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Monday, 16 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Intel Core i7 8086K Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel announced the limited edition Core i7 8086K processor in June to celebrate 40 years since the introduction of the original 8086 processor that ushered in the x86 architecture. The Core i7 8086K is now widely available albeit with an apparent limited time available. This celebratory CPU is built off Intel's existing Coffeelake CPU micro-architecture but with an elevated CPU base frequency and a turbo frequency that tops out at 5.0GHz to make it the company's highest-performing mainstream desktop CPU to date.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Scientific Linux 6.10 RC 1

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Scientific Linux 6.10 RC 1 i386/x86_64 is now available for testing
  • CentOS 6.10 Released, Scientific Linux 6.10 Coming Next Week

    Based off last month's Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 update, CentOS 6.10 is available this week while also the Scientific Linux 6.10 release candidate has also been made available.

    Released on Tuesday was the CentOS 6.10 release. This CentOS 6 update is derived from the same sources as RHEL 6.10.

    As such, like with upstream RHEL 6.10, this new release offers Retpolines and KPTI support for Spectre and Meltdown mitigation. Besides security update work, there are also updates to GCC and other system packages. But all in all, not much is happening for EL6 due to the time around on the market it's mostly just receiving security updates and important fixes. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 remains their prime focus and prepping the yet-to-be-released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

Events: GUADEC and IBM's 'Call for Code'

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • GUADEC 2018 Day 1

    At 8.30 i took off Thursday morning to start my journey to Almería. I took the plane to Madrid and had 1 hour to get hold of a taxi and reach a train taking me to Almería. There I was fortunate to meet Julian and Tobias who were hacking on Fractal and making mockups.

  • GUADEC 2018 Kicks Off In Almería, Spain

    GUADEC 2018, the annual GNOME developers' conference, has kicked off this morning in Almería, Spain.

    As usual, GUADEC 2018 features a range of interesting technical talks. This year's event runs from today (6 July) through Sunday followed by three days worth of hacking and birds-of-a-feather sessions.

  • The field guide to aiding in natural disasters and deploying life-saving code

    As an open-source and mobile developer, I’ve had the opportunity to work on some unique projects in places where both man-made and natural disasters have severely affected people and communities. During my time in Haiti working with organizations helping those impacted by the devastating 2010 earthquake, for example, I learned how to take on challenges to assist those in need and simultaneously cope with more adversity than the average development project would require.

  • Join Forces Against Natural Disasters with the Call for Code

    The Call for Code initiative aims to harness the collective power of the global open source developer community against the growing threat of natural disasters. According to IBM, “the goal is to develop technology solutions that significantly improve disaster preparedness, provide relief from devastation caused by fires, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis and earthquakes, and benefit Call for Code’s charitable partners — the United Nations Human Rights Office and the American Red Cross.”

Android Games That Take A Lot Of Time To Finish

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Android

Most Android games can provide you with few days of entertainment. Some casual games can be played for few weeks before you get bored with it. However, the best games are the ones that take a really long time to finish. These games are challenging and follow a dynamic pattern. Let us have a look at some interesting games that take a long time to finish.

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Nintendo Switch can now run GameCube games – with an emulator and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming
Gadgets

Great news, everyone: you can now play GameCube games on your Nintendo Switch – but only with a considerable amount of hacking your console. The Switch can at last run GameCube games through an emulator hosted on a Linux distribution loaded onto the console.

The development was made by YouTube user Mizumi, who uploaded a video of the Dolphin GameCube emulator program running on Lakka, a Linux distribution for game consoles that looks a lot like the PlayStation 4 interface using a front-end known as RetroArch.

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Security Issues at Gentoo Narrowed Down to Crappy Password

Filed under
Gentoo
Security
  • Linux experts are crap at passwords!

    Fortunately, Gentoo’s GitHub respository wasn’t the primary source for Gentoo code, and few, if any, Gentoo users were relying on it for software updates.

  • Gentoo publishes detailed report after its GitHub was compromised

    You may have seen the news towards the end of June that Gentoo, a fairly advanced Linux distribution, had its GitHub repository compromised after an attacker managed to gain access to one of the connected accounts. Now, Gentoo has published a comprehensive report about the incident and it turns out that the gaff was due to not following rudimentary security tips.

  • Weak Admin Password Caused Compromise of Gentoo GitHub repository

    Gentoo have finished their investigation of the hack that affected their project last week on GitHub. The point of vulnerability has turned out to be a weak Administrator password. upon compromise the hackers added the Linux killer command “rm -rf /” so when users cloned the project to their computers all their data will be erased.

FOSS Project Spotlight: ONLYOFFICE, an Online Office Suite

Filed under
Software

ONLYOFFICE is a free and open-source office suite that provides an alternative for three major MS Office apps—Word, Excel and PowerPoint—working online.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Red Hat Reinforces Commitment to Asia Pacific Partner Ecosystem
  • Which Stock will you hold for a while, Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) or Chubb Limited (CB)
  • The Strategy to Trade Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in June 2018

    This month I accepted 166 packages and rejected only 7 uploads. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 216.

  • Coffee Lake module features shock and vibration resistance

    Adlink’s rugged “Express CF/CFE” COM Express Basic Type 6 integrates an 8th Gen Core or Xeon chip with up to 48GB RAM and loads of SATA, USB 3.1, and PCIe. There’s also a carrier board with a Live Linux USB stick.

  • How To Send SMS From Your PC Using Android Messages?
  • Google patents new AI-driven fitness feature for its Wear OS platform

    There's not much happening in the wearables market right now but that doesn't mean companies aren't working on something behind the scenes. A new patent by Google was unearthed giving us a sneak peek of what the tech giant is preparing for its future Wear OS release.

  • Using Android without Google: A (Kind of) Guide

    If you’re interested in using Android but don’t want all the Googly-ness of it, there are ways to go completely Google-free. With the right set of tools, you can have a truly open Android experience.

  • Reply: open data is 'intellectual infrastructure'

    According to Jason Hill, Executive Partner from Reply, open data is as it sounds – open and accessible data that is available to anyone.

    Hill further states that open data must be interoperable so it can be shared, adapted and reused with other datasets.

  • Open Source DIY Printers are Alive and Well: What We Saw At ERRF 18

    If you follow the desktop 3D printer market, it probably won’t surprise you to hear that nearly every 3D printer on display at the inaugural East Coast RepRap Festival (ERRF) was made in China. Even Printrbot CEO Brook Drumm had to admit that this was the year his company may finally bite the bullet and begin selling a branded and customized printer built overseas.

  • My First Clang Bug

    Part of the role of being a packager is compiling lots (and lots) of packages. That means compiling lots of code from interesting places and in a variety of styles. In my opinion, being a good packager also means providing feedback to upstream when things are bad. That means filing upstream bugs when possible, and upstreaming patches.

    One of the “exciting” moments in packaging is when tools change. So each and every major CMake update is an exercise in recompiling 2400 or more packages and adjusting bits and pieces. When a software project was last released in 2013, adjusting it to modern tools can become quite a chore (e.g. Squid Report Generator). CMake is excellent for maintaining backwards compatibility, generally accomodating old software with new policies. The most recent 3.12 release candidate had three issues filed from the FreeBSD side, all from fallout with older software.  I consider the hours put into good bug reports, part of being a good citizen of the Free Software world.

  • WordPress 4.9.7 Update Fixes a Pair of Security Vulnerabilities

    WordPress 4.9.7 was released on July 5, providing users of the popular open-source content management system with patches for a pair of security vulnerabilities.

    The security vulnerabilities are both arbitrary file deletion issues that could expose WordPress sites to risk. The first issue was publicly reported on June 26, by researchers at RIPS Tech, while the second was discovered by WordPress security firm WordFence on July 2. In addition to the two vulnerabilities, WordPress 4.9.7 provides fixes for 17 other bugs to help improve stability.

  • Keyboard Attack “Thermanator” Steals Your Passwords Using Body Heat [Ed: Likely BS. Here's why: 1) body might not be warm enough. 2) need big equipment. 3) don't know order of strokes. 4) already have physical access anyway. 5) more keystrokes after password entry.]

Software: Firefox, GTK3, Wireshark, PacVim and GNOME

Filed under
Software
  • The Best Firefox Extensions for Managing Tabs

    Frequent crashes, slow performance, and not being able to find the tab you’re looking for—we’ve all been there. Here are some of the best Firefox extensions for helping you manage tab overload.

    Generally, we don’t recommend using any extensions you don’t have to—they can be a privacy nightmare. But until makers of browsers build in some better tab management solutions, we tab hoarders have to rely on extensions to keep us sane. We’ve rounded up some of the best extensions for managing tabs in Firefox. And, while there are a ton of these extensions out there (and everyone has their favorites), we’ve tried to keep our list to well-regarded extensions without reported privacy issues.

  • Marker Is A Powerful Gtk3 Markdown Editor

    Marker is a free and open source GTK3 Markdown editor designed with the Gnome desktop in mind. While the application is still in early development, it already includes most of the things you'd need in a Markdown editor.

  • How I use Wireshark

    Wireshark has a TON of features and I definitely only use a small fraction of its features. The 5 tricks I’ve described here are probably 95% of what I use Wireshark for – you only need to know a little Wireshark to start using it to debug networking issues!

  • PacVim – A Game That Teaches You Vim Commands

    Although Vim (short for VI Improved) is a popular text editor on Linux systems, people still find it hard to learn, it has a steep learning curve especially the advanced features; a lot of Linux newbies are literally afraid of learning this powerful and highly recommended text editor.

    On the other hand, so much effort has been directed by the Tecmint and Linux community towards making Vim easy to learn; from creating Vim tutorials, sharing useful Vim usage tricks and tips, to developing interactive learning web-apps and command-line games such as PacVim.

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  • Testbit is going static

    I’ve always felt at odds with the fact that I’m not able to use the same facilities for blog post creation as for programming. Looking back at my old posts, I’ve actually started out in 2005 with a command line tool that allowed me to easily upload simple text passages for planet aggregation.

    I later started running my own Wordpress instance with full fledged online editing which turned out to be fairly entertaining in the beginning. But I never went back to produce posts as frequently as was the case when I had my command line tool.

    These days, any content I’m working on needs to be tracked in a local Git repository. I want to diff, merge, rebase changes and edit things in-place in Emacs and a terminal. Not being able to utilize my familiar editing environment has really thwarted my efforts to blog even semi-regularly.

    For the above and a plethora of other reasons, I’ve long wanted to move away from venerable Wordpress and any kind of dynamic website management, that includes the Mediawiki instance that used to be hosted on Testbit. Both served a role at some point, but lately the Wiki became more of an archive for old works and the blog felt more and more like a maintenance burden and writing block.

  • Segregating views

    For a long time now Games has had a very basic UI, displaying only a collection of games. Having already had added the developer key to Games, I chose to add a developer view, displaying collection of games by developer. Along with the developer view a platform view was also added to display collection of games by platforms. A GtkStackSwitcher was added to the header bat to easily navigate between these views.

Openwashing and Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Fedora 28 KDE - Call the doctor, it's not feeling well

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

I didn't get to test a lot of things - apps, hardware compatibility, performance, whatnot, but then, there's really no reason to persist. This is a failing distro, like so many others released recently. No validation, no care, nothing. Just random code. A lackluster showing with no pride or passion or quality. Fedora 28 KDE did give me media playback, but that's about the only thing that worked fine. The rest was all broken. Customization wasn't smooth, the fonts are meh, no smartphone support, mediocre network support, and then, a dead desktop after trying to install Nvidia drivers the same way that worked just fine in Fedora 27. Madness.

If you want to use Fedora for some reason, the Gnome edition is better, but it's still a rather average product and not suitable for day-to-say use. A steady decline since version 25, and I'm 100% sure this is all the result of the carefree approach to software development, the rapid release mania and the total disregard to validation and user needs. This one is a total flop. And I've just wasted a day and a half of my life. We're done.

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Also: Call for Fedora Women’s Day 2018 proposals

What Is the Best Way to Contribute to The Linux Kernel?

Filed under
Development
Linux

A person who isn’t much of a computer literate wouldn’t know that the kernel is a fundamental part of any OS. It is so far removed from the surface apps that the closest you could get to it from a typical app on your machine is configuring network protocols and/or installing driver software. As a matter of fact, only programmers typically deal with kernels directly.

To paint a perfect picture, the kernel is to a computer what an engine is to a car. You as what the best way to contribute to the Linux kernel is? I don’t know. I’m not an authority on kernels, but I sure do have some suggestions you may find useful.

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When do All Firefox Users Update?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Last time we talked about updates I wrote about all of what goes into an individual Firefox user’s ability to update to a new release. We looked into how often Firefox checks for updates, and how we sometimes lie and say that there isn’t an update even after release day.

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OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • SD Times Open Source Project of the Week: Indico Enso

    Enterprise AI company Indico wants to give back to the open-source community that it says has helped their technology develop with the release of this week’s highlighted open-source project. Indico’s Enso Python library is an open-source codebase designed to standardize a way to test transfer learning techniques for training natural language processing models.

    While transfer learning, which utilizes knowledge gained from prior machine-learning tasks to speed up later tasks, has proven successful in computer vision and image classification applications, greatly reducing the number of images needed to make subsequent identifications, Indico says that the technique is greatly unproven for natural language processing.

  • Selecting the Right Service Virtualization Tool

    Open source tools are generally adopted in a bottom-up manner: they’re downloaded and experimented with by a developer or development team and, when successful, might slowly be adopted by a larger audience within the organization

  • Cloud Native Machine Learning And AI
  • Decentralized AI-Powered Trust Alliance DATA Open Source Set to Battle Fraud

    DATA is a blockchain based digital data authentication protocol powered by AI & P2P mobile storage infrastructure. The project is devised to address the root of the fraud at its core. It evaluates the credibility of endpoints through blockchain, big data and AI technologies to provide technical solutions for endpoint-level data quality assessment and data fraud. The DATA platform applies a reward system to incentivize end users with their attention contribution and to publishers with pruning their sell-side inventory.

    DATA’s aim is to build a Data Trust Alliance with crucial partners in the digital ecosystem to develop and operate a standard protocol for quality assessment of endpoint data similar to the ISO certification system, which will reduce the inefficiency and high cost in the upstream and downstream of the industry chain due to the lack of trust in digital advertising, financial technology and other industries.

  • DATA Open Source Explained by Dr. Eric Li

    DATA is a blockchain based digital data authentication protocol. The project evaluates the credibility of endpoints through blockchain, big data and AI technologies to provide technical solutions for endpoint-level data quality assessment and data fraud. The DATA project is dedicated to solving data fraud, the lack of trust, the inefficiency of cooperation, the waste of ecological resources, and the uneven distribution of value in the global digital ecosystem through blockchain technology. Through endpoint-level data credibility assessment, DATA hopes to address data traceability, validation incentives, and quality control issues. DATA’s vision is to build a Data Trust Alliance with crucial partners in the digital ecosystem to develop and operate a standard protocol for quality assessment of endpoint data similar to the ISO certification system to reduce the inefficiency and high cost in the upstream and downstream of the industry chain due to the lack of trust in digital advertising, financial technology and other industries. At present, the project has reached strategic collaborations with BlueFocus, Kochava and many other well-known companies in the world.

Free Open Source Guides Offer Practical Advice for Building Leadership

Filed under
Linux
OSS

How important is leadership for evolving open source projects and communities? According to the most recent Open Source Guide for the Enterprise from The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group, building leadership in the community is key to establishing trust, enabling collaboration, and fostering the cultural understanding required to be effective in open source.

The new Building Leadership in an Open Source Community guide provides practical advice that can help organizations build leadership and influence within open source projects.

“Contributing code is just one aspect of creating a successful open source project,” says this Linux Foundation article introducing the latest guide. “The open source culture is fundamentally collaborative, and active involvement in shaping a project’s direction is equally important. The path toward leadership is not always straightforward, however, so the latest Open Source Guide for the Enterprise from The TODO Group provides practical advice for building leadership in open source projects and communities.”

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Open source plays vital role in scientific advances

Filed under
OSS

While the open source movement initially came into being as a way to "democratise" software development, it is now playing an increasingly important role in the development of cutting edge technologies in a wide range of non-IT fields, including medicine and science.

For example, researchers from Chile, who have just been awarded the 2018 PLOS Open Source Toolkit Channel Prize, relied heavily on open source software and hardware for the development of a low-cost fluorescent imaging system.

This system can be used in a wide range of fields including laboratory medicine, pharmacology, environmental biology and molecular biology to image assays. It could also be used in an educational environment for the teaching of biology.

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Canonical Fixes Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Regression Causing Boot Failures on AMD PCs

Filed under
Ubuntu

Last month, on June 20, 2018, Canonical released an AMD microcode firmware update for the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating systems to address the well-known Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerability.

Unearthed by Jann Horn of Google Project Zero, the Spectre security flaw revealed the fact that devices powered by modern processors using branch prediction and speculative execution may allow local attackers to expose sensitive information, including kernel memory, by reading the memory via so-called side-channel attacks.

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Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Wallpaper Contest Is Now Open for Entries

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase is now officially open for submissions in an attempt to gather the best and most colorful images from talented photographers and artists from all over the world, which will be included in the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system, due for release on October 18, 2018.

"Careful consideration will expose an extraordinary quirk: chromatic changes facilitate a unique mechanism for communication. They change the color of their skin to send communiqués. This codename should encourage wacky and eccentric, but unique and colorful images we can ship in October," said Nathan Haines.

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More in Tux Machines

How to enable developer mode on a Chrome OS tablet (and install Linux using Crouton)

Google’s Chrome OS is designed to be a relatively secure, simple operating system that’s easy to use and hard to mess up. But you can run stable channel, beta channel, or dev channel software on any Chromebook depending on whether you want the safest experience or buggy, bleeding-edge features. There’s also an option called Developer Mode, which is different from the dev channel. It allows you to access files and settings that are normally protected and use a command shell to explore the system. It’s designed for developers and advanced users only, since it increases the chances that you’ll break your Chromebook. But enabling Developer Mode is also a prerequisite for using one my favorite Chrome OS hacks: a tool called Crouton that allows you to install Ubuntu or another GNU/Linux distribution and run it alongside Chrome OS. Read more

Red Hat News and Press

Belated Thoughts on van Rossum’s Departure

  • Is BDFL a death sentence?
    A few days ago, Guido van Rossum, creator of the Python programming language and Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL) of the project, announced his intention to step away. Below is a portion of his message, although the entire email is not terribly long and worth taking the time to read if you’re interested in the circumstances leading to van Rossum’s departure.
  • Thoughts on Guido retiring as BDFL of Python
    I've been programming in Python for almost 20 years on a myriad of open source projects, tools for personal use, and work. I helped out with several PyCon US conferences and attended several others. I met a lot of amazing people who have influenced me as a person and as a programmer. I started PyVideo in March 2012. At a PyCon US after that (maybe 2015?), I found myself in an elevator with Guido and somehow we got to talking about PyVideo and he asked point-blank, "Why work on that?" I tried to explain what I was trying to do with it: create an index of conference videos across video sites, improve the meta-data, transcriptions, subtitles, feeds, etc. I remember he patiently listened to me and then said something along the lines of how it was a good thing to work on. I really appreciated that moment of validation. I think about it periodically. It was one of the reasons Sheila and I worked hard to transition PyVideo to a new group after we were burned out.

Catfish 1.4.6 Released

  • Catfish 1.4.6 Released, Now an Xfce Project
    It’s a great day for fans of the fast and powerful Catfish search utility. With the 1.4.6 release, Catfish now officially joins the Xfce family. Additionally, there’s been some nice improvements to the thumbnailer and a large number of bugs have been squashed.
  • Catfish Search Utility Joins The Xfce Project
    The Catfish search utility now officially lives under the Xfce umbrella. Catfish is a GTK3-based and Python 3.x written program for searching for files on the system. Catfish has long been common to Xfce desktop systems and complementary to the Thunar file manager. The Catfish 1.4.6 release was made this weekend and with this version has now officially become part of the Xfce project.