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Monday, 31 Aug 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Games Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2015 - 10:47pm
Story How Scotland can protect itself from GCHQ spying by going open source Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2015 - 10:21pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2015 - 10:18pm
Story KDE's Plasma 5.4: The most advanced and beautiful Linux desktop Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2015 - 10:17pm
Story A unique twist on Android for broke college kids Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2015 - 9:32pm
Story GNU/FSF Links Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2015 - 8:40pm
Story Two new Cyanogen smartphones hit the market: Wileyfox launches Storm and Swift Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2015 - 8:11pm
Story How open source will power tomorrow’s tech unicorns Roy Schestowitz 26/08/2015 - 7:22pm
Story Here's the one 'major problem' facing Munich after switching from Windows to Linux Roy Schestowitz 26/08/2015 - 6:54pm
Story How to find out if your PC is compatible with Linux Roy Schestowitz 26/08/2015 - 6:51pm

Leftovers: GNOME Software

Filed under
GNOME
  • First Beta for GNOME 3.18 Is Out and Ready for Testing

    The GNOME development team has announced that the first Beta update GNOME 3.18 is now out and ready for testing. There is still a long way to go until the stable version is released, but the project is now in software freeze.

  • GNOME 3.17.90 (first beta release)
  • GNOME 3.18 Beta Released, Now In Feature Freeze

    The GNOME 3.18 beta is now available ahead of the planned GNOME 3.18.0 release in late September.

  • Code has landed in Polari

    Polari now indicates the status of each connection next to the connection’s name in the sidebar. If Polari encounters an error, an error icon is displayed. Clicking on the connection in the sidebar, will show a popover with error details and an action which can possibly solve it.

  • Other Locations on Nautilus (GSoC final report)

    Yes, Nautilus now is able to display Other Locations view, and finally it caught up with Gtk+ file chooser! It’s already on master, so anyone can test it with jhbuild. Also, Nautilus 3.17.90 already includes it, so Fedora Rawhide users (and any other bleeding edge distro) will be able to test.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

6 reasons to get excited for Android 6.0 Marshmallow

Filed under
Android

Expected to arrive in late 2015, the latest update to Android promises great new features and enhancements. Here are the top reasons to get excited about the new Android.

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Android Leftovers

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Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Culture

Filed under
OSS

GitHub Reveals Most Popular Programming Languages

Filed under
Development

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • LinuxCon: CII Program Will Give Badges to Open Source Projects With Strong Security

    Amid this week’s LinuxCon in Seattle, SecurityWeek reported that the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), which funds open source projects, will give the badge to those that meet a set of standard criteria. This includes an established bug reporting process, an automated test suite, vulnerability response processes and patching processes. A self-assessment will determine whether the project owners merit the badge.

  • Why every website should switch to HTTPS

    HTTPS protects both website owners and users from interference by network operators. It provides three protections: data authentication, integrity, and confidentiality. HTTPS makes sure that the website you loaded was sent by the real owner of that website, that nothing was injected or censored on the website, and that no one else is able to read the contents of the data being transmitted. We are seeing more and more evidence of manipulation of websites to inject things that the website owners and users didn't intend. Additionally, browsers are starting to deprecate HTTP as non-secure, so in the coming years non-HTTPS websites will start throwing warnings by both Chrome and Firefox.

  • Embargoed firmware updates in LVFS

    The new embargo target allows vendors to test the automatic update functionality using a secret vendor-specific URL set in /etc/fwupd.conf without releasing it to the general public until the hardware has been announced.

  • Security updates for Friday

Libreoffice 5 review

Filed under
LibO
Reviews

It’s free! It’s open! But does LibreOffice deliver on its promise of a powerful office suite for normal users?

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Also: Should Apache Concede OpenOffice Is Done With & Point Users To LibreOffice?

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat

Fedora

  • Binaries are temporary; But the Source *should* be eternal

    Imagine hypothetically that Red Hat, a (mortal) company, were to fail. The community or another company could continue working on Fedora's source code and get it (or a downstream distro) certified.

  • Flock 2015 report, and Fedora nightly compose testing

    Cool, right? That’s what I’ve been working on this whole week since Flock. All the bits are now basically in place such that, each night, openQA will run on the Branched and Rawhide nightly composes when they’re done, and when openQA is done, the compose reports will be mailed out.

Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela - Tight as a tiger

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Reviews

Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela is a highly polished, refined, practical, effortless distro. It's a genuine joy to use. Everything works as expected, and best of all, out of the box, by default. The new release brings in an avalanche of small, soft but most effective improvements, including system settings, themes, and software management.

On the bad sides, there are some tiny quirks. Having to leave your bubble of fun and wander around the Internet in search after some new icons or decorations lessens the impact of having a closed and tight ecosystem that can sustain itself. The Realtek bug is also rather annoying and maybe even alarming, and I do not know how to explain the power to brightness applet transformation. But it only happened once.

Overall though, the impression is very similar to Xubuntu Vivid. Slightly more restrained, because I've learned to accept the fact Mint is a top notch player, whereas Xubuntu used to be a black swan underdog and now it's a majestic phoenix sweeping over the forests of distrolandia, and there's more of a dramatic effect there. But then, tiny tiny glitches, the family woes, and a whole lot of goodness, elegance, great software, and not a single crash. My 10/10 wizard stick is out again, and it's trickling faerie dust. 9.99999/10. Not perfect, because perfection means zero flaws. But you should be testing this one, right now. See you around.

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Linux Leftovers

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Linux

The Strangest, Most Unique Linux Distros

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Reviews

From the most consumer focused distros like Ubuntu, Fedora, Mint or elementary OS to the more obscure, minimal and enterprise focused ones such as Slackware, Arch Linux or RHEL, I thought I've seen them all. Couldn't have been any further from the truth. Linux eco-system is very diverse. There's one for everyone. Let's discuss the weird and wacky world of niche Linux distros that represents the true diversity of open platforms.

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Weird Names, New Filesystem, and Strange Distros

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-s

The top story today seems to be the announcement from ex-Googlite Kent Overstreet of a new COW filesystem for Linux. In other news, Major Hayden explained why Ethernet devices have such weird names in Fedora and Manuel Jose covered the strangest Linux distributions. Elsewhere, Christine Hall posted her review of Bodhi 3.1.0 and Dedoimedo loved Mint 17.2. A review of LibreOffice 5 rounds out the day.

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Ubuntu Touch's Clock App Gets a Major Revamp with Custom Alarm Sounds, Stopwatch

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Ubuntu

Nekhelesh Ramananthan has posted some interesting information on his blog about the latest work done for the default Clock app of Canonical's Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system.

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LeapFrog Epic hops into the Android tablet for kids market

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Android

LeapFrog has revealed its latest child-focused tablet, and its first to run on Android. The 7-inch Epic tablet is said to combine the parental control and kid-safe environment of previous LeapFrog tablets, with a selection of Android games and apps that children love. The Android-powered Epic tablet has also been designed to offer a customized experience which can grow with the child.

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FileZilla Client 3.13.0 Released [How To Install In Ubuntu Linux Or Derivatives Distros]

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Linux


FileZilla Client 3.13.0 Released [How To Install In Ubuntu Linux Or Derivatives Distros]

FileZilla is a free and open source FTP client. It's available for all major operating systems including Windows, Mac and obviouslyLinux. The latest version includes couple of new features and few bug fixes that make it more stable. Let's see how we can install/upgrade to FileZilla 3.13.0 in Ubuntu/Linux Mint or other Debian based Linux distros.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

PC-BSD 10.2 Officially Released with Lumina Desktop 0.8.6, Based on FreeBSD 10.2

Filed under
BSD

While not a GNU/Linux distribution, PC-BSD is an important piece of software for the open-source ecosystem, a BSD operating system tweaked and optimized for desktop computers, based on FreeBSD.

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Kali Linux 2.0 Docker Image Now Available for Download

Filed under
Linux

We reported a while ago the great team of developers behind the BackTrack Linux successor, Kali Linux, have released Docker images that allow users to run the most popular and powerful penetration testing distro on any platform.

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LinuxCon exclusive: Mark Shuttleworth says Snappy was born long before CoreOS and the Atomic Project

Snappy as a project was born four years ago when we started working on the phone, which was long before the CoreOS, long before Atomic. I think the principles of atomicity, transactionality are beautiful, but remember: We needed to build the same things for the phone. And with Snappy, we have the ability to deliver transactional updates to any of these systems—phones, servers and cloud devices.

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Jolla Tablet open for pre-sale at $300

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Linux

Jolla has opened pre-orders on Jolla Tablets starting at $300. The 7.9-inch 2048 x 1536 tablet runs the Linux-based Sailfish OS 2.0 on a quad-core Atom.

The Jolla Tablet has been a long time coming for Indiegogo backers, but the participants will finally receive their tablets in September, says Finland-based Jolla. Now anyone can order the tablets, with shipments due to start in late October. Quantities are said to be limited.

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