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Monday, 23 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 5 of the Best Places to Find DEBs Packages for Debian-Based Linux Distros Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 7:36pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 7:36pm
Story Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Munzali Garba Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 7:33pm
Story Who Contributes to the Linux Kernel? Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 7:31pm
Story “Unboxing” the Android Things Developer Preview Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 7:26pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 1:31pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 12:49pm
Story Debian and Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 12:48pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 12:47pm
Story 10 reasons to use Cinnamon as your Linux desktop environment Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 12:40pm

Best Linux Distributions for New Users

Filed under
Linux

Ah, the age-old question...one that holds far more importance than simply pointing out which Linux distribution is a fan-favorite. Why is that?

Let me set the stage: You have a user—one who has, most likely, spent the majority of their time in front of either a Windows or Mac machine—and they’ve come to you for an alternative. You want to point them in a direction that will bring about the least amount of hiccups along the way and highlight the power and flexibility of Linux.

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Kdenlive 16.12.1 released with Windows version

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KDE

We are proud to announce the first maintenance release for the 16.12 cycle. Besides the usual bugfixes and usability improvements this release also marks the official release of the Windows port.

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Devs Alerted to Long-Delayed Android Wear 2.0 Reboot

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Android

Google is moving ahead with its long-delayed launch of Android Wear 2.0, an operating system for its emerging wearables ecosystem, which finally could decouple the smartwatch from the smartphone.

A notice to developers states that Android Wear 2.0 will launch in early February, Android Police reported Wednesday. The notice alerts developers using a legacy embedded APK mechanism that those particular apps were not optimized for Android 2.0.

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Android Leftovers

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Android

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What benefits do Open Source, SDN, NFV, and new cloud standards bring to the networking industry?

    Remember proprietary networks – where you were expected to buy everything from a single provider (and its certified partners)? Those were the good old days for those proprietary vendors’ shareholders and investors, but they were a nightmare for customers who wanted to be free to choose the best solutions, embrace cutting-edge innovation, mix-and-match different capabilities and price points, and avoid the dreaded vendor lock-in. The good news is that proprietary networks are dead, dead, dead.

  • Report: Agile and DevOps provide more benefits together than alone

    DevOps and agile are two of the most popular ways businesses try to stay ahead of the market, but put them together and they provide even more benefits. A new report, Accelerating Velocity and Customer Value with Agile and DevOps, from CA Technologies revealed businesses experienced greater customer satisfaction and brand loyalty when integrating agile with DevOops.

  • The Hard Truths about Microservices and Software Delivery – Watch our LISA16 Talk

    Everybody’s talking about Microservices right now. But are you having trouble figuring out what it means for you?

  • Manjaro 17.0 alpha 2 is now available for public

    If you know Arch Linux, then you must have heard about Manjaro Linux too. A few hours ago Manjaro development team released Manjaro 17.0 alpha2. This release is made in two flavors, the main KDE flavor and Xfce flavor. Community releases are yet to get updated. The new version is named Gellivara. next releases will be codenamed differently rather than older month codenames.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9, Gets KDE Plasma 5.8.5 LTS

    openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio informed those running the Tumbleweed rolling operating system about the latest software updates that landed in the official, stable repositories.

    openSUSE Tumbleweed is always getting the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source applications, and today we're happy to inform you that the Linux 4.9 kernel finally made its way into the software repos of the distributions, along with cleaned up configuration settings for the Mesa 3D Graphics Library.

  • Modern and secure instant messaging

    I now have an XMPP setup which has all the features of the recent fancy chat systems, and on top of that it runs, client and server, on Free Software, which can be audited, it is federated and I can self-host my own server in my own VPS if I want to, with packages supported in Debian.

  • Qseven COM offers Apollo Lake and a security chip

    Portwell’s “PQ7-M108” is a Linux-friendly Qseven COM with Intel Apollo Lake SoCs, up to 8GB of LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC, -40 to 85°C support, and a security IC.

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Tips for non-native English speakers working on open source projects

    The primary language of most open source projects is English, but open source users and contributors span the globe. Non-native speakers face many communication and cultural challenges when participating in the ecosystem.

    In this article, we will share challenges, how to overcome them, and best practices for easing onboarding of non-native speakers, as non-native English speakers and contributors to OpenStack. We are based in Japan, Brazil, and China, and work daily with the huge OpenStack community that is spread around the world.

    The official language of OpenStack is English, which means we communicate daily as non-native speakers.

  • How companies can help employees contribute to open source

    I'm a part of the Drupal community, which has more than 100,000 active contributors worldwide. And among them is a growing group of employees who are encouraged by their employers to contribute to open source.

    These days, finding a seasoned developer whose resume or CV doesn't mention an open source contributionor two (or more) is rare. The best developers know it matters, and it's becoming normal for contributions to help you get, or keep, a job. If you're an employer in technology, you know that. So how can you help your employees contribute to open source?

  • Open Networking Summit Returns With New and Enhanced Format for 2017; Call for Proposals Closes Jan 21
  • Report Notes OpenStack Gaining Traction with Telcos, and In Europe

    The OpenStack cloud computing platform is evolving in a number of notable new directions, notes Forrester's report OpenStack's Global Traction Expands For Its Newton Release. In particular, the report notes that OpenStack is gaining traction as a public cloud solution, and much of that trend is playing out in Europe. Additionally, telcos are flocking to OpenStack, says Forrester.

    Here are more details.

    “In the past year, telcos like CableLabs, SK Telecom, and Verizon have shelved their previous objections to the Neutron networking project and flocked to the OpenStack community, contributing features like Doctor,” notes the report. “Leading infrastructure & operations (I&O) professionals, application developers, and CIOs at firms like American Express, Disney, and Walmart have embraced OpenStack for their digital businesses. It’s the foundation of many private (and, increasingly, of many public) cloud services that give your company the agility it needs to respond to customer demand, from core systems to the mobile apps that deliver differentiated customer experiences.”

  • Mirantis to Support and Manage OpenContrail SDN

    In 2016, the SDN (Software Defined Networking) category rapidly evolved, and it also became meaningful to many organizations with OpenStack deployments. IDC published a study of the SDN market earlier this year and predicted a 53.9% CAGR from 2014 through 2020, at which point the market will be valued at $12.5 billion. In addition, the Technology Trends 2016 report ranked SDN as the best technology investment for 2016.

  • Why open source seeds could be vital for the future of food

    Open source, a movement most commonly associated with tech, coding and hacking, is now becoming an increasingly important issue for food according to a recent article published on Ensia and GreenBiz. It might be somewhat surprising, for example, to learn that more than one-third of all carrot growing material has been patented and is protected by intellectual property rights (IPs). This raises a host of new challenges for small scale, independent breeders, who are responding by endorsing an “open source movement for seeds”, and could become a critical topic for those advocating a vision for a regenerative, more distributed food system with greater resilience designed in.

  • D-Wave goes public with open-source quantum-classical hybrid software
  • D-Wave Just Open-Sourced Quantum Computing
  • D-Wave Releases Open Quantum Software Environment
  • D-Wave open sources quantum software development tool qbsolv
  • At Last, An Open Source Electric Vehicle From A Major Manufacturer

    There is a rule of thumb to follow when looking at product announcements at the fringes of the motor industry that probably has something in common with crowdfunding campaigns. If the photographs of the product are all renders rather than real prototypes, walk away. It is said that small volume vehicle production is a space that attracts either crooks or dreamers, and parting with your money to either can be a risky business. So when yet another electric vehicle platform makes its debut it’s always worth looking, but too often the rendered images outnumber anything from the real world and you know you’ll never see one on the road.

  • REMINDER - MEDIA ALERT: ESD Alliance to Host Discussion on Open Source, RISC-V Processor
  • After Lawsuits And Denial, PaceMaker Vendor Finally Admits Its Product Is Hackable

    So we've noted how the lack of security in the Internet of Things is a bit of a problem. Initially, many of us thought that easily hacked smart tea kettles and smart refrigerators were kind of cute. Then we realized that this same, paper-mache grade security is also apparently embedded in everything from automobiles to medical gear. Then, more recently, we realized that all of these poorly-secured devices were being quickly compromised and used in botnets to help fuel massive, historically unprecedented, new DDoS attacks. The warnings were there all along, we just chose to ignore them.

    For more than a decade people had been warning that the security on pacemakers simply wasn't very good. Despite these warnings, many of these devices are still vulnerable to attack. This week the FDA was forced to issue a warning, noting that security vulnerabilities in the St. Jude Medical implantable cardiac device and corresponding Merlin@home Transmitter could be a serious problem. It's notable as it's the first time we've seen the government publicly acknowledge this specific type of threat.

LLVM/Clang

Filed under
Development

Open source enlightenment needed to end 'dark ages' of health IT

Filed under
OSS

Your article - "Whatever happened to Open Source in 2016?" highlights the brief vogue that open source recently enjoyed in the NHS – 2014-15 – and now seems to have lost. It raises some good questions and important issues, though I sense some broader perspective may be worth adding here.

It’s worth remembering that healthcare is a well-established science – the first medical school established in the 9th century. While information technology is still a young science – the first MSc in software engineering dates from 1979.

We know that the relatively risk averse culture of healthcare differs very significantly from the frenetic pace of innovation we see in the software world.

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Linux/FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS

Security News

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Security

10 Top Companies That Are Powered By Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linux is one of the most popular operating systems used for many companies, in this article you are going to find 10 companies that use Linux.

Read<br />
more

Ubuntu Budgie Devs Launch Wallpaper Contest for First Release as Official Flavor

Filed under
Ubuntu

In the good tradition of "wallpaper contests" organized for various Ubuntu flavors, the Ubuntu Budgie team is informing the Linux community about their Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) wallpaper contest.

If memory recalls, this is not their first rodeo, but it's the first wallpaper contest put together as official Ubuntu flavor. As usual, they are looking for talented artists and graphic designers who create the most fabulous and original images, and who would be proud to showcase their work in front of millions of Ubuntu users around the world.

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KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE releases Kirigami UI 2.0

    Soon after the initial release of Kirigami UI, KDE's framework for convergent (mobile and desktop) user interfaces, its main developer Marco Martin started porting it from Qt Quick Controls 1 to Qt Quick Controls 2, the next generation of Qt's ready-made standard controls for Qt Quick-based user interfaces. Since QQC 2 offers a much more extended range of controls than QQC 1, the port allowed the reduction of Kirigami's own code, while improving stability and performance. Kirigami 2 is kept as close to QQC 2's API as possible in order to extend it seamlessly.

  • KDE Kirigami UI 2.0 Released

    KDE developers are having a busy day with not only releasing the feature-packed Plasma 5.9 Beta but also publishing the KDE Kirigami UI 2.0.

  • Conf.kde.in 2017

    Carrying on the successful tradition of conf.kde.in since 2011, we are moving to the north-east region of India for this year's conf.kde.in. Join us for conf.kde.in 2017 on 10, 11, and 12 March at Guwahati in Assam, India. conf.kde.in 2017 will focus on the promoting Free and Open source including but not limited to Qt and KDE software.

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • New CloudLinux 7 Kernel Now in Beta, Disables Procfs Restricted Mode by Default

    CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is announcing today, January 12, 2017, the availability of a new kernel for the CloudLinux 7 series of enterprise-ready operating systems in the Beta channels.

    The updated CloudLinux 7 kernel, versioned 3.10.0-427.36.1.lve1.4.32, is now available from the company's "updates-testing" repository, and those brave enough to take it for a test drive to see if it fixes some issues that had with previous kernel version can use the command below to install it.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.42 LTS Updates USB Drivers, Improves ARM64 Support

    Only three days after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.4.41 LTS, renowned kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman is informing us today, January 12, 2017, about the immediate availability of the Linux 4.4.42 LTS kernel.

    If you're reading our reports on the latest Linux kernels, you should already be aware of the fact that Linux 4.4 is an LTS (Long Term Support) branch, used in various popular GNU/Linux distributions, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Arch Linux, and the security-oriented Alpine Linux. The new version, Linux kernel 4.4.42 LTS, it's pretty hefty and changes a total of 92 files, with 903 insertions and 410 deletions.

  • Linux Kernel 4.9.3 Rolls Out with Over 200 Changes, Lots of XFS Improvements

    You won't believe this, but Greg Kroah-Hartman announced today, January 12, 2017, the release of the third maintenance update to the Linux 4.9 kernel stable series, just three days after the release of Linux kernel 4.9.2.

    From the appended shortlog, it looks like there are a total of 201 files changed in this third point release of Linux kernel 4.9, with 1929 insertions and 945 deletions, so we can only think that all these patches were out for a while now, but they didn't make it into the mainline kernel because of the Christmas and New Year's holidays. However, they are more than welcome, and it's really great work.

  • Heterogeneous Memory Management Aims For Linux 4.11

    Jerome Glisse published his sixteenth version of the patches for implementing Heterogeneous Memory Management within the Linux kernel.

    For those unfamiliar with the impact or new possibilities opened up by HMM, it's further explained here. HMM will make it easier to write code targeting GPUs in a manner more similar to CPUs, can use malloc'ed memory transparently on all supported devices by allowing device memory to be used transparently inside any process and for mirroring a process address space on a different device.

  • It's Now Possible To Disable & Strip Down Intel's ME Blob

    Many free software advocates have been concerned by Intel's binary-only Management Engine (ME) built into the motherboards on newer generations of Intel motherboards. The good news is there is now a working, third-party approach for disabling the ME and reducing the risk of its binary blobs.

    Via an open-source, third-party tool called me_cleaner it's possible to partially deblob Intel's ME firmware images by removing any unnecessary partitions from the firmware, reducing its ability to interface with the system. The me_cleaner works not only with free software firmware images like Coreboot/Libreboot but can also work with factory-blobbed images. I was able to confirm with a Coreboot developer that this program can disable the ME on older boards or devices with BootGuard and disable Secure Boot. This is all done with a Python script.

  • X.Org Server 1.19 Gets First Point Release, Fixes XWayland and RandR Issues

    X.Org Foundation's Adam Jackson was happy to announce the other day the release of the first maintenance update to the X.Org Server 1.19 display server series for Linux-based operating systems.

    X.Org Server 1.19.0 launched almost two months ago, on the 15th of November 2016, and we still haven't seen a GNU/Linux distribution making the switch to the most advanced X.Org Server version to date, which brings many improvements for AMD Radeon (AMDGPU/Radeon) and Intel graphics cards.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Ultimate Edition 5.1 Final

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Welcome aboard Ultimate Edition 5.1, 2 Operating Systems released in a week, not to mention new software. A day of Vacation has paid off. Let’s do some math. 4.2 GB X 4,193 downloads in less then a week I believe is roughly 17610 Gigabytes of transfer, 17 Terabytes in 5 days, thanks Sourceforge once again. I look for Ultimate Edition 5.1 to fold that. No screenie, I am hoping to lessen their burden. This I did not know until today, I am the #1 downloaded KDE project on sourceforge. Did you know I hate KDE?

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Android Leftovers

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Android
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Phoronix Benchmarks

Leftovers: Software

  • Are you Struggling With Finding Text In Files Or Locating Files? Try 'Recoll' Program In Linux
    Recoll is a full text search QT based free, open source program especially made for Unix-like and Linux but it is also available for Windows and Mac systems, licensed under GPL. It provides efficient desktop full text search from single-word to arbitrarily complex boolean searches, basically it indexes the documents data (along with their compressed versions) and huge number of files then let you find quickly whatever you search for. Recoll updates its index at designed intervals (for example through Cron tasks) but if desired, the indexing task can run as a file-system monitoring daemon for real-time index updates.
  • New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape
    I hope this type of blog-post will shake the mindset a bit, and make developers more serious about compatibility. The users shouldn't be prompted with a dialog with jargon. The artwork or rendering shouldn't be broken. Inkscape should do the auto-conversion to keep the artwork as it was (especially because the software can). Isn't it the task of Inkscape to be able to read SVG? to properly read itself? I hope a version 0.92.x will happens and solve this serious bug [1] . For those who have been following my work for the last ten years, I like to promote the release of new Free/Libre and Open-Sources Software versions. It costs me a lot emotionally and in production-time to have to make this type of blog-post against a project I love. But what else can I do?
  • Ardour + Cinelerra + 4 Cams + Heavy Blues
  • Albert Quick Launcher 0.9.0 Released With External Extensions Support
    Albert is a quick launcher for Linux inspired by Alfred (Mac). It can be used to run applications, open files, search the web, open bookmarks in your web browser, calculate math expressions, and more.
  • MKVToolNix 9.8.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Support for DVB Subtitles
    Moritz Bunkus released today, January 22, 2017, a new stable release of his popular, multiplatform, and open-source MKV (Matroska) manipulation utility for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. There are bunch of exciting new features added in the new MKVToolNix 9.8.0 release, which comes three weeks after the previous version, namely MKVToolNix 9.7.1, but first we'd like to inform package maintainers about an important change in the build system as parallel builds are now enabled by default.
  • Libvirt 3.0 Released With Various Improvements
    The libvirt virtualization API saw a major 3.0 release this week to succeed its earlier v2.5 milestone.
  • 5 Highly Promising Terminal Emulators
    The terminal emulator is a venerable but essential tool for computer users. The reason why Linux offers so much power is due to the command line. The Linux shell can do so much, and this power can be accessed on the desktop by using a terminal emulator. There are so many available for Linux that the choice is bewildering.
  • What Spotify Takes Away, the Open-Source Community Brings Back…
    One of my favourite bands has just released a new album, which means I now have 11 new songs to learn the words to before I go see them play next!
  • Skype for Linux Alpha Video Call Support Begins ‘Rollout’

today's howtos

Wine Staging 2.0 RC6