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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Kernel/Foundation: CHAOSS, Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), OpenChain, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • If You Can’t Measure It, You Can’t Improve It: CHAOSS Project Creates Tools to Analyze Software Development and Measure Open Source Community Health

    Initial members contributing to the project include Bitergia, Eclipse Foundation, Jono Bacon Consulting, Laval University (Canada), Linaro, Mozilla, OpenStack, Polytechnique Montreal (Canada) Red Hat, Sauce Labs, Software Sustainability Institute, Symphony Software Foundation, University of Missouri, University of Mons (Belgium), University of Nebraska at Omaha, and University of Victoria.

  • Vodafone Joins Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project

    The Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project today announced that Vodafone Group has joined as a Platinum member. The addition of Vodafone, one of the world's largest service providers with operations in 26 countries, demonstrates the continuing momentum ONAP is achieving and highlights Vodafone's ongoing commitment to open standards and open source.

  • OpenChain Project Welcomes Hitachi

    The OpenChain Project is proud to welcome Hitachi as a Platinum Member. Hitachi joins eleven other companies to take a leadership role in our industry standard for open source compliance in the supply chain.

  • Become a Certified Kubernetes Admin with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    The ever-increasing push to the cloud demands proven skills in areas such as cloud migration, application integration, automation, and more. The recent Open Source Jobs Report from The Linux Foundation, in fact, cited cloud technology as the most sought-after area of expertise among 70 percent of employers. Now you can demonstrate your skills through the new Certified Kubernetes Administrator (CKA) exam, offered by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

  • AMDGPU DC Display Code Tacks On Another 28 Patches

    The big undertaking of the rewriting/modernizing of the AMDGPU DRM driver's display code stack has out now another 28 patches.

    This AMDGPU DC display stack has been well over one thousand lines of code and in development for years in trying to better synchronize the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager's display code with that of their Windows driver. AMDGPU DC is what's needed for HDMI/DP audio on modern Radeon GPUs, HDMI 2.0 support, atomic mode-setting, FreeSync, and other modern display features. More recently, it's now needed for driving physical displays/monitors attached to Radeon Vega graphics cards.

  • RadeonSI/AMDGPU Switches Over To New Command Submission API

    Landing today within Mesa Git is a switchover for the AMDGPU winsys layer to using the new command submission (CS) API.

    This change benefits the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver when using the AMDGPU kernel driver. Added to libdrm back in July was a new low overhead command submission API when dealing with the AMDGPU kernel driver. This API sends chunks to the kernel API for a single command stream. This new API is designed to be "more future proof and extensible API."

  • New ARM Board Support In Linux 4.14: Raspberry Pi Zero W, Banana Pi & More

    Olof Johansson has submitted the pull requests of ARM/ARM64 board/SoC updates for the Linux 4.14 merge window.

Programming: Build Systems, Phoronix Test Suite 7.4, Requests for Comments (RFCs) and Node.js

Filed under
Development
  • Meson+Ninja Showing Speedy Build Results For Shotwell
  • Phoronix Test Suite 7.4 M4 Released As "Tynset" Nears Final

    The last planned test/development release of Phoronix Test Suite 7.4-Tynset is now available ahead of the planned stable release in the days to come.

  • 6 lessons on using technical RFCs as a management tool

    As an engineering leader, I value trust and believe that individual contributors should be involved in architectural and high-level technical decision making. I consider every line of code to be a decision made on behalf of someone else (including your future self), and having a fast-growing distributed team makes technical decision making particularly difficult to manage.

    In the early days of building ride-sharing app Ride, we went from three to more than 25 members, across product, design, and engineering, in the first six months. We were tasked with the challenge of taking an early prototype for a carpooling platform and bringing it to life on the web, iOS, and Android. To make things more fun, we were also distributed across the United States, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Argentina, and Ireland.

    [...]

    We weren't the first people to encounter this problem, so we looked at how open source software projects dealt with these situations, and came to the conclusion that adopting the Request for Comments (RFC) process would help us make better decisions together.

  • Modern Modules

    Re-thinking the Node.js ecosystem for modern JavaScript.

    A few months back I sat down to write some code.

    Node.js 8 had been out a while and I decided to take advantage of some of the new language features like async/await in my new code.

  • Using Node.js Packages Manager (NPM)

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Canonical: Updates on Snaps and LXD

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Top 10 snaps in August: Chromium, Dino, Gogs and more

    September, back to school! This month’s pick of the top snaps is all about productivity and collaboration tools. Very competent web browser? Check. Messaging clients? Check. PDF and Video files editing? Check. Hacking your router to host apps and Minepocket server management? Well, September also has weekends – check!

  • LXD: Weekly status #14

    The highlight for this week is the release of LXC 2.1 which is the result of a year and a half of development making up 1528 commits by 96 contributors!

    We’ve also been working on LXD performance testing with lxd-benchmark getting expanded to record more data points and log in a format that we can generate statistics from. This is now running daily on our Jenkins.

Red Hat Tips and Flock Coverage

Filed under
Red Hat
  • 4 tips for leaders helping others evolve their careers
  • My experience with Flock 2017

    After attending Flock 2016, I got another chance to be part of Flock conference. This year, it took place in beautiful city Hyannis, Massachusetts, USA from 29th August to 1st September. Schedule of this 4 day conference was designed differently compared to last year. Both workshops and talks were running in parallel for the first three 3 days followed by a wrap-up session on last day.

  • Flock 2017

    wo weeks ago I got to travel to Cape Cod (or as I came to call it, Cape Code), Massachusetts, USA for Flock, the annual Fedora contributor conference. I arrived on Monday, August 28 after flying in from Denver, CO where I had been eclipse-viewing (well that happened in Wyoming) and summitting 6[0-5] fourteeners[6].

    Tuesday began with a keynote from Matthew Miller, where he presented metrics on the various versions of Fedora in the wild, and talked about where Fedora is heading. After that we had a long session where the presenters each got to give a short pitch for their talks. After that was lunch, and one thing I enjoyed about the schedule this year was the choice to make lunch be two hours each day. That gave us plenty of time for "hallway" type discussions throughout the week. After lunch I went to see Mike Bonet present about Factory 2.0 and the various items that team has been working on in Fedora. Several of their objectives have been related to Bodhi so this was a good session for me to attend. After that I held my "Bodhi hack sesh" session which I thought went pretty well. I think we had about 12 people attend, and I was able to help people get started on a variety of patches for Bodhi. Lastly I attended the dinner and game night, which was a lot of fun.

  • Jonathan Dieter: Flock 2017

OSS: Mastodon, Linux Foundation, Mastodon, Matryx, VCV

Filed under
OSS
  • The new order in an open source software world

    It is clear the future is in open source. Slowly taking hold for decades with the release of mainstream software such as Apple’s Swift and Microsoft’s .Net framework, the projected revenue of open source software for 2020 is over €57 million. The reason behind this increasing adoption is the ability for enterprises to not only drive competitive advantage, but to also attract top talent. However, with that comes a new set of challenges to overcome.   

    While helping accelerate application development, the use of open source can put an organisation at risk of getting breached and failing compliance audits. In fact, 44 per cent of applications contain critical vulnerabilities in an open source component.  

  • Mastodon: The Open Source Alternative To Twitter

    I don’t know about you, but I have long yearned for a social network that I can truly call home. Facebook is no good as it’s full of pictures of people’s cats and their dinner. Twitter is full of trolls and rude people, in my experience at least. When Google+ came along, I had high hopes for it, but alas, it’s pretty much a ghost town these days.

  • ​How companies can make the most from open source

    At The Linux Foundation's Open Source Summit, Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation, announced new programs to help businesses get the most from open source: Open Source Guides for the Enterprise. Using open-source programs is only the start.

    Zemlin said that for enterprises to make the most from open source they need to participate in creating open source: Unfortunately, "Organization still don't know how to be a participate."

    "Today all software development is influenced by open source," Zemlin said. "Just as projects are looking to create communities to sustain them over the long term, corporations are seeking to better understand how they can work with and contribute to open source. The new guides will help more organizations directly engage for the benefit of the broader community."

  • ​How to get the Kubernetes help you need

    At The Linux Foundation's Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Foundation, said, "Kubernetes is the Linux of the cloud." I wouldn't go that far, but Kubernetes is the most popular, open-source DevOps container manager. It's now available on all cloud-platforms including the late-to-the-Kubernetes-party Amazon Web Services (AWS). Now, if only we have enough Kubernetes experts to run it!

    As the GitHub team recently discovered, Kubernetes' documentation isn't very good. That makes setting up a Kubernetes cluster difficult.

  • Anchore Releases Open Source Engine End-to-End Container Certification Solution
  • Matryx Deepens Commitment to Open Source with Calcflow

    Matryx, an open source platform for decentralized collaboration, is open sourcing Calcflow, the world's first virtual reality (VR) graphing tool for mathematical modeling. Calcflow is one of the applications Matryx integrates to help its global users solve complex problems through 3D visualization and natural gesture interactions.

  • New open-source virtual modular synth available for free

    The new software, which was revealed at Illinois's Knobcon 2017 tech convention over the weekend, brings the sound and workflow of Eurorack format modular synthesis to the computer. Unlike other existing software modular systems, like Softube Modular and Native Instrument's Reaktor Blocks, VCV Rack's code is publicly available and free to download for Mac, Windows and Linux. It's currently in a beta form and features 30 modules, including versions of Mutable Instruments, Befaco and Synthesis Technology modules, some of which are directly ported from the original devices. More modules will be added in the coming weeks.

  • New VCV Software Modular for Mac/PC/Linux Is Free

Security: Updates, Equifax, Black Duck FUD, Emacs 25.3, and Measuring Security

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Researchers use Windows 10 Linux subsystem to run malware

    The provision of a Linux subsystem on Windows systems — a new Windows 10 feature known as Subsystem for Linux (WSL) — has made it possible to run known malware on such systems and bypass even the most common security solutions, security researchers at Check Point claim.

    In a detailed blog post, researchers Gal Elbaz and Dvir Atias said they had dubbed this technique of getting malware onto a Windows system as Bashware, with Bash being the default shell on a large number of Linux distributions.

  • Episode 62 - All about the Equifax hack
  • Equifax moves to fix weak PINs for “security freeze” on consumer credit reports

    As Equifax moved to provide consumers the ability to protect their credit reports on the heels of a major data breach, some of the details of the company's response were found lacking. As consumers registered and moved to lock their credit reports—in order to prevent anyone who had stolen data from opening credit in their name—they found that the security personal identification number (PIN) provided in the locking process was potentially insecure.

    [...]

    The PIN revelation came on the heels of concerns that Equifax was attempting to block the ability of those checking to see if their data was exposed or enrolling in the TrustedID Premiere service to sue Equifax over the breach. An Equifax spokesperson said that the arbitration clause in the Terms of Service for TrustedID Premier only applied to the service itself, not to the breach.

  • Unpatched Open Source Software Flaw Blamed for Massive Equifax Breach [Ed: But this claim has since then been retracted, so it might be fake news]
  • Equifax Breach Blamed on Open-Source Software Flaw [Ed: This report from a News Corp. tabloid has since been retracted, so why carry on linking to it?]
  • The hidden threat lurking in an otherwise secure software stack [Ed: Yet another attack on FOSS security, courtesy of the Microsoft-connected Black Duck]
  • [ANNOUNCE] Emacs 25.3 released
  • Emacs 25.3 Released To Fix A Security Vulnerability Of Malicious Lisp Scripts

    GNU --
    Emacs 25.3 is now available, but it doesn't offer major new features, rather it fixes a security vulnerability.

    Emacs' x-display decoding feature within the Enriched Text mode could lead to executing arbitrary malicious Lisp code within the text.

  • Measuring security: Part 1 - Things that make money

    If you read my previous post on measuring security, you know I broke measuring into three categories. I have no good reason to do this other than it's something that made sense to me. There are without question better ways to split these apart, I'm sure there is even overlap, but that's not important. What actually matters is to start a discussion on measuring what we do. The first topic is about measuring security that directly adds to revenue such as a product or service.

    [...]

    I see a lot of groups that don't do any of this. They wander in circles sometimes adding security features that don't matter, often engineering solutions that customers only need or want 10% of. I'll never forget when I first looked at actual metrics on new features and realized something we wanted to add was going to have a massive cost and generate zero additional revenue (it may have actually detracted in future product sales). On this day I saw the power in metrics. Overnight my group became heroes for saving everyone a lot of work and headaches. Sometimes doing nothing is the most valuable action you can take.

Coverage From Open Source Summit 2017

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • Open Source Summit Roundup, Day 1

    The Linux Foundation released the first six in a planned series of Open Source Guides for the Enterprise during Open Source Summit North America in Los Angeles today.

    The Linux Foundation developed the guides in conjunction with TODO Group, with contributors representing Cloud Native Computing Foundation, Microsoft, Google, Netflix, Samsung, Red Hat, Comcast, Autodesk, Intel, Oath, Facebook and Heptio.

  • Watch live: Exploring the open-source business model at Open Source Summit 2017

    Is open source a piece of the information technology stack, or is it the whole stack? What’s the business model around open source’s move up the stack?

    Looking to answer these and other questions, SiliconANGLE Media is at Open Source Summit 2017, taking place in Los Angeles, California, with exclusive commentary and interviews from our roving news desk, theCUBE. (* Disclosure below.) The four-day Linux Foundation event is a combination of LinuxCon, ContainerCon, CloudOpen and the Open Community Conference, which in 2017 all now sit under one umbrella.

Those good surprises...

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS has always remained a reliable OS to work and, as the update included Lomanager, the distro's method to update LibreOffice, I couldn't delay.

Although the update was fast, LibreOffice was taking a considerable time to finish. Yes, I must thank my ISP for that: my connection has been unstable for over a week, with a speed sometimes down to a crawl.

Speed was abnormally slow. I became a bit restless.

That was when I saw the Steam icon on my desktop...the round icon that had not been clicked on since October 2015.

Read more

Devices: Canonical’s 'IoT' Ambitions, SensiEdge’s SensiBLE

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Meeting IoT challenges

    Founded 15 years ago, Canonical has been responsible for delivering the open source Ubuntu platform. “We work to ensure that Ubuntu is certified and can be used on PCs, servers and across cloud infrastructure,” Bell explains.

    “The rise of the IoT brings with it data and opportunities to monetise that data and one thing we can be sure about is that unpredicted methods of monetisation are sure to emerge.”

    Canonical’s approach to the IoT encourages the adoption of a single operating system and, crucially, one that can be upgradable over the air.

  • Tiny Bluetooth LE dev boards target IoT apps

    Two Cortex-M4 Bluetooth LE boards have gained wider distribution: Arrow is selling SensiEdge’s SensiBLE, and Mouser has Adafruit’s Feather Nrf52 Bluefruit.

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) continues to rise in importance as the wireless conduit for MCU-based IoT edge devices. Late last week Arrow Electronics announced it was launching the recently introduced SensiBLE IoT SoM, which is also referred to as the Simba-Pro, from Israel-based SensiEdge. (Mouser has already begun distributing the product, as has RS Components in the UK.)

Security: 'Rich' E-mail, BlackBerry, and D-Link

Filed under
Security
  • The only safe email is text-only email

    The real issue is that today’s web-based email systems are electronic minefields filled with demands and enticements to click and engage in an increasingly responsive and interactive online experience. It’s not just Gmail, Yahoo mail and similar services: Desktop-computer-based email programs like Outlook display messages in the same unsafe way.

  • BlackBerry admits: We could do better at patching

    BlackBerry has confirmed that its first Android device, the Priv, will be stuck on Google's 2015 operating system forevermore, which Google itself will cease supporting next year.

    Having been promised "the most secure Android", BlackBerry loyalists have seen the promise of monthly security updates stutter recently, with distribution of the monthlies getting patchy (no pun intended).

  • Researcher publicly discloses 10 zero-day flaws in D-Link 850L routers

    Peeved about previous vulnerability disclosures experiences with D-Link, a security researcher has publicly disclosed 10 zero-day vulnerabilities in D-Link DIR 850L wireless AC1200 dual-band gigabit cloud routers.

    Security researcher Pierre Kim opted to publicly disclose the vulnerabilities this time, citing a “very badly coordinated” disclosure with D-Link in February. That time around he had reported nine vulnerabilities, but he said it took D-Link five months to release new firmware that ended up patching only one of the flaws he found.

A look at TAILS – Privacy oriented GNU/Linux Distribution

Filed under
Reviews
Security
Debian

The Amensic Incognito Live System, is a Debian based distribution that routes all internet traffic through the TOR network, and leaves no trace of its existence or anything done on the system when the machine is shut down. The obvious aim in this, is to aid in keeping the user anonymous and private. Tails is not installed to a users computer, but instead is run strictly as a LiveUSB / LiveDVD.

TAILS does not utilize the host machines Hard Disk at all, and is loaded entirely into RAM. When a machine is shut down, the data that is stored in RAM disappears over the course of a few minutes, essentially leaving no trace of whatever had been done. Granted, there is a method of attack known as a Cold Boot Attack, where data is extracted from RAM before it has had a chance to disappear, but TAILS has you covered on that front too; the TAILS website says,

“To prevent this attack, the data in RAM is overwritten by random data when shutting down Tails. This erases all traces from your session on that computer.”

Read more

The Most Promising Open Source Projects to Watch for in 2018

Filed under
OSS

Everyone and their mother is talking about open source projects. As you likely already know, at the core it’s a software which is used freely, shared globally in real-time and can be modified by virtually anyone. While there are a myriad of open source licenses offering users various degrees of freedom and leverage, they all have one thing in common: stimulating and encouraging collaboration.

Beyond merely publishing code, the whole notion of open source is to generate an immersive dialogue where anyone has the right to propose changes and make an impact. It’s all about collectively collaborating and inspiring community dialogues.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora: DHS Projects, Financial News, and Fedora's Boltron Preview

Filed under
Red Hat

OpenBSD Development News

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • t2k17 Hackathon report: Ken Westerback on dhclient progress, developer herding
  • A return-oriented programming defense from OpenBSD

    Stack-smashing attacks have a long history; they featured, for example, as a core part of the Morris worm back in 1988. Restrictions on executing code on the stack have, to a great extent, put an end to such simple attacks, but that does not mean that stack-smashing attacks are no longer a threat. Return-oriented programming (ROP) has become a common technique for compromising systems via a stack-smashing vulnerability. There are various schemes out there for defeating ROP attacks, but a mechanism called "RETGUARD" that is being implemented in OpenBSD is notable for its relative simplicity.

    In a classic stack-smashing attack, the attack code would be written directly to the stack and executed there. Most modern systems do not allow execution of on-stack code, though, so this kind of attack will be ineffective. The stack does affect code execution, though, in that the call chain is stored there; when a function executes a "return" instruction, the address to return to is taken from the stack. An attacker who can overwrite the stack can, thus, force a function to "return" to an arbitrary location.

"Oligarchis[ing] open-source communities," Openwashing, and Microsoft EEE

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Programming: Survey of build Systems and Remote Imports for Python

Filed under
Development
  • A tale of three build systems

    As you might have noticed, meson is the new kid on the block. Step by step I am currently converting some projects to it, spearheading Shotwell. Since Shotwell only “recently” became an autotools project, you may ask why. Shotwell had a hand-written makefile system. This made some tasks that would have been incredibly easy with autotools, such as mallard documentation handling, more complicated than it should be. Since autotools provides all the nice features that you want for your GNOME environment, it made sense to leverage that.

  • Remote imports for Python?

    Importing a module into a Python program is a pretty invasive operation; it directly runs code in the current process that has access to anything the process can reach. So it is not wildly surprising that a suggestion to add a way to directly import modules from remote sites was met with considerable doubt—if not something approaching hostility. It turns out that the person suggesting the change was not unaware of the security implications of the idea, but thought it had other redeeming qualities; others in the discussion were less sanguine.

Surge in hybrid cloud adoption helps Red Hat expand footprint in Asia

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat has expanded its cloud and service provider footprint in Asia.

The company has certified a number of new cloud and managed services providers in India, Indonesia, Japan, and Singapore.

Some of the newest Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Providers include Diadem Technologies in India, IndonesianCloud in Indonesia, Mitsubishi Research Institute in Japan, India’s Prodevans Technologies and Singapore’s STT Connect.

Cloud provider models are becoming increasingly complex, expanding beyond multi-tenant public clouds to include private cloud build-outs, Linux container-based infrastructure, and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) solutions.

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Linux Kernel 4.13 Gets First Point Release, It's Now Ready for Production Use

Filed under
Linux

Well, that was fast. Only a week after the launch of the Linux 4.13 kernel series, Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the first point release, which marks the branch as "stable" on the kernel.org website, and ready for production use, of course.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

OSS: Puppet Acquires Distelli, Mozilla Adds Tracking Protection, Fake List of Open Source Companies, and Open Source Summit

  • Puppet Acquires Distelli, Boosting Its Cloud Automation Offerings
    Puppet, the open source company that markets cloud-native software management tools, has acquired startup Distelli. Based in Seattle, Distelli offers a software as a service platform used by developers to build, test, and deploy code written in any language to any server, including cloud platforms. This is an obvious good match, as both platforms enable developers to manage infrastructure and applications across the entire software delivery process to make app development quicker. "Today, a company's success is predicated on how quickly and successfully it can deliver new experiences to customers through software," Puppet's CEO, Sanjay Mirchandani, said in a statement. "Automation makes world-class application delivery straightforward for every enterprise, not just for companies born in the cloud. Together with Distelli, we are bringing a comprehensive solution for orchestrating and automating the entire software delivery lifecycle, from infrastructure, all the way up through containers."
  • Mozilla Adds Tracking Protection to Firefox for iOS, Focus Gets Multitasking
    Mozilla released on Thursday new updates for its Firefox for iOS and Firefox Focus for Android apps adding new features like tracking protection and multi-tasking, along with various other improvements. Firefox for iOS has been updated today to version 9.0, a release that's available on the App Store for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch devices running iOS 10.3 or later. It comes with support for Apple's recently launched iOS 11 operating system, as well as tracking protection, which is enabled by default in the private browsing mode to automatically block third-party trackers in an attempt to increase browsing speed.
  • 35 Top Open Source Companies [Ed: Easy to see that this list will be a 'scam' when the company listed in number one is Adobe. It has even listed Black Duck as "Open Source Company". It’s PROPRIETARY and ANTI-FOSS.]
  • Open Source Summit in Los Angeles: Day 1 in 5 Minutes
    Open Source Summit North America in Los Angeles was packed with keynotes, technical sessions, and special presentations, including a conversation with Linux creator Linus Torvalds. In case you couldn't make it, CodePop.com's Gregg Pollack has put together some short videos recapping highlights of the event.

today's howtos

Software: Temps, LabPlot, GNU Parallel, gnURL, Document Liberation Project

  • Temps – A Smart Beautiful Weather App for GNU/Linux
    I’ve written on a couple of weather applications before, including Cumulus and Simple Weather Indicator and today I bring you yet another free and beautiful Linux app with thanks to the open source community. It’s reminiscent of Cumulus weather application and it goes by the name of Temps. Temps is a beautiful cross-platform weather application that lives in the menu bar of any desktop. Being true to the open source spirit, it uses code from several open source projects like Menubar, OpenWeatherMap, Electron, and Chart.js, to mention a few.
  • [LabPlot] Short update on recent UX improvements
    One of the usual data visualization workflows supported by LabPlot involves the import of some external data into the application and the creation of plots.
  • GNU Parallel 20170922 ('Mexico City') released
    GNU Parallel - For people who live life in the parallel lane.
  • gnURL 7.55.1-4 released
    Today gnURL has been released in version 7.55.1-4 as a patch release.
  • Document Liberation Project: New releases
    LibreOffice’s native file format is the fully standardised OpenDocument Format. This is ideal for long-term storage of data, but many of us have to work with other file formats as well, including those generated by proprietary software.

Mesa 17.1.10 Release Candidate

  • Mesa 17.1.10 release candidate
    The candidate for the Mesa 17.1.10 is now available. Currently we have: - 41 queued - 0 nominated (outstanding) - and 5 rejected patches This is the last release for the 17.1 series.
  • Mesa 17.1.10 Is Being Prepped As The Final 17.1 Update
    J.A. Suarez Romero of Igalia is preparing Mesa 17.1.10 as the final point release for the Mesa 17.1 release stream. The release candidate is out today while Romero is planning to issue this final update to Mesa 17.1 by next week Monday, 25 September. Following that, users are encouraged to upgrade to the stable Mesa 17.2 series.