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Sunday, 19 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KaOS Linux's November 2017 Release Adds KDE Plasma 5.11.3, Linux Kernel 4.13.12 Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 2:08pm
Story Anonymous Live OS Tails Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.13, Latest Tor Software Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 2:07pm
Story LG V30 review: Good hardware design marred by bad camera, software Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 2:02pm
Story Deepin 15.5 Beta——Small and Beautiful Features Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 1:40pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 12:14pm
Story Tails 3.3 is out Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 8:45am
Story Linux Runs on All of the 500 Fastest Supercomputers itsfoss 15/11/2017 - 8:31am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:32am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:19am
Story Linux Mint 18.3 Betas Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:18am

Lakka 2.1 RC6 released with new Allwinner and Rockchip images and Kiosk mode

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Lakka 2.1 RC6 is available for download. It’s a very important update that brings support for a lot of new boards and fixes many compatibility issues.

Read more

Tiny NanoPi SBCs debut with new Ubuntu Core based FriendlyCore

Filed under
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec released two Samsung-based NanoPi SBCs with similar specs: a $28, quad -A9 Fire2A and an $35, octa -A53 Fire3, with new FriendlyCore distro.

FriendlyElec’s open source, NanoPi Fire2A and NanoPi Fire3 SBCs are both very similar to the $29 NanoPi 2 Fire, which itself is roughly based on the old NanoPi 2. The two new SBCs, which support Android and Linux distributions including a new Ubuntu Core-based FriendlyCore distro, are identical except for the processor and RAM. The NanoPi Fire2A uses the same Samsung S5P4418 (4x Cortex-A9 @ 400MHz to 1.4GHz) as the NanoPi 2 Fire, accompanied with 512MB DDR3 while the NanoPi Fire3 taps the S5P6818 (8x Cortex-A53 @ 400MHz to 1.4GHz) used on the NanoPC-T3 and NanoPi M3, with 1GB RAM.

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Security: Updates and Intel Back Doors

Filed under
Security

Samsung shows off Linux desktops on Galaxy smartmobes

Filed under
Linux

Samsung teased the idea of Linux on its flagship phones in October 2017, promising that Linux would run in your hand or, if you use its DeX dock, in full desktop mode on a monitor. Now it's released the video below to show off its idea.

Described as a “Concept Demo”, the vid has a couple of interesting moments.

The first comes at the 12 second mark, after the “Linux on Galaxy” app has been run. At this point we see Ubuntu 16 listed, along with a plus sign to add other OSes to the app. This appears to make good on Samsung's promise that you'll be able to have multiple OSes in your Galaxy.

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Chrome OS Getting Accelerated Video Decoding and Encoding Capabilities Info Soon

Filed under
OS

François Beaufort is always teasing Chromebook users with the latest features, and today he posted a message on his Google+ page that accelerated video decoding and encoding capabilities are now available in the internal chrome://gpu page in Chrome Canary.

It appears that the functionally works if you set profiles for various of the supported video codecs by Chrome OS, which can be decoded and encoded through hardware acceleration if your Chromebook is supported, which many of them are.

Read more

Mageia 5 GNU/Linux Operating System to Reach End of Life on New Year's Eve

Filed under
Linux
MDV

In the blog announcement, the Mageia developer explains that the team decided to postpone the EOL (End-of-Life) for the Mageia 5 release, which was supposed to reach end of life on October 31, until New Year's Eve, because many Mageia 5 users haven't upgraded to Mageia 6.

Announced on July 16, 2017, Mageia 6 is the latest stable release of the GNU/Linux distribution, incorporating some of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source applications, including the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment, AppStream support, GRUB2 as default bootloader, a new Xfce Live edition, and much more.

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The Best PCB Design Software For Linux

Filed under
Linux

PCB design software is a piece of open source CAD software for use in a number of different engineering industries. PCB design software benefits manufacturing and engineering companies so much because you can run thorough tests on products without having to make a prototype first. This saves no end of time and money and avoids repeated attempts at prototypes because of small errors. It allows you to fix multiple products at a time and most importantly, it is viable for use by smaller businesses as well. Traditionally PCB software has been run on Mac or Windows but there are plenty of programs that are optimized for Linux. If you’re struggling to find the best Linux optimized PCB software, here are some of the best ones on the market at the moment.

Read more

Kubuntu 17.10 Users Can Now Update to KDE Plasma 5.11.3 Desktop Environment

Filed under
Ubuntu

Kubuntu 17.10 was released on October 19, 2017, with the KDE Plasma 5.10.5 desktop environment by default. If you're running Kubuntu 17.10 on your personal computer, you can now update it to the KDE Plasma 5.11.3 desktop environment, a bugfix release that addresses multiple issues and annoyances.

The KDE Plasma 5.11.3 packages landed today in the Kubuntu Backports PPA (Personal Package Archive), not Kubuntu 17.10's standard software repositories, along with several other recent KDE applications and core component, including the recently released Krita 3.3.2.1 digital painting software.

Read more

Also: Plasma 5.11.3 bugfix release now in backports PPA for Artful Aardvark 17.10

KDE Applications 17.08 Reaches End of Life, KDE Apps 17.12 Coming December 14

Filed under
KDE

KDE Applications 17.08.3 is the last stability update for KDE Applications 17.08, bringing a total of 41 bug fixes for various core components and applications, among which we can mention Ark, Gwenview, Kdenlive, KGpg, Kontact, Kleopatra, KMail, KNotes, KWave, Okular, and Spectacle, along with updated translations.

Among the improvements included in this release, we can mention a workaround for a Samba 4.7 regression related to password-protected SMB shares, a fix for an Okular crash that occurred after certain rotation jobs, as well as support for the Ark archive manager to preserve file modification dates when extracting ZIP archives.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What Is Arch Linux 32? How To Migrate To This New Fork As Arch Linux 32-Bit Support Ends?

    About nine months ago, the Arch Linux developers announced the end of the support for 32-bit architecture. As a result, Arch Linux 2017.02.01 was the last release to ship a 32-bit ISO as well. It was followed by a depreciation period.

  • Trading Watch on Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Mellanox Announces First Major Production Deployment of Linux Kernel-Based Open Ethernet Switch
  • Cloud Foundry: Focusing on Flexibility and Choice for a Cloud-Native World

    For some organizations working outside of technology hubs such as Silicon Valley, there is a vast shortage of developer talent to choose from. As a result, many have taken a proactive learning approach to help bring their developers up-to-speed with the demands of today’s cloud-native software platforms.

    Cloud Foundry is evolving its technology to benefit these users’ goals, explained Cloud Foundry Executive Director Abby Kearns, in this live-streamed episode of The New Stack Makers podcast recorded at Cloud Foundry Summit Europe last month.

  • Kubernetes by the numbers: 10 compelling stats

    How quickly has Kubernetes’ popularity soared? By most accounts, very quickly. Earlier this year, Cloud Native Computing Foundation executive director Dan Kohn penned a blog post that dug into that claim. People regularly tout Kubernetes as one of the highest velocity projects ever in open source history: Does the data back it up?

    As Kohn found, there may not be a single definitive metric, but they all point in the same conclusion: “You can pick your preferred statistic, such as that Kubernetes is in the top 0.00006% of the projects on GitHub,” Kohn wrote. “I prefer to just think of it as one of the fastest moving projects in the history of open source.”

Desktop: Fedora 27 and Next/Existing Ubuntu

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu
  • Overview of aarch64 SBC support in Fedora 27

    Support for ARM 64 bit (aarch64) Single Board Computers (SBCs) has been one of the most highly requested features along side the Raspberry Pi. It’s something I’ve been working towards almost as long too. Finally with Fedora 27 I felt we would have enough of the bits in place for a Minimum Viable Product (MVP).

  • Call for participation: an ubuntu default theme lead by the community?

    As part of our Unity 7 to GNOME Shell transition in 17.10, we had last August a Fit and Finish Sprint at the London office to get the Shell feeling more like Ubuntu and we added some tweaks to our default GTK theme.

  • Mesa 17.2.4 for Ubuntu 16.04 & 17.10

    Hi, the X-SWAT updates PPA has actually shipped Mesa 17.2 for 16.04 for a few weeks now, but it got bumped to the latest stable release yesterday. It’s available for the latest Ubuntu LTS (16.04) plus most recent interim release (17.10) as usual.

Openwashing and FOSS Foes Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Games and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Software: nomacs, NetworkManager, Opera, PostgreSQL Neon, Krita

Filed under
Software
  • nomacs Image Lounge 3.8.0

    nomacs is licensed under the GNU General Public License v3 and available for Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, Mac, and OS/2.

  • NetworkManager 1.9.90
  • NetworkManager 2.0 Promises Basic Open vSwitch Support, Bluetooth NAP and WPS

    Work on the next major NetworkManager 2.0 release started in early September under the 1.9.x umbrella, and the open-source network connection manager recently entered beta stages of development.

    Developer Beniamino Galvani announced the release of NetworkManager 2.0 Beta (1.9.90), giving us an insight into the new features and improvements coming to this major release of the most used network connection management software for GNU/Linux distributions.

    The biggest new feature of NetworkManager 2.0 appears to be initial support for the Open vSwitch open-source implementation of a distributed virtual multilayer switch, which will allow users to set up basic Open vSwitch configurations. Open vSwitch support will be enhanced in future releases.

  • Opera 49 Web Browser Released with Advanced Screenshot Tool, Built-In VR Player

    Opera Software released today the final Opera 49 web browser for all supported platforms, a release that introduces numerous new features and an extra layer of performance improvements.

    Opera 49 has been in development for the past several months, and since we've pretty much covered its entire development cycle, you should already know which are some of the most prominent features included in this release, starting with the built-in, advanced screenshot tool and VR 360 player, and continuing with the ability to rearrange extensions in the toolbar and the refined private browsing mode.

  • PostgreSQL 10.1 Released

    PostgreSQL 10.1 is now available as the first update over the recently released PostgreSQL 10.

  • #KDE #KDENEON Plasma 5.11.3 Bugfix release ready in User edition
  • Learn Digital Painting with Krita in Bogota, Colombia

    Lina Porras and David Saenz from the Ubuntu Colombia user group wrote to tell us that they will give an introduction to digital painting with Krita starting this Saturday. David will be teaching Krita four Saturday sessions.

Ubuntu and OpenWRT Linux, Tizen News

Filed under
Linux

FOSS and Finance

Filed under
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."

Review: Fedora 27 Workstation

On the whole there are several things to like about Fedora 27. The operating system was stable during my trial and I like that there are several session options, depending on whether we want to use Wayland or the X display server or even a more traditional-looking version of GNOME. I am happy to see Wayland is coming along to the point where it is close to on par with the X session. There are some corner cases to address, but GNOME on Wayland has improved a lot in the past year. I like the new LibreOffice feature which lets us sign and verify documents and I like GNOME's new settings panel. These are all small, but notable steps forward for GNOME, LibreOffice and Fedora. Most of the complaints I had this week had more to do with GNOME specifically than Fedora as an operating system. GNOME on Fedora is sluggish on my systems, both on the desktop computer and in VirtualBox, especially the Wayland session. This surprised me as when I ran GNOME's Wayland session on Ubuntu last month, the desktop performed quite a bit better. Ubuntu's GNOME on Wayland session was smooth and responsive, but Fedora's was too slow for me to use comfortably and I switched over to using the X session for most of my trial. Two other big differences I felt keenly between Ubuntu and Fedora were with regards to how these two leading projects set up GNOME. On Ubuntu we have a dock that acts as a task switcher, making it a suitable environment for multitasking. Fedora's GNOME has no equivalent. This means Fedora's GNOME is okay for running one or two programs at a time, but I tend to run eight or nine applications at any given moment. This becomes very awkward when using Fedora's default GNOME configuration as it is hard to switch between open windows quickly, at least without installing an extension. In a similar vein, Ubuntu's GNOME has window control buttons and Fedora's version does not, which again adds a few steps to what are usually very simple, quick actions. What it comes down to is I feel like Ubuntu takes GNOME and turns it into a full featured desktop environment, while Fedora provides us with just plain GNOME which feels more like a framework for a desktop we can then shape with extensions rather than a complete desktop environment. In fact, I think that describes Fedora's approach in general - the distribution feels more like a collection of open source utilities rather than an integrated whole. Earlier I mentioned LibreOffice can work with signed documents, but Fedora has no key manager, meaning we need to find and download one. Fedora ships with Totem, which is a fine video player, but it doesn't work with Wayland, making it an odd default choice. These little gaps or missed connections show up occasionally and it sets the distribution apart from other projects like openSUSE or Linux Mint where there is a stronger sense the pieces of the operating system working together with a unified vision. The big puzzle for me this week was with software updates. Linux effectively solved updating software and being able to keep running without a pause, reboot or lock-up decades ago. Other mainstream distributions have fast updates - some even have atomic, on-line updates. openSUSE has software snapshots through the file system, Ubuntu has live kernel updates that do away with rebooting entirely and NixOS has atomic, versioned updates via the package manager, to name just three examples. But Fedora has taken a big step backward in making updates require an immediate reboot, and taking an unusually long time to complete the update process, neither of which benefits the user. Fedora has some interesting features and I like that it showcases new technologies. It's a good place to see what new items are going to be landing in other projects next year. However, Fedora feels more and more like a testing ground for developers and less like a polished experience for people to use as their day-to-day operating system. Read more

6 Reasons Why Linux is Better than Windows For Servers

A server is a computer software or a machine that offers services to other programs or devices, referred to as “clients“. There are different types of servers: web servers, database servers, application servers, cloud computing servers, file servers, mail servers, DNS servers and much more. The usage share for Unix-like operating systems has over the years greatly improved, predominantly on servers, with Linux distributions at the forefront. Today a bigger percentage of servers on the Internet and data centers around the world are running a Linux-based operating system. Read more Also: All the supercomputers in the world moved to Linux operating systems

Android Leftovers