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Sunday, 01 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 9:54am
Story Linux Foundation and Linux Announcements Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 9:33am
Story Firefox 46, Vivaldi 1.1, Homeless Thunderbird Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 9:24am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 9:15am
Story GParted 0.26.0 Launches with Read-Only Support for LUKS Encrypted Filesystems Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 8:56am
Story Xubuntu 16.04 - quick screenshot tour Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 8:47am
Story OpenELEC fork LibreELEC 7.0.0 arrives with Kodi 16.1 Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 8:41am
Story OpenStack From Texas Roy Schestowitz 1 27/04/2016 - 8:39am
Story Ultra-modular automation controller runs Linux on Sitara Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 8:20am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 7:50am

Nvidia 364.19

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Nvidia 364.19 stable driver released, featuring Vulkan, Wayland & Mir support
  • Nvidia 364.19 Short-Lived Linux Driver Adds Vulkan 1.0 Support, Wayland Fixes

    Nvidia today, April 22, 2016, updated its short-lived Unix graphics driver to version 364.19 for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris operating systems.

    The Short-Lived branch of the Nvidia video driver usually gets the latest improvements and fixes, but it is not recommended to stable users because it changes too often and new releases are not thoroughly tested. Nvidia 364.19 is now the latest short-lived graphics driver, and it looks like it brings many interesting changes.

  • NVIDIA 364.19 Linux Driver Stabilizes The Wayland & Mir Support

    The NVIDIA 364.19 Linux graphics driver was released today as the first stable release in the NVIDIA 364 driver series.

    The NVIDIA 364 series is the huge update that has the necessary changes for supporting Wayland and Mir. This support comes via new EGL extensions, the nvidia-drm.ko kernel module that registers itself as a DRM driver with KMS support, and other work that has been building up for some time. NVIDIA 364 is also big for integrating the Vulkan graphics API support.

5 things that set openSUSE, elementary OS and Ubuntu apart

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

I am a huge fan of openSUSE and Arch Linux; those are the two distributions that I run on my main system. But I don't belong to any fan-base; I also run some of the major Linux distributions on my machines, to keep an eye on their development.

One distribution that’s getting a lot of attention lately is elementary OS. I have been using it on a virtual machine and I love what they are doing. Then there is Ubuntu, one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems. The latest release of Ubuntu was announced this week and since I use all three in some capacity, I decided to see where they stand against each other.

Read more

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Slides From Linux Foundation's 2016 File-System Conference

    The Linux Foundation was hosting their "Vault" Linux storage and file-system conference the past two days in Raleigh, North Carolina.

  • Tail Wags Dog, Says Canonical

    A Linux kernel module is a derivative work of the Linux kernel, not the other way around.

  • Linux scheduler bug got you down? Here's a fast fix

    The Linux kernel scheduler has deficiencies that prevent a multicore system from making proper use of all cores for heavily multithreaded loads, according to a lecture and paper delivered earlier this month at the EuroSys '16 conference in London,

    If you're running applications that might be affected and would rather not wait for a fix from the kernel team, a patch is available in a script provided by a third party.

  • Linux Kernel 4.5.2 Adds PA-RISC and EXT4 Fixes, Networking Stack Improvements

    Just ten days after we reported that the stable Linux 4.5 kernel series got its first point release, renowned kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman Linux now informs the community about the availability of Linux kernel 4.5.2.

OpenIndiana 2016.04 Released To Let OpenSolaris Live On

Filed under
OS

OpenIndiana 2016.04 has been released as the newest version of this operating system based on Illumos and originally derived from OpenSolaris.

OpenIndiana Hipster 2016.04 is the project's first OS release in a half-year. Unfortunately, there aren't many details about the new release. The release announcement simply says, "As always, there were a lot of changes since last snapshot."

Read more

Sandwich-style RK3288 SBC loads up on wireless options

Filed under
Android
Linux

The Rockchip RK3288 SoC can be found in numerous Android media players, such as the Tronsmart Orion R28, as well as SBCs including the Firefly-RK3288 and Reload boards and the Radxa Rock 2 Square. Unlike these hacker SBCs, the EM4412 does not provide an open source hardware design, but Boardcon is aiming the board at both OEMs and DIYers, and offers fairly extensive documentation.

Read more

Linux/OSS on Servers

Filed under
Server
OSS

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • EBSCO Supports New Open Source Project

    Software for academic libraries will be developed collaboratively

  • Putting open source to work

    A few years ago, at the O'Reilly Open Source Convention, I talked about the fact that it’s a mistake only to look at companies that have implicitly monetized open source when thinking about the commercial open source ecosystem; there are many others who have built their businesses on open source software, and you wouldn't know it to look at them. This is even truer today. You’d be hard pressed to find a single business that doesn't rely on open source for some part of its operations.

    [...]

    Open source technologies are now an integral part of the enterprise. The people, companies, and technologies have changed. Developers face new challenges, and the stack has grown infinitely more complex.

  • The gift economy at the heart of open source
  • Open Source Kafka Connect Adds More Than a Dozen Connectors

    Confluent, founded by the creators of Apache™ Kafka™, today announced growing support within the Kafka and Confluent Partner ecosystem to build and deploy new, Confluent-certified connectors through Kafka Connect. Since Kafka Connect was released in February, Confluent, Kafka core committers, the open source community and ecosystem partners have developed more than a dozen connectors including HDFS, JDBC, Cassandra and S3, with more in development from leading technology companies. Now, Kafka developers can quickly and easily connect various data sources into their stream data platforms.

  • A Protocol for Dying [Ed: Former FFII President]

    Technically, I have metastasis of bile duct cancer, in both lungs. Since February I've had this dry cough, and been increasingly tired and unfocused on work. In March my Father died and we rushed around arranging that. My cough took a back seat. On April 8 I went to my oncologist to say that I was really not well. She organized a rush CAT scan and blood tests.

    [...]

    My kids are twelve, nine, five. Tragic, etc. etc. Growing up without a father. It is a fact. They will grow up with me in their DNA, on Youtube as endless conference talks, and in writing.

  • Automate your home with openHAB

    OpenHAB is an open source automation platform designed to use a pluggable architecture, which means that new devices and protocols can be added easily. This pluggability extends also to the persistence layer, so your system can maintain its state information on your choice of platform

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Latest RaspEX Build Brings Ubuntu 16.04 LTS to Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs

Filed under
Ubuntu

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton informs us about the availability for download of a new build of his RaspEX project that brings the latest version of the Ubuntu Linux operating system to Raspberry Pi SBCs.

Read more

Five of the Best Productivity Tools for Linux

Filed under
Linux

Operating systems exist so that you can communicate with computer hardware to get things done. On top of the operating system are live applications that make the process of getting things done efficient. That’s where productivity tools come in. What are productivity tools? Naturally, the definition will depend on the angle from which you approach the question. Management productivity is very different from standard office productivity, and it’s the latter I wish to address.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Let's Encrypt Reaches 2,000,000 Certificates

    Earlier today, the Let's Encrypt certificate authority issued its two millionth certificate, less than two months after the millionth certificate. As we noted when the millionth certificate was issued, each certificate can cover several web sites, so the certificates Let's Encrypt has issued are already protecting millions and millions of sites.

  • Hackers Make This Search Engine Out Of 70 Million Voters’ Data

    Did you ever imagine an easily-browsable hacked data available to public and that too in the form of a search engine? Well, here is one of those interesting hacking cases where hackers made a search engine out of the hacked data of the 70 million citizens of Philippines and anyone can easily search for everybody else.

  • How Big Is Your Target?

    In his 2014 TED presentation Cory Doctorow compares an open system of development to the scientific method and credits the methods for bringing mankind out of the dark ages. Tim Berners-Lee has a very credible claim to patent the technology that runs the internet, but instead has championed for its open development. This open development has launched us forward into a brave new world. Nearly one third of all internet traffic rides on just one openly developed project. Its place of dominance may be unsure as we approach a world with cybersecurity headlines. Those headlines do much to feed the industry of fear resulting in government efforts to close doors on open source efforts.

    This paper is a qualitative theoretical discussion regarding cyber security and open source solutions written in three parts. Its goal is to demonstrate that the use of open source technologies reduces vulnerability to cyber attacks. The first part of this paper identifies the difficulties in presenting a software consideration model capable of illustrating the full spectrum of expectations for the performance of today’s code. Previous models merely address basic requirements for execution namely security, functionality & usability. While these aspects are important they fail to take into account modern requirements for maintenance, scalability, price, reliability and accessibility of software. This part of the paper modernizes the model developed by Andrew Waite and presents a clear model for software discussion.

OpenStack News

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • OpenStack Summit in Austin is almost here!

    OpenStack comes home to Austin on Monday for the OpenStack Summit! I will be there with plenty of other Rackers to learn, collaborate, and share our story.

  • How the science of happiness can improve OpenStack teams

    What does the science of happiness have to do with OpenStack? As it turns out, a lot. An international community of contributors works on OpenStack, so the overall health of the large pool of community members influences the direction of OpenStack projects. In this interview, OpenStack Summit speaker Alexis Monville (Director, Improvement & Dissemination of the Red Hat Cloud Innovation Practice) explains how contributors can increase their happiness on individual and team levels, and he offers a few resources for building healthier teams.

  • What's the total cost of ownership for an OpenStack cloud?

    Technical discussions around OpenStack, its features, and adoption are copious. Customers, specifically their finance managers, have a bigger question: "What will OpenStack really cost me?" OpenStack is open source, but its adoption and deployment incur costs otherwise. So, what is the OpenStack TCO (total cost of ownership)? There has been no systematic answer to this question—until now. Massimo Ferrari and Erich Morisse, strategy directors at Red Hat, embarked on a project to calculate the TCO of OpenStack-based private cloud over the years of its useful life.

  • Open Source Cloud Apps: 65 Cloudy Apps

    Open source cloud apps are the wave of the future -- and the present. Cloud computing itself is no longer just a buzzword, it's becoming simply the ways things are done. IDC predicts that public cloud spending will grow from $70 billion in 2015 to more than $141 billion in 2019, a compound annual growth rate of 19.4 percent. That is six times faster growth than the firm expects to see for IT spending as a whole.

    The open source community is playing a major role in the growth of the cloud with projects like OpenStack, CloudStack and others providing some of the fundamental building blocks that enable both public and private cloud computing. In addition, many open source project owners make cloud-hosted versions of their software available on a software as a service (SaaS) basis, which gives them a way to monetize their projects and simplifies deployment and support for users.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-alpha1 (0.6.0.80)

    I just made a release of KBibTeX 0.6.1-alpha1 (0.6.0.80), which is the first preview release of the upcoming bugfix release in the 0.6 series. Please note that the 0.6 series is still based on KDE 4.

  • KDiff3 for KDE Frameworks 5 becomes usable

    After recently starting to port KDiff3 to KDE Frameworks 5, I made a few commits today making the software actually usable.

  • Grantlee v5.1.0 (Codename Außen hart und innen ganz weich) now available

    The Grantlee community is pleased to announce the release of Grantlee version 5.1 (Mirror). Grantlee contains an implementation of the Django template system in Qt.

  • Minuet 0.1 released!

    I'm happy to announce that the very first release of Minuet is available today as part of KDE Applications 16.04 \o/.

  • News about kdepim: Allow to build standalone each applications
  • New Krita 3.0 Alpha/Development Windows Builds
  • Kdenlive: Café, release and development

    In a few days, we are going to celebrate the release of Kdenlive 16.04.0.
    If you are interested in the project, you are welcome to join us in the next Kdenlive café, a monthly IRC meeting for users and developers.

  • KDE Neon out now – An Interview with Jonathan Riddell

    Is KDE’s Neon a new Linux distribution? Is it a showcase? Is it a test bed? Neon (“tech preview”) User Edition launches today and we got Jonathan Riddell, Neon’s front runner, to explain what all the fuss is about.

  • kver’s definition of anarchy
  • Travis-CI builds of KDE projects on Archlinux chroot

    How many of you knew that KDE has a github mirror? The mirror is useful for github users/fans (who can for example star their favorite KDE projects), but can also be useful to KDE developers who don’t care about github. I was on of them, until today. Github features an excellent integration with Travis-CI. This means that you (as github user) get for free a Continuous Integration system already up and running, waiting for your commits.

  • KDE 5_16.04 for Slackware-current

    You may already have tried it through the PLASMA5 variant of the Slackware Live Edition which I uploaded yesterday, and here is the announcement of the addition of KDE 5_16.04 to my ‘ktown’ repository – the April release of the combined KDE Frameworks 5.21.0, Plasma 5.6.3 and Applications 16.04.0.

  • KDE-FreeBSD catching up

    After a long struggle with digiKam (mostly because of the libmediawiki plugin), a brief struggle with KDevelop (it is well-behaved), and a careful struggle with CMake (because lots of other ports depend on it), official ports have been updated (by Tobias Berner and Raphael Kubo da Costa) with the state-of-the-art for KDE4 from the unofficial area51 repository.

GNU Software

Filed under
GNU

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • An Easy Way To Build An Ubuntu Kernel With Hopefully Better Scheduler Performance

    Since the recent news about the Linux kernel being in worse shape than some people imagine, there's already been some downstream corrective action taking place. Clear Linux is one of the distributions already patching/tweaking their kernel for better scheduler performance but so far we haven't heard anything from the Ubuntu camp. Fortunately, there's been others working on their own solutions.

    A Phoronix reader contacted me this week about his build_ubuntu_kernel_wastedcores script. This script makes it easier to spin your own Ubuntu custom kernel and integrates the "wasted cores" patch cited by the earlier research into the poor shape of the Linux kernel scheduler.

  • Y is for…
  • Ubuntu 16.04 Released: See what’s new

    For those who might not be aware of that fact that Canonical keep the funkiest name for their project. All the official Ubuntu release names are like Ubuntu X.YY where is X is the Year of release Minus 2000 and YY is the Month of release. Since the date of release is not known and cannot be predicted till release, Canonical conventionally names all it release as Adjective + Animal. In Ubuntu 16.04, Xerial is an Adjective and Xerus is an Animal.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) released
  • Ubuntu Snap's Security Is Easily Circumvented Due To X11g

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Is Now Available To Download

Filed under
Linux
News
Ubuntu

A long waited release Ubuntu 16.04 has finally been made available to download with some new & interesting features. Ubuntu 16.04 is a long-term supported release that means once you install Ubuntu 16.04, it's going to provide security updates, bug fixes and applications updates for 5 years with no if and but. Ubuntu and other family members' (Ubuntu Mate, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu etc.) 16.04 version can be downloaded and installed.

Read more

Tesla hacker installs Gentoo and can now watch movies on the Model S’ 17-in display

Filed under
Gentoo

For obvious safety reasons, most jurisdictions across the US and the world prohibit someone from driving a car if a “video monitor” is clearly visible from the driver’s seat. Hence why even though Tesla’s 17-in center display could certainly be capable of playing videos, the automaker disabled any video playing capabilities other than the video feed from the rear camera.

It didn’t stop a hacker who recently managed to install Gentoo, a Linux-based operating system, in her car and can now play videos directly from her Model S’ 17-in display.

I am using ‘her’ here because the hacker is staying anonymous but goes by ‘Hemera’, the Greek goddess of daytime.

Read more

Snap Not Contained, Shuttleworth Says Don't Talk Back

Filed under
-s

Ubuntu continued to dominate the headlines today with some reporting the new version being actually available and all the usual accompanying posts. One of the more interesting Ubuntu articles of the day came from Matthew Garrett who said that Snap applications could expose your private data. In other Ubuntu news, Mark Shuttleworth announced the new codename for the next release already. Elsewhere, Gentoo was hacked onto a car computer and Microsoft is hiring Linux developers.

Read more

Also: Developer Claims That Canonical's Snap Format Isn't Secure in Ubuntu with X11 - Updated

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How Linux Frustrated Me Into Loving It
    I have been very interested in Linux since my entry into the Wonderful World of Unix in 2006. I found Ubuntu and installed it on a crappy Dell desktop computer I was given when I was doing online schooling. The computer originally came with Windows, and one day while I was browsing, I decided to search for “alternative to Windows.” Linux popped up right away. I had never heard of Linux before, but after voraciously reading article after article, I decided Linux was the path for my future.
  • HP Chromebook 13 is a business-focused Chrome OS laptop with USB-C
    In the grand scheme of things, Chrome OS is hardly a major player from a desktop market share perspective -- for now. With that said, the Linux-based operating system has captured the hearts and minds of many consumers. It has matured quite a bit too, becoming a viable Windows alternative for home users. Actually, it is a great choice for some businesses too -- depending on needs, of course.
  • Summary: Linux Scheduler: A decade of wasted cores - Part 1 - What is NUMA ?
    Last month, a research paper with title 'The Linux Scheduler: a Decade of Wasted Cores' was trending on the front page of HN. As an individual who is interested in Systems, I thought it would be good idea to read this 16 page research paper. I spent a good amount of time learning about different topics which were involved in it. This is the first post in the series in which I will try to summarize the paper.
  • Vulkan 1.0.12 Specification Update Adds VK_AMD_rasterization_order
  • GTK+ 3.22 Is Working On An OpenGL Renderer & Scene Graph
    Matthias Clasen of Red Hat has written an update about changes to GNOME's GTK+ tool-kit for the 3.20 cycle but he also mentions some of the exciting work that's brewing for GNOME/GTK+ 3.22. Clasen's latest blog post covers some of the recent internal changes to GTK+ CSS, theme changes, various changes facing application developers, and more. Those interested about the GTK+ tooling changes can read the blog post.
  • Bunsenlabs Rc2
  • April is almost gone
    The second one was the release of pre-release isos of Mageia 6 and OpenMandriva Lx 3. I must say that both distros are doing a great job; the systems performed so well that they did not seem beta versions to me. I did not like Plasma 5, though... I am sure the KDE team is doing a great work, but I truly do not see what the point of this tablet-ready interface is. After all, KDE missed the tablet train (the Vivaldi tablet never saw the light of the day) and tablets are already in decline...
  • New BlackArch Linux version released, now provides 1400 pentesting tools
    BlackArch Linux version 2016.04.28 released for ethical hackers and security researchers with 1400 pentesting tools
  • Manjaro 16.06 - third preview released
    It took us almost another month to prepare this third preview of our upcoming stable release we call Daniella. The Xfce edition remains our flagship offering and has received the attention it deserves. Few can claim to offer such a polished, integrated and leading-edge Xfce experience. We ship Xfce 4.12 with this release of Manjaro. We mainly focused on polishing the user experience on the desktop and window manager, and on updating some components to take advantage of newly available technologies such as switching to a new theme called Maia, we already using for our KDE edition.
  • IoT Past and Present: The History of IoT, and Where It's Headed Today [Ed: just devices with a network stack. Nothing new.]
  • 1btn – an Open Source Dash
    The availability of cheap radios, omni-present WiFi and powerful web services means the IoT wave is here to stay. Amazon got into the act with its “do only one thing” Dash button. But a more interesting solution would be an IoT “do it all” button.
  • No Time to Panic as One Quarter Shows Minor Dip in Smartphone Sales - Total Smartphone Market Will Grow This Year (and here's why)
    We now have the Q1 numbers from Strategy Analytics and IDC, the two last remaining of the classic four big smartphone industry analyst houses we used on this blog to calculate the industry average of the total market size, back when the 'smartphone bloodbath' started six years ago. And both SA and IDC are in exceptional, near-perfect agreement on the exact size of the market, we get a total smartphone market for Q1 at 334.8 Million units. That is down 18% from the Christmas sales Quarter (normal that Q1 is down) but for the first time ever in this industry, the YEAR-ON-YEAR comparison of Q1, so the January-March quarter last year 2015 vs now, is down. This has not happened in the smartphone industry in any YoY period. And some are now talking about 'peak smartphone'. That number COULD be a signal that smartphone industry growth has stalled and now peaked and smartphone sales will either plateau flat, or decline into the next year(s).
  • GhostBSD 10.3 Alpha Released With ZFS File-System Support, MATE 1.12
    The first alpha release was made available this weekend of GhostBSD 10.3 Alpha 1, a desktop focused operating system built atop FreeBSD 10.3.
  • 3D Printer Crowdfunding projects
    Like every Kickstarter project, there is a risk. But I think that Trinus appears to be a good project, we need to wait to the launch and review a real machine to know if it worth it. Also, the Youtube Channel Maker’s Muse, made a review of the project and the company Konama, creators of Trinus, sent him a the 3d printer and he currently makes the review of this printer that pledged more then 1 million dollars on KickStarter.
  • Refactoring the open-source photography community
    Generally speaking, most free-software communities tend to form around specific projects: a distribution, an application, a tightly linked suite of applications, and so on. Those are the functional units in which developers work, so it is a natural extension from there to focused mailing lists, web sites, IRC channels, and other forms of interaction with each other and users. But there are alternatives. At Libre Graphics Meeting 2016 in London, Pat David spoke about his recent experience bringing together a new online community centered around photographers who use open-source software. That community crosses over between several applications and libraries, and it has been successful enough that multiple photography-related projects have shut down their independent user forums and migrated to the new site, PIXLS.US.
  • DIY recycling, UCONN's open source chemistry book, and more news

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming