free software movement that preceded it and continues to promote free software today.

The difference between free and open-source software is at this point largely moot, save for deep philosophical differences that don't matter much to anyone outside a very small community of thinkers.

You can read an entertaining history of the Open Source Initiative here at The Reg. Here's my extremely foreshortened version: Open-source software is of course what happened to the free software movement when, to borrow a phrase from 1980s punk rock, the suits showed up.

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OSS: GitHub, Nextcloud Talk, OpenZFS, GCC, Bruce Perens and EOMA68

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OSS
  • GitHub reveals open source project trends for 2018

    GitHub has released a report with statistics on the types of projects the GitHub community collaborated on from September 2016 to September 2017.

    Last year, 24 million people from over 200 different countries worked together on GitHub to code better and build bigger.

    From frameworks to data visualisations across more than 25 million repositories, the activity picked up more this year.

  • Two decades on, open source still brings the world together

    On Feb. 3, 1998, a few weeks after the announcement, a group of leading software developers who included Eric Raymond, Jon Hall and Michael Tiemann, among others, met to strategize how they could continue the momentum of the news. At the meeting’s close, the group agreed upon “open source” as the label for the movement.

  • Nextcloud Talk: video conferencing the open way

    For instant messaging I’ve been primarily using Telegram. I think it’s a good compromise between openness and features and mass adoption. It can also do encrypted audio calls, but it can’t do video calls and audio/video conferences of multiple people.

  • ZFS vs. OpenZFS

     

    You’ve probably heard us say a mix of “ZFS” and “OpenZFS” and an explanation is long-overdue. Our Senior Analyst clears up what ZFS and OpenZFS refer to and how they differ.  

  • GCC Lands s390 Compiler-Side Changes For Spectre V2

    Landing a few days ago for the Linux 4.16 kernel merge window was IBM z / s390 mitigation work for Spectre while now the necessary compiler-side changes are also present for the upcoming GCC 8 stable release.

    Landing this week in the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) code-base was the s390 architecture specific code for disabling prediction of indirect branches as part of its Spectre Variant Two work on IBM Z.

  • Bruce Perens wants to anti-SLAPP Grsecurity's Brad Spengler with $670,000 in legal bills

    Having defeated a defamation claim for speculating that using Grsecurity's Linux kernel hardening code may expose you to legal risk under the terms of the GPLv2 license, Bruce Perens is back in court.

    This time, he's demanding Bradley Spengler – who runs Open Source Security Inc and develops Grsecurity – foots his hefty legal bills, after Spengler failed to successfully sue Perens for libel.

    Perens, a noted figure in the open source community, and his legal team from O’Melveny & Myers LLP – as they previously told The Register – want to be awarded attorneys' fees under California's anti-SLAPP statute, a law designed to deter litigation that aims to suppress lawful speech.

    That deterrence takes the form of presenting unsuccessful litigants with the bill for the cost of defending against meritless claims.

  • Bruce Perens Wants to Anti-SLAPP GRSecurity's Brad Spengler With $670,000 in Legal Bills [Ed: Many comments here, some of them good]
  • Remember The EOMA68 Computer Card Project? It Hopes To Ship This Year

    The EOMA68 computer card project is the open-source hardware effort that aims to be Earth-friendly and allow for interchangeable computer cards that can be installed in laptop housings and other devices. The ambitious concept relying upon ARM SoCs raised more than $170k USD via crowdfunding in 2016 but its lineage dates back to the failed Improv dev board as well as the failed KDE Vivaldi tablet years earlier. It turns out in 2018 there is hope of EOMA68 hardware finally shipping.

    Luke Kenneth Casson Leighton, the main person behind the EOMA68 Libre Laptop project and EOMA68-A20 computer card, continues work on this effort. He spoke last weekend at FOSDEM 2018 about these efforts.

Security: Fake Authentication 'Solution', Cryptojacking, and Meltdown's Linux Patches

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Security

The best Linux distro for gaming in 2018

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

A Linux gaming distro, as the name suggests, is tailored for avid gamers. As such it usually comes bundled with games to play, as well as drivers for graphics cards, games controllers and so forth.

There aren't many Linux distros specifically made for gaming. This isn't because Linux users dislike games, but rather it’s due to the fact that most modern Linux distros support virtually every type of recent graphics card anyway. As such, any regular Linux distro can easily be turned into a ‘game station’.

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Razer doesn’t care about Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Razer is a vendor that makes high-end gaming hardware, including laptops, keyboards and mice. I opened a ticket with Razor a few days ago asking them if they wanted to support the LVFS project by uploading firmware and sharing the firmware update protocol used. I offered to upstream any example code they could share under a free license, or to write the code from scratch given enough specifications to do so. This is something I’ve done for other vendors, and doesn’t take long as most vendor firmware updaters all do the same kind of thing; there are only so many ways to send a few kb of data to USB devices. The fwupd project provides high-level code for accessing USB devices, so yet-another-update-protocol is no big deal. I explained all about the LVFS, and the benefits it provided to a userbase that is normally happy to vote using their wallet to get hardware that’s supported on the OS of their choice.

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Review: Linspire 7.0

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Reviews

Linspire 7 is a solid distribution and one I would recommend to friends and family. Coming from a Windows, openSUSE, ChromeOS and CloudReady background I pretty much knew what to expect. There is nothing that seriously stands out with Linspire to make me say WOW save its stability, easy of use and compatibility. I had several older devices and newer devices that I wasn't expecting to work and they did. Would this bring me around to switching? Absolutely. ChromeOS is a serious mess and CloudReady doesn't support one of my laptops anymore. Its easier to configure than openSUSE with YAST and its a straightforward solution. I would recommend this for old folk like me and for small businesses who need a cheap and neat solution. One of the many things I like in this Linspire vs the old Linspire is that this one is more close knit with the Linux apps and doesn't have many proprietary-to-them applications. I do miss Click and Run. A few criticisms I do have is that some of the documentation is a little techy and novices would get lost easy. I would work with and get a better bug reporting system. Overall I am enjoying the experience and like I said, solid, stable and affordable. I definitely will keep this and Windows 10 around for a long time.

I want to thank PC/Opensystems for bringing Linspire back to us and I would like to thank Medium.com for hosting this review.

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Games: Summer Islands, Them's Fightin' Herds, Warbands: Bushido

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Gaming

Linux 4.16 Now in Release Candidate Mode

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.16-rc1

    Two weeks have passed, -rc1 is out there, and the merge window is thus over.

    I don't want to jinx anything, but things certainly look a lot better
    than with 4.15. We have no (known) nasty surprises pending, and there
    were no huge issues during the merge window. Fingers crossed that this
    stays fairly calm and sane.

    As usual, I'm only appending my mergelog, because while this is not
    shaping up to be a particularly huge release, none of our recent
    releases have been small enough to describe with the shortlogs I use
    for later rc's.

    The actual diff is dominated by drivers, and once again the GPU
    patches stand out - this time some AMD GPU header files. Happily, this
    time the bulk of those lines is actually *removal* due to cleanups and
    getting rid of some unused headers.

    But there really is changes all over. Drivers may be the bulk (GPU,
    networking, staging, media, sound, infiniband, scsi and misc smaller
    subsystems), but we have a fair amount of arch updates (spectre and
    meltdown fixes for non-x86 architectures, but also some further x86
    work, and just general arch updates). And there's networking,
    filesystem updates, documentation, tooling..

    There's a little bit for everybody, in other words.

    Go out and test,

    Linus

  • Linux 4.16-rc1 Kernel Released With Many Changes

    Just like clockwork, the first release candidate of Linux 4.16 is now available.

    Linux 4.16-rc1 was tagged just minutes ago and remains under the "Fearless Coyote" codename that has been happening for several cycles now. Over the Linux v4.15 stable release, the Linux 4.16 merge window up to RC1 brings 11340 files changed, 491295 insertions(+), 305085 deletions(-). Yes, that's another hearty merge window.

    To learn about all of the changes for this next kernel version, see my thorough Linux 4.16 feature overview that I finished up this morning. Linux 4.16 is bringing a lot more work on Spectre/Meltdown mitigation, AMDGPU DC multi-display synchronization, better Intel Cannonlake support, VirtualBox Guest Driver is now mainline, many CPU/scalability improvements, AMD SEV encrypted virtualization support for KVM, file-system improvements, new ARM board support, and a wide range of other improvements as outlined in the aforelinked article.

  • A Look At The Plethora Of Linux 4.16 Kernel Features & Changes

    After the lengthy Linux 4.15 kernel cycle, the past two weeks have marked the Linux 4.16 merge window. Yet again it's been another heavy feature period for the kernel. There is still a lot of mitigation work going on for most CPU architectures surrounding Spectre and also Meltdown, the open-source graphics drivers have continued getting better, various CPU improvements are present, the VirtualBox Guest driver was mainlined, and dozens of other notable changes for Linux 4.16. Take a look.

    Here's our usual kernel feature overview from our original reporting the past two weeks in closely monitoring the Linux kernel mailing list and Git repository. Linus Torvalds is expected to mark the end of the merge window today by releasing Linux 4.16-rc1.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Living The Linux Laptop Lifestyle

Another great advantage of open source software: you can run it off of a flash drive before installing it. And I have to admit that I loved Linux Lite's out-of-the-box feel, so much so that I reconsidered installing my number two selection: LXLE, which is designed for underpowered older machines. According to a label on the bottom of my Toughbook, this pre-Linux laptop was decommissioned in 2005, making it well over ten years old. And so I replaced the RAM, installed Linux Lite, and after a short period, I was back to living a Linux laptop lifestyle while waiting for my charger. Read more

Mentor Embedded Linux gains cloud-based IoT platform

Mentor announced a “Mentor Embedded IoT Framework” platform that builds on top of Mentor Embedded Linux with cloud-based IoT cloud services ranging from device authentication and provisioning to monitoring and diagnostics. Mentor’s Mentor Embedded IoT Framework (MEIF) extends its Yocto Project based Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) and Nucleus RTOS development platforms to provide cloud services for IoT device management. The platform mediates between these platforms and cloud service backends, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Eclipse IoT, Microsoft Azure, and Siemens MindSphere. Read more

Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more