Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 06 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Servers/Networks Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 11:58am
Story Comma.ai: Car AI Liberated Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 11:54am
Story Comcast Becomes the First Cable Company to Join ONOS & CORD Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 11:47am
Story R3 Corda Ledger Is Now Open Source Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 11:45am
Story SUSE and HPE: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 11:28am
Story Development News (SourceForge and Perl) Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 11:06am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 10:26am
Story 3 open source password managers Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 10:09am
Story Is Open Source Good for Business? Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 10:08am
Story Make Q4OS Look Like Windows With XPQ4 Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 10:00am

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Gwenview Importer is back

    I spent some time over the last weeks to port Gwenview Importer to KDE Frameworks 5, as I was getting frustrated with importing pictures by hand. It's a straight port: no new features.

    Here is a screenshot after I filled my SD Card with random pictures of my daughter and cat for the purpose of illustrating this blog post Smile

  • Time to craft

    It's time for KDE Emerge to emerge as Craft.

    After many years of being the KDE Windows build tool we want to make KDE Emerge more visible and a tool for all developers.

    People associate Emerge with Gentoo, and they are right about it. This was a problem for many years now.

    For that reason Emerge will be called Craft from now on.

  • Functional reactive programming at Meeting C++

    There were couple of really nice talks – some less technical like the one from Jon Kalb of CppCon to the low level ones like the Rainer’s talk about the memory model of C++. Also, seing Bjarne Stroustrup in-person was a pleasure.

  • New Supernovae Data Source in KStars!

    The initial support for Supernovae in KStars was added back in 2011, but it relied on parsing an HTML page using a Python script to extract the necessary information on the latest discovered supernovae. It was obviously a very crude and hackish way to get the data, and I longed to rely on a better source for our data.

    The Harvard page we were relying on for supernovae updates suddenly stopped posting any further updates, its last update was made in 2015. Thankfully, we discovered a new gold trove of information: The Open Supernovae Catalog project!

  • Watching org.libelektra with Qt

    libelektra is a configuration library and tools set. It provides very many capabilities. Here I’d like to show how to observe data model changes from key/value manipulations outside of the actual application inside a user desktop. libelektra broadcasts changes as D-Bus messages. The Oyranos projects will use this method to sync the settings views of GUI’s, like qcmsevents, Synnefo and KDE’s KolorManager with libOyranos and it’s CLI tools in the next release.

  • Windows installer for Kate 16.08.3 KF5.28
  • Welcome new Kubuntu Members

    Friday November 18 was a productive day for the Kubuntu Community, as three new people were questioned and then elected into Membership. Welcome Simon Quigley, José Manuel Santamaría, and Walter Lapchynski as they package, work on our tooling, promote Kubuntu and help users.

  • Testing the untestable

    Admit it: how many times you have seen “software from this branch is completely untested, use it at your own risk” when you checked the latest code from any FOSS project? I bet you have, many times. For any reasonably modern project, this is not entirely true: Continuous Integration and automated testing are a huge help in ensuring that the code builds and at least does what it is supposed to do. KDE is no exception to this, thanks to build.kde.org and a growing number of unit tests.

  • From window killing to screenshot

    Last week I concentrated most of my development work on screenshot support through spectacle in a KWin Wayland session. Now I am happy to announce that we merged support for capturing a screenshot of a window with the help of an external application like spectacle.

    To explain why this is a great achievement we first need to look at X11. On X11 taking a screenshot of a window is easy. It’s part of the X protocol to read the pixmap data of the root window and you get the position and size of each window. Thus one is able to cut out the window and have it as a screenshot. That’s the most simple variant to do it, spectacle and previously ksnapshot do it differently. More on that later on.

  • New features in Ark 16.12

    Ark, the file archiver and compressor developed by KDE, has seen a lot of development for the upcoming 16.12 release. This blog post provides a summary of the most important changes.

Linux 4.8.11

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.11 kernel.

All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.8.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.4.35

NVIDIA vs. AMDGPU-PRO vs. RadeonSI OpenGL Comparison For Holidays 2016

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

If you are planning to upgrade your graphics card in a Linux system this holiday season, here are some fresh benchmarks of several different AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards with various Linux gaming tests under Ubuntu. The AMD tests were done both with the latest RadeonSI Gallium3D stack as well as the AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver.

Tested on the AMD side was the Radeon R9 285, R9 290, RX 460, and RX 480 with both the fully-open driver stack (Linux 4.9 Git + LLVM 4.0 SVN + Mesa 13.1-dev Git as of the end of the week) and then AMDGPU-PRO 16.40.

Read more

What Is Rasberry Pi Project?

Filed under
Linux

The Raspberry Pi is a series of single-board, low-cost, high-performance computer first developed in the UK by the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The Raspberry Pi 3 is the sixth and latest iteration to be released in the series and it just keeps getting better.

Read<br />
more

AV Linux Update: Good but Not Better

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

If you plan on checking out AV Linux, keep in mind that the live session ISO (which you must run in order to install or even load) requires a user name and a password to log in. You will find these necessities hidden in the ISO file name.

For the 64-bit version, the user name is isotester. The password is avl64. The 32-bit version is similar. Use isotester with avl32. For security reasons, you can not access root accounts on the LiveISO.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Plans Unveiled for R3s Corda to Move to Open Source

    Head over to corda.net on November 30 for links to the codebase, simple sample applications and a tutorial to get started writing your own CorDapps.

  • How to Get Certified for Top Open Source Platforms and Applications

    The cloud computing and Big Data scenes are absolutely flooded with talk of shortages in people with deployment and management expertise. There just are not enough skilled workers to go around. The OpenStack Foundation, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation and other organizations are now taking some important steps to address the situation.

    As 2017 approaches, here are some of the best ways to get certified for the open source cloud and Big Data tools that are makng a difference.

    As part of its efforts to grow the OpenStack talent pool and global community, the OpenStack Foundation has announced professional certification programs that are meant to provide a baseline assessment of knowledge and be accessible to OpenStack professionals around the world. Some of the first steps in advancing the program are taking place now, and Red Hat is also advancing OpenStack certification plans.

  • Open-source Darwin now available to download for Apple MacOS Sierra
  • How open source hardware is defining data centre innovation
  • More Offloading Code Hits GCC Mainline For Both HSA & NVPTX

    For those following GCC's offloading capabilities to devices like GPUs, more work continued being mainline this week. We are onto stage 3 development of GCC 7 but items that were still being reviewed at that time are still being allowed to land. It looks like in 2017 we may finally see more GCC support come to reality when it comes to AMD HSA support and OpenMP / OpenACC offloading to NVIDIA GPUs.

  • Dutch Drecht cities published first batch of open datasets

    The Drecht cities (Drechtsteden), a collaboration of six municipalities in the delta region of the Netherlands, have published a first batch of open datasets. The data has been made available on several public open government data platforms. It includes information on complaints, monumental trees, groundwater levels, monuments, playgrounds, dumpsters, and real estate values. More datasets will follow in the near future.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Final Station Post-Apocalyptic 2D Side-Scrolling Shooter Out Now on Linux

    On Thanksgiving day, Russian developer Do My Best Games was proud to announce the availability of the Linux port of their post-apocalyptic train simulator and zombie shooter game, The Final Station.

    Developed by Do My Best Games and published by tinyBuild Games the game was launched on the 30th of August 2016 on Valve's Steam gaming distribution platform, but only for Windows and Mac operating systems.

  • My top list of must-have strategy games on Linux as of right now

    Are you a new Linux gamer wondering what strategy games we have? Or perhaps you’re just in the mood for something new! Here’s my current top list of Linux strategy games.

  • 'The Final Station' released on Linux

    I'm very glad to see that after a long journey, The Final Station has finally arrived at the Linux platform, with a hefty discount this Autumn Steam Sale.

    The game is very atmospheric and the story reminds me of works by Zajdel and Strugatsky brothers. The nostalgia of the dying world and the inevitability of moving forward, even at the price of leaving something or someone behind really spoke to me. But don't take my word for it, go and experience it on your own!

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Linux hardening: a 15-step checklist for a secure Linux server [Ed: paywall]

    Most people assume Linux is secure, and that’s a false assumption. Imagine your laptop is stolen without first being hardened. A thief would probably assume your username is “root” and your password is “toor” since that’s the default password on Kali and most people continue to use it. Do you? I hope not.

  • Homeland Security Issues 'Strategic Principles' For Securing The Internet Of Broken Things

    For much of the last year, we've noted how the rush to connect everything from toasters to refrigerators to the internet -- without adequate (ok, any) security safeguards -- has resulted in a security, privacy and public safety crisis. At first, the fact that everything from Barbies to tea kettles were now hackable was kind of funny. But in the wake of the realization that these hacked devices are contributing to massive new DDoS botnet attacks (on top of just leaking your data or exposing you to hacks) the conversation has quickly turned serious.

    Security researchers have been noting for a while that it's only a matter of time before the internet-of-not-so-smart-things contributes to human fatalities, potentially on a significant scale if necessary infrastructure is attacked. As such, the Department of Homeland Security recently released what they called "strategic principles" for securing the Internet of Things; an apparent attempt to get the conversation started with industry on how best to avoid a dumb device cyber apocalypse.

  • Microsoft gives third-parties access to Windows 10 Telemetry data

    Microsoft struck a deal with security company FireEye recently according to a report on Australian news magazin Arn which gives FireEye access to all Windows 10 Telemetry data.

GNU/Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Meet Pinebook, A Low Cost Linux Laptop That Looks Like A MacBook

    PineBook is a budget laptop running an Allwinner quad-core 64-bit processor. The device comes in two screen sizes both of them having 2GB RAM and 16GB eMMC storage along various ports and connectivity options. PineBook supports a number of Linux distros and Android versions.

  • Meet the Pinebook, a $89 ARM Laptop That Runs Ubuntu

    The Pine64 Pinebook is an ARM laptop priced from $89. It can run Android, ChromiumOS and various flavours of Linux, including Ubuntu.

  • Light and Thin 64-bit ARM based Open Source Notebook
  • The 12 Most Ridiculous Windows Errors of All Time

    Computers and humans are so different. While computers are infinitely faster at processing information, they run into trouble if they try to stray from their course. These “fast idiots” contrast to people, who can’t think as fast as machines but can adapt much more easily.

    These relations have produced some hilarious situations where novice users failed to grasp the basics of using Windows. On the other side of this are error messages. When a computer runs into an unexpected scenario, it usually throws up a message box for the user to review.

Debian News

Filed under
Debian
  • Starting the faster, more secure APT 1.4 series

    We just released the first beta of APT 1.4 to Debian unstable (beta here means that we don’t know any other big stuff to add to it, but are still open to further extensions). This is the release series that will be released with Debian stretch, Ubuntu zesty, and possibly Ubuntu zesty+1 (if the Debian freeze takes a very long time, even zesty+2 is possible). It should reach the master archive in a few hours, and your mirrors shortly after that.

  • Debian package build tools

    When I was first introduced to Debian packaging, people recommended I use pbuilder. Given how complex the toolchain is in the pbuilder case, I don’t understand why that is (was?) a common recommendation.

  • vmdebootstrap Sprint Report

    This is now a little overdue, but here it is. On the 10th and 11th of November, the second vmdebootstrap sprint took place. Lars Wirzenius (liw), Ana Custura (ana_c) and myself were present. liw focussed on the core of vmdebootstrap, where he sketched out what the future of vmdebootstrap may look like. He documented this in a mailing list post and also presented (video).

    Ana and myself worked on live-wrapper, which uses vmdebootstrap internally for the squashfs generation. I worked on improving logging, using a better method for getting paths within the image, enabling generation of Packages and Release files for the image archive and also made the images installable (live-wrapper 0.5 onwards will include an installer by default).

  • Quicker Debian installations using eatmydata

    Two years ago, I did some experiments with eatmydata and the Debian installation system, observing how using eatmydata could speed up the installation quite a bit. My testing measured speedup around 20-40 percent for Debian Edu, where we install around 1000 packages from within the installer. The eatmydata package provide a way to disable/delay file system flushing. This is a bit risky in the general case, as files that should be stored on disk will stay only in memory a bit longer than expected, causing problems if a machine crashes at an inconvenient time. But for an installation, if the machine crashes during installation the process is normally restarted, and avoiding disk operations as much as possible to speed up the process make perfect sense.

Tizen News

Filed under
Linux
  • App: Navitel Navigator is available in Tizen Store for Samsung Z2 & Z1

    Navitel Navigator is a satnav application that was first available for the Samsung Z2, but has now been released for the Z1 but still not on the Z3 yet ? but it’s still worth a mention to our readers The application boasts that it is a precise offline GPS navigation app with free geosocial services and detailed maps of 64 countries. It has had over 20 Million downloads and ranks as one of the Top 5 Navigation apps in 12 countries.

  • Gujarat Lions – A new Cricket Game added to the Tizen Store

    Indian cricket fans will be delighted to hear about a new cricket game, created by Zapak Mobile Games Pvt. Ltd, released in the Tizen Store named Gujarat Lions and is for the Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3, with a download file size of 43MB.

  • T20 Cricket Champion 3D game for Tizen Smartphones

    Zapak Multimedia Pvt. Ltd. has released another cricket game in the Tizen Store named T20 Cricket Champion 3D. You can play this game with your favorite country team. Many countries are available including India, Bangladesh, England, South Africa, Pakistan etc. You can play this game in two different modes: Quick Match and T20 Cricket Champions. In Quick Play mode you can select your favorite team and your opposing team and in Tournament mode you’ve to select your best team to play for. You can also play this game in 3,5,10 or 20 overs and easy, medium or hard (3 difficulties.) Also you get a chance to play in different places in India ie. Mohali, Delhi & Rajkot. A store is available where you can purchase power-ups and different articles. There is also a spinwheel machine available where you can earn coins like a lottery play. Daily rewards also available. The cheerleaders will dance when you hit a six or a four. This is a realistic 3D Cricket Game on your Tizen smartphone.

  • Game: Super Truck Parking is Available in Tizen Store

    Super Truck Parking is a game created by Black Cobra Studios Ltd and run on all Tizen smartphones such as the Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3. This game is about parking your trucks and passing your lessons / the ultimate test. You need to go through your lessons (try to do well on each of them) to come to what is called the ultimate test, yes, your driving test, the test that will finish it all! You have to navigate your way across the city, starting from the Greenhorn Driver Only Backyard Zone and then travel across the city to the Warehouse Noob Transport Truck Driver zone and complete the ultimate parking simulation with The Circuit Only for Real Truck Driver Load Zone.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Korora 25 Upgrades, Mageia 6 Delays, Gift Ideas

Filed under
-s

The Korora project announced a bit of good news for user waiting for the latest release while Mageia users will have to continue to wait. opensource.com published a gift buying guide for Open Source fans and it looks like the netbook is back is back. Gary Newell reviewed Q4OS 1.8 and makeuseof.com today reminded us of why we use Linux.

Read more

Wine 1.9.24

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 1.9.24 is now available.

  • Wine 1.9.24 Ships With More Fixes & Improvements

    Wine 1.9.24 is out as the newest bi-weekly development release of this program for running Windows binaries on Linux and other operating systems.

    Wine 1.9.24 isn't the most exciting release by far in recent memory but does have support for unordered access views in Direct3D, fixes to regression tests, improvements in HID support, and various bug-fixes. In total there are 28 known bug-fixes with this new version.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Deepstream: an Open-source Server for Building Realtime Apps

    Realtime apps are getting really popular, but they’re also hard to build. Wolfram Hempel introduces deepstream, an open-source server he co-founded to make data-sync, request-response and publish-subscribe a whole lot easier.

  • Open Source Email Marketing with phpList

    Email marketing has been exploding in popularity. You might have heard of the likes of MailChimp and Emma advertising the use of their services to send a whole bunch of messages for prospects and profit. The number of ways to promote goods online is forever growing, and research shows emails are still the most effective. I like to compare it with the “desktop is dead” myth; while mobile is on the rise, desktop is here to stay. I believe the same about email.

    Having said that, it’s no surprise that the number of services competing in the field have mushroomed in recent years, capitalising on demand from firms of all sizes to get access to that most personal of places, the email inbox.

    While big brand proprietary platforms and their sponsorship deals have been busy establishing themselves, an Open Source alternative has been minding its own business, making regular releases and accumulating a committed base of users since the year 2000. Enter phpList, the email marketing app you can run yourself without paying for messages, subscribers, or additional features.

  • 3 alternative reasons why you should test Nextcloud 11 Beta

    And many of the folks about to be put in power by President-elect Trump favor more spying, including on US citizens, expansion of the NSA, a crackdown on whistleblowers and more. Trump's pick for CIA director calls for Snowden's execution. For, what I can only guess must be giving proof of illegal government spying to dangerous terrorists like the Washington Post and the Guardian, who proceeded to win a Pulitzer prize by disclosing this information irresponsibly to the US public.

  • Mickey Mouse Open Source, Close Call at WordPress, and More…

    These days we’re seeing a lot of companies that aren’t officially in the software business releasing code developed in-house for internal use under open source licenses. You can now add Disney to that list, which includes Capital One, Walmart and others.

    This was pointed out on Wednesday by InfoWorld’s Paul Krill, who notes that in addition to Mickey Mouse, Pinocchio and Nemo, the company has given us advanced image projects such as OpenEXR, as well as DevOps tools for the Mac, such as Munki. More information on Disney’s open source projects can be found on its GitHub page.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

  • Building MySQL DBaaS on OpenStack And Ceph Clouds
    With a properly configured OpenStack deployment and Red Hat Ceph storage backend, DBaaS clients merely go to a self-service interface and request the number and configuration of databases they require. OpenStack dynamically provisions the required storage capacity from the appropriate Ceph storage pool. No more manual placement of these database instances on MySQL clusters of various shapes and sizes. This manual exercise was a bit like playing the old Tetris game, trying to fit new database instances into fixed-sized clusters, followed by moving or rearranging them to new clusters when they outgrew available capacity.
  • Now available: The Open Organization Leaders Manual
    Available now, The Open Organization Leaders Manual is a community-produced companion to Jim Whitehurst's The Open Organization. With contributions from more than 15 authors, it explores new attitudes and practices leaders should adopt when leveraging the power of transparecy, meritocracy, inclusivity, sharing, and collaboration to build the workplaces of the future.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Stake Maintained by Verde Servicos Internacionais S.A.
  • National Pension Service Purchases 12,387 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

7 cool little open source projects that stood out in 2016

In the early days of the open source movement, a lot of the attention was on operating systems, and later on large content management systems. These days, containers are mentioned regularly even in mainstream news outlets. The big tech stories are great, but they miss the other great activity in the niches of the open source space. I've rounded up seven interesting lesser-known projects from the past year. You can see more articles about projects like this in my Nooks and Crannies column. Read more

RaspArch, the Arch Linux Remix for Raspberry Pi 3 SBCs, Now Shipping with Yaourt

After announcing the release of a new version of his Ubuntu-based ExTiX Linux operating system for Intel Compute Stick devices, Arne Exton has announced today the availability of RaspArch Build 161205. RaspArch is a remix of Arch Linux ARM for Raspberry Pi 3 and Raspberry Pi 2 single-board computers, and the latest release is shipping with the long-term supported Linux 4.4.35 kernel and the latest package versions released upstream as of December 5, 2016. "When you have installed RaspArch to your Micro SD Card you can use the system like any other Arch Linux system, i.e. install new programs, etc," said Arne Exton in the release announcement. "Arch motto is KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid). RaspArch uses kernel 4.4.35-1-ARCH and the LXDE Desktop environment." Read more

Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.2 Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.36, Firefox 45.5.1

Porteus Solutions, through Tomasz Jokiel, announced today the release and immediate availability of Porteus Kiosk 4.2.0, the latest stable version of the free and open source Gentoo-based kiosk operating system for web terminals. Powered by the latest long-term supported Linux 4.4.36 kernel, Porteus Kiosk 4.2.0 ships with some of the latest and greatest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software projects, including the recently released X.Org Server 1.18.4 display server, as well as the Mozilla Firefox 45.5.1 ESR and Google Chrome 54.0.2840.100 web browsers. Read more