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Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Chromium and Chrome Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 12:55pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 12:54pm
Story Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0 Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 12:54pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 12:53pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 12:21pm
Story Vulkan News Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 10:54am
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 10:53am
Story More on Radeon Vega Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 10:52am
Story Kodi 17.1 “Krypton” is Released Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 10:43am
Story Two open source secure email services Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 9:58am

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • GitLab acquires Gitter, a new BeagleBone board, and more open source news
  • UP Core SBC is a smaller, wireless version of the Atom-based UP

    Aaeon’s UP Core is a smaller version of the community-backed, Atom x5 Z8350 based UP board that swaps out the GbE port for WiFi and Bluetooth.

    Aaeon closed out the Embedded World show by announcing a more compact and COM-like UP Core version of its community-backed UP board SBC. The similarly Linux- and Android-ready UP Core will soon hit Kickstarter with a price of $69 (vs. $89 retail) with a base level of 1GB RAM and 16GB eMMC. Also at Embedded World, Aaeon unveiled several IoT-oriented products, including a LoRa gateway based on the UP SBC (see farther below).

  • Filling In the Missing Bits: Kantar Numbers and World Smartphone Market

    Even in the rich world Android now outsells iPhones at 2 to 1 ratio. And outside of the rich world it is 1 in 6 or less that are iPhones. To understand how to adjust these numbers for an annual number - this quarter Apple has 18% market share but for full calendar year 2016 Apple only had 15% market share. For the full year those regional splits would need to be adjusted downward for the iPhone and upward for Androids, by about 3 points per region, to get annual data levels.

BSD and GPL

Filed under
GNU
BSD
  • Call for testing: OpenSSH 7.5p1

    OpenSSH 7.5p1 is almost ready for release, so we would appreciate testing on as many platforms and systems as possible. This is a bugfix release.

  • Updates to the last two posts

    Someone from the FSF’s licencing department posted an official-looking thing saying they don’t believe GitHub’s new ToS to be problematic with copyleft. Well, my lawyer (not my personal one, nor for The MirOS Project, but related to another association, informally) does agree with my reading of the new ToS, and I can point out at least a clause in the GPLv1 (I really don’t have time right now) which says contrary (but does this mean the FSF generally waives the restrictions of the GPL for anything on GitHub?). I’ll eMail GitHub Legal directly and will try to continue getting this fixed (as soon as I have enough time for it) as I’ll otherwise be forced to force GitHub to remove stuff from me (but with someone else as original author) under GPL, such as… tinyirc and e3.

Linux Security

Filed under
Security
  • Why Codethink is a founding member of the Civil Infrastructure Platform, a Linux Foundation initiative

    On April 4th 2016 a new Linux Foundation initiative called the Civil Infrastructure Platform was announced. CIP aims to share efforts around building a Linux-based commodity platform for industrial grade products that need to be maintained for anything between 25 and 50 years - in some cases even longer. Codethink is one of the founding members.

  • Ubuntu 12.04 Will Be End-Of-Life in April 28th 2017 & ESM Surprise
  • Update Shyness

    But the update madness had just started. A couple days after the PCLOS incident, I booted OpenMandriva and Discover notified me that there were updates. I must confess that the update process in OpenMandriva has not been easy for me: I prefer to use the Control Center, but sometimes it cannot install some packages and those have to be installed with Discover. Sometimes, the latter simply refuses to load the package list.

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Mycroft Plasmoid Gets An Update

    Mycroft is your own Open Source personal digital assistant you can use your voice or the keyboard to ask questions (“what’s the weather in Tokyo? / Calculate Pi to 50 Digits”), set reminders, launch apps and even search your plasma desktop for files and recent documents, you could also start using mycroft for shouting instructions like “Create a new activity” or “Lock this computer” or “Switch Users” or “Send an SMS” at your computer on a regular basis.. The Mycroft Plasmoid is the GUI front-end for Mycroft on the Plasma Desktop.

  • [Krita] Interview with Sonia Bennett

    I want to thank the people who worked so hard to create Krita and keep making it better and better. Thank you for this opportunity to show my work here and I appreciate all the encouragement and support I have received from my friends and family. I hope my art can encourage more people to paint with Krita and develop their talent and creativity. If there is any way I can contribute to making Krita better, I would be most happy to help!

  • Kubuntu Podcast 21
  • Women Tech Makers with Qt

    And that day would not pass in blank here in Rio de Janeiro, so the Google Development Group of Rio organized a Women Tech Makers Rio meetup. And on that meetup I made my second version of my presentation: Qt – Your Toolkit for C++ and Python with the real write once deploy everywhere.

  • Cutelyst 1.5.0 released, I18N and HTTPS built-in

    Cutelyst the C++/Qt web framework just got a new stable release.

    Right after last release Matthias Fehring made another important contribution adding support for internationalization in Cutelyst, you can now have your Grantlee templates properly translated depending on user setting.

  • Almost perfect HiDPI experience on Linux (Xorg)

    In 2013 I bought a Macbook Pro 13” which came with a HiDPI display (also known as retina display). Already back then the support for a single HiDPI display was quite alright with KDE4 and a few tweaks here and there. Months later Qt5 got native HiDPI support and most applications switched from GTK2 to GTK3 and finally the outliers (chromium based apps, godot, arduino…) got support for higher DPIs as well.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

A Short Review of Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 Beta 1

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you curious about GNOME 3.22 and later, and about the next-release of Ubuntu GNOME, then it's good to see what's inside Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 "Zesty Zapus" pre-release. Here I write an overview of its Beta 1 release and showing some interesting aspects such as memory usage, new additions (Flatpak & Snappy), new features (Night Light etc.), and its default apps (LibreOffice 5.3 etc.). This Beta 1 is already very nice and exciting to use. I hope you enjoy Ubuntu GNOME 17.04.

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A Short Review of deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux Beta

Filed under
Reviews

deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux will be released in April 2017. Here is a review of its Beta Version showing some interesting aspects: memory usage, new appearances, new programs, and more. This new 15.4 has big improvements in its user interface, making it more beautiful, plus a new program called Deepin Screen Recorder. It's very interesting for any GNU/Linux user to take a look. This review is a continuation of our previous review in 2016 for Deepin 15.3 GNU/Linux.

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5 Innovative Linux Operating Systems You Should Try Today

Filed under
GNU
Linux

There are many, many Linux operating systems out there, variations upon a theme. Each one unique in their behavior, and appearance. In this flurry of operating systems however, a few stand out in regards to what they bring to the table. And the word for that can only be described as innovative.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Pre-order your own disk with Ubuntu 17.04

    Ladies and gentlemen, it is the same time of the year again. It is March, and it means that the release of the next generation of your favourite operating system will be released in a month's time!

    Yes, Ubuntu 17.04 is less than a month away. Many of you already looking for downloading of your own ISO image of the system. Yes, that's the next version, codenamed ZestyZapus.

    But many of you are not so lucky, and will need to wait longer, because you can not or do not want to create their own DVDs with operating system images.
    We can help!

  • Longtime Ubuntu Contributor, Cloud Liaison Leaving Canonical

    After being at Canonical for nearly one decade, Jorge Castro is leaving his work on the Ubuntu Cloud and joining a new startup.

    Jorge Castro had been at Canonical since 2007, while he had contributed to Ubuntu all the way back to 2004. At Canonical he started out in developer relations and for the past number of years was a cloud liaison and most recently was serving within the Kubernetes team.

  • Patterns for Testing Debian Packages

    At the and of 2016 I had the pleasure to attend the 11th Latin American Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs, a.k.a SugarLoaf PLoP. PLoP is a series of conferences on Patterns (as in “Design Patterns”), a subject that I appreciate a lot. Each of the PLoP conferences but the original main “big” conference has a funny name. SugarLoaf PLoP is called that way because its very first edition was held in Rio de Janeiro, so the organizers named it after a very famous mountain in Rio. The name stuck even though a long time has passed since it was held in Rio for the last time. 2016 was actually the first time SugarLoaf PLoP was held outside of Brazil, finally justifying the “Latin American” part of its name.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 6 Best PDF Page Cropping Tools For Linux

    Portable Document Format (PDF) is a well known and possibly the most used file format today, specifically for presenting and sharing documents reliably, independent of software, hardware, or more so, operating system.

    It has become the De Facto Standard for electronic documents, especially on the Internet. Because of this reason, and increased electronic information sharing, many people today get useful information in PDF documents.

  • Kgif – A Simple Shell Script to Create a Gif File from Active Window

    Kgif is a simple shell script which create a Gif file from active window. I felt this app especially designed to capture the terminal activity. I personally used, very often for that purpose.

    It captures activity as a series of PNG images, then combines all together to create a animated GIF. The script taking a screenshot of the active window at 0.5s intervals. If you feel, its not matching your requirement, straight away you can modify the script as per your need.

  • Some Firefox 52 Users on Linux Left Without Sound

    Many Firefox users on Linux were left without the ability to play sound in their browser after updating to Firefox 52, released last week.

    The issue at the heart of this problem is that Mozilla dropped support for ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture) and is now requiring Linux users to have installed the PulseAudio library to support audio playback inside Firefox.

    ALSA is a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers. On the other hand, PulseAudio is a more modern sound server that's already supported on most Linux distros, but also on FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and even macOS.

  • Modern software development is cancer

    Somewhere in the past 15 years, it all went wrong.

  • Gna! Software Hosting Will Shut Down

    Do you know Gna! Software Project Hosting? It's something today similar to SourceForge, GitHub, or Savannah, a place that host many free software projects. You find many projects source codes there, along with all development stuffs (SCM, bugtrack, forum, etc.). The important thing is Gna! supports and hosts only free software projects. Yesterday (Thursday, March 17th) I came across a sad reminder that Gna! will shut down soon. Actually this plan was announced in November 2016, it said "6-months notice before saying goodbye", so it could be this April or May 2017. I show my support to Gna! by this article and I humbly encourage you to support them too by any way you can. Big thanks and respect for Gna! for this 13 years supporting free software.

  • The GNU Toolchain Has Made Much Progress So Far In 2017

    GNU tooling updates we have seen recently include GLIBC 2.25, GDB 7.12.1, Newlib 2.5, GCC 6.3, GCC 7 nearing release, and Binutils 2.28.

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • BUS1 Is Working On A D-Bus Broker

    BUS1 remains in-development as an in-kernel IPC mechanism and the spiritual successor to the never-merged KDBUS.

    BUS1 continues advancing albeit it's not yet in the mainline Linux kernel and it isn't clear yet when it will be ready for merging. BUS1 continues seeing frequent commits to this out-of-tree kernel module.

  • Another Polaris 12 ID Added To RadeonSI

    Another Polaris 12 device ID was added to the RadeonSI driver yesterday. In AMD's other open-source driver components they have also been tidying up their lists this week of the PCI device IDs for the upcoming Polaris 12 hardware.

    The latest device ID added to RadeonSI was 0x6995. This now brings it up to seven Polaris 12 IDs in the open-source driver. As always, it doesn't necessarily mean there will be seven different "Polaris 12" graphics cards AMD is launching but some of these IDs are simply reserved, etc. For reference there were nine device IDs for Polaris 11 and 11 for Polaris 10.

  • Sway 0.12 Wayland Compositor Released

    Sway 0.12 was released earlier this month as the newest feature update to this i3-compatible Wayland compositor.

    This Wayland compositor effort has been in development for a while and has a steady following, in part due to its compatibility with the i3 tiling window manager.

  • Pipeline Statistic Queries Land In Mesa ANV

    Support for pipeline statistics queries are now enabled within Mesa Git for the Intel ANV Vulkan driver.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Eight-year-old Linux security flaw finally fixed

    ANOTHER years-old vulnerability in the Linux kernel has been patched - the fourth such ageing security flaw that has been patched recently.

  • Paving with Good Intentions: The Attempt to Rescue the Network Time Protocol

    After the Heartbleed bug revealed in April 2014 how understaffed and under-funded the OpenSSL project was, the Network Time Foundation was discovered to be one of several projects in a similar condition. Unfortunately, thanks to a project fork, the efforts to lend NTP support have only divided the development community and created two projects scrambling for funds where originally there was only one.

  • Mozilla: Everyone's scared of hackers but clueless about fending them off

    According to Firefox maker Mozilla, we're nearly all afraid of hackers, but few of us feel we can protect ourselves from them.

    The non-profit's survey of 30,000 people found internet users' confidence is extremely low when it comes to privacy and security. The survey found that 90 percent of people are unsure how to protect themselves online, while 11.5 percent feel they know nothing about security.

Linux on Servers

Filed under
Server
  • What is Linux VPS Hosting?

    Basically, Linux VPS stands for a virtual private server running on a Linux system. A virtual private server is a virtual server hosted on a physical server. A server is virtual if it runs in a host computer’s memory. The host computer, in turn, can run a few other virtual servers.

  • How the cloud can kickstart your business

    So, you’re a developer with a great tech idea. You have a vision for a world-beating product, perhaps even one that defines a new category. But the journey from idea to execution is long, painful, and often expensive. The cloud can help developers realize their dreams while minimizing capital outlay. Here’s how.

    In the early days and even into maturity, startups are experimenting. They are testing assumptions, prototyping new features and ideally looking at usage patterns to see how these features are being received. The technology to support this cycle of innovation can be one of the most critical costs for a tech startup. Developing, testing and deploying these experiments isn’t cheap. No startup wants to buy and maintain its own server technology while it churns new ideas. Infrastructure is a distraction for these companies.

  • NFV vs. VNF: What's the difference?

    Networking professionals sometimes use the terms virtual network functions, or VNF, and network functions virtualization, or NFV, interchangeably, which can be a source of confusion. However, if we refer to the NFV specifications the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, or ETSI, sets forth, it becomes clear the two acronyms have related but distinct meanings.

Development News/Languages

Filed under
Development
  • Principles for C programming

    In the words of Doug Gwyn, “Unix was not designed to stop you from doing stupid things, because that would also stop you from doing clever things”. C is a very powerful tool, but it is to be used with care and discipline. Learning this discipline is well worth the effort, because C is one of the best programming languages ever made. A disciplined C programmer will…

  • Growing Young FOSS Programmers With Help of Scratch and Al Sweigart

    If your young child is showing an interest in learning computers, an introduction to Scratch and these instructional videos by Al Sweigart might be in order.

  • The RedMonk Programming Language Rankings: January 2017

    Besides the above plot, which can be difficult to parse even at full size, we offer the following numerical rankings. As will be observed, this run produced several ties which are reflected below (they are listed out here alphabetically rather than consolidated as ties because the latter approach led to misunderstandings). Note that this is actually a list of the Top 23 languages, not Top 20, because of said ties.

  • Algorithm Time Complexity and Big O Notation

Zorin OS 12.1 Education Is Here

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are pleased to announce the release of Zorin OS 12.1 Education. Zorin OS 12.1 Education pairs the latest and greatest software with educational apps that make learning better and more impactful.

This new release of Zorin OS Education takes advantage of the new features and enhancements in Zorin OS 12, our biggest release ever. These include an all new desktop environment, a new way to install software, entirely new desktop apps and much more. You can find more information about what’s new in Zorin OS 12 here.

Read more

Games and Wine

Filed under
Gaming

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more