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Sunday, 22 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story You Can Now Create Your Own Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Live System with Pinguy Builder Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 7:48pm
Story P-State/CPUFreq CPU Frequency Scaling Tests For Radeon/NVIDIA Gaming With Linux 4.16 Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 7:46pm
Story A look at Mixxx in GNU/Linux Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 7:42pm
Story Google’s updated AIY Vision and Voice kits ship with Raspberry Pi Zero WH Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 7:40pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 4:34pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 4:10pm
Story Events: Red Hat, Curl, and LF's Open Source Summit North America Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 4:09pm
Story Kernel and LF: Linux 5, FOSSology Turns 10, Xen Project Interview Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 4:05pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 3:59pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 3:57pm

3 password managers for the Linux command line

Filed under
Linux

We all want our passwords to be safe and secure. To do that, many people turn to password management applications like KeePassX or Bitwarden.

If you spend a lot of time in a terminal window and are looking for a simpler solution, you'll want to check out one of the many password managers for the Linux command line. They're quick, easy to use, and secure.

Read more

Google's not-Linux OS documentation cracks box open at last

Filed under
OS
Linux
Google

Google has published details of its "Fuchsia" operating system.

The last time we updated readers on the OS it needed fair amount of work to get going.

Now, Google has decided it's time it gave the world something more informative than a bunch of Git-managed open-source code, and this week published what it calls The Book: a programmer-oriented guide to interacting with Fuchsia (which, The Book emphasized, is Not Linux).

Read more

Mozilla Leftovers: Data Collection, Containers, WebAssembly Studio

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 36
  • Data Collection at Mozilla: Browser Errors

    The first step was to find out how many errors we’d be collecting. One tool at our disposal at Mozilla is Shield, which lets us run small studies at targeted subsets of users. In this case, I wanted to collect data on how many errors were being logged on the Nightly channel.

  • Use Firefox Focus to keep Facebook contained on your mobile device

    Most of us signed up for Facebook to keep in touch with friends and family. We didn’t sign up to share our personal information with mysterious third-party organizations. That’s why we created the Facebook Container, which lets you use Facebook on your desktop or laptop without sharing personal info with third parties outside of Facebook. Firefox Focus for iOS and Android can give you similar privacy protection when you’re using Facebook on the go. Here’s how it works.

  • Sneak Peek at WebAssembly Studio

    WebAssembly.Studio is an online IDE (integrated development environment) that helps you learn and teach others about WebAssembly. It’s also a Swiss Army knife that comes in handy whenever working with WebAssembly.

    

    We started working on WebAssembly Studio in late December 2017, in an attempt to merge two existing tools that we had developed: WasmExplorer and WasmFiddle. Since then, thanks to several contributors who jumped into the project early, we’ve made quite a bit of progress. We’ve merged those two tools and added several new features. Our beta (more like an alpha) release is now live at https://webassembly.studio and we are very interested in your feedback.

Changing Healthcare with Blockchain Technology

Filed under
Server
OSS

He also emphasized that open source efforts, such as The Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger Project, are driving blockchain forward and are essential. He said that openness ensures scalability, accessibility, resiliency, and innovation. “Participating in The Hyperledger Project has made a lot of sense for us,” Symanski noted. “It protects protocol governance, node management, consensus mechanisms, and more and these are all very important in the healthcare industry.”

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Video: See What's New in Ubuntu 18.04 Beta Preview. Is it Worth the Hype?

Filed under
Reviews

Ubuntu 18.04 Beta has been released ahead of the final release on 26th April. I took it for a test ride and created a video of the main new features in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

Read more

Also (Video): EzeeLinux Show 18.15 | GNU Midnight Commander

Debian Leftovers

Filed under
Debian

Software: Feed Readers, Kiwi TCMS, Laverna, Tig, Flash Player and More

Filed under
Software
  • 5 Best Feed Reader Apps for Linux

    RSS feeds were once most widely used, to collect news and articles from different sources at one place. It is often perceived that RSS usage is in decline. However, there are still people (like me) who believe in opening an application that accumulates all the website’s articles at one place, which they can read later even when they are not connected to the internet.

    Feed Readers makes it easier by collecting all the published items on a website for anytime access. You don’t need to open several browser tabs to go to your favorite websites, and bookmarking the one you liked.

    In this article, I’ll share some of my favorite feed reader applications for Linux desktop.

  • Kiwi TCMS 4.1.4

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 4.1.4! This is a bug-fix and enhancement update which upgrades to the latest Django version, resolves several issues and includes lots of internal code updates.

  • Laverna – A Cross-Platform Privacy-Focused Note Taking App

    FossMint has a number of Markdown note-taking app articles under its belt and it is with pleasure that we bring you another fantastic one, Laverna.

    Laverna is a modern open source Markdown editor with a sleek UI and a focus on user privacy. It is written in JavaScript to provide users with a speedy enough performance to stand in as an Evernote alternative.

    With Laverna, you can take notes and create to-do lists, both of which you can organize using notebooks. During editing, you can decide to work in normal, preview, or distraction – free mode.

  • Tig – A Command Line Browser for Git Repositories
  • What’s A Suitable Flash Player Alternative To Adobe Flash Player

    More people are willing to break away from Adobe Flash Player – perhaps because it won’t be long before support for it will end. While many are making a move from Flash, Adobe is still offering releases for it such as the Flash Player 24 branch. Of course, with numerous threats plaguing the player, people wonder if they are any viable options available.

  • New PELUX 1.0 Automotive Software Leverages Open Source Technologies
  • Epiq Solutions Unveils Highly Integrated RF + Linux® Module to Simplify Wireless Product Development Cycle
  • DOSBox Part 1: Introduction, Startup Scripts and The Keymapper

    This guide provides the necessary skills that will be used in each successive guide. The main focus of this series is to provide practical examples and tutorials for achieving certain tasks using DOSBox. Later tutorials will cover handling floppy disk images and booting from them, same with hard drive images, running Windows 3.11, and other advanced tasks.

  • Capsule8 Launches Zero-Day Threat Detection Platform for Linux [Ed: Capsule8 seems to be proprietary and nothing that is secret code should be trusted anywhere near secure systems]

    Security startup Capsule8 officially launched the 1.0 release of its zero-day threat detection platform on April 11, after more than a year of active development.

    Capsule8 1.0 is intended to help secure both container as well as non-container based Linux workloads from unknown zero-day threats. Among the risks that Capsule8 aims to help mitigate are side-channel memory attacks, like the recently disclosed Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities.

  • Introducing Snallygaster - a Tool to Scan for Secrets on Web Servers

    A few days ago I figured out that several blogs operated by T-Mobile Austria had a Git repository exposed which included their wordpress configuration file. Due to the fact that a phpMyAdmin installation was also accessible this would have allowed me to change or delete their database and subsequently take over their blogs.

Krita 4.0.1 Released

Filed under
KDE

Today the Krita team releases Krita 4.0.1, a bug fix release of Krita 4.0.0. We fixed more than fifty bugs since the Krita 4.0.0 release! See below for the full list of fixed isses. Translations work again with the appimage and the macOS build.

Read more

Falkon browser - Fly babe fly

Filed under
KDE
Software
Reviews
Web

Falkon and QupZilla may be the same product, but just re-branding it has already improved the overall impression. Not by a huge margin, but enough to make it interesting. Once you start using it, you do realize that it's a mix of good and odd, much like the predecessor, with some really brilliant and dubious choices packaged together. Adblocking, session manager versus fuzzy interface, missing spellcheck and database plaintext thingie. Then, the behavior is nowhere near as stellar, lithe or fast as it should be.

Still, this has been my most successful QupZilla-ed experience so far. Falkon was stable, it did not crash, there were no errors, and overall, it worked well. But the sense of unease remains. I can't put my finger to it, but there's just something slightly out of place with it. Not sure what it is. But whatever it is, it's probably the reason why there hasn't been that much uptake with this native KDE Internet-giving program. Once that part is sorted out, Plasma may have a nice and friendly browser. Worth testing, and try not to be dissuaded by the oddness.

Read more

Awesome GNOME extensions for developers

Filed under
GNOME

Extensions add immense flexibility to the GNOME 3 desktop environment. They give users the advantage of customizing their desktop while adding ease and efficiency to their workflow. The Fedora Magazine has already covered some great desktop extensions such as EasyScreenCast, gTile, and OpenWeather. This article continues that coverage by focusing on extensions tailored for developers.

If you need assistance installing GNOME extensions, refer to the article How to install a GNOME Shell extension.

Read more

Also: Free software desktops to 2020 & beyond

Python Distribution

Filed under
Development
  • Anaconda, CPython, PyPy, and more: Know your Python distributions

    When you choose Python for software development, you choose a large language ecosystem with a wealth of packages covering all manner of programming needs. But in addition to libraries for everything from GUI development to machine learning, you can also choose from a number of Python runtimes—and some of these runtimes may be better suited to the use case you have at hand than others.

    Here is a brief tour of the most commonly used Python distributions, from the standard implementation (CPython) to versions optimized for speed (PyPy), for special use cases (Anaconda, ActivePython), or for runtimes originally designed for entirely different languages (Jython, IronPython).

  • Fedora and Python 2

    It has been known for quite some time that Python 2 will reach its end of life in 2020—after being extended by five years from its original 2015 expiry. After that, there will be no support, bug fixes, or security patches for Python 2, at least from the Python Software Foundation and the core developers. Some distributions will need to continue to support the final Python 2 release, however, since their support windows extend past that date; the enterprise and long-term support distributions will likely be supporting it well into the 2020s and possibly beyond. But even shorter-support-cycle distributions need to consider their plan for a sweeping change of this sort—in less than two years.

Neptune 5.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

We are proud to announce version 5.1 of Neptune .

This update represents the current state of Neptune 5 and renews the ISO file so if you install Neptune you don't have to download tons of Updates.

The Calamares Installer now handles also installing hyphentation, thesaurus and spellecheck for the choosen localization.

Main changes in this version are the update of Plasma to version 5.12.4 and KDE Frameworks to version 5.44. Besides that we also updated our default icon theme to include some new icons and Plasma Discover got some minor fixes and a slightly improved UI now featuring a refresh button in the Update dialog.

Knetworkmounter should work like usual again and Enlightenment fans should be able to install their beloved desktop in version 0.22.

Read more

Kernel: "​Linux is Under Your Hood" and LWN's Latest Kernel Coverage (Paywall Expired)

Filed under
Linux
  • ​Linux is under your hood

    Much of that work is done via the Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). This Linux Foundation-based organization is a who's who of Linux-friendly car manufacturers. Its membership includes Ford, Honda, Mazda, Nissan, Mercedes, Suzuki, and the world's largest automobile company: Toyota.

    "Automakers are becoming software companies, and just like in the tech industry, they are realizing that open source is the way forward," said Dan Cauchy, AGL's executive director, in a statement. Car companies know that while horsepower still sells, customers also want smart infotainment systems, automated safe drive features, and, eventually, self-driving cars.

    I have two young grandsons. I seriously wonder if they'll learn to drive. Just like many people who no longer know how to drive a stick-shift, I can see people in the next 20 years never bothering with driving classes.

  • wait_var_event()

    One of the trickiest aspects to concurrency in the kernel is waiting for a specific event to take place. There is a wide variety of possible events, including a process exiting, the last reference to a data structure going away, a device completing an operation, or a timeout occurring. Waiting is surprisingly hard to get right — race conditions abound to trap the unwary — so the kernel has accumulated a large set of wait_event_*() macros to make the task easier. An attempt to add a new one, though, has led to the generalization of specific types of waits for 4.17.

  • An audit container ID proposal

    The kernel development community has consistently resisted adding any formal notion of what a "container" is to the kernel. While the needed building blocks (namespaces, control groups, etc.) are provided, it is up to user space to assemble the pieces into the sort of container implementation it needs. This approach maximizes flexibility and makes it possible to implement a number of different container abstractions, but it also can make it hard to associate events in the kernel with the container that caused them. Audit container IDs are an attempt to fix that problem for one specific use case; they have not been universally well received in the past, but work on this mechanism continues regardless.

    The audit container ID mechanism was first proposed (without an implementation) in late 2017; see this article for a summary of the discussion at that time. The idea was to attach a user-space-defined ID to all of the processes within a container; that ID would then appear in any events emitted by the audit subsystem. Thus, for example, if the auditing code logs an attempt to open a file, monitoring code in user space would be able to use the container ID in the audit event to find the container from which the attempt originated.

  • Kernel lockdown in 4.17? [Ed: Giving Microsoft the keys to Linux]

    The UEFI secure boot mechanism is intended to protect the system against persistent malware threats — unpleasant bits of software attached to the operating system or bootloader that will survive a reboot. While Linux has supported secure boot for some time, proponents have long said that this support is incomplete in that it is still possible for the root user to corrupt the system in a number of ways. Patches that attempt to close this hole have been circulating for years, but they have been controversial at best. This story may finally come to a close, though, if Linus Torvalds accepts the "kernel lockdown" patch series during the 4.17 merge window.

    In theory, the secure-boot chain of trust ensures that the system will never run untrusted code in kernel mode. On current Linux systems, though, the root user (or any other user with sufficient capabilities) can do exactly that. For anybody who wants to use secure boot to ensure the integrity of their systems (or, perhaps, to prevent their customers from truly owning the system), this hole defeats the purpose of the whole exercise. Various kernel lockdown patches have been proposed over the years (LWN first covered them in 2012), but these patches have run into two types of criticism: (1) restricting what root can do goes against the design of Unix-like systems, and (2) locking down the system in this way still does not solve the problem.

A look at terminal emulators, part 1

Filed under
Linux
Software

In the face of the rising ubiquity of graphical interfaces. Terminal emulators have replaced hardware terminals, which themselves were upgrades from punched cards and toggle-switch inputs. Modern distributions now ship with a surprising variety of terminal emulators. While some people may be happy with the default terminal provided by their desktop environment, others take great pride at using exotic software for running their favorite shell or text editor. But as we'll see in this two-part series, not all terminals are created equal: they vary wildly in terms of functionality, size, and performance.

Some terminals have surprising security vulnerabilities and most have wildly different feature sets, from support for a tabbed interface to scripting. While we have covered terminal emulators in the distant past, this article provides a refresh to help readers determine which terminal they should be running in 2018. This first article compares features, while the second part evaluates performance.

Read more

Free Software at LibrePlanet

Filed under
GNU
  • Making institutional free software successful

    Many large institutions, especially government agencies, would like to distribute their software—including the software of the vendors with whom they contract—as free software. They have a variety of reasons, ranging from the hope that opening the code will boost its use, all the way to a mature understanding of the importance of community, transparency, and freedom. There are special steps institutions can take to help ensure success, some stemming from best practices performed by many free-software projects and others specific to large organizations. At the 2018 LibrePlanet conference, Cecilia Donnelly laid out nine principles for the successful creation and maintenance of a software project under these circumstances.

  • Benjamin Mako Hill: Free software and the shifting landscape of online cooperation
  • Free software forever

    As free software activists, do we focus on our own project-based communities or should we be looking outside? If free software is to succeed (forever!) I believe we need to do both. Maintaining our ideals as we take free software to new places, introduce it to new people, and bend it to new purposes depends on our willingness to grow both individually and collectively. Change is never simple so I hope that we will be gentle with each other as we try new things and work to build an even bigger movement.

Replicate your custom Linux settings with DistroTweaks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
HowTos

Currently, there are more than 300 different Linux operating system distributions available. Each distro serves a slightly different purpose with slightly different bundles of programs for different communities of users.

Even though there are hundreds of different versions of Linux, it hasn't been very easy for individual customizers to share them with the community. DistroTweaks, a process that allows users to customize and share Linux, is a better option than what's come before.

A DistroTweak is a process that allows anyone to quickly and easily add dozens of customizations and programs to an existing Linux distro with just the click of a button. It replaces the tedious process of making changes and manually (and individually) adding dozens of programs. The term "tweak" is a nod to what computer enthusiasts call a slight modification of an operating system or application. A tweak generally doesn't change the core of the operating system or program; it merely adds to it.

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Games: For The King and More

Filed under
Gaming

The best way to build with Yocto Project and BitBake

Filed under
Linux

At the Embedded Linux Conference, Intel’s Stephano Cetola offered tips and tricks for getting the most of Yocto Project and its BitBake build system, from using layers and SSTATE cache to exploring package feeds and BitBake scripts.

Despite its widespread and growing adoption, the Yocto Project is one of the more misunderstood of Linux technologies. It’s not a distribution but rather a collection of open source templates, tools, and methods for creating custom embedded Linux-based systems. Yocto Project contributor and Intel Embedded Software Engineer Stephano Cetola explained more about Yocto in his talk at the recent Embedded Linux Conference in Portland.

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More in Tux Machines

Collaboration Events: Pakistan Open Source Summit, GNOME+Rust Hackfest, DataworksSummit Berlin

  • Pakistan Open Source Summit 2018 concludes [Ed: Not about software]
    A large number of attendees from industry, academia, government, and students participated in the summit. Portuguese Ambassador to Pakistan Dr Joao Sabido Costa was the chief guest at the opening ceremony while former Naval Chief Admiral (r) Asif Sandila graced the occasion as the chief guest at the closing ceremony.
  • ‘Open Summit key to create industry-academy linkages’
    Ambassador of Portugal to Pakistan Dr Joao Sabido Costa has said that events such as the Open Source Summit are excellent for spreading awareness and for creating industry-academia linkages and enhancement of the information technology. He stated this while addressing a concluding ceremony of the two-day informative ‘Pakistan Open Source Summit 2018’ attended by large number of people from industry, academia, government and students. Former naval chief Admiral (R) Asif Sandila co-chaired the concluding session. Dr Joao Sabido Costa said that the organisations should utilise open source platforms to build their IT infrastructures in future. To build open source culture in Pakistan, he recommended roadmap with future activities and timelines for spreading open source.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 2
    Yesterday we went to the Madrid Rust Meetup, a regular meeting of rustaceans here. Martin talked about WebRender; I talked about refactoring C to port it to Rust, and then Alex talked about Rust's plans for 2018. Fun times.
  • DataworksSummit Berlin - Wednesday morning
    Data strategy - cloud strategy - business strategy: Aligning the three was one of the main themes (initially put forward in his opening keynote by CTO of Hortonworks Scott Gnau) thoughout this weeks Dataworks Summit Berlin kindly organised and hosted by Hortonworks. The event was attended by over 1000 attendees joining from 51 countries. The inspiration hat was put forward in the first keynote by Scott was to take a closer look at the data lifecycle - including the fact that a lot of data is being created (and made available) outside the control of those using it: Smart farming users are using a combination of weather data, information on soil conditions gathered through sensors out in the field in order to inform daily decisions. Manufacturing is moving towards closer monitoring of production lines to spot inefficiencies. Cities are starting to deploy systems that allow for better integration of public services. UX is being optimized through extensive automation.

Today in Techrights

today's howtos

10 Great Linux GTK Themes For 2018

Customization is a big part of the Linux experience, and your desktop theme is no exception. The world of Linux desktop themes is an ever-evolving one, with new ones replacing old favorites all the time. Of course, the desktop environments and GTK itself are always changing, so that adds another dynamic element to consider. That said, some of the best desktop customization happens on the simplest desktop environments, like XFCE. As of now, in early 2018, there are some really excellent GTK themes available. These themes aren’t ranked in any particular order. That comes down to a matter or preference. Any one of them can add a whole new look to your GTK-based desktop. Read more