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Sunday, 28 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2017 - 10:51pm
Story Feren OS: A Linux Desktop Game-Changer Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2017 - 8:43pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2017 - 8:13pm
Story Windows Intruded by CIA Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2017 - 2:20pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2017 - 2:27am
Story today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2017 - 9:57pm
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2017 - 8:55pm
Story Tizen Everywhere at Samsung Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2017 - 8:22pm
Story Security Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2017 - 4:42pm
Story Android Domination and Android O Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2017 - 4:06pm

Linux and Linux Foundation

  • CPU Utilization is Wrong

    The metric we all use for CPU utilization is deeply misleading, and getting worse every year. What is CPU utilization? How busy your processors are? No, that's not what it measures. Yes, I'm talking about the "%CPU" metric used everywhere, by everyone. In every performance monitoring product. In top(1).

  • Linux Foundation Tackles Real-Time Data Analysis with SNAS.io Initiative

    The Linux Foundation is looking to boost access to real-time analytics with the adoption of the former Open Border Gateway Monitoring Protocol (OpenBMP) platform into the open source community under the new SNAS.io (Streaming Network Analytics System) initiative.

  • OpenBMP Project Comes to Linux Foundation as SNAS.io

    The Open BGP Monitoring Protocol (OpenBMP) collection framework is now being renamed and brought to the Linux Foundation as a new project known as snas.io.

    The OpenBMP project defined itself as an open source implementation of the draft-ietf-grow-bmp-17 protocol. BMP is a protocol to monitor BGP sessions.

    "BMP is intended to provide a convenient interface for obtaining route views," the IETF draft states. "The design goals are to keep BMP simple, useful, easily implemented, and minimally service-affecting. BMP is not suitable for use as a routing protocol."

  • Snas.io joins the Linux Foundation’s open-source project

    Snas.io, a project that provides network routing topologies for software-defined applications, has joined the Linux Foundation.

    The Snas.io project helps track and analyze network routing topology data in real time for those that are using border gateway protocol (BGP) as a control protocol, internet service providers, large enterprises, and enterprise data center networks using EVPS.

GNU Artanis 0.2 and a New Rant About RMS

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Artanis 0.2 released

    I'm pleased to announce the first stable version artanis-0.2 here.

  • Artanis: GNU Gets Into Web Application Frameworks, Written In Guile Scheme

    Artanis 0.2 has been released, a newer GNU project that's a web application framework written in Guile Scheme.

    GNU Artanis is designed to be used for developing dynamic websites, web applications, web services, and other web resources. Artanis is dual-licensed under the GPLv3+ and LGPLv3+.

  • Heed the Prophet Stallman, oh Software Sinners! [Ed: Robin Miller veers off into another one of those rants about RMS. RMS is an atheist who just satirises religion.]

    Few of us will ever live up to Richard’s spiritual example or follow every tenet laid out in The Gospel of Free Software. The best we mere mundanes can do is try — and work especially hard to avoid egregious sins like melting our jewelry down into raw gold and using it to build a golden Windows computer or something similarly evil.

Tips for picking a GNU/Linux Distribution

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Distrohopping is a term some like to use for switching from one GNU/Linux distribution to another frequently, rather than sticking to one system. I’m no stranger to this, I’ve installed nearly every major and popularly known system you’ll come across – twice.

However, through my time trying all of these various distributions, I’ve learned a great deal and finally settled (I think) upon where I plan to stay, so I thought I’d share some tips for picking your long-term system, as well as some ideas depending on what you enjoy.

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Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Release of NetworkManager 1.8

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • NetworkManager 1.8 Released

    NetworkManager 1.8 is now available as the latest version of this widely-used network management component to Linux systems.

  • NetworkManager 1.8 Is Officially Out, Handles PINs for PKCS#11 Tokens as Secrets

    NetworkManager, the open-source network management tool used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions for allowing users to connection to various wired, wireless or mobile network connections, was updated to version 1.8.0.

    NetworkManager 1.8 is a major release that introduces numerous improvements and new features over the NetworkManager 1.6 series. Prominent ones include more flexible configurations for hostname management, as well as support for more route options like mtu, lock-mtu, initrwnd, lock-initrwnd, cwnd, lock-cwnd, tos, window, lock-window, pref-src, src, initcwnd, and lock-initcwnd.

Free/Open Source NFV

Filed under
OSS
  • Telcos Digging In on Open Source NFV

    The early results on telecom's use of open source are in and it's been a bit of a bumpy road thus far. One thing is clear: The companies that are moving forward are those willing to get their hands dirty.

    Speakers from BT, Orange and Telefónica said at last week's NFV World Congress in San Jose, Calif., that open source is a vital component to their NFV plans. As early adopters, though, they had to do some work. Telefónica SA (NYSE: TEF), for instance, got around interoperability problems by taking the DIY approach.

  • Network microsegmentation possible with NFV and SDN combined

    With software-defined networking, network service providers can far more easily adopt zero-trust models for networking across shared infrastructures. One of the primary reasons people deploy SDN technologies is to achieve network microsegmentation of infrastructure, which implements fine-grain restrictions on which network entities -- physical or virtual machines, containers or network segments -- can talk to other entities.

    Network microsegmentation is foundational to zero-trust architectures. In a microsegmented model, the network knows which systems are allowed to talk to which other systems, in which ways and under what circumstances. Network microsegmentation allows sanctioned traffic to pass, allows each network node to see only what it needs to talk to or listen to and hides the rest.

​HPE hasn't abandoned OpenStack, releases Helion OpenStack 5.0

Filed under
Server
OSS

If you thought HPE was getting out of the cloud business, I couldn't blame you. In late 2015, HPE gave up on its public OpenStack-based Helion cloud. Then, early this year, all of HPE's OpenStack developers moved over to SUSE. So, was HPE bidding the cloud, and OpenStack in particular, goodbye? Nope.

In Boston this week at OpenStack Summit, HPE released HPE Helion OpenStack 5.0. This release Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) based cloud is built on the OpenStack Newton codebase and adheres tightly to application programming interface (API) standards and services. Since OpenStack's open APIs are an important part of why it's popular with so many companies, that's no small matter.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • How to protect your Google and Facebook accounts with a security key

    Google supports a format called FIDO Universal 2nd Factor (U2F), which it helped develop. Keys are available that work over USB, Bluetooth, and NFC, so they can be used with a smartphone or tablet in addition to a PC.

  • Cisco Patches WikiLeaks Security Vulnerability Affecting Hundreds Of Devices

    Cisco has patched a critical flaw in its IOS software that affected more than 300 models of routers and switches that was discovered after WikiLeaks exposed CIA documents.

    "We've spoken to a few customers about it, a few enterprise clients, and thankfully it didn't any disrupt business for us," said one top executive from a solution provider and Cisco Gold partner who did not wished to be named. "I'm glad to know they fixed the issue. … Their devices will always be a big target for attackers because Cisco is everywhere."

  • Microsoft makes emergency security fix

    Microsoft has released an urgent update to stop hackers taking control of computers with a single email.

    The unusual bug, in Microsoft anti-malware software such as Windows Defender, could be exploited without the recipient even opening the message.

    Researchers working for Google's Project Zero cyber-security outfit discovered the flaw at the weekend.

    The fix has been specially pushed out hours before the software giant's monthly Tuesday security update.

  • Google’s OSS-Fuzz Finds 1,000 Open Source Bugs

    The numbers are in, and judging by them, OSS-Fuzz, the program Google unveiled last December to continuously fuzz open source software, has been a success.

    In five months the effort has unearthed more than 1,000 bugs, a quarter of them potential security vulnerabilities, Google says.

  • Open source vulnerabilities hit VMware [Ed: Ridiculous! WMware is secret software with back doors (RSA/EMC), so why focus only on holes in a FOSS component?]

    Apache Struts 2 is an open source web application framework for developing Java applications that has been in use since 2007. The recent Apache Struts 2 vulnerability affected vCenter Server 6.0 and 6.5, vRealize Operations Manager 6.x, vRealize Hyperic Server 5.x, and versions 6.x and 7.x of the Horizon Desktop-as-a-Service Platform.

  • Samsung partners with McAfee, brings security software to the Galaxy S8, Smart TVs, and PCs [Ed: But Samsung should know adding proprietary software to Tizen and/or Android won't necessarily make these more secure]

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

WHY WINDOWS POWER USERS BREAK LINUX

Filed under
Linux

Finally, I think it’s worth pointing out that Linux is not a product, it’s a community. Windows and Mac people have a hard time wrapping their heads around that. They’re used to venting frustration at Microsoft and Apple. If they do that in a Linux forum, they will most likely get flamed. It’s important to understand that attacking Linux is like attacking the entire community. Is Linux perfect? Hell no! Is there much room for improvement? Absolutely! How you present your critiques and/or ask for help makes all the difference in the world. I have found that a positive and constructive attitude goes a long, long way. I have had developers bend over backward to help me with a problem or point me to an alternative solution just because I came to them with respect and didn’t point fingers.

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Open source SQL database CockroachDB hits 1.0

Filed under
OSS

CockroachDB, an open source, fault-tolerant SQL database with horizontal scaling and strong consistency across nodes—and a name few people will likely forget—is now officially available.

Cockroach Labs, the company behind its development, touts CockroachDB as a “cloud native” database solution—a system engineered to run as a distributed resource. Version 1.0 is available in both basic and for-pay editions, and both boast features that will appeal to enterprises.

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Mozilla and Thunderbird are continuing together, with conditions

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Thunderbird e-mail client still has its supporters, but for the past couple of years, Mozilla has been making moves to distance itself from the project. In late 2015, Mozilla announced that it would be looking for a new home for Thunderbird, calling its continued maintenance "a tax" on Firefox development.

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Leftovers: Devices, KDE, ArchBang, Grml and More

Filed under
Misc
  • Raspberry Pi Zero W fixes networking omission

    I don't recommend trying to use the Raspberry Pi Zero W as a GUI desktop alternative. It works, but it is slow. I mean, you can watch YouTube videos on it, but for an extra $25, you could get a Raspberry Pi 3 that has double the RAM and more horsepower to give you a better and more responsive experience than the Raspberry Pi Zero W.

  • Take a sneak peek at Google's Android replacement, Fuchsia

    An enthusiast has compiled Google's infant Fuchsia OS and put the toddler through its paces.

    The open-source OS is an open secret – anyone can download the platform from Github, and one enthusiast at Hotfix, a repair shop in Texas, has done just that.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.5, Krita 3.1.3 and digiKam 5.5 Coming Soon to Kubuntu 17.04 Users

    KDE's José Manuel Santamaría Lema is informing the Kubuntu Linux community today about the upcoming availability of a multitude of updates for various KDE technologies in the Kubuntu Backports PPA.

    It's a known fact that Kubuntu developers are always working hard to bring you all the latest goodies as soon as they are released upstream, and it looks like Kubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) users will be treated with the KDE Plasma 5.9.5 desktop environment, which is the last in the series as KDE Plasma 5.10 is coming at the end of May.

  • ArchBang OpenRC Rc iso
  • Grml 2017.05 "Freedatensuppe" Distro Enters Development Based on Debian Stretch

    The Debian-based Grml GNU/Linux distribution designed for system administrators is once again in development after taking a long break of approximately two and a half years.

    Dubbed "Freedatensuppe," the next major release of the operating system is versioned Grml 2017.05, and a first Release Candidate (RC) build is now available for public testing. Development of Grml 2017.05 is currently based on the Debian Testing branch, which will soon become Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch."

  • Much ado about communication

    One of the first challenges an open source project faces is how to communicate among contributors. There are a plethora of options: forums, chat channels, issues, mailing lists, pull requests, and more. How do we choose which is the right medium to use and how do we do it right?

    Sadly and all too often, projects shy away from making a disciplined decision and instead opt for "all of the above." This results in a fragmented community: Some people sit in Slack/Mattermost/IRC, some use the forum, some use mailing lists, some live in issues, and few read all of them.

  • What Internet-Connected War Might Look Like

    A technician hurriedly slings his backpack over his shoulders, straps on his M9 pistol, and bolts out of the transport with his squad of commandos in a hail of gunfire. As soon as his team reaches the compound, he whips out a laptop and starts deploying a rootkit to the target server, bullets whizzing overhead all the while.

Proprietary Browsers and Proprietary Games

Filed under
Software
Web
Gaming
  • Vivaldi 1.10 Web Browser to Let You Control New Tab Behavior Through Extensions

    The development of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.10 web browser continues at fast pace, and today we see the availability of a new snapshot, versioned 1.10.838.7, which implements more new features, but also fixes several regressions.

    Coming only one week after the previous snapshot, which added a new way to sort downloads, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.10.838.7 is the third in this development cycle, and it attempts to implement a new functionality that promises to allow users to control the behavior of new tabs directly from extensions. It will be located under Settings -> Tabs -> New Tab Page -> Control by Extension.

  • Opera Reborn “rethinks” the browser… with integrated WhatsApp and Facebook

    Vivaldi, which was created by Opera's co-founder and former CEO, continues along its own path, focusing on privacy, security, and interesting enhancements to tabbed browsing. Vivaldi hit version 1.9 last week and now lets you "plant trees as you surf."

  • Wednesday Madness, a quick look at some good Linux gaming deals
  • Project Zomboid adds vehicles in a new beta

    I've tested it and as they mentioned in the announcement forum post, it is an early work in progress. Cars have no sound, sometimes other textures go on top of the car which looks weird and there are other issues. Even so, it's still awesome to finally be able to play around with vehicles to move around the map quicker.

GTK+ 3.22.13 and WebKitGTK+ 2.16.2

Filed under
Development
GNU
GNOME
  • GTK+ 3.22.13 Introduces More Wayland Improvements, Fixes for Some Memory Leaks

    While work on the major GTK+ 4 series advances at a slow pace, the GTK+ 3.22 stable branch is still being updated, and today we see the launch of yet another bugfix release, the thirteenth in the series.

    GTK+ 3.22.13 is a maintenance release that adds a month's worth of fixes and updated translations from various contributors. The bug fixes are typically small but significant and include a memory leak fix for the Wayland display server when exporting handle, a memory leak fix for linkbutton, and a quartz backend segfault fix, which was a regression from last month's point release, GTK+ 3.22.12.

  • WebKitGTK+ 2.16.2 Updates User Agent Quirks for New Google Login Page, YouTube

    WebKitGTK+, the open-source and full-featured port of the WebKit rendering engine to the GTK+ GUI toolkit used to build modern applications for the GNOME desktop environment was updated today to version 2.16.2.

    WebKitGTK+ 2.16.2 is just a small bugfix release that only resolves some of the issues users reported since the first maintenance update of the WebKitGTK+ 2.16 stable series. The most prominent change being improved user agent quirks to add compatibility for Google's new login page and YouTube.

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • SUSE Unveils OpenStack Cloud Monitoring & Supports TrilioVault

    Today at the OpenStack Summit 2017 in Boston, MA, SUSE, aside from celebrating its 25th anniversary, announced its new open source software solution that makes it simple to monitor and manage the health and performance of enterprise OpenStack cloud environments and workloads, SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring. In other SUSE related news, Trilio Data, announced that its TrilioVault is Ready Certified for SUSE OpenStack Cloud.

  • Students to Enhance Multiple Open Source Projects

    Five students will spend this summer putting their coding skills into practice for openSUSE and other projects during this year’s Google Summer of Code.

    The international program that matches mentors and students funded 1,315 student projects this year for 201 open source organizations, who will benefit from the active involvement from these new developers.

    “We are excited to be selected as a mentoring organization and to mentor these talented, young GSoC students,” said Christian Bruckmayer, one of the openSUSE mentors. “This year’s projects focus on enhancing the capabilities of our open source tools, so that the benefits are shared amongst the open-source ecosystem.”

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • MapD Open Sources GPU-Powered Database

    Since starting work on MapD more than five years ago while taking a database course at MIT, I had always dreamed of making the project open source. It is thus with great pleasure to announce that today our company is open sourcing the MapD Core database and associated visualization libraries, effective immediately.

  • Enterprise Open Source Programs: From Concept to Reality

    How pervasive is open source in today’s businesses? According to the 2016 Future of Open Source Survey from Black Duck and North Bridge, a mere three percent of respondents say they don't use any open source tools or platforms.

    Leveraging open source has also become a key avenue for fostering new ideas and technologies. Gartner's Hype Cycle for Open Source Software (2016) notes that organizations are using open source today not just for cost savings, but increasingly for innovation. With this in mind, major companies and industries are quickly building out their open source programs, and the open source community is responding.

  • LinuxFest Northwest report

    This weekend was LinuxFest Northwest 2017, and as usual I was down in Bellingham to attend it. Had a good time, again as usual. Luckily I got to do my talk first thing and get it out of the way. I’d post a link to the recording, but there doesn’t seem to be one – I’ll check with the organizers if it got lost or sometihng. In the mean time, here’s the slide deck. It was a general talk on Fedora’s past, present and future.

  • Aleph Objects and IC3D promote transparency with first Open Source Hardware filament

    Aleph Objects, best-known for developing the LulzBot brand of 3D printers, has announced the launch and availability of a certified Open Source Hardware 3D printing filament at RAPID+TCT.

  • What does SVG have to do with teaching kids to code?

    Jay Nick is a retired electrical engineer who volunteers at local schools in his community by using art as a creative way to introduce students to mathematics and coding. Reflecting on the frustrations that his own children experienced in college programming classes, he decided to use his own experience with Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) to create an approach to coding that combines principles of mathematics and art.

  • Microsoft's .NET-mare for developers: ASP.NET Core 2.0 won't work on Windows-only .NET

    Microsoft has made a change to its forthcoming ASP.NET Core 2.0 web framework so that it is now incompatible with the Windows-only .NET Framework, causing confusion and annoyance for some .NET developers.

Solus - how far will it go?

Filed under
Reviews

The Live run of Solus was stable, fast and smooth. I especially liked the crispness of the fonts, windows and of all the elements.

At the same time, if you want to use Solus Budgie as a production OS, I'd recommend you to think twice. The main show-stopper for me would be the unknown format for supported packages. It locks down the number of available applications to whatever is available in official repositories, and there are already some gaps. Of course, there are some doubtful decisions on default set of applications and default desktop items, but that's easy to fix.

I hope that Solus will develop further and this is not my last visit to that part of the Linux world. I hope the team will not run out of patience and resources.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME and GTK News: GNOME Release and More

These are the most exciting Linux powered devices

What started off as a hobby project for the Finnish engineer Linus Torvalds, has turned into a global phenomenon. Today Linux is literally powering the modern economy – everything from Amazon public clouds, stock exchanges, and social networks run on Linux. It also runs in devices like sensors, printers, routers…and what not. Linux virtually owns the smartphone market with Android. Read more

FreeBSD News: 64-bit Inodes and KDE

  • FreeBSD Lands Support For 64-bit Inodes (ino64 Project)
    While Linux and other operating systems (including DragonFlyBSD) have supported 64-bit inodes for data structures on file-systems, FreeBSD has been limited to 32-bit. But thanks to the work of many on the ino64 project, FreeBSD now has support for 64-bit inodes while retaining backwards compatibility.
  • KDE FreeBSD CI (2)
    The KDE Continuous Integration system builds KDE software from scratch, straight from the git repositories, and usually from master (or whatever is considered the development branch). It’s been building for Linux for a long time, and has recently been expanded with FreeBSD servers as well. KDE sysadmin has been kind enough to provide two more VMs (with some more compiling “oomph”) so that we can keep up better, and the CI has just been expanded with all of the Plasma products. That means we’re now building KDE Frameworks, and the Plasma desktop.

Enlightenment 0.21.8

  • Enlightenment DR 0.21.8 Release
    This is another bugfix and stability release for the Enlightenment 21 Release series.
  • Enlightenment 0.21.8 Released
    Enlightenment 0.21.8 was released this week as the latest stable point release to the E21 series. Enlightenment 0.21.8 has a number of fixes, including some display fixes, avoid starting XWayland repeatedly, X11 and Wayland specific alterations, and other routine work.