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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 11:07am
Story Results of the EU-FOSSA survey Rianne Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 11:06am
Story Learn an instrument with this open source music teacher Rianne Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 10:55am
Story libinput is done Rianne Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 10:43am
Story $5 Linux-equipped Omega2 IoT module launches on Kickstarter Rianne Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 10:39am
Story Fedora News Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 10:35am
Story Four Alternatives to Raspbian and Ubuntu MATE Rianne Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 10:31am
Story Korora 24 & OpenMandriva 3.0 RC1 Released, Dell XPS 13 Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 10:30am
Story Today and Yesterday in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 9:50am
Story Linux and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 7:58am

Watch: Security Researchers Use Ubuntu Linux to Hack ROS-Powered Surgical Robots

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Today we're continuing our "Watch" series of articles with a new one where you'll be able to see a group of security researchers attempting to hack a surgical robot, courtesy of Motherboard.

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GNOME 3.21.4 unstable tarballs due

Filed under
Development
GNOME

Hello all,

Tarballs are due on 2016-07-18 before 23:59 UTC for the GNOME 3.21.4
unstable release, which will be delivered on Wednesday. Modules which
were proposed for inclusion should try to follow the unstable schedule
so everyone can test them. Please make sure that your tarballs will
be uploaded before Monday 23:59 UTC: tarballs uploaded later than that
will probably be too late to get in 3.21.4. If you are not able to
make a tarball before this deadline or if you think you'll be late,
please send a mail to the release team and we'll find someone to roll
the tarball for you!

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Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

SlackEX Is Based on Slackware 14.2, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.6.4 & KDE 4.14.21

Filed under
Slack

Today, July 14, 2016, Arne Exton informs us about the availability of a new build of his SlackEX Live Linux operating system, which has been rebased on the latest Slackware release.

Based on Slackware 14.2, powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.6.4 kernel with support for the latest hardware devices, and using the KDE Development Platform 4.14.21 that shipped with the KDE Applications 16.04.2 software suite, SlackEX Build 160711 is a 64-bit (x86_64) OS brings support for installation on USB flash drives.

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GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Ubuntu GNOME 16.04.1 LTS to Drop Broken GNOME Maps App from Default Install

    Ubuntu GNOME maintainer Jeremy Bicha informs the community today, July 14, 2016, about the fact that the popular GNOME Maps application from the GNOME Stack has recently lost its free map tile service, MapQuest, which disabled access to their feed.

    Of course, this automatically translates to the fact that as of July 12, 2016, GNOME Maps is no longer a functional application, and it would appear that it might take weeks, or even months for the GNOME development team responsible for the maintenance of the app to find a new free service for displaying the maps.

  • GSoC Report #1

    For the past few weeks I’ve been working on the first part of my project which consisted in getting rid of the deprecated GtkAction API (with the related GtkActionGroup, GtkUIManager) and port everything to GAction. This blog post is long overdue as I hoped I could finish the task before reporting on my project’s progress, considering the port one of the milestones of my project. However, without much knowledge about the specifics of GtkAction and GAction, I greatly underestimated the time I will spend on finishing my task, and therefore, I delayed my post up to this very moment, when my task is nearing completion. I will submit the patch after passing the patch by Michael for a final review.

You Can Now Upgrade from Linux Mint 17.3 Cinnamon and MATE to Linux Mint 18

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" computer operating system arrived two weeks ago, on June 30, with the usual Cinnamon and MATE editions, but an upgrade patch was not available for users running Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa".

Today, July 14, 2016, Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre informs the community that the upgrade path from Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa" to Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" is now open and they can start upgrading their operating systems as we speak, following the instructions provided below.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux User? The US Government May Classify You an Extremist

    Do you use decentralized, open source software? The US government considers you an extremist.

    According to leaked documents related to the XKeyscore spying program, the National Security Agency (NSA) flags as an “extremist” anyone who uses Tor or Tails Linux, or who subscribes to Linux Journal.

  • New Vivaldi Web Browser Snapshot Improves Proprietary Media Support on Linux

    Ruarí Ødegaard informs Softpedia today, July 14, 2016, about the availability of yet another snapshot towards the Vivaldi 1.3 cross-platform web browser, bringing more improvements to Linux support.

    According to Mr. Ødegaard, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.3.537.5 has been released only a few days after the previous snapshot, version 1.3.534.3, mostly to improve the broken HTML5 proprietary media support on Linux kernel-based operating systems, which was made more robust on the Ubuntu Linux distribution but now works on Slackware and openSUSE, SLES, and derivatives.

  • Next Slackware will use UTF-8 by default

    Besides taking security updates, Patrick already started minor changes in Slackware-Current which probably have big impact for users. The first one is enabling UTF-8 support by default in /etc/profile.d/lang.{csh,sh} script which are loaded by default and also in lilo dialog. It will not prompt you about UTF-8 anymore since it will use it by default and the kernel is already UTF-8 compliance. We will have less installation dialog in the next Slackware release Smile

    The second change is mesa upgrade to 12.0.1. This is requested in LQ, but surprisingly Patrick approved it. Normally, current will not be active for some time besides security updates.

  • Price Target Update: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • 5 Reasons I’m Excited By Nokia’s Upcoming Android Phones

    Nokia used to be the world’s biggest phone maker. When you thought of mobile phones you thought of Nokia. The brand was synonymous with mobile technology, just as Apple iand Samsung are right now.

  • Running Ubuntu on top of Windows 10 is a thing thanks to Bash [Ed: Microsoft sites continue to 'linuxwash' Vista 10 which is a piece of malware]
  • Photoshop vs. GIMP: Which Photo Editor Do You Need?

    Just about every image you encounter in the world has been manipulated or processed in some way. Headline images, fine art photography, and advertisements all rely to some extent on image editing software. Many of these manipulations are so subtle that they’re nearly imperceptible: Slight cropping, adjusting contrast, and color correction are all standard procedures. Others are more drastic, like altering shapes and removing (or inserting) certain elements.

  • Open-source Bluetooth sensor beacon offers "IoT for everyone"

    Finnish startup Ruuvi Innovations has successfully crowdfunded the first fully open-sourced Bluetooth Smart (Bluetooth 5 ready) sensor beacon. The device, RuuviTag, is claimed to be the only sensor beacon with a one kilometer open-air range and offers unlimited possibilities for makers, developers, Internet of Things (IoT) companies and educational institutions.

  • Security advisories for Thursday

Samsung Gear Manager updated for Tizen Smartwatches to Version 2.2.16070451

Filed under
Linux

Today, the Gear Manager app, which is used to connect a Smartphone with the Gear Smartwatches, has received another update, taking it to version 2.2.16070451. There is no changelog at the moment so this possibly the usual bug-fixes and performance improvements.

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The new Moto E3 has four cores, a 5-inch screen, and Android 6

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Android

Very much in line with the way it enlarged the Moto G this year, Lenovo is taking the ultra-affordable Moto E and beefing it up for 2016. The Moto E3, as the new model is called, moves from the 4.5-inch display of yesteryear to a new 5-inch HD screen, adds a quad-core processor with 1GB of RAM, and steps up the main camera to an 8-megapixel resolution. This is augmented with a 2,800mAh battery, 8GB of storage, a microSD card slot for expansion, and a splash-proof construction for extra peace of mind. Lenovo even claims the Moto E has a "built-in smudge-resistant screen protector," though how that differs from just building a good screen with something like Gorilla Glass, I'm not really sure.

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Open Source Software for Enterprise File Access ownCloud Secures Financing

Filed under
OSS

ownCloud, a Nürnberg, Germany-based provider an open source software for enterprise file access, secured millions in financing.

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Also: ownCloud Secures Financing and Expands its Management Team

Where Open Source fits in New Zealand

Filed under
OSS

NZ Open Source Society president Dave Lane is a frequent and articulate promoter of his cause. He can also be a scathing critic of proprietary software.

In keeping with the Open Source philosophy, his presentation from this year’s ITX conference is online.

You can read the slides, or hit the S key to see the slides and his speaker notes.

Lane’s presentation has a Creative Commons licence. You can copy, adapt and share the work to your heart’s content so long as you credit the author.

It’s well worth a read if you need a crash course in Open Source. It also works as a refresher.

Read more

Ubuntu MATE, Pithos and the Sounds of Popcorn

Filed under
GNU
Linux

My trusty old Sony Vaio laptop has been saddled up with Ubuntu MATE for a little over a month now. For the most part, it’s running just as smoothly as it ever did on Windows XP — and definitely better than it ran with the lovingly installed bloatware that came included with it shiny and new from the factory.

Upon the suggestion of FOSS Force reader Jeff, I invested in a recent upgrade of RAM that fulfills its maximum potential of a single gigabyte. Compared to its performance in the past, it’s definitely noticeable. But compared to my main work computer with a humble (by modern standards) 4 GB RAM, it can feel a little sluggish if I try to do do something unreasonable — like having two programs open at once.

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Devices and Hardware (Linux and Hacker-Friendly)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
OSS
  • 8 open source point of sale systems

    Running a small business isn't easy, and especially so for retailers, restaurant owners, and others who have a brick-and-mortar storefront. Managing purchases and cash flow, keeping inventory stocked, making sure your employees are happy, and above all else serving your customers needs requires dedication, a solid business plan, and a bit of luck to be successful.

  • ELC video explains the mystery of modern caches

    In his recent ELC talk, ARM kernel developer Mark Rutland traced the evolution of caches over the last decade or so, and explained how to manage them.

    “If you’re a bit tired, this is a presentation on cache maintenance, so there will be plenty of opportunity to sleep,” began Rutland. Despite this warning, Rutland’s presentation, titled Embedded Linux Conference presentation titled Stale Data, or How We (Mis-)manage Modern Caches, was actually kind of an eye opener — at least as far as cache management presentations go.

  • This open source CNC system integrates high-tech automation into backyard farming

    This story might more properly belong on RobotHugger, but with its open source DIY approach to small-scale food production, FarmBot is worth a look.

    The old-school gardener in me is battling my high-tech early adopter side over whether or not this robotic farming device is a step toward greater food sovereignty or toward a dystopian future where robot overlords rule backyard farms. Sure, it's easy enough to learn to garden the old fashioned way, on your hands and knees with your hands in the soil, but considering that one of the excuses for not growing some our own food is lack of time and lack of skills and knowledge, perhaps this automated and optimized small-scale farming approach could be a feasible solution for the techie foodies who would like homegrown food without having to have a green thumb.

  • Tropical Labs Offers a Powerful Open Source Servo for Makers

    Joe Church from Tropical Labs wanted low cost, accurate servo motors for a project but was unable to find the right parts for his need. The team began to develop motors and recording their progress on hackaday.io. The motor project eventually turned into Mechaduino, and Tropical Labs is running a highly successful Kickstarter campaign to fund the first run of production motors.

  • SiFive – the open-source hardware company

    Customisation periods end with ICs becoming complex and expensive and, at that point, standardisation comes in and returns ICs to affordability.

    Or that’s the theory.

    Over the years there have been many ways to bring the cost of custom silicon down – MPW, ASIC, P-SOC, FPGAs and, latterly, ARM’s offer of free access to Cortex-M0 processor IP through DesignStart which aims to deliver test chips for $16,000.

GNOME Board of Directors Announced

Filed under
GNOME

This year we had 253 registered voters, 142 of which sent in valid ballots. Elections ran during the months of May and June, and the new Board was officially announced on June 18, 2016.

The Board of Directors is a team of volunteers who are elected for a one-year term by GNOME Foundation members. The Board is an important part of the GNOME Foundation and ensures the health of the organization by working on operational and legal items that help keep the Foundation in order. It also helps to manage the relationship with the Advisory Board and promotes the overall well-being of the GNOME Project. This year’s Board has experience that spans the GNOME project including expertise in design, development, usability, and communications.

Read more

Microsoft and Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Xen Project Release Strengthens Security and Pushes New Use Cases

    Xen Project technology supports more than 10 million users and is a staple in some of the largest clouds in production today, including Amazon Web Service, Tencent, and Alibaba’s Aliyun. Recently, the project announced the arrival of Xen Project Hypervisor 4.7. This new release focuses on improving code quality, security hardening and features, and support for the latest hardware. It is also the first release of the project’s fixed-term June - December release cycles. The fixed-term release cycles provide more predictability making it easier for consumers of Xen to plan ahead.

  • Released DigiKam 5.0 and completely ported with Qt5

    The photos are organized in albums which can be sorted chronologically, by folder layout or by custom collections.You can tag your images which can be spread out across multiple folders, and digiKam provides fast and intuitive ways to browse these tagged images. You can also add comments to your images.

  • Cubemap 1.3.0 released

    I just released version 1.3.0 of Cubemap, my high-performance video reflector. For a change, both new features are from (indirect) user requests; someone wanted support for raw TS inputs and it was easy enough to add.

  • MKVToolNix 9.3 "Second Sight" Released with Several Enhancements and Features

    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus proudly announced the other day the release of the MKVToolNix 9.3.0 "Second Sight" maintenance update of the popular open-source MKV (Matroska) manipulation utility, promising to implement many of the user-requested features, as well as to fix numerous reported bugs.

    MKVToolNix 9.3 brought a new chapter generation feature with two placeholders, better support when opening a saved configuration via the merge tool, along with the ability to specify how much a TS or MPEG-PS file will be probed for tracks by using the new "–probe-range-percentage" option.

Kernel Space: Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Linux
  • Automotive Grade Linux Releases 2.0 Spec Amid Growing Support
  • Linux Has Seen 30k+ Commits So Far This Year

    Being half-way now through the year and Linux 4.7 coming later this month, I figured it would be fun to run some statistics on the Linux kernel Git repository to see how this year is stacking up compared to past years.

    When running GitStats on the mainline kernel tree as of yesterday, there were 21,718,865 lines of code reported across 603,345 commits by 15,430 different authors.

  • Thunderbolt Networking Support Is Still Being Worked On For Linux

    Thunderbolt networking support is still being worked on for the mainline Linux kernel.

    The set of patches for implementing Thunderbolt networking for Linux is up to its third revision. These patches are for enabling networking of computer-to-computer over a Thunderbolt cable for non-Apple hardware. This adds the Thunderbolt networking support for hardware with a firmware-based controller, namely the Intel Connection Manager (ICM). These Linux kernel patches continue to be worked on by Intel with Amir Levy sending them out.

  • NVIDIA Releases "The World's Most Advanced VR Game", Will Be Open-Sourced
  • Why We Made the World’s Most Advanced VR Game – NVIDIA VR Funhouse

    Today’s release of NVIDIA VR Funhouse extends our role in the gaming ecosystem to that of a game creator.

    Our first game, NVIDIA VR Funhouse is built on Epic’s Unreal Engine 4, and is the brainchild of NVIDIA’s LightSpeed Studios. It was created with a dual-purpose.

    First, we wanted it to be fun. To be enjoyed by people of all ages, whether or not they’ve tried VR, whether or not they’re an early adopter.

    Second, it was created to show how immersive VR can be when physics simulation is fully integrated into an experience.

  • Intel Has A Final Round Of Graphics Updates For Linux 4.8, Broxton Is Ready

    Daniel Vetter of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has submitted the final round of feature updates for the i915 DRM driver for DRM-Next to in turn target the Linux 4.8 kernel.

    The Intel DRM code already had some pull requests of material in DRM-Next for Linux 4.8. The previous pulls included work on DisplayPort++ dongles, more GuC stuff, panel-related work and one end-user feature that's new is the GVT-g para-virtualization support for Broadwell and newer.

  • The Founder Of Wayland Has Joined Google

    Last week we reported on Kristian Høgsberg, the founder of Wayland and a long-time Linux graphics developer, leaving his position at Intel. We now know he headed off to Google.

    Through his LinkedIn profile he has confirmed that he's now working for Google in the Portland area as a software engineer.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Free Tools for Driving an Open Source Project to Success

    How can you showcase the fact that your open source project follows best practices and is secure? The Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) Badge Program is a free program that is good to know about on this front. Its Best Practices Badge is a symbol of open source secure development maturity. Projects having a CII badge showcase the project's commitment to security, and The Linux Foundation is the steward of this program.

    Note that The Linux Foundation also has a collection of very useful free resources pertaining to open source compliance topics. For example, Publishing Source Code for FOSS Compliance: Lightweight Process and Checklists and Generic FOSS Policy can align your project’s development with best practices and policies.

  • 8 answers to management questions from an open point of view

    I recently saw the following questions on a survey about organizational management, and decided to answer them from my open organization point of view. I'd love to hear how others in the open source world would answer these questions, so leave some comments and tell us what you think!

  • IBM Forms Impactful IoT Partnership with AT&T, Focused on Open Source

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is finally ramping up in a big way, and many of the biggest tech companies are announcing partnerships. The latest two players to cozy up to each other are IBM and AT&T. They are in partnership to meld AT&T’s connectivity with IBM’s Watson and Bluemix analytics platforms. Via APIs and development environments, including a number of open source tools, the tech titans want to make life easier for developers focused on IoT.

  • How (and why) FreeDOS keeps DOS alive

    Jim Hall’s day job is chief information officer for Ramsey County in the US state of Minnesota. But outside of work, the CIO is also a contributor to a number of free software/open source projects, including FreeDOS: The project to create an open source, drop-in replacement for MS-DOS.

    FreeDOS (it was originally dubbed ‘PD-DOS’ for ‘Public Domain DOS’, but the name was changed to reflect that it’s actually released under the GNU General Public License) dates back to June 1994, meaning it is just over 22 years old — a formidable lifespan compared to many open source projects.

  • Next month's Firefox 48 is looking Rusty – and that's a very good thing

    Mozilla says it will next month ship the first official Firefox build that sports code written in its more-secure-than-C Rust programming language.

    The Firefox 48 build – due out August 2 – will include components developed using Rust, Moz's C/C++-like systems language that focuses on safety, speed and concurrency.

  • Serious flaw fixed in widely used WordPress plug-in

    If you're running a WordPress website and you have the hugely popular All in One SEO Pack plug-in installed, it's a good idea to update it as soon as possible. The latest version released Friday fixes a flaw that could be used to hijack the site's admin account.

    The vulnerability is in the plug-in's Bot Blocker functionality and can be exploited remotely by sending HTTP requests with specifically crafted headers to the website.

    The Bot Blocker feature is designed to detect and block spam bots based on their user agent and referer header values, according to security researcher David Vaartjes, who found and reported the issue.

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