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Friday, 17 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux pioneer Munich supports Windows 10 rollout from 2020 in key vote

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Linux

While the decision will need approval from the full council on 23rd November, Dr Florian Roth, leader of the Green Party in Munich, says committee decisions are normally simply confirmed by the council, without change. However, he said the Green Party would be pushing for a detailed discussion and consideration of the decision by the full council.

"I think it's a great mistake," adding it would place unnecessary burden and cost on Munich at a time it was already restructuring its IT department and implementing new laws on e-government.

"I have the feeling that the IT department don't want to do this, but they have to do it because the two parties who have the majority in the government want this."

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Compact field controller runs Yocto Linux on i.MX6

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Linux

Kingdy’s compact, fanless “TB-045S” and -20 to 70°C ready ““TB-045W” systems run Yocto on an i.MX6, and offer 9-36V power, up to 32GB eMMC, and mini-PCIe.

Kingdy, an embedded manufacturer company of Taiwan-based Hong Jue, has announced two flavors of a compact, 130 x 92 x 42mm embedded computer and remote management field controller designed for industrial automation applications. The 0 to 60°C range TB-045S and otherwise identical, -20 to 70°C resistant TB-045W, are equipped with dual-core Dual Lite or quad-core Quad versions of NXP’s 1GHz Cortex-A9 i.MX6 SoC.

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Games: Hand of Fate 2, Another Hitman Game, Steam Client Update, System Shock, In the Shadows, X-Plane

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Gaming

10 Most Secure Linux Distros For Complete Privacy & Anonymity | 2017 Edition

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GNU
Linux
Security

One of the most compelling reasons to use Linux is its ability to deliver a secure computing experience. There are some specialized secure Linux distros for security that add extra layers and make sure that you complete your work anonymously and privately. Some of the popular secure Linux distros for 2017 are Tails, Whoix, Kodachi, etc.

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Ethical Hacking OS Parrot Security 3.9 Officially Out, Parrot 4.0 In the Works

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OS
Security

Just a minor improvement to the Parrot Security 3.x series of the Linux-based operating system used by security researchers for various pentesting and ethical hacking tasks, Parrot Security OS 3.9 is here with all the latest security patches and bug fixes released upstream in the Debian GNU/Linux repositories.

But it also looks like it ships with some important new features that promise to make the ethical hacking computer operating system more secure and reliable. One of these is a new sandbox system based on the Firejail SUID program and designed to add an extra layer of protection to many apps, protecting users from 0day attacks.

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Samsung phones soon can run true GNU/Linux distributions

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Linux

Imagine being able to place your cellphone into a small little dock, and be able to run your favourite Linux distribution on a monitor with proper mouse and keyboard, use it as you desire, then switch over to android; still using the mouse and keyboard. Once all was said and done, you could undock the phone, and put it back in your pocket and walk away...

This ladies and gentlemen, is Linux on Galaxy, a new application as part of the new Samsung Ecosystem, DeX.

Users who own a DeX compatible phone, such as the S8, S8+ or Note 8, have the option of picking up this new technology, which allows the usage of your phone as a sort of PC. With the addition of 'Linux on Galaxy', users could run Ubuntu, or Linux Mint, on their phones. While it seems like something so simple and obvious that we should have; it also is going to have much larger implications for the technology world as well.

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Tech Corner: Open Source breaking business-as-usual

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GNU
OSS

Back in 1983, Richard Stallman already begun his GNU project and two years later he started the Free Software Foundation. In 1989 he then wrote the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL). After Torvalds published version 0.99 using the GNU GPL, GNU components were integrated with Linux and it became a fully functional and free operating system. Torvalds later admitted, “Making Linux GPL’d was definitely the best thing I ever did.”

Many of today’s most promising new enterprise technologies such as Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning (Google’s Tensorflow), Containers (Docker Swarm and Kubernetes), Big Data (Apache Spark, Akka and Apache Kafka) are based on free, open-source technology. Open-source software licenses give developers and users freedoms they would not otherwise have. Its source code is freely available to anyone. Therefore, it can be modified and distributed without requiring attribution, payment or anything owed to the original creator.

Commenting on open source’s wide acceptance within today’s computer industry, Dr. Ronald D. Eaglin Chair of Daytona State’s School of Engineering Technology, says, “It’s all open source now. I build all my classes on open source software.”

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Latest IPFire 2.19 Linux Firewall Update Patches OpenSSL, Wget Vulnerabilities

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Linux
Security

Coming only a few days after the Core Update 115 release, which introduced a new IPFire Captive Portal allowing for easy access control of wireless and wired networks, along with updated OpenVPN configuration options, the IPFire 2.19 Core Update 116 release patches important security vulnerabilities.

For starters, the update bumps the OpenSSL version to 1.0.2m, a release that addresses two security flaws affecting modern AMD Ryzen and Intel Broadwell processors, as well as certificate data. More details about the two vulnerabilities are available at CVE-2017-3736 and CVE-2017-3735.

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3.5-inch SBC comes in 6th and 7th Gen Intel flavors

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Linux

Commell’s 3.5-inch “LS-37K” SBC supports 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series and Xeon-E3-1200 v5 CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, triple displays, 2x SATA, and mSATA.

Commell announced a 3.5-inch SBC with Intel’s 6th (“Skylake”) or 7th (“Kaby Lake”) Gen Core S-series and Xeon-E3-1200 v5 CPUs. The LS-37K’s layout and feature set are similar to that of its Skylake based LE-37I and LE-37G 3.5-inch boards. As usual, no OS support is listed, but Linux should run with no problem.

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antiX MX 17 Enters Beta, Ships with Latest Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Updates

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Debian

antiX MX is an open source GNU/Linux distro based on the Debian GNU/Linux operating system and built around the lightweight Xfce desktop environment. Its development schedule is different than that of the big brother antiX and includes additional software packaged by the MX community.

Development of antiX MX 17 is, of course, based on antiX 17 "Heather Heyer," which was released two weeks ago, on October 24, 2017, and the first beta milestone is now available for public testing, incorporating all the latest upstream updates from the software repositories of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch."

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today's leftovers

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Misc

Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Open-Source Acumos Project Aims to Make AI Apps More Accessible

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is one of the hottest areas in technology today, with enterprise application developers often struggling to figure out how to integrate the technology. A new open-source effort that is set to debut in early 2018 could change that situation, making AI easier to use and integrate.

    The Acumos Project will be an open-source effort hosted by the Linux Foundation, as an initiative that aims to make AI easier to integrate and consume. The initial founding members of the nascent effort include AT&T and Tech Mahindra.

  • Open Source Summit Europe 2017 & Dedoimedo

    I am happy with the OSS Europe 2017. It was a solid success. Smart planning, great organization, great atmosphere, friendly attitude, and a colorful mix of mingling, food and technology. My own session was received well, I met old friends, made some new ones, and that's what it's all about.

    While it's unlikely that my call to action will result in any major revolution on the desktop side, and we still haven't figured out who the emperor - or empress - ought to be, having fun is all that matters. I intend to continue participating, well, provided my future talks get accepted, and I am definitely looking forward to the 2018 event. Anyway, thank you for the fish and see you next year.

  • MongoDB’s Mat Keep: Open-Source Database Can Help Agencies ‘Glean Insights’ From Large Data Volumes

    Mat Keep, director of product and market analysis at MongoDB (Nasdaq: MDB), has said government agencies should modernize their data infrastructures to manage and analyze large volumes of collected data through the adoption of non-relational databases.

    Keep wrote such databases work to help organizations automatically spread data across public cloud platforms and data centers as well as “maintain service continuity in the event of a failure.”

  • NIH Awards $9M for Open Source, Cloud-Based Big Data Commons

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has selected twelve recipients of $9 million in grant funding to support the development of an open source, cloud-based data common for biomedical big data.

    The pilot phase of the NIH Data Commons will create a shared, secure space to share data sets and analytics tools that support a wide variety of research topics, especially those related to precision medicine and genomics.

    “The NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase will create new opportunities for research not feasible before,” said NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase Program Manager, Vivien Bonazzi, PhD.

  • How Microsoft Contributes to Kubernetes
  • FundRequest – The Decentralized Platform For Rewarding Open Source Contributions And Developments

    Open source software is an important component in the IT systems of many important institutions such as governments, companies, and applications all over the world.

  • GhostBSD 11.1 Is Almost Ready With MATE & Xfce Tailored FreeBSD Desktop Experience

    GhostBSD 11.1-RC1 was released on Monday as the final test release before shipping this official update of the Xfce/MATE-desktop oriented FreeBSD 11.1 derivative.

  • Background for future changes to membership in FSFE e.V.

    At the general assembly in October the Executive Council sought the members’ consent to simplify and streamline the route to membership in FSFE e.V. The members gave it, and as a consequence, the Executive Council will prepare a constitutional amendment to remove the institution of Fellowship Representatives at the next general assembly. If this constitutional amendment is accepted, active volunteers meeting a yet-to-be-decided threshold will be expected to directly apply for membership in the FSFE e.V. The Executive’s reasoning for moving in this direction can be found below.

    For the reasons listed below, the Council believes that the institution of Fellowship Representatives has ceased to serve its original purpose (and may indeed have never served its intended purpose). In addition, it has become a tool for arbitrarily excluding active contributors from membership, and has thus become harmful to the future development of the organization. Wherefore, the Council believes that the institution of Fellowship Representatives should be removed and asks for the members’ consent in preparing a constitutional amendment to eliminate the institution and resolve the future status of Fellowship Representatives in office at the time of removal. The proposal would be presented to the General Assembly for adoption at the next ordinary meeting.

  • 5 ways blockchain can accelerate open organizations
  • Novel open source software for drug combination analysis reveals complex effects of combining clinically used drugs

    The effect of combining clinically used drugs for the treatment of colon cancer can vary widely depending on concentrations, ranging from cases where the drugs counteract each other to cases where they reinforce each other. This is the main conclusion from a cell culture analysis in which collected data were analyzed using novel open source software recently developed.

  • Open data platform DKAN changes hands

    Open source open data platform DKAN is now under new leadership. Digital government firm CivicActions announced last week that it has taken over stewardship of the project from Granicus, also a digital government services firm.

  • Uber Releases Pyro: An Open Source Probabilistic Programming Language
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  • How To Code Like The Top Programmers At NASA — 10 Critical Rules

Security: Marcher, WPA2, Updates, Reproducible Builds and More

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Security

Chromebooks Run Chrome OS, GNU/Linux (e.g. Crouton), and 'Windows' (CrossOver)

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GNU
Linux
Google

Review of Ubuntu 17.10 and Other Caonical/Ubuntu News

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 - unhappy remarriage

    Ubuntu 17.10 is a new operating system not just because it was released very recently, in October 2017. It is also the first operating system from Canonical since it reverted from Unity to the GNOME desktop environment as default. It was GNOME 2 in use at the divorce time, and now it is GNOME 3 after the re-marriage.

    Linux notes from DarkDuck has already reviewed the GNOME version of Ubuntu, when Unity was still in place. There is also a quick screenshot-style review of Ubuntu 17.10, but it is now time to get a more in-depth look into this operating system.

    Ubuntu 17.10 is available to download through a large global network of mirrors, and torrents are available. The 32-bit ISO images are no longer available, only the 64-bit. The most recent 32-bit image for Ubuntu users is Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which still will be supported for a few more years. However, all newer versions will only be available with the 64-bit kernel, unless you are looking for the low-resource distributions like Lubuntu or Xubuntu.

  • What Unity Users Need to Know About Ubuntu 17.10’s GNOME Shell

    Rather than clicking the Ubuntu logo icon at the top of the launcher, you’ll click the 9-dot “Show Applications” button at the bottom of the dock to view, search, and launch your installed applications. Most of the applications are the same ones Ubuntu used on Unity, as Unity has always borrowed a lot of applications from GNOME.

  • LXD Weekly Status #22
  • Top snaps in October: IntelliJ IDEA, MuseScore and more

    Hot on the heels of the Ubuntu 17.10 release, the snap store has seen some great additions for musicians with MuseScore, for developers with IntelliJ IDEA, and many more! Let’s have a look at our october selection...

Apache OpenOffice: We're OK with not being super cool... PS: Watch out for that Mac bug

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Interviews
OOo

Apache OpenOffice 4.1.4 finally shipped on October 19, five months later than intended, but the software is still a bit buggy.

The resource-starved open-source project had been looking to release the update around Apache Con in mid-May, but missed the target, not altogether surprising given persistent concerns about a lack of community enthusiasm and resources for the productivity suite.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: New Release of HardenedBSD, Windows Leaks Details of Windows Back Doors

  • Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 11-STABLE v1100054
  • Kaspersky blames NSA hack on infected Microsoft software
    Embattled computer security firm Kaspersky Lab said Thursday that malware-infected Microsoft Office software and not its own was to blame for the hacking theft of top-secret US intelligence materials. Adding tantalizing new details to the cyber-espionage mystery that has rocked the US intelligence community, Kaspersky also said there was a China link to the hack.
  • Investigation Report for the September 2014 Equation malware detection incident in the US
    In early October, a story was published by the Wall Street Journal alleging Kaspersky Lab software was used to siphon classified data from an NSA employee’s home computer system. Given that Kaspersky Lab has been at the forefront of fighting cyberespionage and cybercriminal activities on the Internet for over 20 years now, these allegations were treated very seriously. To assist any independent investigators and all the people who have been asking us questions whether those allegations were true, we decided to conduct an internal investigation to attempt to answer a few questions we had related to the article and some others that followed it:
  • Kaspersky: Clumsy NSA leak snoop's PC was packed with malware
    Kaspersky Lab, the US government's least favorite computer security outfit, has published its full technical report into claims Russian intelligence used its antivirus tools to steal NSA secrets. Last month, anonymous sources alleged that in 2015, an NSA engineer took home a big bunch of the agency's cyber-weapons to work on them on his home Windows PC, which was running the Russian biz's antimalware software – kind of a compliment when you think about it. The classified exploit code and associated documents on the personal system were then slurped by Kremlin spies via his copy of Kaspersky antivirus, it was claimed.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source Networking Days: Think Globally, Collaborate Locally
    Something that we’ve learned at The Linux Foundation over the years is that there is just no substitute for periodic, in-person, face-to-face collaboration around the open source technologies that are rapidly changing our world. It’s no different for the open networking projects I work with as end users and their ecosystem partners grapple with the challenges and opportunities of unifying various open source components and finding solutions to accelerate network transformation. This fall, we decided to take The Linux Foundation networking projects (OpenDaylight, ONAP, OPNFV, and others) on the road to Europe and Japan by working with local site hosts and network operators to host Open Source Networking Days in Paris, Milan, Stockholm, London, Tel Aviv, and Yokohama.
  • The Open-Source Driving Simulator That Trains Autonomous Vehicles
    Self-driving cars are set to revolutionize transport systems the world over. If the hype is to be believed, entirely autonomous vehicles are about to hit the open road. The truth is more complex. The most advanced self-driving technologies work only in an extremely limited set of environments and weather conditions. And while most new cars will have some form of driver assistance in the coming years, autonomous cars that drive in all conditions without human oversight are still many years away. One of the main problems is that it is hard to train vehicles to cope in all situations. And the most challenging situations are often the rarest. There is a huge variety of tricky circumstances that drivers rarely come across: a child running into the road, a vehicle driving on the wrong side of the street, an accident immediately ahead, and so on.
  • Fun with Le Potato
    At Linux Plumbers, I ended up with a Le Potato SBC. I hadn't really had time to actually boot it up until now. They support a couple of distributions which seem to work fine if you flash them on. I mostly like SBCs for having actual hardware to test on so my interest tends to be how easily can I get my own kernel running. Most of the support is not upstream right now but it's headed there. The good folks at BayLibre have been working on getting the kernel support upstream and have a tree available for use until then.
  • PyConf Hyderabad 2017
    In the beginning of October, I attended a new PyCon in India, PyConf Hyderabad (no worries, they are working on the name for the next year). I was super excited about this conference, the main reason is being able to meet more Python developers from India. We are a large country, and we certainly need more local conferences :)
  • First Basilisk version released!
    This is the first public version of the Basilisk web browser, building on the new platform in development: UXP (code-named Möbius).
  • Pale Moon Project Rolls Out The Basilisk Browser Project
    The developers behind the Pale Moon web-browser that's been a long standing fork of Firefox have rolled out their first public beta release of their new "Basilisk" browser technology. Basilisk is their new development platform based on their (Gecko-forked) Goanna layout engine and the Unified UXL Platform (UXP) that is a fork of the Mozilla code-base pre-Servo/Rust... Basically for those not liking the direction of Firefox with v57 rolling out the Quantum changes, etc.
  • Best word processor for Mac [iophk: "whole article fails to mention OpenDocument Format"]
  • WordPress 4.9: This one's for you, developers!
    WordPress 4.9 has debuted, and this time the world's most popular content management system has given developers plenty to like. Some of the changes are arguably overdue: syntax highlighting and error checking for CSS editing and cutting custom HTML are neither scarce nor innovative. They'll be welcomed arrival will likely be welcomed anyway, as will newly-granular roles and permissions for developers. The new release has also added version 4.2.6 of MediaElement.js, an upgrade that WordPress.org's release notes stated has removed dependency on jQuery, improves accessibility, modernizes the UI, and fixes many bugs.”
  • New projects on Hosted Weblate
  • Cilk Plus Is Being Dropped From GCC
    Intel deprecated Cilk Plus multi-threading support with GCC 7 and now for GCC 8 they are looking to abandon this support entirely. Cilk Plus only had full support introduced in GCC 5 while now for the GCC 8 release early next year it's looking like it will be dropped entirely.
  • Software Freedom Law Center vs. Software Freedom Conservancy

    On November 3rd, the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) wrote a blog post to let people know that the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) had begun legal action against them (the SFC) over the trademark for their name.

  • What Is Teletype For Atom? How To Code With Fellow Developers In Real Time?
    In a short period of three years, GitHub’s open source code editor has become one of the most popular options around. In our list of top text editors for Linux, Atom was featured at #2. From time to time, GitHub keeps adding new features to this tool to make it even better. Just recently, with the help of Facebook, GitHub turned Atom into a full-fledged IDE. As GitHub is known to host some of the world’s biggest open source collaborative projects, it makes perfect sense to add the collaborative coding ability to Atom. To make this possible, “Teletype for Atom” has just been announced.
  • Microsoft Is Trying To Make Windows Subsystem For Linux Faster (WSL)
  • Microsoft and GitHub team up to take Git virtual file system to macOS, Linux

Ubuntu: New Users, Unity Remix, 18.04 LTS News

  • How to Get Started With the Ubuntu Linux Distro
    The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we’ll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.)
  • An ‘Ubuntu Unity Remix’ Might Be on the Way…
    A new Ubuntu flavor that uses the Unity 7 desktop by default is under discussion. The plans have already won backing from a former Unity developer.
  • Ubuntu News: Get Firefox Quantum Update Now; Ubuntu 18.04 New Icon Theme Confirmed
    Earlier this week, Mozilla earned big praises in the tech world for launching its next-generation Firefox Quantum 57.0 web browser. The browser claims to be faster and better than market leader Google Chrome. Now, Firefox Quantum is available for all supported Ubuntu versions from the official repositories. The Firefox Quantum Update is also now available.
  • New Icon Theme Confirmed for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
    ‘Suru’ is (apparently) going to be the default icon theme in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. That’s Suru, the rebooted community icon theme and not Suru, the Canonical-created icon theme that shipped on the Ubuntu Phone (and was created by Matthieu James, who recently left Canonical).

OnePlus 5T Launched

  • OnePlus 5T Keeps the Headphone Jack, Introduces Face Unlock and Parallel Apps
    Five months after it launched its OnePlus 5 flagship Android smartphone, OnePlus unveiled today its successor, the OnePlus 5T, running the latest Android 8.0 (Oreo) mobile OS. OnePlus held a live event today in New York City to tell us all about the new features it implemented in the OnePlus 5T, and they don't disappoint as the smartphone features a gorgeous and bright 6.0-inches Optic AMOLED capacitive touchscreen with multitouch, a 1080x2160 pixels resolution, 18:9 ratio, and approximately 402 PPI density. The design has been changed a bit as well for OnePlus 5T, which is made of anodized aluminum.
  • OnePlus 5T Launched: Comes With Bigger Screen, Better Dual Camera, And Face Unlock
    Whenever costly phones like iPhone X or Google Pixel 2 are bashed (here and here) and their alternatives are discussed, OnePlus is always mentioned. In the past few years, the company has amassed a fan base that has found the concept of “Never Settle” impressive.
  •