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Thursday, 18 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 8 KDE Plasma Tips and Tricks to Improve Your Productivity Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2018 - 9:15am
Story Are Linux GUI Software Centers Any Good? Let’s Find Out! Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2018 - 9:12am
Story Raspberry Pi Zero WH adds 40-pin GPIO header to Zero W Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2018 - 9:00am
Story LittleFS: A New File-System For ARM Embedded Devices Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2018 - 8:51pm
Story MX Linux MX-17 Horizon - Shaping up beautifully Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2018 - 8:45pm
Story Tweaking Ubuntu 17.10 To Try To Run Like Clear Linux Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2018 - 8:04pm
Story Mozilla Development and Developers Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2018 - 8:02pm
Story Hands on With System76’s Beautiful Linux Distro Pop!_OS Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2018 - 7:27pm
Story GCC 8.0 vs. LLVM Clang 6.0 On AMD EPYC Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2018 - 7:16pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2018 - 5:34pm

Fedora and Red Hat: New ISO, AArch64, ARM, OpenShift, Kubernetes

Filed under
Red Hat
  • F27-20180105 updated isos released

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.11-300 kernel.

  • Fedora 28 Looking To Promote Its AArch64 Server Support

    The latest in the long list of planned features/changes for Fedora 28 come down to an AArch64 promotion.

    Fedora developers are looking to promote their AArch64 / ARM64 / ARMv8 server offerings to being a "primary architecture" for this next Fedora release. The Fedora AArch64 server installer, Cloud images, and Docker base images would be the same status then as the other primary server architectures like x86_64.

  • Video: Red Hat Showcases ARM Support for HPC at SC17

    In this video from SC17, Jon Masters from Red Hat describes the company’s Multi-Architecture HPC capabilities, including the new ARM-powered Apollo 70 server from HPE.

  • PodCTL #20 – Gathering Kubernetes Communities

    Before Kubernetes became popular, we had a suspicion that these trends would happen and we started the OpenShift Commons community. Whereas the Kubernetes community is focused on the technology, the OpenShift Commons community strives to bring together both technologists and practitioners to share knowledge and work to solve common challenges.

  • 5 reasons Kubernetes is the real deal

    I've been to a lot of tech conferences in my life, but there was something different about the December 2017 KubeCon/Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Summit in Austin. Sure, there's a ton of hype around Kubernetes, but it's something more. Not only did attendance go up by a staggering amount vs. 2016 (there were more than 4,000 people in Austin) but it was about who was and wasn't there. The content was solid, the Linux Foundation did its usual fabulous job running the event, but the real highlight for me was about the who.

    [...]

    Many open source projects come from one developer's crazy/beautiful idea, but leave lots and lots to be done before the use cases are built out and proven. In this case, similar to MapReduce/Hadoop, the primary use case and even most key foundational technical elements have been proved out, in production at Google for years.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Rethinking your open source use policy

    I spoke with someone the other day that was fired from his job as a technical product manager after more than 20 years of experience. He is now job-searching but is finding it difficult. There is a new bar set for speed of technology development that capitalizes on agile software development practices and leveraging open source technologies—two things that were not taken seriously just ten years ago. According to 69 percent of senior executives, this digital transformation is forcing us now to rethink our cybersecurity strategies.

    To accommodate these time constraints from management, developers have turned more and more to open source code as a great asset to build products and features, as opposed to writing code from scratch.  Open source technologies are available openly on the internet through sites like GitHub and SourceForge. Open source code now makes up 90 percent of the code composition of our modern applications.

  • New-Age Networking Predictions for the New Year: Open Source

    As software-defined networking (SDN), network functions virtualization (NFV) and other new-age networking initiatives mature, we'll be taking a look at what's in store for some of the most promising projects in the new year, now examining the open source movement.

    Modern networking techniques such as SDN and NFV are closely tied to the open source phenomenon. As they've originated, evolved and matured, such approaches naturally have gravitated to open source, which itself is in the midst of a rising popularity trend.

  • What is Lisa OS, the legendary operating system by Apple to be released for free

    The Computer History Museum in California has decided to go ahead and release the Apple’s legendary Lisa operating system for free. The OS will now be available as open source for everyone. However, even back in 1983, Apple had a reputation being forward with its product. The tech giant announced Lisa desktop computer on January 19, 1983. Officially, “Lisa” stood for “Local Integrated Software Architecture”, however, there are multiple reports that state that the name of the OS was also the name of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs’ daughter.

  • Lisa OS: Steve Jobs' rare failed project to be released for free as open source
  • FOSDEM 2018 talk: Perl in the Physics Lab

    FOSDEM 2018, the "Free and Open Source Developers' European Meeting", takes place 3-4 February at Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Solbosch, Brussels - and our measurement control software Lab::Measurement will be presented there in the Perl devrooom! As all of FOSDEM, the talk will also be streamed live and archived; more details on this follow later.

The Openwashing of AT&T (Sponsored) and Monsanto

Filed under
OSS

Programming: Forking Bazaar, Qt 5.9 on FreeBSD, Netlify Reaches 1.0

Filed under
Development
  • Breezy: Forking Bazaar

    A couple of months ago, Martin and I announced a friendly fork of Bazaar, named Breezy.

    It's been 5 years since I wrote a Bazaar retrospective and around 6 since I seriously contributed to the Bazaar codebase.

  • Bazaar Version Control System Forked As Breezy

    While the developers acknowledge modern open-source projects should be using Git as their distributed revision control system, if you find yourself still using GNU Bazaar there is now a fork known as Breezy.

    With Canonical not doing much to push Bazaar the past several years, Breezy has been quietly in development the past several months by some independent developers. Breezy is cleaning up Bazaar's bugs as well as porting the code-base from Python 2 to Python 3, which is important with Py2 nearing its end-of-life. This is more work than Canonical developers have done the past few years on Bazaar with many of the company's projects now having switched over to Git.

  • Qt 5.9 on FreeBSD

    Tobias and Raphael have spent the past month or so hammering on the Qt 5.9 branch, which has (finally!) landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree. This brings FreeBSD back up-to-date with current Qt releases and, more importantly, up-to-date with the Qt release KDE software is increasingly expecting. With Qt 5.9, the Elisa music player works, for instance (where it has run-time errors with Qt 5.7, even if it compiles). The KDE-FreeBSD CI system has had Qt 5.9 for some time already, but that was hand-compiled and jimmied into the system, rather than being a “proper” ports build.

  • Netlify 1.0 Launched, More Open Source News

    On Dec. 7, 2017, Netlify announced its open source Netlify CMS project had hit version 1.0, boasting a fully-redesigned UI, a new media library and identity management.

    Mathias Biilmann, CEO of Netlify, told CMSWire Netlify 1.0, “provides an open source alternative to the rising number of proprietary headless CMS offerings that enable how developers actually work today — in Git and increasingly decoupling the front and back end.”

Mozilla: AMO, Socorro, Rust and Alliance for Open Media

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • New Contribution Opportunity: Content Review for addons.mozilla.org

    For over a dozen years, extension developers have volunteered their time and skills to review extensions submitted to addons.mozilla.org (AMO). While they primarily focused on ensuring that an extension’s code adhered to Mozilla’s add-on policies, they also moderated the content of the listings themselves, like titles, descriptions, and user reviews.

    To help add-on reviewers focus on the technical aspects of extension review and expand contribution opportunities to non-technical volunteers, we are creating a new volunteer program for reviewing listing content.

  • Socorro in 2017

    Socorro is the crash ingestion pipeline for Mozilla's products like Firefox. When Firefox crashes, the Breakpad crash reporter asks the user if the user would like to send a crash report. If the user answers "yes!", then the Breakpad crash reporter collects data related to the crash, generates a crash report, and submits that crash report as an HTTP POST to Socorro. Socorro saves the crash report, processes it, and provides an interface for aggregating, searching, and looking at crash reports.

  • Rust 2018

    I want 2018 to be boring. I don't want it to be slow, I want lots of work to happen, but I want it to be 'boring' work. We got lots of big new things in 2017 and it felt like a really exciting year (new language features, new tools, new libraries, whole new ways of programming (!), new books, new teams, etc.). That is great and really pushed Rust forward, but I feel we've accumulated a lot of technical and social debt along the way. I would like 2018 to be a year of consolidation on 2017's gains, of paying down technical debt, and polishing new things into great things. More generally, we could think of a tick-tock cadence to Rust's evolution - 2015 and 2017 were years with lots of big, new things, 2016 and 2018 should be consolidation years.

  • A proof-of-concept GraphQL server framework for Rust

    Recently, I've been working a new project, a framework for GraphQL server implementations in Rust. It's still very much at the proof of concept stage, but it is complete enough that I want to show it to the world. The main restriction is that it only works with a small subset of the GraphQL language. As far as I'm aware, it's the only framework which can provide an 'end to end' implementation of GraphQL in Rust (i.e., it handles IDL parsing, generates Rust code from IDL, and parses, validates, and executes queries).

    The framework provides a seamless GraphQL interface for Rust servers. It is type-safe, ergonomic, very low boilerplate, and customisable. It has potential to be very fast. I believe that it can be one of the best experiences for GraphQL development in any language, as well as one of the fastest implementations (in part, because it seems to me that Rust and GraphQL are a great fit).

  • The Fight For Patent-Unencumbered Media Codecs Is Nearly Won

    Apple joining the Alliance for Open Media is a really big deal. Now all the most powerful tech companies — Google, Microsoft, Apple, Mozilla, Facebook, Amazon, Intel, AMD, ARM, Nvidia — plus content providers like Netflix and Hulu are on board. I guess there's still no guarantee Apple products will support AV1, but it would seem pointless for Apple to join AOM if they're not going to use it: apparently AOM membership obliges Apple to provide a royalty-free license to any "essential patents" it holds for AV1 usage.

Security: Cryptocurrency Mining, Meltdown and Spectre, Updates, Cryptographic Key Generation

Filed under
Security
  • Cryptocurrency Mining Operations Take Aim at SSH Servers

    As the value of cryptocurrency continues to rise, there has been growing interest from attackers and security researchers alike.  

    So far in January 2018, multiple new attack vectors against cryptocurrencies have been disclosed as well as at least one major vulnerability. While there are potentially great opportunities to be had with cryptocurrency, the security issues serve as a reminder that there are risks too.

    A report released Jan. 8 alleges that among those now taking aim at cryptocurrency is the government of North Korea, which is conducting an un-authorized Monero mining operation. On Jan 3. a report from security firm F5 revealed that attackers are using a new python script to mine Monero on servers. While un-authorized mining operations are taking aim at servers, the security of the Electrum digital wallets used to access cryptocurrency has also been at risk and was patched on Jan. 7.

  • Clear Linux Rolls Out KPTI Page Isolation & Retpoline Support

    Intel's own Clear Linux distribution has now been updated with protection for addressing the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities disclosed last week.

  • What You Need to Know About the Meltdown and Spectre CPU Flaws

    The computer industry is racing to deal with several new vulnerabilities that affect the majority of processors in modern computers and mobile devices. The flaws enable new attacks that break the critical memory defenses in operating systems and bypass fundamental isolation layers, including those vital to virtualization and container technologies.

    The most serious of the flaws, dubbed Meltdown or CVE-2017-5754, allows applications running in userspace to extract information from the kernel’s memory, which can contain sensitive data like passwords, encryption keys and other secrets. The good news is that Meltdown can be largely mitigated through software patches, unlike two other vulnerabilities known collectively as Spectre (CVE-2017-5753 and CVE-2017-5715) that will require CPU microcode updates and will likely haunt the industry for some time to come.

  • GCC 8 Patches Posted For Spectre Mitigation

    There's been a well-published branch the past few days of a patched GCC 7.2 code-base with the code changes for fending off Spectre while now patches have arrived on the mailing list for Spectre/CVE-2017-5715 of mainline GCC 8.

    Toolchain expert H.J. Lu of Intel has posted a set of five patches for Spectre mitigation with the current GCC 8 code-base. These patches introduce the new -mindirect-branch, -mindirect-branch-loop, -mfunction-return, -mindirect-branch-register options for GCC. Enabling the new functionality converts indirect branches to call and return thunks in order to avoid speculative execution.

  • Spectre and Meltdown explained

    I found this great article of Anton Gostev about Spectre and Meltdown, so I’m reposting it here :

    By now, most of you have probably already heard of the biggest disaster in the history of IT – Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities which affect all modern CPUs, from those in desktops and servers, to ones found in smartphones. Unfortunately, there’s much confusion about the level of threat we’re dealing with here, because some of the impacted vendors need reasons to explain the still-missing security patches. But even those who did release a patch, avoid mentioning that it only partially addresses the threat. And, there’s no good explanation of these vulnerabilities on the right level (not for developers), something that just about anyone working in IT could understand to make their own conclusion. So, I decided to give it a shot and deliver just that.

  • Weekend tech reading: Spectre/Meltdown recap, 400Gbps Ethernet, next-gen DisplayPort
  • Security updates for Monday
  • What cryptographic key generation needs is a good source of entropy

    Let's move to computers. As opposed to board games, you generally want a computer to do the same thing every time you ask it to do it, assuming you give it the same inputs: you want its behaviour to be deterministic when presented with the same initial conditions. Random behaviour is generally not a good thing for computers. There are, of course, exceptions to this rule, such as when you want to use your computer to play a game, as things get boring quickly if there's no variation in gameplay.

    There's another big exception: cryptography. Not all cryptography, though; you definitely want a single plaintext to be encrypted to a single ciphertext under the same key in almost all cases. But there is one area where randomness is important, and that's in the creation of the cryptographic key(s) you're going to be using to perform those operations. It turns out that you need to have quite a lot of randomness available to create a key that is unique—and keys really need to be truly unique. If you don't have enough randomness, not only might you generate the same key (or set of them) repeatedly, but other people may do so as well. If they can guess what keys you're using, they could do things like read your messages or pretend to be you.

ASUS Tinker Board S Is New Raspberry Pi-killer With Linux And Android Support (CES 2018)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

At CES 2018, ASUS unveiled tons of small form factor hardware and expanded its family. PB40 and PN40 are two mini PCs that let combine power and portability. Chromebox 3 is Chromebox 2 successor with 8th Generation Intel Core processor with DDR4 2400 Memory. For Linux enthusiasts and DIYers, the good news came in the form of a new Raspberry Pi competitor.

Read more

Also: Mirabook laptop dock for smartphones coming in May

Games: Boson, Descenders, Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III

Filed under
Gaming
  • Forgotten FOSS Games: Boson

    Back in September of 1999, just about a year after the KDE project had shipped its first release ever, Thomas Capricelli announced “our attempt to make a Real Time Strategy game (RTS) for the KDE project” on the kde-announce mailing list. Boson 0.1, as the attempt was called, was based on Qt 1.4, the KDE 1.x libraries, and described as being “Warcraft-like”.

    Development continued at a fast pace over the following year. 3D artists and sound designers were invited to contribute, and basic game play (e.g. collecting oil and minerals) started working. The core engine gained much-needed features. A map editor was already part of the package. Four releases later, on October 30, 2000, the release of version 0.5 was celebrated as a major milestone, also because Boson had been ported to Qt 2.2.1 & KDE 2.0 to match the development of the projects it was based on. Then the project suddenly went into hiatus, as it happens so often with ambitious open source game projects. A new set of developers revived Boson one year later, in 2001, and decided to port the game to Qt 3, the KDE 3 libraries and the recently introduced libkdegames library.

  • Descenders is an extreme downhill biking game is coming to Linux

    Although it may not list it on the Steam store page, the developer of Descenders [Steam, Official Site], an extreme downhill biking game has confirmed it will be released for Linux.

  • Feral has patched Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III for Linux to fix Vulkan on NVIDIA 384

    For those who noticed Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III [Steam] was a bit broken on the NVIDIA 384 driver series, Feral has now fixed it.

Benchmarking Linux With The Retpoline Patches For Spectre

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While the Kernel Page Table Isolation (KPTI) patches were quick to land in the mainline Linux kernel for addressing the Meltdown CPU vulnerability, the "Retpoline" patches are still being worked on as the leading approach on the Linux side for dealing with the Spectre CPU vulnerability. The Retpoline patches are said to have little impact on performance, but here are our benchmarks of these kernel patches for seeing how they affect a variety of AMD and Intel systems.

Read more

5 arcade-style games for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games often are not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.

So, can someone who uses only free and open source software find games that are polished enough to present a solid gaming experience without compromising their open source ideals? Absolutely! While most open source games are unlikely to rival some of the AAA commercial games developed with massive budgets, there are plenty of open source games, in many genres, that are fun to play and can be installed from the repositories of most major Linux distributions.

Read more

You GNOME it: Windows and Apple devs get a compelling reason to turn to Linux

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

Open Source Insider The biggest open source story of 2017 was unquestionably Canonical's decision to stop developing its Unity desktop and move Ubuntu to the GNOME Shell desktop.

What made the story that much more entertaining was how well Canonical pulled off the transition. Ubuntu 17.10 was quite simply one of the best releases of the year and certainly the best release Ubuntu has put out in a good long time. Of course since 17.10 was not an LTS release, the more conservative users – which may well be the majority in Ubuntu's case – still haven't made the transition.

Read more

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of TrueOS A Unix Based OS

Filed under
Linux

​Trust me, the name TrueOS takes me back to 1990s when Tru64 UNIX operating system made its presence. TrueOS is PC-BSD’s new unified brand built upon FreeBSD-CURRENT code base. Note that TrueOS is not a Linux distro but is BSD Unix.

Read<br />
more

Hands-on with the Gemini PDA handheld PC with Android, Linux and a 6 inch display

Filed under
Android
Linux
Reviews

The Gemini PDA is a tiny computer that’s small enough to hold in one hand, but with a keyboard that makes it possible to touch-type… maybe.

Planet Computer introduced the Gemini PDA nearly a year ago and launched a crowdfunding campaign to take the device from prototype to shipping product. Now it’s about ready to ship.

I got a chance to check out a few pre-release units at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, and it really does seem like Planet Computer has delivered on most of its promises. The little computer dual boots Google Android 7.1 and Debian Linux. It has a keyboard that’s a little cramped, but which is pretty responsive… and familiar to anyone who’s ever used an old Psion handheld. Planet Computer hired the designer of the Psion Revo and Series 5 keyboard to help design the Gemini PDA.

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5 Differences Between Linux And Windows

Filed under
Linux

Are you an entirely new computer user who just bought a PC and had Microsoft Windows pre-installed on it? Seeking out what’s beyond the realm of Windows Operating System, exploring curiously what Linux is and how it is different from the former one that already came with your computer when you purchased it. Or is it the other way around where Linux was the default Operating System on your computer? Either case, you are at the right place and I’ll be pointing out some major differences between the two.

Read<br />
more

Sub-1GHz IoT gateway combines BB Black and TI LaunchPad boards

Filed under
Linux

Newark Element14’s “SimpleLink Sub-1GHz Sensor to Cloud Linux Industrial Gateway” kit combines a BeagleBone Black, a wireless cape, and a pair of TI SimpleLink CC1350 LanchPad kits.

Newark Element14’s “SimpleLink Sub-1GHz Sensor to Cloud Linux Industrial Gateway” kit provides a Sub-1GHz sensor network development platform with an Internet of Things (IoT) gateway and cloud connectivity. The Linux-driven kit supports low-power, long range Sub-1GHz networks of up to 50 secure nodes with built-in frequency hopping.

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Software: Eddy, KDE, and GNU

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Software
  • Eddy - Easily Install Debian Packages on Elementary

    Eddy is a simple Debian package management GUI tool in Elementary OS that allows installation of Debian packages by dragging and dropping Debian files onto a GUI window. The tool can be installed straight from App Center platform or installed from source. Let's see how we can install from source on Elementary 0.4.1 Loki.

    Installing from AppCenter is the preferred way of installing Eddy since it contains the stable, tested version of the application. Compiling from source provides you with the latest "commit" with the newest functionality that may not be released as a part of an update in AppCenter or in general.

  • Season Of KDE 2018

    It’s been 5 months since I came to GCompris community, but it feels it was a few days back. I came here as a newbie in open source, not even knowing how to ask sensible questions (that’s very important which I learned during my works in GCompris), not even knowing how and where to begin.

    But I deeply thank our awesome community and helpful mentors, Johnny Jazeix, Timothee Giet, Divyam Madaan, Emmanuel Charruau and Rudra Nil Basu who kept guiding me and helped me constantly in my tasks through which I learned a lot of things, which otherwise I could have never got the opportunity to learn.

    [...]

    I will continue to contribute to GCompris for a long time and help our software grow, as much as I can.

  • Beginning 2018

    2017 began with the once-in-a-lifetime trip to India to speak at KDE.Conf.in. That was amazing enough, but the trip to a local village, and visiting the Kaziranga National Park were too amazing for words.

    Literal highlight of last year were the eclipse and trip to see it with my son Thomas, and Christian and Hailey's wedding, and the trip to participate with my daughter Anne, while also spending some time with son Paul, his wife Tara and my grandson Oscar. This summer I was able to spend a few days in Brooklyn with Colin and Rory as well on my way to Akademy. So 2017 was definitely worth living through!

    [...]

    First, I'm so happy that soon Kubuntu will again be distributing 17.10 images next week. Right now we're in testing in preparation for that; pop into IRC if you'd like to help with the testing (#kubuntu-devel). https://kubuntu.org/getkubuntu/ next week!

  • Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About bash

     

    Here I’ve focussed on the things that either confused me or increased my power and productivity in bash significantly, and tried to communicate them (as in my book) in a way that emphasises getting the understanding right.

  • Emacs for Science

        

    I typically cover software packages that do actual calculations to advance scientific knowledge, but here I'm exploring a slightly stranger tool in the arsenal of scientific computation.

    Emacs is a text editor that has almost all the functionality of an operating system. A collection of enhancements and configuration settings are available bundled under the name of scimax. Being an Emacs user myself, I was surprised I'd never heard of it before now. This project has been in development for some time, but it recently has started to find wider attention.

Games: Steam, SuperTux and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Turns out Linux market share on Steam did not go back up in December

    Originally, the December market share for Linux on Steam was shown as 0.43%, but Valve have revised this down to 0.26%. So that's a decrease of 0.01 percentage points from November to December.

  • SuperTux: A Linux Take on Super Mario Game

    When people usually think of PC games, they think of big titles, like Call of Duty, which often cost millions of dollars to create. While those games may be enjoyable, there are many games created by amateur programmers that are just as fun.

    I am going to review one such game that I love to play. It’s called SuperTux.

  • PhysicS cheats

    I guess the goofiest stuff in basic game physics is really just about mapping player controls to in-game actions like jumping and deceleration; the rest consists of hacks to compensate for representing everything as a box.

Why I Find Nginx Practically Better Than Apache

Filed under
Server

According to the latest web server survey by Netcraft, which was carried out towards the end of 2017, (precisely in November), Apache and Nginx are the most widely used open source web servers on the Internet.

Apache is a free, open-source HTTP server for Unix-like operating systems and Windows. It was designed to be a secure, efficient and extensible server that provides HTTP services in sync with the prevailing HTTP standards.

Ever since it’s launch, Apache has been the most popular web server on the Internet since 1996. It is the de facto standard for Web servers in the Linux and open source ecosystem. New Linux users normally find it easier to set up and use.

Nginx (pronounced ‘Engine-x’) is a free, open-source, high-performance HTTP server, reverse proxy, and an IMAP/POP3 proxy server. Just like Apache, it also runs on Unix-like operating systems and Windows.

Well known for it’s high performance, stability, simple configuration, and low resource consumption, it has over the years become so popular and its usage on the Internet is heading for greater heights. It is now the web server of choice among experienced system administrators or web masters of top sites.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel: Kernelci.org, Tripwire, Linux Foundation, R600 Gallium3D

  • Kernelci.org automated bisection
    The kernelci.org project aims at continuously testing the mainline Linux kernel, from stable branches to linux-next on a variety of platforms. When a revision fails to build or boot, kernel developers get informed via email reports. A summary of all the results can also be found directly on the website.
  • Securing the Linux filesystem with Tripwire
    While Linux is considered to be the most secure operating system (ahead of Windows and MacOS), it is still vulnerable to rootkits and other variants of malware. Thus, Linux users need to know how to protect their servers or personal computers from destruction, and the first step they need to take is to protect the filesystem. In this article, we'll look at Tripwire, an excellent tool for protecting Linux filesystems. Tripwire is an integrity checking tool that enables system administrators, security engineers, and others to detect alterations to system files. Although it's not the only option available (AIDE and Samhain offer similar features), Tripwire is arguably the most commonly used integrity checker for Linux system files, and it is available as open source under GPLv2.
  • Open Source Networking and a Vision of Fully Automated Networks
    Arpit Joshipura, Networking General Manager at The Linux Foundation, discussed open source networking trends at Open Source Summit Europe. Ever since the birth of local area networks, open source tools and components have driven faster and more capable network technologies forward. At the recent Open Source Summit event in Europe, Arpit Joshipura, Networking General Manager at The Linux Foundation, discussed his vision of open source networks and how they are being driven by full automation. “Networking is cool again,” he said, opening his keynote address with observations on software-defined networks, virtualization, and more. Joshipura is no stranger to network trends. He has led major technology deployments across enterprises, carriers, and cloud architectures, and has been a steady proponent of open source. “This is an extremely important time for our industry,” he said. “There are more than 23 million open source developers, and we are in an environment where everyone is asking for faster and more reliable services.”
  • R600 Gallium3D Gets Some Last Minute Improvements In Mesa 18.0
    These days when Dave Airlie isn't busy managing the DRM subsystem or hacking on the RADV Vulkan driver, he's been spending a fair amount of time on some OpenGL improvements to the aging R600 Gallium3D driver. That's happened again and he's landed some more improvements just ahead of the imminent Mesa 18.0 feature freeze.

OSS Leftovers

  • Reliance Jio and global tech leaders come together to push Open Source in India
    The India Digital Open Summit which will be held tomorrow at the Reliance Corporate Park campus in Navi Mumbai -is a must-attend event for industry leaders, policymakers, technologists, academia, and developer communities working towards India’s digital leadership through Open Source platforms. The summit is hosted by Reliance Jio in partnership with the Linux Foundation and supported by Cisco Systems.
  • Open-source software simulates river and runoff resources
    Freshwater resources are finite, unevenly distributed, and changing through time. The demand—and competition—for water is expected to grow both in the United States and in the developing/developed world. To examine the connection between supply and demand and resulting regional and global water stresses, a team developed Xanthos. The open-source hydrologic model is available for free and helps researchers explore the details and analyze global water availability. Researchers can use Xanthos to examine the implications of different climate, socioeconomic, and/or energy scenarios over the 21st century. They can then assess the effects of the scenarios on regional and global water availability. Xanthos can be used in three different ways. It can operate as an independent hydrologic model, driven, for example, by scenarios. It can serve as the core freshwater supply component of the Global Change Assessment Model, where multiple sectors and natural systems are modeled simultaneously as part of an interconnected, complex system. Further, it can be used by other integrated models and multi-model frameworks that focus on energy-water-land interactions.
  • “The Apache Way” — Open source done well
    I was at an industry conference and was happy to see many people stopping by the Apache booth. I was pleased that they were familiar with the Apache brand, yet puzzled to learn that so many were unfamiliar with The Apache Software Foundation (ASF). For this special issue, “All Eyes On Open Source”, it’s important to recognize not just Apache’s diverse projects and communities, but also the entity behind their success. Gone are the days when software and technology, in general, were developed privately for the benefit of the few. As technology evolves, the challenges we face become more complex, and the only way to effectively move forward to create the technology of the future is to collaborate and work together. Open Source is a perfect framework for that, and organizations like the ASF carry out a decisive role in protecting its spirit and principles.
  • ​Learn how to run Linux on Microsoft's Azure cloud
  • LLVM 6.0-RC1 Makes Its Belated Debut
    While LLVM/Clang 6.0 was branched earlier this month and under a feature freeze with master/trunk moving to LLVM 7.0, two weeks later the first release candidate is now available. Normally the first release candidate comes immediately following the branching / feature freeze, but not this time due to the shifted schedule with a slow start to satisfy an unnamed company seeking to align their internal testing with LLVM 6.0.
  • Hackers can’t dig into latest Xiaomi phone due to GPL violations
     

    Yet another Android OEM is dragging its feet with its GPL compliance. This time, it's Xiaomi with the Mi A1 Android One device, which still hasn't seen a kernel source code release.  

    Android vendors are required to release their kernel sources thanks to the Linux kernel's GPLv2 licensing. The Mi A1 has been out for about three months now, and there's still no source code release on Xiaomi's official github account.

  • 2017 - The Year in Which Copyright Went Beyond Source Code
    2017 was a big year for raising the profile of copyright in protecting computer programs. Two cases in particular helped bring attention to a myth that was addressed and dispelled some time ago but persists in some circles nonetheless. Many lawyers hold on to the notion that copyright protection for software is weak because such protection inheres in the source code of computer programs. Because most companies that generate code take extensive (and often successful) measures to keep source code out of the hands of third parties, the utility of copyright protection for code is often viewed as limited. However, copyright also extends to the “non-literal elements” of computer programs, such as their sequence, structure and organization, as well as to things such as screen displays and certain user interfaces. In other words, copyright infringement can occur when copying certain outputs of the code without there ever having been access to the underlying code itself.
  • Announcing WebBook Level 1, a new Web-based format for electronic books
    Eons ago, at a time BlueGriffon was only a Wysiwyg editor for the Web, my friend Mohamed Zergaoui asked why I was not turning BlueGriffon into an EPUB editor... I had been observing the electronic book market since the early days of Cytale and its Cybook but I was not involved into it on a daily basis. That seemed not only an excellent idea, but also a fairly workable one. EPUB is based on flavors of HTML so I would not have to reinvent the wheel. I started diving into the EPUB specs the very same day, EPUB 2.0.1 (released in 2009) at that time. I immediately discovered a technology that was not far away from the Web but that was also clearly not the Web. In particular, I immediately saw that two crucial features were missing: it was impossible to aggregate a set of Web pages into a EPUB book through a trivial zip, and it was impossible to unzip a EPUB book and make it trivially readable inside a Web browser even with graceful degradation. When the IDPF started working on EPUB 3.0 (with its 3.0.1 revision) and 3.1, I said this was coming too fast, and that the lack of Test Suites with interoperable implementations as we often have in W3C exit criteria was a critical issue. More importantly, the market was, in my opinion, not ready to absorb so quickly two major and one minor revisions of EPUB given the huge cost on both publishing chains and existing ebook bases. I also thought - and said - the EPUB 3.x specifications were suffering from clear technical issues, including the two missing features quoted above.
  • Firefox 58 Bringing Faster WebAssembly Compilation With Two-Tiered Compiler
    With the launch of Mozilla Firefox 58 slated for next week, WebAssembly will become even faster thanks to a new two-tiered compiler.
  • New Kernel Releases, Net Neutrality, Thunderbird Survey and More
    In an effort to protect Net Neutrality (and the internet), Mozilla filed a petition in federal court yesterday against the FCC. The idea behind Net Neutrality is to treat all internet traffic equally and without discrimination against content or type. Make your opinions heard: Monterail and the Thunderbird email client development team are asking for your assistance to help improve the user interface in the redesign of the Thunderbird application. Be sure to take the survey.

IBM code grandmaster: what Java does next

Reports of Java’s death have been greatly exaggerated — said, well, pretty much every Java engineer that there is. The Java language and platform may have been (in some people’s view) somewhat unceremoniously shunted into a side ally by the self-proclaimed aggressive corporate acquisition strategists (their words, not ours) at Oracle… but Java still enjoys widespread adoption and, in some strains, growing use and development. Read more

Programming/Development: Git 2.16, Node.js, Testing/Bug Hunting

  • Git v2.16.0
    The latest feature release Git v2.16.0 is now available at the usual places. It is comprised of 509 non-merge commits since v2.15.0, contributed by 91 people, 26 of which are new faces.
  • Git 2.16 Released
    Git maintainer Junio Hamano has released version 2.16.0 of this distributed revision control system.
  • Announcing The Node.js Application Showcase
    The stats around Node.js are pretty staggering. There were 25 million downloads of Node.js in 2017, with over one million of them happening on a single day. And these stats are just the users. On the community side, the numbers are equally exceptional. What explains this immense popularity? What we hear over and over is that, because Node.js is JavaScript, anyone who knows JS can apply that knowledge to build powerful apps — every kind of app. Node.js empowers everyone from hobbyists to the largest enterprise teams to bring their dreams to life faster than ever before.
  • Google AutoML Cloud: Now Build Machine Learning Models Without Coding Experience
    Google has been offering pre-trained neural networks for a long time. To lower the barrier of entry and make the AI available to all the developers and businesses around, Google has now introduced Cloud AutoML. With the help of Cloud AutoML, businesses will be able to build machine learning models with the help of a drag-and-drop interface. In other words, if your company doesn’t have expert machine-learning programmers, Google is here to fulfill your needs.
  • Re-imagining beta testing in the ever-changing world of automation
    Fundamentally, beta testing is a test of a product performed by real users in the real environment. There are a number of names for this type of testing—user acceptance testing (UAT), customer acceptance testing (CAT), customer validation and field testing (common in Europe)—but the basic components are more or less the same. All involve user testing of the front-end user interface (UI) and the user experience (UX) to find and resolve potential issues. Testing happens across iterations in the software development lifecycle (SDLC), from when an idea transforms into a design, across the development phases, to after unit and integration testing.