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Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Moodle News Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 5:12am
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 4:29am
Story Servers/Networks Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 4:24am
Story In a world of free operating systems, can Windows 10 survive? Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 3:59am
Story Open source software free (but not the free you’re thinking of) Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 3:38am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 3:15am
Story Fedora News (Flatpak 0.6.11, Rust, RISC-V) Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 2:57am
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 2:54am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 2:48am
Story OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2016 - 2:41am

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Software Freedom Day and FOSS News

Filed under
OSS
  • Happy Software Freedom Day!

    And today is the 13th edition of Software Freedom Day! We wish you all a great day talking to people and discovering (or making them discovery) the benefits and joys of running Free Software. As usual we have a map where you can find all the events in your area. Should you just discover about SFD today and want to organize an event it is never too late. While the date is global, each team has the freedom to run the event at a date that is convenient in their area. We (in Cambodia) are running our event on November 26 due to university schedule, other conferences and religious holidays conflicting.

  • Canonical and Western Digital launch Ubuntu Linux 'Nextcloud Box' powered by Raspberry Pi

    Cloud storage is amazingly convenient. Unfortunately, the best part of the cloud can also be the worst. You see, having your files stored on someone else's severs and accessing them over the internet opens you to focused hacking, and potentially, incompetence by the cloud storage company too. As a way to have the best of both worlds, some folks will set up net-connected local storage so they can manage their own 'cloud'.

  • Run Your Own Private Ubuntu Cloud with the Nextcloud Box

    Most of us love using the cloud. It gives us on-the-go-access to our personal files, photos and documents, and helps keep our busy lives in sync.

    But loving the cloud doesn’t mean you have to love using a proprietary closed-off services like Dropbox, Google Drive or One Drive.

  • Cache in hand, Varnish cloud workload tuning goes one louder

    Content delivery firm Varnish Software has announced its Varnish Plus Cloud product — essentially, a full version of the Varnish Plus software suite that can be accessed via the AWS (Amazon Web Services) Marketplace.

  • Nexenta wins NetNordic open source storage contract

    NetNordic said it has recently chosen Nexenta to create a centralised storage repository for its customer base as well as for the company, as the operator and its customer base continue to grow. Nexenta provides open source-driven, software-defined storage, which offers extra data with compression turned on, a significant factor for NetNordic, said its operations engineer Sander Petersson.

  • Toyota, Open Source Robotics Foundation to partner on automated vehicle research
  • The scourge of LEDs everywhere: Readers speak out

    Open Source to the Rescue

    One solution to LED overload is going with open source technology.

    One Slashdot commenter going by the handle of guruevi uses OpenWrt: "You can reprogram any LED on your router for whatever purpose. Want them all on or off at the certain time of day or blink if it detected anomalous traffic."

    I also got email from Dave Taht, who happened to recently write a blog post titled "Blinkenlights: A debugging aid AND a curse" (with the subhed of "Too many LEDs! Give me back the stars!"). Taht is a busy guy as director of the Make Wi-Fi Fast project and co-founder of the Bufferbloat and CeroWrt projects, though took time out to share some LED disabling tips in his blog post.

    Taht, like many of those cited above, has made his share of manual fixes over the years, using electrical tape and just plan moving devices behind things. Only recently did he start monkeying with software to solve his problem.

  • On the importance of patient empowerment and open source: A Medicine X panel weighs in

    Speaker Karen Sadler, JD, heartedly agreed that developing open-source software for medical devices is critical. She is the executive director of Software Freedom Conservancy, a non-profit organization that develops, promotes and defends open-source software. Her life was changed when she was diagnosed with a life-threatening heart problem and implanted with a defibrillator. “I went from someone who thought open source was cool and useful to someone who thought great open-source software is essential for our society,” Sadler said.

  • Open Science Project Presents Brand New Approach for Malaria Drug Discovery
  • Unique open science project shows way for development of new antimalarial treatments
  • OICR Team Develops Open-Source Offline Base Caller for MinIon Nanopore Sequencer
  • Welcome to the age of the open-source executive

    Open-source code is no longer just for computers – it’s increasingly the code for how business gets done in a globally connected, always-on marketplace.

    Today’s marketing executive needs a skillset that is freely used, freely changed and freely shared by anyone. The modern marketer must understand return on investment like a chief financial officer, technology like a chief technology officer, product integration like a chief product officer, PR like a chief commercial officer, and bring it all together like a chief executive – all the while delivering compelling, seamless and delightful consumer experiences.

Microsoft and Apple

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • These Microsoft veterans are on their way out

    This year, a handful of Microsoft veteran employees are retiring and/or moving on. Over the past couple of weeks, here's who has left or is in the midst of leaving the company:

  • Microsoft fiddles results to show Edge is 'better' than Opera and Chrome

    THE DANCE-OFF over which browser has the best battery life goes on in a war that has turned some parts of the internet into an uninhabitable zone in the hours of darkness.

    Opera pwned everyone in its own tests, taking particular beef with Microsoft's Edge half-browser, but Google then came forward to show that version 53 of its Chrome browser pwned all the things.

    Microsoft has now re-run the tests and, not entirely surprisingly, claimed that Edge beats everything else.

    Microsoft conducted tests against its three biggest rivals, and said that Edge, when used with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, uses 24 per cent less power than Chrome, 32 per cent less than Opera and 43 per cent less than Firefox.

    Edge managed 527 minutes of video playback against 429 for Opera, 365 for Chrome and 312 for Firefox, according to Microsoft.

    However, closer inspection reveals that Microsoft used Chrome 51 (not 53), Opera 38 (not 39) and Firefox 36 (not 38).

    In other words, Microsoft's methodology has been tainted by pitting the latest version of Edge against earlier versions of other browsers.

  • Microsoft Corporation Is Giving Up on Fitness Bands [Ed: The number of dead products at Microsoft keeps increasing]

    According to ZDNet, all signs indicate that the Microsoft Band 2 will be the final product of the software giant's foray into smart fitness trackers. The original Microsoft Band from 2014 was poorly received by the market, as was the follow-up successor, even though it was redesigned and improved in many ways. Band 2 even got a price bump and launched at $250, which didn't help its chances. The company has since reduced the price to $175, presumably in an effort to clear out inventory.

  • Microsoft Corporation: Microsoft and Tuxera strengthen partnership through Tuxera SMB Server[Ed: helping Microsoft's patent fight against Linux and the GPL]
  • Microsoft Azure borkage in central US leads to global woes

    At its height, the fault affected API management, web apps, Service Bus and SQL database services in the central US region, and Azure DNS globally.

    Microsoft's Azure status page has just now reported that SQL database is still affected in the central US region.

    As is often the case, however, customers noticed confusion with Microsoft's messages, as Azure Twitter feeds and status pages seemed to disagree on the speed of recovery.

  • [Reposted] FSF, RMS Issue Statements Over Libreboot's Accusations [Ed: There are a lot of examples of sexism, homophobia and other abuse inside Microsoft and Apple but unlike FOSS communities they hide it. Here are examples of Microsoft sexism [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] and Microsoft homophobia [1, 2, 3]
  • Leaked Apple emails reveal employees' complaints about sexist, toxic work environment [Ed: apropos the above and new report, too]

    Danielle* didn't expect her workday to begin with her male coworkers publicly joking about rape.

    Danielle is an engineer at Apple — and like many of the women in the company, she works on a male-dominated team. On a Tuesday morning in July, when men on her team began to joke that an office intruder was coming to rape everybody, Danielle decided to speak out about what she described as the "very toxic atmosphere" created by jokes about violent sexual assault.

    The coworker who first made the joke apologized, repeatedly assuring her that something like this wouldn't happen again. But his assurances did little to instill confidence. This wasn't the first time Danielle had allegedly seen something like this happen on her team, nor was it the first time she complained that the office culture at Apple was, in her words, toxic. Despite repeated formal complaints to her manager, Danielle said, nothing ever changed.

    But this rape joke was the final straw. The next day, Danielle escalated her complaint about the offense to the very top: Apple CEO Tim Cook.

  • After 23 years, the Apple II gets another OS update

    You can test-drive ProDOS 2.4 in a Web-based emulator set up by computer historian Jason Scott on the Internet Archive. The release includes Bitsy Bye, a menu-driven program launcher that allows for navigation through files on multiple floppy (or hacked USB) drives. Bitsy Bye is an example of highly efficient code: it runs in less than 1 kilobyte of RAM. There's also a boot utility that is under 400 bytes—taking up a single block of storage on a disk.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • GitHub gets all grown-up with better code review, project management, etc

    The GitHub Universe event has kicked off in San Francisco, with a number of new GitHub features announced by CEO Chris Wanstrath.

    GitHub's main product is a collaborative source code repository, which you can use on the public cloud or in your own private deployment. There are now over 19 million open source projects hosted on GitHub, with 5.8 million active users.

    The focus of today's announcements is on project management and workflow. A new Project dashboard lets you create cards from pull requests, issues or notes, and organize them into groups such as Backlog, In Progress, and Ready.

  • JDK 9 release delayed another four months

    Oracle's asking for more time to complete JDK 9.

    The chief architect of Oracle's Java Platform Group, Mark Reinhold, took to the Java developer's mailing list to say that while work on JDK 9 is coming along nicely “We are not, unfortunately, where we need to be relative to the current schedule.”

    The hard part of JDK 9 is “Project Jigsaw”, an effort to “design and implement a standard module system for the Java SE Platform, and to apply that system to the Platform itself and to the JDK.” Reinhold says “it's clear that Jigsaw needs more time.”

  • Pass the 'Milk' to make code run four times faster, say MIT boffins

    MIT boffins have created a new programming language called “Milk” that they say runs code four times faster than rivals.

    Professor Saman Amarasinghe says the language's secret is that changes the way cores collect and cache data.

    Today, he says, cores will fetch whole blocks of data from memory. That's not efficient when working on tasks like big data, when only some of a block's content is needed by an application that may want to work on only a few items across very large data set.

  • Node.js: Building Better Technology and a More Diverse Community
  • Open Source Mobile Dev Tool Onsen UI Breaks Free from AngularJS Dependency

    Monaca today announced Onsen UI 2.0, a UI framework and tools for building HTML5-based native mobile apps, is now JavaScript framework-agnostic, having broken from its AngularJS dependency roots.

    The open source Onsen UI is itself based on the popular open source Apache Cordova/PhoneGap projects, which facilitate creating native iOS and Android apps with one codebase based on technologies usually used for Web development: HTML5, JavaScript and CSS.

  • The Python Packaging Ecosystem

    There have been a few recent articles reflecting on the current status of the Python packaging ecosystem from an end user perspective, so it seems worthwhile for me to write-up my perspective as one of the lead architects for that ecosystem on how I characterise the overall problem space of software publication and distribution, where I think we are at the moment, and where I'd like to see us go in the future.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • 20 Questions Security Leaders Need To Ask About Analytics

    It would be an understatement to say that the security world tends to be full of hype and noise. At times, it seems like vendors virtually xerox each other’s marketing materials. Everyone uses the same words, phrases, jargon, and buzzwords. This is a complicated phenomenon and there are many reasons why this is the case.

    The more important issue is why security leaders find ourselves in this state. How can we make sense of all the noise, cut through all the hype, and make the informed decisions that will improve the security of our respective organizations? One answer is by making precise, targeted, and incisive inquiries at the outset. Let’s start with a game of 20 questions. Our first technology focus: analytics.

  • Trend Micro shows that Linux systems not so bulletproof against trojans [Ed: very low risk (must fool the user or gain physical access)]
  • Sixth Linux DDoS Trojan Discovered in the Last 30 Days [Ed: drama over something that must fool users]

    Linux users have yet another trojan to worry about, and as always, crooks are deploying it mostly to hijack devices running Linux-based operating systems and use them to launch DDoS attacks at their behest.

  • Yet Another Linux Trojan Uncovered
  • Secure Docker on Linux or Windows platforms

    With Docker appearing in businesses of all shapes and sizes, security is a concern for many IT admins. Here's how to secure Docker on the container or the host machine.

  • New release: usbguard-0.6.1
  • Ransomware Getting More Targeted, Expensive

    I shared a meal not long ago with a source who works at a financial services company. The subject of ransomware came up and he told me that a server in his company had recently been infected with a particularly nasty strain that spread to several systems before the outbreak was quarantined. He said the folks in finance didn’t bat an eyelash when asked to authorize several payments of $600 to satisfy the Bitcoin ransom demanded by the intruders: After all, my source confessed, the data on one of the infected systems was worth millions — possibly tens of millions — of dollars, but for whatever reason the company didn’t have backups of it.

  • Web security CEO warns about control of internet falling into few hands

    The internet was designed to be a massive, decentralized system that nobody controlled, but it is increasingly controlled by a select few tech companies, including Google, Facebook, Apple and Amazon, and they are continuing to consolidate power, said the CEO of a cybersecurity company.

    "More and more of the internet is sitting behind fewer and fewer players, and there are benefits of that, but there are also real risks," said Matthew Prince, chief executive officer of web security company CloudFlare, in an interview with CNBC. His comments came at CloudFlare's Internet Summit — a conference featuring tech executives and government security experts — on Tuesday in San Francisco.

    Facebook has faced a lot of criticism for perceived abuse of its editorial sway among the 1.7 billion monthly active users who visit the site to consume news alongside family photos and ads. For example, a Norwegian newspaper editor recently slammed Mark Zuckerberg for Facebook's removal of a post featuring an iconic image known as the Napalm Girl that included a naked girl running from napalm bombs.

Updated Debian 8: 8.6 released

Filed under
Debian

The Debian project is pleased to announce the sixth update of its stable distribution Debian 8 (codename "jessie"). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories were already published separately and are referenced where available.

Please note that this update does not constitute a new version of Debian 8 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old "jessie" CDs or DVDs but only to update via an up-to-date Debian mirror after an installation, to cause any out of date packages to be updated.

Read more

FSF Says Firing Wasn’t Discrimatory

Filed under
GNU

Friday afternoon after we published our report, Richard Stallman, founder and president of FSF, posted a brief, unofficial statement in an email to the thread around Rowe’s email. “The dismissal of the staff person was not because of her gender,” he said. “Her gender now is the same as it was when we hired her. It was not an issue then, and it is not an issue now.”

Read more

Also: FSF, RMS Issue Statements Over Libreboot's Accusations

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Builder Nightly Flatpak

    For a while now, you’ve been able to get Builder from the gnome-apps-nightly Flatpak repository. Until now, it had a few things that made it difficult to use. We care a whole lot about making our tooling available via Flatpak because it is going to allow us to get new code into users hands quicker, safer, and more stable.

    So over the last couple of weeks I’ve dug in and really started polishing things up. A few patches in Flatpak, a few patches in Builder, and a few patches in Sysprof start getting us towards something refreshing.

  • Endless and LAS GNOME

    Next Monday I am speaking at the Libre Application Summit GNOME in Portland about how we’re managing and delivering the applications to our Endless OS’s users. I am also very curious to check out the city of Portland as everybody tells me good things about it.

  • No Public Transit Routing in GNOME Maps App for GNOME 3.22 Desktop

Putting Linux on your Chromebook is easier than you think (and totally worth it!)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

If you need to use those productivity programs that Chrome OS just doesn't offer, or you just want to try something new, Linux on your Chromebook has you covered.

You've may have seen chatter on the internet about installing Linux on your Chromebook. Plenty of longtime Chrome OS users are doing it, and it allows the use of programs like GIMP (a Photoshop replacement), or Darktable, (a Lightroom alternative) as well as plenty of programs for video and audio editing. It's a way to use your Chromebook for the few power-user features you might need. It's also completely free and easier than you think.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Elizabeth Joseph Talking Open Source Careers in Oman

    Sometimes we wonder how Ms. Joseph finds the time to balance her career at HP with writing, evangelizing Ubuntu and public speaking, along with an active life in the city by the bay. That she is an inspiration to open sourcers everywhere can be seen in this video.

  • Canonical and Western Digital launch Ubuntu Linux 'Nextcloud Box' powered by Raspberry Pi

    Cloud storage is amazingly convenient. Unfortunately, the best part of the cloud can also be the worst. You see, having your files stored on someone else's severs and accessing them over the internet opens you to focused hacking, and potentially, incompetence by the cloud storage company too. As a way to have the best of both worlds, some folks will set up net-connected local storage so they can manage their own 'cloud'.

  • Canonical & Nextcloud Roll Out An Ubuntu-Powered Nextcloud 10 Box

    The embargo expired this morning on the Nextcloud Box, a device from the cooperation of Canonical, Nextcloud, and WDLabs for making it easy to deploy your own Ubuntu-powered personal cloud.

  • HPE sells Vertica analytics, thanks to the growth of open source software

    HPE is paring down its software holdings, including analytical software in the Vertica line. A sale to Micro Focus is due to close next year.

  • Mirantis, a startup driving VMware and Red Hat crazy, just bought a 30-person startup for $30 million

    Cloud computing has vastly changed the $3 trillion enterprise computer industry and one of the most interesting technologies at the center of this trend is called OpenStack.

    And one of the critical (and oddest) companies at the center of OpenStack is Mirantis.

    On Thursday, Mirantis announced that it bought a startup in Prague called TCP Cloud.

  • Mirantis Doubles Down on Kubernetes, Cloud Management with Acquisition

    Mirantis, focused on OpenStack, announced an initiative in February of last year that would integrate Kubernetes with OpenStack, letting developers deploy containers on OpenStack in what the company claimed took only minutes. Since then, Kubernetes' star has risen and containers are all the rage.

    Against that backdrop, Mirantis has announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire TCP Cloud. Headquartered in Prague, Czech Republic, TCP Cloud employs 30 people and specializes in managed services for OpenStack, OpenContrail and Kubernetes. The acquisition will support Mirantis’ initiative with Google and Intel to enable OpenStack on Kubernetes by equipping Mirantis to continuously deliver OpenStack to customer datacenters. According to Mirantis, the combined entity will solve the problem of upgrades, which is one of the primary burdens of on-premises infrastructure.

    "The model for delivering infrastructure employed by traditional vendors is fundamentally misaligned with modern software development patterns. Disruptors of the digital era push new code to production multiple times a day, while traditional enterprise vendors ship infrastructure as packaged software once every few years and require forklift upgrades,” said Alex Freedland, Mirantis CEO. “Mirantis empowers enterprises to embrace the new, continuously delivered infrastructure model on their terms. TCP Cloud’s technology and expertise helps us accelerate that vision."

  • Proposal Calls for Moving NetBeans Stewardship from Oracle to Apache
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: September 16th
  • denemo Version 2.0.12 is out.
  • Libreboot Leaves GNU Claiming Gender Identity Discrimination by FSF

    A disturbing story broke this morning concerning the sudden action by the Libreboot project to leave the GNU project. I started to write “potentially disturbing,” until it occurred to me that no matter how this plays out, the news is disturbing.

  • LEOS – drafting legislative texts made easy

    While LEOS has been developed to support the drafting of legislation by the European Commission services (i.e. proposals for directives, regulations and autonomous acts), public administrations can download and adapt the code to meet their own specific requirements. The code is available under the free European Union Public Licence (EUPL).

  • Raspberry Pi sells 10 million units, Open Library Foundation established, and more open source news
  • Open-source research mechanism could lead to discovery of new, cheap medicines for malaria

    Malaria is one of the leading causes of mortality in developing countries – last year killing more than 400,000 people. Researchers worldwide have found the solution for drug discovery could lie in open, “crowd-sourced” science.

  • UK researchers release open source RMADS code for Matlab to help users find best 3D printing solution

    Now that the dust from the desktop 3D printing explosion has settled, one thing has become clear: desktop 3D printing is fantastic, but DIY part design comes with a huge learning curve. Even experienced users regularly run into design challenges and issues surrounding materials and costs. But there is a solution. British researchers from Newcastle University have just shared their own open source RMADS code for Matlab, which consists of a detailed 3D printing advice system that helps users find the best and most cost-effective 3D printing solution.

Fedora 24 Funage, Smoooth Mageia 5, Tumblin' Tumbleweed

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news, Red Hat formally announced their 2017 expansion plans into Boston. Elsewhere, Dedoimedo posted another guide, this time how to make Fedora 24 useful and fun. After a rough start, Michael Huff found Mageia 5 to be "smart, eager and full of potential" and Dimstar has this week's Tumbleweed update.

Read more

Also about Fedora:

  • Sneak into…

    the current stage of the Fedora 25 Supplemental Wallpaper.. Start of this month I openend the submission phase for the Fedora Supplemental Wallpaper. So far we have received 91 submissions and currently 72 of them are approved. So far 49 contributors earned a badge for their submission. But there is still time until 11. October left to contribute a wallpaper.

  • Event Report: Fedora Women Day 2016, Kolkata

    A two-day workshop on women in free software and Fedora Women Day were held on the 15th and 16th of July 2016 at the Netaji Subhash Engineering College in Kolkata, India. This event was jointly organized by Ubuntu Women Project, Fedora Project, and the university. It was substantially sponsored by Ubuntu Women Project. The goal of the workshop was also to get new participants interested, improve the level of participation by women, and explore new avenues of free software community development. Given the factors involved, the Workshop on Women in Free Software / Fedora Women Day 2016 (shortened to WWFS-FWD’2016) was a successful one.

  • Fedora 24 - From 0 to Fun in 10 minutes

    Ladies and gentlemen, it's pimping time. We shall now transform a tame Fedora installation that is not designed for mass consumption into a beautiful and majestic fun box. This means adding codecs and pretty stuff and extra software that people crave. We shall do this quickly and easily, and I will be your shepherd.

    Recently, I've discovered or rather rekindled my passion for all things Red Hat and Gnome, and Fedora has joined the list, after a long season of dreadful releases. It works well, it's fun and stable and fast, and all it's missing is some flavor and spice.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Tizen News

Filed under
Linux
  • Samsung is offering Guarantee against Display Burn-in on its 2016 SUHD Tvs

    Samsung Electronics has now announced that it is providing a lifetime guarantee against screen burn-in, covering all of its 2016 Tizen-powered SUHD Quantum Dot TVs. Though with the high level of technology the Koren giant infused on the 2016 models it is very unlikely for Burn-in to occur on the smart TVs. But if peradventure it does occur, Samsung has said it will replace the smart TV for free.

  • Gear S2 Classic 3G gets a new firmware update in the US
  • Game: Cublast available for the Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3.

    Cublast was initially avaialble for the Android and Windows platforms and has now made its way to the Tizen Platform. This is an arcade style game that promises a lot of fun, which is called a “all new agility game” for your smartphone! We have Touch and tilt controls, multiple challenging stages, mind blowing puzzles, and the ability publish your high score online whilst battling against the clock !

Security News

Filed under
Security

More Microsoft EEE and Layoffs

Filed under
Microsoft

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • GitHub's new features aim for business and open-source users

    GitHub, the popular code repository service, has to serve two masters. It's well-known for hosting popular open-source projects, but it's also working to acquire more large and small business users to privately store and manage their proprietary code.

    Those different constituencies sometimes need different things. But Chris Wansrath, the company's co-founder and CEO, told the company's annual user conference this week that building new features into GitHub isn't a matter of helping only one or the other.

  • PHP version 5.6.26 and 7.0.11
  • anytime 0.0.2: Added functionality

    anytime arrived on CRAN via release 0.0.1 a good two days ago. anytime aims to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, ... format to POSIXct (or Date) objects.

Hands-on with the Orange Pi One quad-core Linux SBC

Filed under
Linux

In this brief hands-on review, Ben Martin takes the low cost, quad-core Orange Pi One hacker SBC for a spin, and benchmarks the board’s performance.

The Orange Pi single board computer series lets you run a small Linux machine dedicated to a specific task for a very attractive price — less than $20 for a complete setup. Some ideas for using an Orange Pi include adding network connectivity to an older printer, transcoding a USB webcam and sending it over the network, or just connecting some hardware to the 40 pins and being able to interface to chips faster than a microcontroller could.

Read more

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