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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story FOSS Databases in the News Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 12:49pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 12:47pm
Story Meet The New Linux Desktop Environment Inspired by Windows 7 Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 11:40am
Story The best Linux distributions for any purpose Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 11:32am
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 10:50am
Story GNOME/GTK News Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 10:49am
Story What's your favorite open source animal? Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 10:47am
Story Unleashed: Open source tech for pets and animals Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 10:45am
Story Microsoft loves Linux. But not Skype for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 10:38am
Story DEFT Zero (2017.1) ready for download Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 10:07am

Android Wear 2.0 debuts on two LG watches

Filed under
Android

Google released Android Wear 2.0, available on the new LG Watch Style and Sport, with an overhauled UI, autonomy, LTE, app downloads, and Google Assistant.

Google’s Android Wear distribution for smartwatches and wearables has cumulatively held its own against the Apple Watch, but considering the sorry state of the smartwatch market in general, that’s not saying much. Google is giving it at least one more shot, however, with the release of the Android Wear 2.0.

Read more

Here's Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Running on Microsoft Surface Pro 4

Filed under
Ubuntu

Guess we've missed this last year, but YouTube user John Cuppi has made a demo video to showcase the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system running on a Microsoft Surface Pro 4 tablet and laptop device.

Read more

Docker 1.13.1 Implements Support for Global Scoped Network Plugins in Swarm Mode

Filed under
Server
OSS

Docker released today, February 8, 2017, the first point release of the major Docker 1.13 stable series of the open-source application container engine for Linux-based operating systems, as well as Microsoft Windows and OSX/Darwin.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Hazelcast release Jet, open-source stream processing engine

    Hazelcast are primarily known for their open-source in-memory data grid (usually referred to as Hazelcast IMDG, or just Hazelcast). However, over the last 2 years, they have been working on a major new open-source project, called Hazelcast Jet, and this week have announced a release of this new technology.

  • Keymetrics is a Node.js monitoring tool for your server infrastructure

    French startup Keymetrics just raised $2 million from Alven Capital and Runa Capital to build the best monitoring tool for your Node.js infrastructure. The startup’s founder and CEO Alexandre Strzelewicz also created the popular open source Node.js process manager PM2.

    How do you turn a popular open source project into a successful startup? This question has so many different answers that sometimes it’s hard to find the right one from the first try, and Keymetrics is no exception.

    A few years ago, when Strzelewicz developed PM2 while living in Shanghai, he was just trying to create a better process manager for Node.js because existing solutions were lacking. He didn’t expect that his open source release would take off on Hacker News, attracting contributors working from Google and living in Brazil and Japan.

  • Ranger Joins Many Big Data Projects Graduating at Apache

    Over the past couple of years, we've steadily taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has recently squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Recently, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu had graduated as a Top-Level project. Then, the news came that Apache Geode had graduated from the Apache Incubator as well. It is a very interesting open source in-memory data grid that provides transactional data management for scale-out applications needing low latency response times during high concurrent processing.

  • ACLU Massachusetts Technology for Liberty Director Kade Crockford at LibrePlanet 2017

    Kade Crockford is the Director of the Technology for Liberty Program at the ACLU of Massachusetts. Kade works to protect and expand core First and Fourth Amendment rights and civil liberties in the digital 21st century, focusing on how systems of surveillance and control impact not just society in general but their primary targets — people of color, Muslims, immigrants, and dissidents.

    The Information Age produces conditions facilitating mass communication and democratization, as well as dystopian monitoring and centralized control. The Technology for Liberty Program aims to use the unprecedented access to information and communication to protect and enrich open society and individual rights by implementing basic reforms to ensure new tools do not create inescapable digital cages limiting what people see, hear, think, and do. Towards that end, Kade researches, strategizes, writes, lobbies, and educates the public on issues ranging from the wars on drugs and terror to warrantless electronic surveillance. Kade has written for The Nation, The Guardian, The Boston Globe, WBUR, and many other publications, and regularly appears in local, regional, and national media as an expert on issues related to technology, policing, and surveillance.

  • Understand Your Distributed Apps with the OpenTracing Standard

    Microservices and services-oriented architecture are here to stay, but this kind of distributed system destroys the traditional type of process monitoring. Nonetheless, companies still need to understand just what’s happening inside the flow of an application. Ben Sigelman, Co-founder of LightStep, said at his keynote at CloudNativeCon that by adopting a new standard for distributed applications called OpenTracing can tell those stories without building complex instrumentation, or fundamentally changing the code of your application.

  • Keynote: OpenTracing and Containers: Depth, Breadth, and the Future of Tracing - Ben Sigelman
  • State of Application Delivery Survey Finds the Cloud Driving IT Plans

    How influential has the rise of cloud computing been on the state of application delivery? Hugely influential, according to a new survey of of 2,197 IT executives and technologists on topics including DevOps and security application services and standards.

  • CLARITY project- enhancing take-up of open eGovernment services in Europe

    The CLARITY project is a two year project, funded by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework. Grant Agreement number: 693881. The project will support European Member States in their pursuit for greater trust, transparency and efficiency within their open eGovernment initiatives and highlight best practice within this field.

  • The 7 Elements of an Open Source Management Program: Teams and Tools

    A successful open source management program has seven essential elements that provide a structure around all aspects of open source software. In the previous article, we gave an overview of the strategy and process behind open source management. This time we’ll discuss two more essential elements: staffing on the open source compliance team and the tools they use to automate and audit open source code.

KDE and New Software

Filed under
KDE
Software
  • Finally, a Linux laptop worthy of KDE

    These are Macbook Air-like machines that are (as the name would imply) slim, light, and modern. The weight of Slimbook with an installed 120GB SSD, and 4GB of RAM, comes in at 1.39 kg (3.06 pounds). Considering my Chromebook Pixel 2 weighs in at 3.4 pounds, I would happily accept that encumbrance.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.1 – Here is the First Bugfix Release

    Today, the Kde team announced the first minor release for Kde Plasma 5.9 including various little but important bugfixes and translation updates. Certainly, this first small bugfix release will improve the stability and usability of the desktop environment.

  • Desktop Dimmer – an Open-Source Screen Dimmer App

    If you regularly work in a dark room, and find your dimmed screen is still too bright, you may want to this open-source screen dimmer app a try.

  • Kupfer Quick Launcher Ported To Python 3 And GTK 3, Sees New Release After 4 And A Half Years [PPA]

    After around 4 and a half years of inactivity, a new Kupfer (quick launcher) version was released 3 days ago, followed by 3 more releases since then.

    The application has a new developer who ported the application to Python 3, GTK 3 and GObject Introspection, while also fixing various bugs.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Linux Foundation Projects

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • Open Source MANO Interoperates with 10 NFV Infrastructures

    At NFV Plugtests hosted by ETSI last week, the Open Source MANO (OSM) group tested its code for interoperability with various network function virtualization (NFV) infrastructures and virtual network functions (VNFs).

    Participants at the Plugtests were provided with different combinations of VNFs, NFV infrastructures, and orchestrators, and they were given about an hour-and-a-half to make it all interoperate. OSM’s orchestrator software interoperated successfully with all 10 of the NFV infrastructures and all of the 15 “official” VNFs (5 additional VNFs were considered “test” VNFs).

  • Blockchain: The Invisible Technology That's Changing the World

    Blockchain isn't a household buzzword, like the cloud or the Internet of Things. It's not an in-your-face innovation you can see and touch as easily as a smartphone or a package from Amazon. But when it comes to our digital lives—every digital transaction; exchange of value, goods and services; or private data —blockchain is the answer to a question we've been asking since the dawn of the internet age: How can we collectively trust what happens online?

    Every year we run more of our lives—more core functions of our governments, economies, and societies—on the internet. We do our banking online. We shop online. We log into apps and services that make up our digital selves and send information back and forth. Think of blockchain as a historical fabric underneath recording everything that happens exactly as it occurs. Then the chain stitches that data into encrypted blocks that can never be modified and scatters the pieces across a worldwide network.

Lessons from the rise and fall of an open source project

Filed under
OSS

Eight years ago, the CyanogenMod project exploded onto the mobile device software scene. The Android-based open source mobile operating system quickly caught the attention of developers, Android fans and investors, and attracted interest from tech giants including Microsoft and Google. But at the end of last year the project imploded spectacularly. Today the CyanogenMod project is no more, but the arc of its story offers fascinating insight into the world of open source software development.

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Open source users: It’s time for extreme vetting

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Open source software is the norm these days rather than the exception. The code is being written in high volumes and turning up in critical applications. While having this code available can offer big benefits, users also must be wary of issues the code can present and implement proper vetting.

Josh Bressers, cybersecurity strategist at Red Hat, emphasized this point during a recent talk with InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill.

Read more

Linux 3.18.48

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 3.18.48 kernel.

Wait, what? Yeah, 3.18.48, you read that right.

Turns out there was a bug in 3.18.47 in one of the backports. And a bug
in 3.18.27 as well, with one of the backports there. And a very minor
issue in the 3.18.28 release, but no one cares about the debug messages
for a specific scsi driver, so you can just ignore that issue...

Read more

10 of the best lightweight Linux distros

Filed under
Linux

Modern Linux distros are designed to appeal to a large number of users who run modern hardware. As a result, they have become too bloated for older machines, even if cut down by hand – if you don't have several gigs of RAM to spare and an extra core or two, these distros may not deliver the best performance for you. Thankfully, there are many lightweight distros, trimmed and tweaked by expert hands, which can be used to breathe new life into older hardware.

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Mozilla binds Firefox's fate to the Rust language

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla always intended for Rust to be used in building key parts of the Firefox browser. Now the company is committing to that vision in a significant manner.

After version 53, Firefox will require Rust to compile successfully, due to the presence of Firefox components built with the language. But this decision may restrict the number of platforms that Firefox can be ported to—for now.

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Do you know where that open source came from?

Filed under
OSS

Last year, while speaking at RSA, a reporter asked me about container provenance. This wasn’t the easiest question to answer because there is a lot of nuance around containers and what’s inside them. In response, I asked him if he would eat a sandwich he found on the ground. The look of disgust I got was priceless, but it opened up a great conversation.

Think about it this way: If there was a ham sandwich on the ground that looked mostly OK, would you eat it? You can clearly see it’s a ham sandwich. The dirt all brushed off. You do prefer wheat bread to white. So what’s stopping you? It was on the ground. Unless you’re incredibly hungry and without any resources, you won’t eat that sandwich. You’ll visit the sandwich shop across the street.

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Smart lighting gizmo offers video chat, gesture support, and Alexa

Filed under
Linux

The Linux-based, $149 “Brilliant Control” smart lighting controller has a wall-mounted, 5-inch screen, Alexa voice support, motion control, and video chat.

Most home automation devices are controlled exclusively through a mobile or web app, but there’s a growing trend toward wall-mounted displays as well as voice interaction. The new Brilliant Control device from San Mateo startup Brilliant offers all three, as well as motion control and physical touch sliders.

Read more

Developer Endorses Dell For Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Fwupd Updated With New Support, Developer Endorses Dell For Linux

    Longtime GNOME developer Richard Hughes has announced a new release of fwupd, the open-source utility for updating firmware on Linux in a safe, automatic, and reliable manner.

    Fwupd continues advancing for making it much easier to upgrade firmware for many systems from the Linux desktop. Fwupd supports UEFI capsule updates and other interfaces while for end-users it can be run from the command-line or via front-ends like with GNOME Software integration. With today's first new release on their fwupd-0.8 branch, there are not only fixes but also new features.

  • New fwupd release, and why you should buy a Dell

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Ekos Polar Alignment Assistant Tool
    When setting up a German Equatorial Mount (GEM) for imaging, a critical aspect of capturing long-exposure images is to ensure a proper polar alignment. A GEM mount has two axis: Right Ascension (RA) axis and Declination (DE) axis. Ideally, the RA axis should be aligned with the celestial sphere polar axis. A mount's job is to track the stars motion around the sky, from the moment they rise at the eastern horizon, all the way up across the median, and westward until they set.
  • KStars 2.7.4 for Windows is released!
    Glad to announce the release of KStars v2.7.4 for Windows 64bit. This version is built a more recent Qt (5.8) and the latest KF5 frameworks for Windows bringing more features and stability.
  • Atom 1.14 Has Been Released
    As you may know, Atom is an open-source, multi-platform text editor developed by GitHub, having a simple and intuitive graphical user interface and a bunch of interesting features for writing: CSS, HTML, JavaScript and other web programming languages. Among others, it has support for macros, auto-completion a split screen feature and it integrates with the file manager.
  • Computer Eye Strain Prevention App `SafeEyes` Sees New Release
    SafeEyes is a Linux application which tries to protect your eyes from eye strain by reminding you to take breaks, while also providing some simple exercises.
  • WeatherDesk Changes Your Wallpaper Based On Current Weather Conditions
    WeatherDesk is a Python3 tool that allows using a wallpaper that changes based on the weather and optionally, time of day. It supports most Linux desktop environments as well as Windows and Mac.
  • Penguin Subtitle Player 1.0 Released With SSA/ASS Subtitles Support [Quick Update]
    Penguin Subtitle Player is especially useful for online video streaming websites that don't support subtitles or don't allow custom subtitles. You can also use Penguin Subtitle Player to display subtitles in a custom position, like on the black top/bottom bands, or to display multiple subtitles in the same time. The Qt5 application should be able to display subtitles on top of any window, including HTML5 or Flash videos. Until now, Penguin Subtitle Player (which we've covered before) only supported SRT subtitles, however, with the latest 1.0.0 version, released yesterday, the application received support for SSA/ASS subtitles.
  • Jam: Listen To Google Play Music From The Console
    Jam is a new Google Play Music console player for Linux and Windows. The application, which is written in Go, had its first alpha release about two weeks ago, and it's currently at version 0.4.0. Jam features a console interface very similar to that of Cmus, with easy keyboard navigation. While the interface is easy to use, it currently lacks a help screen, so for a list of keyboard shortcuts, see the Jam GitHub page.
  • “Wiki, what’s going on?” is back again and has a lot to say!
  • Plasma Sprint: Legacy Media Support in KDE Applications
    Boudhayan Gupta dropped by for the final day of the Plasma Sprint because he had 3D printed that save icon and wanted to test it. Coincidently I found a treasure in the glove compartment of my dad’s car, a Eurythmics Greatest Hits audio CD.
  • Kubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Update Available
    The second point release update to our LTS release 16.04 is out now. This contains all the bugfixes added to 16.04 since its first release in April. Users of 16.04 can run the normal update procedure to get these bugfixes. In addition, we suggest adding the Backports PPA to update to Plasma 5.8.5. Read more about it: http://kubuntu.org/news/plasma-5-8-5-bugfix-release-in-xenial-and-yakkety-backports-now/

today's howtos

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more