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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security: WordPress 4.8.2, CCleaner 5.33, Apache Patch and Cryptocurrencies Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2017 - 11:21am
Story Ubuntu and Linux Mint Development Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2017 - 11:18am
Story Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 13 Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2017 - 9:48am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2017 - 8:34am
Story Linux-driven Sitara SiP module shrinks to 21mm square Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2017 - 8:19am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2017 - 12:59am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2017 - 12:57am
Story OSS: Blockchain, Innersource, SQL and Clang Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2017 - 12:55am
Story Games: Ostriv, Back to Bed, EVERSPACE, Hiveswap: Act 1 Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2017 - 12:01am
Story Openwashing and Microsoft FUD Roy Schestowitz 19/09/2017 - 11:38pm

Linux and Linux Foundation: Wipro, Torvalds, Zemlin and Kees Cook

Filed under
Linux
  • Wipro joins The Linux Foundation, Automotive Grade Linux
  • Wipro joins Open source technologies focused Linux foundation
  • Linux Goes to Hollywood for Inaugural Open Source Summit
  • Linux Foundation Aims to Advance Open-Source Software Development

    The Linux Foundation hosted its annual Open Source Summit North America event from Sept. 11 to 14 in Los Angeles, highlighting open-source efforts that it helps to lead. One question that Linux Foundation Executive Director, Jim Zemlin grapples with on a regular basis is why his organization continues to be relevant.

    In an era where anyone can simply go to GitHub and start a project, the barriers to entry for open-source development are very low. The Linux Foundation however isn't about basic open-source project hosting, according to Zemlin.

    "One question that we ask ourselves all the time inside of The Linux Foundation is why do we need The Linux Foundation," Zemlin told eWEEK in a video interview. "What's the point?"

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  • Open Source Summit: Linux Kernel Developers Discuss Challenges, Opportunities

    While Linus Torvalds is the most famous Linux kernel developer, he's just one of many that help to lead the way forward. In a panel session at the Open Source Summit in Los Angeles a panel of leading Linux kernel developers discussed their views on the current state of Linux kernel development.

    Google developer Kees Cook explained that right now the kernel is broken up into many different sub-systems each with its own maintainer. A challenge for Cook, is getting changes implemented that span multiple sub-systems. Cook works specifically on security and the changes he tends to need to make have broad impact.

    What Cook has to do now is either send patches to each and every subsystem, or have his own complete kernel tree that the subsystem maintainers can pick up.

Desktop: Lenovo and StationX

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Is Open Source Secure?

Filed under
OSS

With ransomware attacks and security breaches impacting organisations globally on a regular basis, security is very much front and centre of every CSO’s agenda. Known vulnerabilities like Heartbleed and the SMB vulnerability exploited in the WannaCry ransomware attack brought many organisations to their knees, causing panic and chaos.

According to Telstra’s 2017 Cyber Security Report, almost 60 percent of surveyed organisations in Australia detected a security incident on at least a monthly basis in 2016. The Telstra report stated seeing increases in security risks across the board with more than half of all businesses experiencing a ransomware attack last year.

With open source software (OSS) gaining popularity among organisations, there is inevitably discussion around the security of OSS, with most people simply wanting to know: “is open source secure?”

Read more

Games: Swim Out, Mesa, Psychonauts, SteamWorld Dig 2, Ravenfield

Filed under
Gaming

KDE: Plasma Accessibility, Randa Report, KMarkdownWebView 0.1.0, and PureOS

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma accessibility updates

    Marco Martin recently posted about some of the improvements in krunner, today I want to show some of the effort into navigating the Plasma panels.

    This video shows a user navigating the plasma panel using voice and keyboard. A shortcut focusses the panel, and then one can use tab and cursor keys as normal. In future we will improve our key-focus visual indicators, and allow for richer interaction.

  • Randa Report: The Fall of KDateTime

    The main goal for me and Volker for this year Randa Meeting was to port KCalCore, our calendaring library, away from KDateTime. KDateTime/KTimeZone are classes for handling date, time and time zones which were used back in the KDE4 (and earlier) days when Qt’s QDateTime wasn’t good enough for us, mainly due to missing time zone support.

    In Qt5 QDateTime finally gained all the necessary features we need which made it possible for us to leave KDateTime behind. But we couldn’t just go and replace “K” with “Q” everywhere – there are many subtle (and not-so-subtle) differences in API, behavior and some missing features of QDateTime that required us to carefully consider each step. The fact that we started working on this over 2 years ago shows how challenging task this was.

  • KMarkdownWebView 0.1.0

    The KMarkdownWebView software provides a KParts plugin for rendered display of Markdown files, using web technologies (webpage with JavaScript library which creates HTML from the plaintext handed in). This enables KParts-using applications (like the archiving tool Ark or the file manager Krusader) to show Markdown files in the target format. It is also prepared for the upcoming “Live Preview” plugin for KTextEditor-based applications like the editors/IDEs Kate & KDevelop (see introduction).

  • ​KDE is partnering with Purism to create a Linux smartphone

    Most people are happy to use Android smartphones. Others love their Apple iPhones. But there's some folks who really want a free-software smartphone without a trace of proprietary code or firmware. For these folks, Purism and KDE are partnering to create the Purism Librem 5 smartphone.

How an open source tool is helping hurricane victims

Filed under
OSS

After Hurricane Harvey recently ripped through the Houston area, causing catastrophic flooding and devastation, the Stephen F. Austin Community Health Network (SFA) responded quickly by leveraging open source technology to reach out to patients and victims of the crisis in areas of Texas that are virtually inaccessible.

Using an advanced cloud-based version of the OpenEMR software, the SFA Community Health Network was able to treat patients in clinics that were physically unreachable by care providers. The next-generation version of the open source electronic health record (EHR) was developed and is maintained by St. Louis-based Williams Medical Technologies, Inc. (WMT).

Read more

Initial Benchmarks Of The AMD EPYC 7601 On Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week we received the AMD EPYC 7601 32 core / 64 thread processor for testing at Phoronix with the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Since then I've had the pleasure of putting this Zen server processor through its paces. I am still early in the testing process with many more interesting benchmarks to come, but today are some initial numbers of the AMD EPYC 7601 compared to various Intel Xeon CPUs while running Ubuntu Linux.

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Linux drone controller has HDMI input and long-range WiFi

Filed under
Linux

The ArduPilot based “Emlid Edge” drone controller runs Linux on a quad -A53 SoC, and offers an HDMI input, long-range 5.8GHz WiFi, and a UAVCAN GNSS module.

Emlid, which has previously launched the Raspberry Pi based Navio and HAT-ready Navio2 drone controllers, has now opened $699 pre-sales on a much more advanced Emlid Edge controller, due in November. The kit is notable for offering an HDMI input to capture video from an HD camera such as the GoPro. There’s also an optimized, long-range 5.8GHz WiFi links that streams pre-compressed HD video and telemetry data at up to 2 km to Emlid’s QGroundControl Ground Control Station (GCS) software running on a laptop equipped with the same 5.8GHz link.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • ​New IBM big iron for Linux

    IBM mainframes are alive, well, and being designed to make the most of Linux.

  • Create a Linux VM with these potential limitations in mind

    it involves creating a VM object and allocating hardware resources, such as memory, virtual network adapters and virtual CPUs. As simple as the creation process might be, however, the OS that will eventually be installed onto the VM requires some consideration. For example, the VM will need to be provisioned with enough memory to run the OS. In some cases, there may be additional considerations that need to be made beyond meeting the minimum hardware requirements of the OS. This can be especially true for a Linux VM.

  • Cairo Adds Support For OpenGL ES 3.0

    The Cairo 2D vector graphics library used by GTK, Firefox, WebKit, and many other programs finally has an OpenGL ES 3.0 back-end merged.

    Cairo supports many different backends from OpenGL to DirectFB to outputting as SVG/PDF/PostScript files as well as Skia, Direct2D, OpenVG, and other less notable code paths. Finally, OpenGL ES 3.0 is now supported by mainline Cairo.

  • Install and Configure ISC DHCP Server in Debian 9
  • Solving Physics Problems on Linux

Red Hat, CentOS and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Devices: Purism’s Librem 5, ASUSTOR, and Tizen

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

OSS: Comcast, Small Businesses, Cloudera, Windows, and DragonFly

Filed under
OSS
  • Comcast cuts truck rolls with open source AI software

    Comcast claims to have saved tens of millions of dollars through avoiding the need for truck rolls, by using a machine learning program that can predict with 90% accuracy whether or not it will need to send a technician to a customer’s home to fix connectivity problems. Every operator would love to reduce truck rolls. Estimates of the average costs vary, but tend to be somewhere between $50 and $100 per truck roll. Even if a company is using the most efficient vehicles possible, those costs are increasing as fuel and labour costs rise. Every operator is well aware that they end up sending people out on the road more often than is really needed, because many problems could be…

  • Need Free Software? Open-Source Options for Small Businesses

    Nearly all of today's software packages run on a monthly subscription model. It doesn't sound like much upfront, but if you spend $10 a month here and another $20 there, all of a sudden you're forking over a bunch of money each month for programs you're no longer sure that you even need.

    If you're a solopreneur or a small business, you don't want the costs of effective software to eat too much into the bottom line. At the same time, you definitely need the right tools to get the job done.

    This is where free, open-source software can come to the rescue. Not every icon may have the same type of excessive attention to detail and polish as paid software, but when it comes to getting the job done, these free tools can be just as effective. Here are a few of our favorite options.

  • Cloudera Joins Open Source Eclipse IoT Community

    Cloudera, Inc. (NYSE: CLDR), the modern platform for machine learning and analytics, optimized for the cloud, announced it has joined the Eclipse Foundation as a Solutions member and will participate in the Eclipse IoT Working Group. In this capacity, Cloudera collaborates with industry leaders such as Bosch, Eurotech, Red Hat and Samsung Electronics to support the development of Eclipse IoT Open Testbeds. This new initiative showcases how open source software, open standards, and commercial solutions can be used to create real-world, industry-specific IoT (Internet of Things) solutions.

  • On my way to Kieler Open Source und Linux Tage
  • Preview: Linux Containers on Windows
  • How the Windows vs. Linux Debate Has Changed over the Past Decade [Ed: Better headline might be, how Microsoft PR money has subverted the media (e.g. "loves Linux") and more money silenced the Linux Foundation, Linux OEMs]
  • HAMMER2 Is Looking & Performing Good As The Future DragonFlyBSD File-System

    With this week DragonFlyBSD seeing HAMMER2 support added to the installer in preparation for this file-system being an option in the next DragonFly release due out in a few weeks, I've been testing out the state of this HAMMER file-system successor as well as running some benchmarks.

FOSS Licensing News

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • Public Money? Public Code! 22 Organizations Seek to Improve Public Software Procurement

    Today, 22 organizations are publishing an open letter in which they call for lawmakers to advance legislation requiring publicly financed software developed for the public sector be made available under a Free and Open Source Software license. The initial signatories include CCC, EDRi, Free Software Foundation Europe, KDE, Open Knowledge Foundation Germany, Open Source Business Alliance, Open Source Initiative, The Document Foundation, Wikimedia Germany, as well as several others; they ask individuals and other organization to sign the open letter. The open letter will be sent to candidates for the German Parliament election and, during the coming months, until the 2019 EU parliament elections, to other representatives of the EU and EU member states.

  • Two Open Source Licensing Questions: The AGPL and Facebook
  • How Open Source and Proprietary IP Can Co-Exist [Ed: law firms pushing software patents, not just copyright]

    Open source software imparts a number of benefits, including decreasing product development time, distributing development across a community and attracting developers to your organization. However, some organizations shy away from it due to perceived risks and disadvantages around intellectual property.

    [...]

    That's a situation in which we might open source an implementation and file for a patent at the same time. In scoping the patent and the license terms, the open source community gets access to the software but the patent retains value.

FOSS and Oracle

Filed under
OSS
  • Oracle Joins CNCF, and Releases Kubernetes on Oracle Linux and Terraform Kubernetes Cloud Installer

    At the Open Source Summit, held in Los Angeles, USA, it was announced that Oracle have joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as a Platinum member. Oracle have also released two technologies for installing Kubernetes on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure: "Kubernetes on Oracle Linux", an integration of Kubernetes into the Oracle Container Service; and an open source HashiCorp Terraform Kubernetes Installer for the Oracle Bare Metal Cloud. This news follows from the July release of three open source container tools by Oracle, which included a Rust-based alternative container runtime that implements the OCI-runtime specification

  • Oracle Joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation
  • Java EE Finds Open Source Home

    Oracle announced this week it would turn over Java Enterprise Edition to the Eclipse Foundation, a nonprofit corporation formed in 2004 and an outgrowth of a software project originally created by IBM in 2001. The company said its decision resulted from consultations with IBM and Red Hat, the other key contributors to the Java EE platform.

  • Get out your specs: Java EE's headed to the Eclipse Foundation

    Oracle has named the Eclipse Foundation as the new host for Java Enterprise Edition, but said the platform won’t get to keep its name.

    The decision to make Java EE - which is already developed in open source - fully open was announced last month, with Oracle’s David Delabassee saying it was in a bid to make it “more agile and responsive”.

  • Oracle Punts Java EE To The Eclipse Foundation

    Since last month's announcement by Oracle that they were essentially looking to offload Java EE to a new foundation, that new steward has now been named.

KDE: More on Plasma 5.11 Beta and KDE Plasma Mobile

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma 5.11 Beta

    Thursday, 14 Sep 2017. Today KDE publishes a testing release of this autumn's Plasma feature release, KDE Plasma 5.11, to be released in mid-October 2017. Plasma 5.11 will bring a redesigned settings app, improved notifications, a more powerful task manager. Plasma 5.11 will be the first release to contain the new “Vault”, a system to allow the user to encrypt and open sets of documents in a secure and user-friendly way, making Plasma an excellent choice for people dealing with private and confidential information.

  • KDE Plasma 5.11 Rolls Into Beta With New System Settings, Better Wayland Support

    The beta is now available of the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.11. There have been many changes baking for the Plasma 5.11 milestone.

    Plasma 5.11 is rolling out a new system settings design, notification history, task manager improvements, Plasma Vault for making it easy to deal with file encryption, app launcher menu improvements, and better Wayland support.

  • Help us create a privacy-focused Free software smartphone!

    The news is out! KDE and Purism are working together on a Free software smartphone featuring Plasma Mobile. Purism is running a crowdfunding campaign right now, and if that succeeds, with the help of KDE, the plan is to deliver a smartphone based on Plasma Mobile in January 2019.

  • KDE Plasma Mobile Is Coming to the Purism Librem 5

    KDE Plasma Mobile is coming to the Purism Librem 5. Purism and KDE have today announced a partnership that will see both projects work together to bring Plasma Mobile to the Librem 5 handset with the pooling of resources, developers and expertise.

Meet the Ubuntu 17.10 Default Wallpaper

Filed under
Ubuntu

The mascot motif still has to share screen space with the tired familiar orange and purple color gradient, which, as it has been since 2014, is layered with ‘origami’ folds.

Notably, this is the first Ubuntu wallpaper to feature a mascot since 2008. Ubuntu 8.10 ‘Intrepid Ibex’ shipped a textured wallpaper with an abstract ibex artwork (though more commonly seen as a “coffee stain”).

Read more

Games: Arma 3, Albion Online, Hurricane Relief Bundle, RUINER and Steam Updates

Filed under
Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.