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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Flatpak Linux App Sandboxing Tool Now Works Out of the Box with OpenGL Drivers Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2017 - 7:53am
Story Linux Graphics: NVIDIA, Games, AMD, and Wayland Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2017 - 7:49am
Story Statement by The Document Foundation about the upcoming discussion at the City of Munich to step back to Windows and MS Office Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2017 - 7:37am
Story Mageia 6 and OpenMandriva Lx Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2017 - 7:24am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 11:58pm
Story KDE and Qt Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 11:56pm
Story Linux Foundation Teaches GNU and Linux Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 11:55pm
Story Lumina Adds Luster to Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 11:52pm
Story CentOS Vs. Ubuntu Mohd Sohail 14/02/2017 - 11:34pm
Story Vala Development Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 10:19pm

How I became a project team leader in open source

Filed under
OSS

As an idealistic young university undergraduate I hung around with the nerds in the computer science department. I was studying arts and, later, business, but somehow I recognized even then that these were my people. I'm forever grateful to a young man (his name was Michael, as so many people in my story are) who introduced me first to IRC and, gradually, to Linux, Google (the lesser known search engine at the time), HTML, and the wonders of open source. He and I were the first people I knew to use USB storage drives, and oh how we loved explaining what they were to the curious in the campus computer lab.

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Kurdish Group Hacks openSUSE Linux Website

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

In this day and age, you never know where you're going to run across a political statement. For example, if you visited the openSUSE News website on Monday, you would have been treated to an image of the Kurdistan flag, along with a rather potty mouthed anti-ISIS statement.

Yup. The openSUSE site had been defaced, by a hacker identifying himself as MuhmadEmad and connected with a group called "KurDish HaCk3Rs." A screenshot of the defaced site is available -- thanks to Roy Schestowitz, publisher of Tux Machines and Techrights -- but we'll not show it here due to an F-bomb in the message. The good news is that little harm seems to have been done and the site was quickly returned to normal by way of a recent backup.

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Linux-driven dev board harnesses Sitara PRU-ICSS

Filed under
Linux

MYIR unveiled a new development board for its TI AM437x based “MYC-C437X” module designed to tap the AM437x’s PRU-ICSS real-time chips.

In late 2015, MYIR launched its MYD-C437X baseboard and MYC-C437x COM based on TI’s single Cortex-A9, 1GHz Sitara PRU-ICSS (Programmable Real-Time Unit and Industrial Communication Subsystem) AM437x SoC. Now, the Chinese manufacturer has spun a MYD-C437X-PRU development board that uses the same Linux-driven MYC-C437x COM. It’s designed for developers who want to exploit the capabilities of the AM437x’s quad-core, 200MHz PRU-ICSS real-time, programmable chips. The MYC-C437x module is again supported with a Linux BSP, now upgraded to a Linux 4.1.18 kernel.

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KDE Applications 16.12.2 Rolls Out for Plasma Users to Fix over 20 Recorded Bugs

Filed under
KDE
Security

Today, February 9, 2017, KDE has had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of the second point release of its KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for KDE Plasma desktops.

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Escuelas Linux 5.1 Officially Released with LibreOffice 5.3 and Vivaldi Browser

Filed under
LibO
Linux

The development team behind the Escuelas Linux operating system informed Softpedia today about the immediate availability of the Escuelas Linux 5.1 release, a major milestone that adds numerous improvements and new components.

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Poverty Helps You Keep Technology Safe and Easy

Filed under
Linux

But wait! There’s more! The Android phones that got famous for burning up everything in sight were top-dollar models my wife says she wouldn’t want even if we could afford them. Safety first, right? Frugality’s up there, too.

Now let’s talk about how I got started with Linux.

Guess what? It was because I was poor! The PC I had back in the days of yore ran DOS just fine, but couldn’t touch Windows 98 when it came out. Not only that, but Windows was expensive, and I was poor. Luckily, I had time on my hands, so I rooted around on the Internet (at phone modem speed) and eventually lit upon Red Hat Linux, which took forever to download and had an install procedure so complicated that instead of figuring it out I wrote an article about how Linux might be great for home computer use someday in the future, but not at the moment.

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Linux on Servers

Filed under
Server

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel 3.18 Reaches End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.9 or 4.4

    Today, February 8, 2017, renowned Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman put an end to the release cycle of the long-term supported (LTS) Linux 3.18 kernel series by releasing what appears to be the last hotfix.

    Linux kernel 3.18.48 LTS is here and is the last in the series, which was marked for a January 2017 extinction since mid-April last year. According to the appended shortlog, the new patch changes a total of 50 files, with 159 insertions and 351 deletions.

  • Inside Real-Time Linux

    Real-time Linux (RTL), a form of mainline Linux enabled with PREEMPT_RT, has come a long way in the past decade. Some 80 percent of the deterministic PREEMPT_RT patch is now available in the mainline kernel itself. Yet, backers of the strongest alternative to the single-kernel RTL on Linux -- the dual-kernel Xenomai -- continue to claim a vast superiority in reduced latency. In an Embedded Linux Conference Europe presentation in October, Jan Altenberg rebutted these claims while offering an overview of the real-time topic.

  • Introduction to Realtime Linux

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Atom 1.14

    A fundamental component of the text editor called the display layer has been redesigned to rely on a new data structure that is implemented in C++. These changes enable Atom to open larger files more quickly while using much less memory. Improvements in this area are ongoing, so expect more in upcoming releases.

  • Atom 1.14 Hackable Text Editor Launches with Improved Large File Performance

    GitHub's Ian Olsen is announcing today, February 8, 2017, the general availability of the Atom 1.14 open-source and multiplatform hackable text editor for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    Launched exactly one month after the release of Atom 1.13, the new Atom 1.14 release does not appear to be a major milestone, as it only adds 64-bit installation support for Microsoft Windows operating systems, improved MRU tab traversal with a bunch of fixes, as well as large file performance across all platforms.

  • Why I Swapped VLC for MPV

    In fact, if I were to you all what video player you use on Ubuntu I’d be cowered by the collective cry of ‘VLC’!

    And quite right too. VLC is open-source, obscenely powerful and plays dang well near everything you chuck at it,

  • PostfixAdmin 3.0.2

    This release fixes a security bug - admins could delete protected aliases like abuse@ (CVE-2017-5930). Besides that, some non-security bugs were fixed. Read the official announcement for details.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.700.0.0

    Time for another update of RcppArmadillo with a new release 0.7.700.0.0 based on a fresh Armadillo 7.700.0. Following my full reverse-dependency check of 318 package (commit of log here), CRAN took another day to check again.

  • CodeWeavers has Released CrossOver 16.1.0 for Linux and MacOS

    I am delighted to announce that CodeWeavers has just released CrossOver 16.1.0 for both macOS and Linux.

    The big news in CrossOver 16.1 is that we now support Quicken 2017. We know many of our customers use Quicken and CrossOver to do their taxes this time of year. With CrossOver 16.1, you can use the latest version of Quicken.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat IT Single Sign On(SSO) Runs on Red Hat Virtualization

    Red Hat is best known for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and for being a leader in driving open source development projects. In many cases, the upstream projects then become Red Hat products that provide enterprise functionality elsewhere in the stack.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux Across Architectures: Everything Works Out of the Box

    Since the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server for ARM Development Preview 7.3 became available I’ve been wanting to try it out to see how the existing code for x86_64 systems works on the 64-bit ARM architecture (a.k.a. aarch64).

    Going in, I was a bit apprehensive that some kind of heavy lifting would be needed to get things working on the ARM platform. My experience with cross-architecture ports with other distros (before I joined Red Hat) indicated going through dependency hell as I frantically tried to find equivalent packages for the ARM architecture. Needless to say, most of these porting exercises ended with massive amounts of productivity loss and potential security exposures as I downloaded packages from unknown sources, all the time hoping one of them would work.

  • NethServer 7 Server/Network-Focused Linux OS Released

    NethServer 7 is a CentOS derived Linux distribution designed for SOHO use-cases and makes it easy to setup a mail server, web server, DNS/DHCP server, and other common networking tasks via its modular design and web-based administrative interface.

  • 5 New features in RHEL 7 you should know about.
  • Why to Keeping Eye on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Amphenol Corporation (APH)?
  • The next big things, 2017 edition.

    Along with several people on the Fedora Engineering team, I recently attended the DevConf.cz 2017 event. The conference has grown into an amazingly successful gathering of open source developers. Most attendees live in Europe but there were some from every continent. The coverage spanned all the big open source buzz-generating technologies. Session topics included containers, PaaS, orchestration and automation, and DevOps.

  • Dealing with Mono under Fedora 25.
  • Earn Fedora Badges designing Badges!

    Fedora Badges is a perfect place to start if you want to help out the Fedora Design Team. “I’m not a designer!” “I can’t draw!” “I’ve never opened Inkscape” – you might say. And that is totally fine! Everybody can help out, and none of those reasons will stop you from designing your first badge (and getting badges for designing badges)!

  • Helping new users get on IRC, Part 2
  • Reducing the bandwidth requirements for keeping Fedora up to date

    Keeping your Fedora installation up to date can become a problem if your ISP imposes a strict datacap or if you’re stuck with only an expensive mobile data connection. Here are a few tricks for lowering Fedora’s system update bandwidth requirement.

Tizen Apps

Filed under
OS
Linux
Software
  • Smartphone App: Walkie Talkie app added to Tizen Store

    Last week, we have had a new Walkie Talkie app added to the Tizen Store, something a little different and a little fun, created by developer SomyaC. A walkie-talkie (more formally known as a Handheld Transceiver, or HT) is a hand- held, portable, two-way radio transceiver that lets you communicate directly between both handsets.

  • Smartphone App: Speed Test for Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3 is available in Tizen Store

    Do you know what is your internet speed on your Tizen smartphone? Do you know your internet connection download or upload speed? Anything about ping? Have you never test it? No problem! Developer Srabani S S Patra added a new app last week named Speed Test.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Udacity open sources its self-driving car simulator for anyone to use

    Self-driving cars require self-driving car software, and Udacity’s helping to feed that need with its nanodegree program in the field. Now, the online education company is also making available its self-driving car simulator via open source license, allowing anyone with a working knowledge of Unity to gab the assets, load its preexisting scenes and create their own tracks for virtual testing.

    If you weren’t already aware, a lot of the ‘education’ of self-driving vehicle software happens in virtual environments, since it’s still relatively expensive to build an actual self-driving test vehicle, and a bit complicated on the regulatory side to find somewhere willing to let you test in real-world conditions – plus you have to prove you can do so with a reasonable expectation of safety. That’s a steep hurdle for tinkerers working independently, and for companies just starting out.

  • Open source vs. COTS: 8 integration considerations

    Nothing is moving faster to the top of IT wish lists than hybrid integration platforms. They offer agencies the ability to use application programming interfaces to integrate on-premises, cloud and mobile applications. However, IT managers face a critical decision when it comes to choosing between an open-source or commercial-off-the-shelf enterprise service bus (ESB) for integration to support that hybrid environment. Below are eight considerations for deciding which digital initiative to implement.

  • 2016 Open Source Yearbook: Print edition now available
  • The benefits of tracking issues publicly

    A public issue tracker is a vital communication tool for an open organization, because there's no better way to be transparent and inclusive than to conduct your work in public channels. So let's explore some best practices for using an issue tracker in an open organization.

    Before we start, though, let's define what we mean by "issue tracker." Simply put, an issue tracker is a shared to-do list. Think of scribbling a quick list of errands to run: buy bread, mail package, drop off library books. As you drive around town, it feels good to cross each item off your list. Now scale that up to the work you have to do in your organization, and add in a healthy dose of software-enabled collaboration. You've got an issue tracker!

  • 4 must-read books for open source career seekers

    Finding a good job can be stressful and finding your dream job even more so. Even in the open source world, with its many opportunities for making a name for yourself by volunteering, it takes effort to make the connection between what you have to offer as a job seeker and what employers are looking for in an employee. One thing that can help set you apart from other applicants is having a solid understanding of yourself and what you bring to the table.

  • The most popular JavaScript front-end tools

    Choosing a development tool based on its popularity isn’t a bad idea. Popular tools are usually more stable, and they often have more resources and community support than less popular tools. Developer satisfaction is another key indicator of a good tool, and for the JavaScript ecosystem, I'm going to show you some significant research on both of these criteria.

    The list that follows contains all of the main tooling categories for a modern JavaScript developer. It includes the most popular tools for each category according to developer popularity and user satisfaction.

  • Netflix Open Sources a Slack Bot for Tracking GitHub Repositories

    Not many organizations have the technology expertise that Netflix has, and it may come as a surprise to some people to learn that the company regularly open sources key, tested and hardened tools that it has used for years. We've reported on Netflix open sourcing a series of interesting "Monkey" cloud tools as part of its "simian army," which it has deployed as a series of satellite utilities orbiting its central cloud platform.

  • Launching an Independent OpenNews Program

    At Mozilla, one of our essential roles is convener: working to identify, connect and support like-minded people who are building a healthier Internet.

    An early — and strong — example of that work is the OpenNews program. Six years ago, Mozilla and Knight Foundation created an initiative to combine open-source practices with journalism. Our aim: strengthen journalism on the open web, and empower newsroom developers, designers and data reporters across the globe.

    The program flourished. Since 2011, OpenNews has placed 33 fellows in 19 newsrooms, from BBC and NPR to La Nacion and the New York Times. It built a global community of more than 1,100 developers and reporters. It spawned the annual SRCCON conference, bolstered newsroom diversity and gave way to innovative newsgathering tools like Tabula. OpenNews has also played a key role in building the annual MozFest in London and Mozilla’s nascent leadership network initiative.

    Mozilla is immensely proud of OpenNews — and immensely grateful to the team behind its success. And today, we’re announcing that OpenNews is spinning out as an independent organization. Going forward, OpenNews — with the support of nonprofit fiscal partner Community Partners — will build on the success it achieved when incubated at Mozilla. OpenNews will continue to play an active role in MozFest and Mozilla’s leadership network.

  • What’s next for open-source Spark?

    A conference focused on a single open source project sounds like the sort of event that will feature a lone keynote speaker speaking to maybe 100 interested parties in a lecture hall at a local college. Spark Summit East was very much the opposite.

    A total of 1,503 people watched the five keynote speakers in a cavernous ballroom at the Hynes Convention Center lay out the future of Spark, the big data processing engine originally developed at the University of California – Berkeley by Matei Zaharia. Spark underlies huge data-driven applications being used by major players like Salesforce, Facebook, IBM and many others, helping organize, analyze, and surface specific grains of sand from beach-sized databases.

  • Cloudera and Intel Team on Accelerating Machine Learning Workloads

    In recent months, countless new machine learning tools have been open sourced, including tools from tech giants such as Google. Both machine learning and AI tools tend to place tough demands on hardware resources, though. With that in mind, Cloudera has announced a jointly tested solution with Intel to advance capabilities for machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) workloads.

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
OSS

Microsoft Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Thousands of WordPress websites defaced through patch failures

    Thousands of WordPress domains have been subject to attack through a severe content injection security flaw that many website operators have failed to protect themselves against.

    The security flaw, a zero-day vulnerability that affects the WordPress REST API, allows attackers to modify the content of posts or pages within a website backed by the WordPress content management system (CMS).

    As noted by cybersecurity firm Sucuri, one of the REST endpoints allows access via the API to view, edit, delete, and create posts.

  • Introducing Capsule8: Industry's First Container-Aware, Real-time Threat Protection for Linux

    "The cloud has catapulted Linux to the most popular platform on the planet, and now the use of container technology is exploding. Yet there has been no world-class commercial security offering focused on securing the Linux infrastructure until now," said Bob Goodman, partner at Bessemer. "Capsule8 is solving the difficult problem of providing zero-day threat protection for Linux, whether legacy, container or something in-between. Simply put, John, Dino and Brandon are pioneering the most comprehensive and effective security protection ever offered for Linux."

  • Container-Aware Security Startup Capsule8 Emerges from Stealth

    Capsule8, a Brooklyn, NY-based security startup, emerged from stealth today to debut its container-aware threat protection platform for Linux.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Another Potential CPU Optimization For Mesa: Quadratic Probing

    Mesa developer Thomas Helland is looking at reviving an old set of Mesa patches that could help out in some CPU-bound scenarios.

    Helland re-discovered some old Mesa patches from April 2015 for implementing quadratic probing in hash tables for being faster rather than the linear re-probing hash table as is used currently. Helland explained further in the patch, "This will allow us to remove the large static table and use a power of two hash table size that we can compute on the fly. We can use bitmasking instead of modulo to fit our hash in the table, and it's less code. By using the algorithm hash = sh + i/2 + i*i/2 we are guaranteed that all retries from the quad probing are distinct, and so we should be able to completely fill the table."

  • Libinput X.Org Driver Updated With New Capabilities

    Libinput is the input handling library that originated with Wayland but has since been adopted by Mir as well as X.Org when using the xf86-input-libinput handling driver. This xf86-input-libinput adaptation for X.Org Servers has seen a new release today.

    Last month marked the libinput 1.6 release with new features to the input library. Now xf86-input-libinput has been upgraded for improving the support for this generic input handling implementation on xorg-server systems.

  • RadeonSI Working Toward Better Rocket League Performance

    Marek Olšák has posted a set of patches today to the Mesa mailing list and they should help some Linux games, at least Rocket League.

  • Wayland's Weston 2.0 Beta Released

    One day after the Wayland 1.13 Beta, the reference Weston compositor is updated to its 2.0 beta state.

    Wayland's reference compositor, Weston, is moving to version 2.0 rather than version 1.13 since its new output configuration ABI has broken Weston's ABI. In addition to the new output handling API, Weston 2.0 has seen work on DRM compositor improvements, support for using EGL_KHR_swap_buffers_with_damage, initial window positioning for XWayland apps, desktop shell refinements, and other improvements.

Jolla Releases Sailfish OS 2.1, Adds Copy & Paste To The Browser

Filed under
OS

Ahead of Mobile World Congress (MWC17) happening later this month, Jolla has released Sailfish OS 2.1.

Sailfish OS 2.1 is now the latest release of this Finnish mobile phone operating system powered by Linux. It does add some new features, but nothing considered extraordinary by comparison to Android and iOS.

Read more

Also: Sailfish OS 2.1.0 now available to early access for Jolla devices

Remix OS: Is This the Droid You Were Looking For?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

Ever wanted to try Android on your PC but there weren’t any really usable projects? Now you can. Remix OS is an Android based operating system that’s designed to offer a full-fledged desktop PC-like experience. The developers have done a lot of work to implement many desktop-centric features such as multi-window multi-tasking. It offers a very familiar interface inspired by Windows, so the learning curve is not that steep. If you have used Android before, you will find yourself at home.

Remix OS is being developed by Jide Technologies, a company founded by three ex-Googlers, “with a mission to unlock the potential of Android in order to accelerate a new age of computing,” reads the “about us” page.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Picard 1.4 released
    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production
    Linux Digital Audio Workstations When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments. Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine. In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.
  • i2pd 2.12 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.
  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux
    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job. Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.
  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers
    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.
  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape
    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".
  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support
    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support. Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.
  • Rusty Builder
    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!
  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Unvanquished Open-Source Shooter Game Prepares For An Exciting 2017
    The Unvanquished open-source first person shooter game had been very promising and issuing monthly alpha releases all the way up to 48 alpha versions while they ended that one year ago without any new releases. The project is still ongoing and they are preparing for a great 2017. The Unvanquished team posted a teaser to their project site this weekend. They have been working on some "much bigger" changes. They aren't saying what the next release will be, but most will know what generally follows alpha builds... I'm a big supporter of Unvanquished, and have heard from their project lead and look forward to what's next ;)
  • OSS: RPG Maker MV CoreScript
    "RPG Maker MV CoreScript" is a game engine player for 2D games that runs on the browser. "RPG Maker MV CoreScript" is designed as a game engine dedicated to "RPG Maker MV", the latest work of "RPG Maker" series of 2DRPG world number one software with more than 20 years history, and more than 1000 games are running. (February 2017)
  • HITMAN released for Linux, initial port report and two gameplay videos
    HITMAN [Steam, Feral Store] is the brand new Linux port from Feral Interactive and what a game it is! This is some serious fun to keep you occupied for many hours!
  • Hitman is Coming to Your Home
  • Castle Game Engine 6.0 Released
    Castle Game Engine is yet another open-source cross-platform game engine. What separates this game engine from others is that interestingly it's written in Object Pascal. Up until seeing this Castle Game Engine 6.0 release, I hadn't thought of Object Pascal in a few years and interesting it's being used by this game engine. Castle Engine 6.0 continues to be fitted for both 2D and 3D games and this latest release incorporates about one year of development work.

Fedora: The Latest

  • Anaconda Install Banners get a Makeover!
    A redesign/ update for Anaconda install banners has been an ongoing project for me since the summer and has recently, in the passed month or so, had a fair amount of conversation on its Pagure ticket. I have done multiple series of iterations for these banners, and in the couple of weeks have established a design that represents the Fedora vibe. There are three, sort of, sub-categories for the banners: Common Banners, Server-specific Banners, and Desktop-specific Banners. At this point I have completed drafts of the Common banners (available on all editions) and the Desktop-specific banners (available in addition to Common for Desktop editions).
  • This is why I drink: a discussion of Fedora's legal state
    Tom Callaway seems to be a very nice person who has been overclocked to about 140% normal human speed. In only 20 minutes he gave an interesting and highly-amusing talk that could have filled a 45-minute slot on the legal principles that underpin Fedora, how they got that way, and how they work out in practice. In the old days, Callaway said, Red Hat made Red Hat Linux, entirely in-house. What the company didn't make was any money; sales of hats generated more profit than sales of Red Hat box sets, which apparently were sold at a loss. It was felt that this plan wouldn't work out in the long term, so Red Hat changed to making Enterprise Linux. It didn't want to stop doing a hobbyist Linux, however, so Fedora Core was launched. Red Hat also wanted the community to have input into what Fedora was, and how it looked, but the company couldn't just drop the reins and let the community take over, because it was still legally the distributor.
  • Modularity & Generational Core: The future of Fedora?
  • Fedora 25: running Geekbench.