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Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's howtos and software

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HowTos

KDE: Clazy/Qt, Kirigami and Kdenlive

Filed under
KDE
  • Clazy Results Visualizer for Qt

    Clazy is a clang plugin which extends the compiler with over 50 warnings related to Qt best practices ranging from unneeded memory allocations to API misuse. It’s an opensource project spawned by KDAB’s R&D efforts for better C++ tooling.

  • Kirigami Notation App

    And here I am writing on the blog after a long time.
    This time it’s about talking about my new project, becoming a developer!
    Unfortunately I can not study full time (in fact you see the results), however, I am to show you the “results” of my study.
    Thanks to the Kirigami module developed by Marco Martin and the ease of QtQuick here is my first application, that is, the Alpha version. The application for now is called “Notation”, but I will definitely make a vote for the names (suggest the names in the comments below).

  • Kirigami and color palettes

    A new release of Kirigami is about to come with the new version of KDE Frameworks about to be released, 5.38.

  • This week in Kdenlive

    The refactoring branch of Kdenlive is progressing nicely and we hope to merge our code to master in the last days of october to meet the KDE Applications 17.12 release schedule. Today we updated the AppImages of both stable and refactoring branch.

Games: Starblast, Battle for Orion, Hat in Time, Overgrowth and More

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Gaming

Red Hat and Fedora: Container-Native Storage, Omnetric, systemd 235 and More

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Red Hat

OSS: Apache, Mozilla, Events, and 3D Printing

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OSS
  • Large-Scale Governance – 10 Apache Lessons

    Even if one of these applies, you still might be smarter to join an existing “umbrella” like Software Freedom Conservancy in the US or Public Software in the UK. But if you do end up devising your own organization, you won’t go far wrong my starting with the Apache Software Foundation’s principles.

  • Mozilla extends, and ends, Firefox support for Windows XP and Vista

    Mozilla has announced it will end support for its Firefox browser on Windows XP and Windows Vista.

    The organisation offers Firefox Extended Support Releases (ESRs) that keep getting bug fixes for 54 weeks, even though nine new versions of Firefox should come along during that time. Mozilla offers ESR releases so that organisations with standard desktop environments can pick a version of Firefox and run it for a year, without the need to update their gold images.

    Enterprise software vendors also like this arrangement: Oracle only certifies its wares for ESRs because keeping up with a six-weekly release cycle is too much effort.

  • New Sessions Announced for the Samsung Developer Conference #SDC2017
  • Who Won at OpenWorld? Oracle, or Amazon and Splunk?

    As this year's Oracle OpenWorld 2017 draws to a close, I'm convinced that the best seat in the house to watch this one wasn't anywhere near San Francisco's Moscone Convention Center, the event's venue, but sitting in front of a computer in your home or office.

  • How a university's 3D-printed prosthetics club provides devices for amputees

    Last fall, one of the co-founders of Duke University eNable published an article describing our club’s beginnings and visions for the future. In the spring of 2016, we started out as six engineering students with a passion for innovation and design, supported by a small stipend from the Innovation Co-Lab and a grant from OSPRI (Open Source Pedagogy, Research and Innovation), a project supported by Red Hat.

    Since then we have established ourselves as a presence on campus, grown into a large interdisciplinary team, and connected with multiple recipients—including a young boy in Milot, Haiti. The resources offered through Duke and the sponsorship we've received allow us to continuously transform our ideas into things we can share with open source enthusiasts, makers, and dreamers alike.

Programming: RICE, Bugs, and Java

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Development
  • Double Your Development Velocity without Growing Your Team

    The Developer Experience team at SendGrid is a small, but mighty force of two. We attempt to tackle every problem that we can get our hands on. This often means that some items get left behind.  At the outset, we surveyed everything that was going on in our open source libraries and we quickly realized that we needed to find a way to prioritize what we were going to work on. Luckily, our team lives, organizationally, on the Product Management team, and we had just received a gentle nudge and training on the RICE prioritization framework.

    On our company blog, I wrote an article about how employing this framework, using a spreadsheet, helped us double our velocity as a team within the first sprint. Our development velocity doubled because the most impactful things for the time spent are not always the biggest things, but the biggest things tend to attract the most attention due to their size.

  • Review by many eyes does not always prevent buggy code

    Writing code is hard. Writing secure code is harder—much harder. And before you get there, you need to think about design and architecture. When you're writing code to implement security functionality, it's often based on architectures and designs that have been pored over and examined in detail. They may even reflect standards that have gone through worldwide review processes and are generally considered perfect and unbreakable.*

    However good those designs and architectures are, though, there's something about putting things into actual software that's, well, special. With the exception of software proven to be mathematically correct,** being able to write software that accurately implements the functionality you're trying to realize is somewhere between a science and an art. This is no surprise to anyone who's actually written any software, tried to debug software, or divine software's correctness by stepping through it; however, it's not the key point of this article.

  • Java Moving Forward With Faster Pace Release Schedule, Modular System
  • Onwards to Valhalla: Java ain't dead yet and it's only getting bigger

    Scale was big at the JavaOne conference this week. Spotify lauded its success scaling with Java, and Oracle execs practically squealed as they reeled off adoption statistics. Big Red believes the next ten years belong to Java.

    "We want the next decade to be Java first, Java always," vice president Mark Cavage said on stage.

    Of course Java is already big and among those on stage was Alibaba, one of the world's largest Java users, which talked up its ability to run more than a million JVM instances at once.

Security: Updates, Apple APFS Passwords, WordPress, Microsoft FUD, and Internet of Broken Things

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Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Apple fixes Keychain vulnerability, but only in macOS High Sierra

     

    The zero-day vulnerability in macOS's Keychain has been addressed by Apple, along with some other issues in High Sierra. But other recent versions of the operating system are still vulnerable.  

  • macOS High Sierra bug exposes APFS passwords in plain text

     

    A Brazilian software developer has uncovered a bug in Apple's macOS High Sierra software that exposes the passwords of encrypted Apple File System (APFS) volumes in plain text.

  • The September 2017 WordPress Attack Report

    This edition of the WordPress Attack Report is a continuation of the monthly series we’ve been publishing since December 2016. Reports from the previous months can be found here.

    This report contains the top 25 attacking IPs for September 2017 and their details. It also includes charts of brute force and complex attack activity for the same period, along with a new section revealing changes to the Wordfence real-time IP blacklist throughout the month. We also include the top themes and plugins that were attacked and which countries generated the most attacks for this period.

  • Step aside, Windows! Open source and Linux are IT’s new security headache [Ed: Microsoft propagandist Preston Gralla is back from the woods. The typical spin, lies. Deflection. Windows has back doors.]
  • Sex Toys Are Just As Poorly-Secured As The Rest Of The Internet of Broken Things

    At this point we've pretty well documented how the "internet of things" is a privacy and security dumpster fire. Whether it's tea kettles that expose your WiFi credentials or smart fridges that leak your Gmail password, companies were so busy trying to make a buck by embedding network chipsets into everything, they couldn't be bothered to adhere to even the most modest security and privacy guidelines. As a result, billions upon billions of devices are now being connected to the internet with little to no meaningful security and a total disregard to user privacy -- posing a potentially fatal threat to us all.

4 Best Linux Distros for Older Hardware

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Linux

One of the many great aspects of the Linux operating system is its ability to bring new life to old hardware. This is not only a boon for your bottom line but also an environmentally sound philosophy. Instead of sending that older (still functioning) hardware to the trash heap, give it a second lease on life with the help of Linux. You certainly won’t be doing that with Windows 7, 8, or 10. Linux, on the other hand, offers a good number of options for those wanting to extend the life of their aging machines.

And don’t think these distributions aimed at outdated hardware are short on features. Remember, when that hardware was in its prime, it was capable of running everything you needed. Even though times have changed (and software demands far more power from the supporting hardware), you can still get a full-featured experience from a lightweight distro.

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Raspberry Pi: Hands-on with the Pi-Desktop kit

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Linux

This is the latest in my adventures to see what sort of useful things can be done with a Raspberry Pi. The friendly people at the Pi-Shop.ch recently added the Farnell element 14 Pi Desktop to their offerings. This kit is not only a nice case, it also includes an add-on board which contains a power on/off button (yes!), a Real Time Clock with battery backup, and an mSATA socket so that you can add an SSD (Solid State Disk) if you want.

There is also a software download available from the element 14 Pi Desktop page which adds the necessary functionality to the Raspbian operating system to make the On/Off switch, RTC and SSD work. Note that this software is required for any of these new hardware bits to work; the printed installation document included with the Pi Desktop implies that it is only necessary if you want to boot from SSD or USB, but that is not true.

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Dynamic Users with systemd

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Red Hat
Software

Today we released systemd 235. Among other improvements this greatly extends the dynamic user logic of systemd. Dynamic users are a powerful but little known concept, supported in its basic form since systemd 232. With this blog story I hope to make it a bit better known.

The UNIX user concept is the most basic and well-understood security concept in POSIX operating systems. It is UNIX/POSIX' primary security concept, the one everybody can agree on, and most security concepts that came after it (such as process capabilities, SELinux and other MACs, user name-spaces, …) in some form or another build on it, extend it or at least interface with it. If you build a Linux kernel with all security features turned off, the user concept is pretty much the one you'll still retain.

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The October 2017 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the October 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Servers and Red Hat: Cloud Management Suite, Paravirtualization, Gluster

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Cloud Management Suite Announces Support for Linux

    "Although Windows is predominantly used at the desktop, many organizations run Linux on their servers," said Diane Roger, Chief Product Officer for Cloud Management Suite.

  • Which OSes include paravirtualization support?

    Certain versions of the Linux kernel offer more complete and uniform support for paravirtualization than others due to the open source nature of Linux.

  • Red Hat Stretches Gluster Clustered Storage Under Containers

    Red Hat has been aggressive in building out its capabilities around containers. The company last month unveiled its OpenShift Container Platform 3.6, its enterprise-grade Kubernetes container platform for cloud native applications that added enhanced security features and greater consistency across hybrid and multi-cloud deployments.

    A couple of weeks later, Red Hat and Microsoft expanded their alliance to make it easier for organizations to adopt containers. Red Hat last year debuted OpenShift 3.0, which was based on the open source Kubernetes orchestration system and Docker containers, and the company has since continued to roll out enhancements to the platform.

  • Why Investors remained confident on Bank of America Corporation (BAC), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?

OSS/Openwashing: Amdocs, Tevora, Singapore and Cloud Foundry

Filed under
OSS
  • Amdocs launches open source-based software and services portfolio for carriers

    Amdocs has announced Amdocs Network Function Virtualization (NFV) powered by Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) – a portfolio featuring modular capabilities that accelerate service design, virtualization and operating capabilities on demand.

    As the communications and media industry moves from static appliance-based networks to software based, elastic networks, carriers will be increasingly capable of providing services and capacity on demand or based on predictive traffic patterns.

    Instead of building networks for high peak periods, carriers want to spin them up dynamically to provide better network services in the right locations at lower price points. Service providers using technologies developed in ONAP and its ecosystem of capabilities can provide enterprises the ability to design their own networks as part of a richer set of service features.

  • Tevora Releases Free, Open-Source Penetration Testing Tool, SecSmash

    SecSmash is available free of charge on GitHub. Its modular framework allows for integration with any available technology solutions.

  • Open source gaining momentum in Singapore

    If you live in Singapore and have started using the newly-minted parking.sg app developed by the government to pay for street parking at public car parks, you may have noticed something in fine print in one corner of the app’s menu that says “built with open source software”.

  • Open Source Health IT App Development Cuts Back Costs

    Cloud Foundry Applications Runtime is an open source application development platform for cloud-native application. The platform is used and modified constantly to help organizations quickly gain access to the latest development technology.

    The tool has been a part of the Cloud Foundry Foundation for three years. It was originally created at VMware in 2010 and then moved to Pivotal in 2013 before it was donated to Cloud Foundry.

Hologram Debuts Open Source Cellular Modem for IoT

Filed under
OSS

Hologram on Thursday launched Nova, the first open source modem for cellular connectivity.

Nova is a USB cellular modem purpose-built for Internet of Things development. Its Hologram software tools are compatible with most single board computers, such as Raspberry Pi.

The Nova modem is open source and unlocked, so its use is not limited to Hologram's SIMs. Though it targets the developer community, it has potential uses for everyone from makers to system architects. It sells for US$49.

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Tiny Apollo Lake net appliance features 4x GbE and dual USB 3.0

Filed under
Linux

Aaeon announced a compact “FWS-2272” networking appliance with a Celeron N3350, 2x USB 3.0, 4x GbE, SATA III, mini-PCIE, and 8GB of RAM and eMMC.

Aeon’s new Apollo Lake based FWS-2272 updates last year’s Bay Trail FWS-2251 with a faster processor, a second USB 3.0 port, and eMMC storage, among other minor upgrades. However, it also drops from 3x mini-PCIe slots to one. The device supports firewall, load balancing, network access control, software define management, vCPE,and UTM applications, says Aaeon.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Containers and Microservices Spark a Search for Better File Systems

    File systems usually stay low, both at the operating system level and in tech discussions. Red Hat’s recent deprecation of the Btrfs file system from its platform ignited some interest in the role of file systems in containerized environments.

    As Linux distributions container-based operations microservices, they come across new file-system related challenges. Linux vendors, including Red Hat, SUSE and Canonical, are major players in the container space. In addition to their traditional OSes, these companies have also built container as service platforms to handle containerized workloads and microservices. Following the footsteps of CoreOS’s Container Linux, Red Hat has created Project Atomic; Canonical came out with Ubuntu Core and SUSE released SUSE CaaS Platform and Kubic.

  • Merging SUSE Studio and Open Build Service
  • SUSE Studio online + Open Build Service = SUSE Studio Express

    SUSE Studio was launched in 2009 to make building images really easy. Nowadays, images are used everywhere – for public cloud you need images; container images are used to have small and movable workloads, and data center operators use golden images to start their workloads.

  • F/LOSS (in)activity, September 2017

    Unfortunately, September was a poor month for me in terms of motivation and energy for F/LOSS work. I did some amount of Gitano work, merging a patch from Richard Ipsum for help text of the config command. I also submitted another patch to the STM32F103xx Rust repository, though it wasn't a particularly big thing. Otherwise I've been relatively quiet on the Rust/USB stuff and have otherwise kept away from projects.

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