Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A Short MATE Desktop 1.18 Review in March 2017 Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2017 - 6:03pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2017 - 5:42pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2017 - 3:53pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2017 - 3:34pm
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2017 - 3:33pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2017 - 3:22pm
Story Microsoft v GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2017 - 3:20pm
Story Linux Mint KDE Review: Easy And Beautiful Rianne Schestowitz 25/03/2017 - 8:33am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2017 - 12:14am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2017 - 12:13am

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • The 25 Best Games for Linux and Steam Machines

    When I was first introduced to Linux and the Open Source community gaming was an issue that users always complained about. Interested gamers always had to use wine or implement one workaround or the other.

    There were either not good enough drivers to run certain games on Linux or the games themselves weren’t available for the platform.

    Fast forward to 2017 and the story has changed. Linux gamers now have a variety of games they can choose from ranging from free to the relatively pricey ones.

    Today, I bring you a list of the 25 best games you can play on your Linux system.

  • Dota 2 patched for AMD Ryzen

    Valve have put out a small Dota 2 update that aims to improve performance on the new Ryzen processors from AMD.

  • Jack Orlando: Director's Cut now has a Wine-port on Steam for Linux

    Jack Orlando: Director's Cut [Steam], an adventure game published by Topware is the latest game of theirs to get a Wine-port on Steam.

  • RPG Maker MV now has a Linux version and a Linux game export option

    We saw signs of RPG Maker MV [Steam] coming to Linux early last year, but now it's official. RPG Maker MV now has a Linux version and it can export Linux games.

    With the release of the 1.4.0 update, anyone who owns it now has access to the Linux version on Steam. So anyone wanting to make simple RPG games on Linux has access to a highly rated tool.

Red Hat Launches Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9. The latest update to the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9 builds upon more than six years of enterprise-proven success, offering a more secure, stable and reliable platform for the modern enterprise and prioritizes features for critical deployments.

Read more

Also: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9 Released

KDevelop 5.1.0 released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of KDevelop 5.1! Tons of new stuff entered KDevelop 5.1. Here's a summary of what's new in this version:

Read more

Also:KDevelop 5.1 Released With LLDB Support, Initial OpenCL, Better Python Support

GNOME Photos 3.24.0

Filed under
GNOME

It was high time that we overhauled our old GtkIconView-based overview grids. Their inability to reflow the thumbnails leads to a an ugly vertical gutter of empty space unless the window is just the right size. The other problem was performance. GtkIconView gets extremely slow when the icons are updated, which usually happens when content is detected for the first time and start getting thumbnailed.

Read more

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Old Linux kernel security bug bites

    OK, hands up, who knows what High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) is? It's an archaic networking data framing protocol that's used in modems, X.25, frame-relay, ISDN, and other now uncommon networking technologies. I know it because I used to work with them back in the day. You'll get to know it now because a researcher discovered a security hole hidden within the Linux kernel driver that implements it.

  • Seven year-old Linux vulnerability now patched

    An old vulnerability was just discovered in the Linux kernel, potentially allowing hackers to gain privilege escalation, or cause a denial of service. The vulnerability was quickly fixed and there have been no signs of it in the wild, although that does not necessarily mean it went unnoticed.

  • OpenSSH 7.5 released

    OpenSSH 7.5 has just been released. It will be available from the mirrors listed at http://www.openssh.com/ shortly.

  • OpenSSH 7.5 Has Security Fixes, Removes OpenSSL 1.0 Support for Portable OpenSSH

    OpenSSH, the cross-platform and open-source 100% complete SSH 2.0 protocol implementation offering both SFTP server and client support was updated today to version 7.5.

    OpenSSH 7.5 comes three months after the release of OpenSSH 7.4 in late December 2016, and promises to be a maintenance update that addresses two important security issues, implements support for the "=-" syntax to make removing of methods from algorithm lists a lot easier, and fix numerous reported bugs.

  • Is Linux Mint a secure distribution?

    Linux Mint has been lambasted by some in the media for security problems over the last few years. But how accurate are such perceptions? Does Linux Mint really suffer from security problems or is it all much ado about nothing?

    A writer at DistroWatch wades into the controversy and examines some of the myths and misunderstandings about Linux Mint and security.

  • Linux Mint's security record

    Some of the more common misunderstandings I have encountered recently have involved the Linux Mint distribution. Mint has been a popular project in recent years and, with many people using the distribution and talking about the project, there is bound to be some mis-communication. In particular, most of the rumours and misunderstandings I have encountered have revolved around Mint's security practises and history. I would like to clear up a few of the more common rumours.

  • Mozilla Firefox is the First Pwn2own 2017 Victim to be Patched

    Some vendors respond to security issues faster than others. Last week, the 10th annual Pwn2own hacking challenge was hosted by Trend Micro's Zero Day Initiative (ZDI), with multiple groups of researchers taking aim at web browsers, operating systems and virtualization technology.

    Mozilla's Firefox web browser was successfully exploited on March 16, the second day of the Pwn2own event. Researchers from Chaitin Security Research Lab were the only group to attack Mozilla Firefox, and earned $30,000 for demonstrating a new zero-day exploit. The day the exploit was demonstrated, the only thing publicly revealed about the exploit is that it made use of an integer overflow flaw in combination with an uninitialized memory buffer in the Windows kernel.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • Dota 2 Receives Optimization For AMD Ryzen CPUs

    If you were an early buyer of AMD Ryzen hardware, Valve has pushed out a Dota 2 game update with some Ryzen optimizations.

    Today's Dota 2 update from Valve mentions, "Improved threading configuration for AMD Ryzen processors." Presumably this is with better dealing of Ryzen's new SMT capabilities for AMD processors.

  • Space sandbox game 'Avorion' has a whopper of an update, considering getting a server for it

    I am a massive fan of 'Avorion' [Steam] as this Early Access space sandbox has a lot going for it and it just got a major update. I am also considering setting up a GOL server for it!

    This new update will mean a re-design of your ships, so be warned. The flight model has been reworked and you now need to make use of three new blocks: Directional Thruster, Gyro Array, Inertia Dampeners.

Mesa and Radeon RX Vega

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

ToaruOS 1.0.4

Filed under
Reviews

Most of the projects we talk about on DistroWatch are variants of Linux or, occasionally, one of the BSDs. However, there are other open source operating systems out there, smaller projects which rarely get attention because they have fewer developers or are not as rich in features. This week I would like to discuss a project that has been put together as a hobby, but which has a surprisingly rich feature set, especially when we consider the operating system appears to be mostly the work of one developer.

Read more

7 ways to discuss legal matters with an open community

Filed under
OSS

Having watched a fair number of people attempt to engage both the Open Source Initiative's licensing evaluation community and the Apache Software Foundation's legal affairs committee, I'd like to offer some hints and tips for succeeding when it's your turn to conduct a legal discussion with an open community.

Read more

antiX 17 Linux Alpha 2 ISO Images Are Based on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The developers of the Debian-based antiX Linux operating system released today new Alpha builds of the upcoming antiX 17 series, the first public images based of Debian Stretch.

Read more

Emmabuntus Debian Edition 1.02 Lands Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7, Xfce Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Patrick Emmabuntüs is informing Softpedia today about the immediate availability for download of the Debian-based Emmabuntus Debian Edition 1.02 operating system.

Read more

AMD GPU Linux driver patches is listing seven Vega 10 IDs

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

100 Linux patches amounting to over fourty thousand lines of code was sent out today for review in order to provide "Vega 10" support within the Linux AMDGPU DRM driver.

Adding Vega support to AMDGPU is a big task due to all of the changes over Polaris and other recent GPUs reports Phoronix.

Read more

ExTiX 17.2 "The Ultimate Linux System" Released with LXQt 0.10.0 and Kernel 4.10

Filed under
Linux

After informing us about the availability of a new build of his Arch Linux-based ArchEX GNU/Linux distribution, Arne Exton is today announcing the general availability of ExTiX 17.2.

Read more

Tails 3.0 Anonymous LiveCD Gets Third Beta Release with Important Security Fixes

Filed under
Security
Debian

The developers of the Tails amnesic incognito live system announced the availability of the third Beta release of the upcoming major Tails 3.0 operating system, which will be based on the soon-to-be-released Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" OS.

Read more

Plasma 5.9.3, Applications 16.12.3 and Frameworks 5.32.0 available in Chakra

Filed under
KDE

It's only been days since our latest release Goedel 2017.03 was announced, but KDE software updates fully roll in Chakra and we could not delay this any further. As always, simply upgrading your system after installation will provide you with the latest available software in our repositories.

The most recent updates for KDE's Plasma, Applications and Frameworks series are now available to all Chakra users. All of these have been built against an important update of Qt to version 5.8.0.

Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Linux Kernel 4.10.3, GNOME 3.24 Coming Soon

Filed under
SUSE

Dominique Leuenberger from the openSUSE Project is informing the Tumbleweed community about the latest updates brought by a total of five snapshots during the week that passed.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)