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Sunday, 19 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2017 - 8:15pm
Story Mobile GNU/Linux: GameShell and Purism Librem Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2017 - 8:13pm
Story Linux Now Powers 100% of the World’s Top 500 Supercomputers Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2017 - 8:10pm
Story Linux Graphics and Games Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2017 - 5:28pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2017 - 5:23pm
Story Red Hat: ARM and Financial News Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2017 - 5:16pm
Story Desktop GNU/Linux and Microsoft Intervention Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2017 - 5:13pm
Story Linux 4.15 Roundup Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2017 - 5:04pm
Story Happy 60th birthday, Fortran Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2017 - 4:56pm
Story Mozilla: Firefox 57 “Quantum” and More Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2017 - 4:45pm

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Uber Made Its Homegrown AI Language Open Source, but Not Entirely out of Altruism

    Uber’s artificial-intelligence lab is less than a year old, but researchers there have already built their own programming language for AI applications—and now they’re releasing it for anyone to use. Quite a generous move for a company known more for its hard-nosed business tactics than for handing out in-house innovations to potential competitors.

  • Kubernetes by the numbers: 10 compelling stats

    How quickly has Kubernetes’ popularity soared? By most accounts, very quickly. Earlier this year, Cloud Native Computing Foundation executive director Dan Kohn penned a blog post that dug into that claim. People regularly tout Kubernetes as one of the highest velocity projects ever in open source history: Does the data back it up?

    As Kohn found, there may not be a single definitive metric, but they all point in the same conclusion: “You can pick your preferred statistic, such as that Kubernetes is in the top 0.00006% of the projects on GitHub,” Kohn wrote. “I prefer to just think of it as one of the fastest moving projects in the history of open source.”

  • HyperLedger – The Linux Foundation’s Blockchain Framework for Business

    Blockchain development is a novelty in the tech world, but has been around long enough to see platforms such as Ethereum give birth to a myriad of decentralized applications. These dApps aim to solve some of the world’s problems, challenges, or to create new marketplaces.

    Hyperledger is a blockchain project started by the Linux Foundation in January of 2016 as an enterprise-level development framework. This open-source collaboration has attracted the support of many leaders across various industries that want to utilize blockchain technology to facilitate interconnectivity between businesses.

  • The Open-Source Model And Wall Street
  • Open Source Machine Learning: Open Source Dominates Preferred ML and AI Tools and Frameworks

    Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies are being developed and adopted at a rapid pace. This area has become a hot topic in 2017. Interestingly, many of the more prominent tools are Open Source. The technologies are being used with a wide variety of applications, like search, data mining, spam detection, character recognition, autonomous vehicles, online recommendations

    Many of those Open Source tools offer a Python interface to allow developers to jump in quickly. For example, there are core libraries like NumPy, SciPy and SciKit. Keras is a Deep Learning library and TensorFlow is Google’s Open Source Machine Learning tool.

  • Global Application Modernization Services Market 2017-2022 - Open-Source Technology Paving the Way for Untapped Possibilities
  • Service providers use NFV open source to innovate the network

    With NFV open source, service providers can push network innovation and reduce network costs. But service providers will need to adjust to a new open source culture.

  • Open Source Initiative Announces DigitalOcean Corporate Sponsorship

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), dedicated to increasing the awareness and adoption of open source software, is delighted to welcome DigitalOcean as a Premium Sponsor. DigitalOcean, a cloud services platform designed for developers, will provide both financial support and hosting for several OSI community-driven services.

    A Forbes' Cloud 100 company, DigitalOcean's active engagement and investment in open source software highlights how today's most innovative and successful companies have recognized the value of, and opportunities within, open communities of collaboration. The company regularly sponsors open source related MeetUps and Hackathons—including their popular "Hacktoberfest", develops tutorials on open source technologies and techniques, maintains and contributes to a number of open source projects, and of course offers hosting to open source projects and foundations.

  • Highlights from the fifth annual SeaGL conference

    The fifth annual Seattle GNU/Linux Conference (better known as SeaGL), held Oct. 6–7 at Seattle Central College, was again a great event. Seattle even rolled out the welcome committee for us with penguins on the train and geek-oriented tagging posted around town.

  • R / Finance 2018 Call for Papers

    The tenth (!!) annual annual R/Finance conference will take in Chicago on the UIC campus on June 1 and 2, 2018. Please see the call for papers below (or at the website) and consider submitting a paper.

    We are once again very excited about our conference, thrilled about who we hope may agree to be our anniversary keynotes, and hope that many R / Finance users will not only join us in Chicago in June -- and also submit an exciting proposal.

    So read on below, and see you in Chicago in June!

  • Juniper Integrates AppFormix into Contrail Cloud for OpenStack

    At the OpenStack Summit in Sydney, Australia, Juniper announced multiple enhancements to its Contrail Cloud Software Defined Networking (SDN) platform. Among the enhancements are integrated AppFormix visibility capabilities and integrated support for Red Hat's Ceph Storage platform.

  • From imaging neurons to understanding space - what's happening in science with OpenStack?

     

    Scientists are increasingly turning to the open source infrastructure to support the enormous data their experiments yield

  • Stressed about serverless lock-in? Don't be [Ed: Mac Asay continues to promote dangerous buzzwords like "serverless" and denies the fact it's all just lock-in]
  • How to Monetize an Open Source Project [Ed: Engaging Steven Grandchamp from Microsoft as though he's a FOSS expert?!]

Copyleft and Licensing

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OSS
Legal
  • FSFE makes copyrights computer readable

    The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is proud to release its next version of our REUSE practices designed to make computers understand software copyrights and licenses.

    The REUSE practices help software developers make simple additions to license headers which make it easier for a computer to determine what license applies to the various parts of a programs source code. By following the REUSE practices, software developers can ensure their intent to license software under a particular license is understood and more readily adhered to.

    Together with the updated practices, which mostly clarify and make explicit some points, the FSFE is also releasing a set of developer tools and examples which show the REUSE practices in action. Three example repositories, together with an example walkthrough of the process used to make the cURL project REUSE compliant, are complemented with a simple tool to validate whether a program is REUSE compliant.

  • Apple Will No Longer Be Developing CUPS Under The GPL

    One decade after Apple bought out CUPS as the de facto printing system for Unix-like operating systems, they are changing the code license.

    The CUPS Common UNIX Printing System up to now had been developed under the GPLv2 license while now Apple will be switching it to the Apache 2.0 software license.

  • Software Freedom Law Center and Conservancy

    There’s been quite a bit of interest recently about the petition by Software Freedom Law Center to cancel the Software Freedom Conservancy’s trademark. A number of people have asked my views on it, so I thought I’d write up a quick blog on my experience with SFLC and Conservancy both during my time as Debian Project Leader, and since.

    It’s clear to me that for some time, there’s been quite a bit of animosity between SFLC and Conservancy, which for me started to become apparent around the time of the large debate over ZFS on Linux. I talked about this in my DebConf 16 talk, which fortunately was recorded (ZFS bit from 8:05 to 17:30).

Security: USB. WPA2, Updates, Magento

Filed under
Security

today's howtos

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HowTos

Programming and Hardware: Atom 1.22, BSD, GCC, RISC-V, ROCm

Filed under
Development
  • Atom 1.22

    Users who work with large projects will be happy to see we resolved a long-standing performance issue related to spawning Git processes to fetch Git status. This manifested in periodic pauses of Atom’s UI and we’ve seen a noticeably smoother experience.

    The autocomplete-plus default provider now computes suggestions natively and on a separate thread. This means no memory overhead and no threat to Atom’s responsiveness. Read more in our in-depth blog post on Atom’s new concurrency-friendly buffer implementation.

  • Atom 1.22 Hackable Text Editor Introduces Performance and Usability Improvements

    GitHub updated their open-source and cross-platform Atom hackable text editor to version 1.22, a monthly bugfix release that promises to add an extra layer of performance and usability improvements.

    Atom 1.22 is here to address a long-standing performance issue for those who work with large projects. The issue was related to the spawning of Git processes that fetch the Git status, and it would apparently occur at times.

  • The first AF3e preorders

    This morning, Google alerted me to a reputable site mentioning “Absolute FreeBSD, 3rd Edition.”

  • Paul Irofti (pirofti@) on hotplugd(8), math ports, xhci(4) and  other kernel advancements
  • Cannonlake Onboarding Posted For GCC Compiler

    An Intel developer is looking to merge the -march=cannonlake support for the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC).

  • Codasip and Avery Partner to Improve Regression Test Methodology of RISC-V Processors

    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded CPU cores, today announced its partnership with Avery Design Systems, the provider of cutting-edge verification intellectual property (VIP) solutions for SoC and IP companies.

  • Exploring AMD’s Ambitious ROCm Initiative

    The ROCm developers wanted a platform that supports a number of different programming languages and is flexible enough to interface with different GPU-based hardware environments (Figure 1). As you will learn later in this article, ROCm provides direct support for OpenCL, Python, and several common C++ variants. One of the most innovative features of the platform is the Heterogeneous-Compute Interface for Portability (HIP) tool, which offers a vendor-neutral dialect of C++ that is ready to compile for either the AMD or CUDA/NVIDIA GPU environment.

  • RQuantLib 0.4.4: Several smaller updates

Microsoft and Intel Back Doors

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

GNU Pioneer Stallman to Speak to CWDS Lunch

Filed under
GNU

Richard Stallman founded the free software movement 34 years ago and announced the GNU Project, the thrust of which wasn’t software’s cost but its ability to be shared, changed and shared again. One offshoot of the project was GNU/Linux, software created and inspired by the movement’s open-source principles.

CWDS is hosting Stallman because it, too, is trying to foster innovation in state IT while freely sharing the products of its best efforts with the city, county and other state agencies it supports through tech.

Read more

Linux Boards with Intel (Back Doors)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Arduino Create Expands to Support Linux on Intel Chips

    When we talk about open source hardware, we often think about the Raspberry Pi and other community-backed single board computers running Linux. Yet all these communities were modeled on the success of the 14-year-old Arduino project, in which Linux has been only tangentially involved, and only over the past four years. The two platforms should grow closer, however, now that Arduino has extended its Arduino Create development environment to support Linux on x86 platforms.

    With the new Linux support, “users are now able to program their Linux devices as if they were regular Arduinos,” says Arduino. Arduino Create works in concert with embedded Linux distributions – initially Ubuntu or Intel’s Wind River Pulsar Linux – to let developers load Arduino sketches to control lower level interfaces to sensors and other Internet of Things peripherals.

  • 3.5-inch SBC comes in 6th and 7th Gen Intel flavors

    Commell’s 3.5-inch “LS-37K” SBC supports 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series and Xeon-E3-1200 v5 CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, triple displays, 2x SATA, and mSATA.

    Commell announced a 3.5-inch SBC with Intel’s 6th (“Skylake”) or 7th (“Kaby Lake”) Gen Core S-series and Xeon-E3-1200 v5 CPUs. The LS-37K’s layout and feature set are similar to that of its Skylake based LE-37I and LE-37G 3.5-inch boards. As usual, no OS support is listed, but Linux should run with no problem.

  • Apollo Lake DIN-rail computer packs a lot in a little

    Axiomtek’s Linux-friendly “ICO120-83D” IoT gateway runs on a dual-core Apollo Lake Celeron, and offers mini-PCIe expansion and extended temp support.

    Axiomtek has launched an ICO120-83D Internet of Things gateway that runs on Intel’s dual-core, 1.1GHz Celeron N3350 SoC with 6W TDP. The system has the same Apollo Lake processor and fanless DIN-rail design as the recent ICO300-83B gateway, but with a more compact 125 x 100 x 31mm. 0.3 k footprint and a reduced feature set.

Carrier board extends Linux-driven Jetson modules

Filed under
Linux

Aetina’s “ACE-N261” Nano-ITX carrier for the Jetson TX1/TX2 COMs offers GbE, HDMI, 2x USB 3.0, 2x CAN, 2x mini-PCIe, and optional -20 to 70°C support.

In April, Aetina announced a Nano-ITX ACE-N620 carrier board for Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 COM, as well as its earlier, pin-compatible Jetson TX1. The company has now announced a more feature-rich ACE-N261 Nano-ITX (120 x 120mm) carrier aimed at machine vision.

Read more

GCC 8 & LLVM Clang 6.0 Compiler Performance On AMD EPYC - November 2017

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the continuously evolving state of open-source code compilers, especially for the newer AMD Zen "znver1" architecture, here is the latest installment of our compiler benchmarks. Tested for this article from and AMD EPYC 7601 processor were GCC 7.2, GCC 8.0.0, LLVM Clang 5.0, and LLVM Clang 6.0 SVN.

Read more

Linux 4.13.12

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.13.12 kernel.

All users of the 4.13 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.13.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.13.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.9.61

Linux 4.4.97

Linux 3.18.80

Arch Linux Officially Kills 32-Bit Support, Migrate to "Arch Linux 32" Fork Now

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Linux

The Arch Linux devs announced today that they are officially terminating support for 32-bit architectures, removing all i686 packages from the repositories by the end of the month.

At the beginning of the year, on January 25, Arch Linux's Bartłomiej Piotrowski announced that they are phasing out 32-bit (i686) support for the operating system beginning March 1, 2017, no longer building monthly ISO snapshots that support 32-bit installation.

Arch Linux 2017.02.01 was the last monthly ISO snapshot released with 32-bit support, as all ISO snapshots that followed included only 64-bit packages, but existing 32-bit installations were still supported for a 9-month period during which users were had to move to 64-bit.

Read more

Also: Arch Linux Ends i686 Package Support Today

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Daily Builds Now Available to Download

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Ubuntu

Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth dubbed the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system as the "Bionic Beaver," but he didn't reveal any of the plans for the next long-term supported release of one of the most popular free operating systems in the world, which Canonical will maintain for the next five years.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is in early development stages, which means that the daily build ISO image is currently based on the stable branch, Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark). As such, it's running the Linux 4.13 kernel and uses the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

Read more

Also: Daily ISOs Begin For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver"

Linux pioneer Munich supports Windows 10 rollout from 2020 in key vote

Filed under
Linux

While the decision will need approval from the full council on 23rd November, Dr Florian Roth, leader of the Green Party in Munich, says committee decisions are normally simply confirmed by the council, without change. However, he said the Green Party would be pushing for a detailed discussion and consideration of the decision by the full council.

"I think it's a great mistake," adding it would place unnecessary burden and cost on Munich at a time it was already restructuring its IT department and implementing new laws on e-government.

"I have the feeling that the IT department don't want to do this, but they have to do it because the two parties who have the majority in the government want this."

Read more

Compact field controller runs Yocto Linux on i.MX6

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Linux

Kingdy’s compact, fanless “TB-045S” and -20 to 70°C ready ““TB-045W” systems run Yocto on an i.MX6, and offer 9-36V power, up to 32GB eMMC, and mini-PCIe.

Kingdy, an embedded manufacturer company of Taiwan-based Hong Jue, has announced two flavors of a compact, 130 x 92 x 42mm embedded computer and remote management field controller designed for industrial automation applications. The 0 to 60°C range TB-045S and otherwise identical, -20 to 70°C resistant TB-045W, are equipped with dual-core Dual Lite or quad-core Quad versions of NXP’s 1GHz Cortex-A9 i.MX6 SoC.

Read more

Games: Hand of Fate 2, Another Hitman Game, Steam Client Update, System Shock, In the Shadows, X-Plane

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Gaming

10 Most Secure Linux Distros For Complete Privacy & Anonymity | 2017 Edition

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

One of the most compelling reasons to use Linux is its ability to deliver a secure computing experience. There are some specialized secure Linux distros for security that add extra layers and make sure that you complete your work anonymously and privately. Some of the popular secure Linux distros for 2017 are Tails, Whoix, Kodachi, etc.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.15 Is A Huge Update For Both AMD CPU & Radeon GPU Owners

Linux 4.15 is shaping up to be a massive kernel release and we are just half-way through its merge window period. But for AMD Linux users especially, the 4.15 kernel release is going to be rocking. Whether you are using AMD processors and/or AMD Radeon graphics cards, Linux 4.15 is a terrific way to end of the year. There are a number of improvements to make this release great for AMD customers. Read more

Announcing Season of KDE 2018

KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way. Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work. For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program. Read more

How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.) Read more

today's leftovers