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Saturday, 21 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE: KDE Frameworks 5.39.0, New Kubuntu ISOs, Krita Interview Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 4:26pm
Story Games: Football Manager, Ravenfield, Dying Light, Tower of Time, Immortal Redneck, Let Them Come, DwarfCorp Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 4:11pm
Story Renesas taps new 10-year SLTS kernel from the Civil Infrastructure Platform Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 3:55pm
Story today's howtos and leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 10:58am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 10:52am
Story Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 15 Rianne Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 10:00am
Story Wi-Fi WPA2 Encryption Problem (and Hype About That) Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 7:45am
Story Linus Torvalds lauds fuzzing for improving Linux security Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 7:39am
Story Software: psdash, Tilix, Oceanaudio Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 5:56am
Story Linux 4.14-rc5 Released Roy Schestowitz 1 16/10/2017 - 4:10am

Ubuntu MATE 17.10 to Be First Linux OS to Ship with a Snap Installed by Default

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress is pioneering pre-installed Snap support in his Ubuntu distro by shipping the forthcoming Ubuntu MATE 17.10 release as the first distro with a Snap app installed by default.

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GNOME and Budgie: 2 Comfy Ubuntu 17.10 Environments

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you are looking for a change-of-pace desktop that has a modern flare and very tiny learning curve, Ubuntu's integration of both GNOME 3 and Budgie easily can fit your needs. If you want to keep using the Ubuntu family desktop line, take the other Ubuntu flavors for a spin.

Or, consider checking out the GNOME and Budgie flavors as an alternative to your current Linux distro. Canonical is a solid developer that has pioneered many innovations.

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Customizable RPi expansion line adds stepper, breakout, and PoE LoRa boards

Filed under
Linux

Gumstix added to its line of “Gumstix Pi” add-ons for the Pi and Pi Compute Module 3 with a Stepper HAT, a breakout, and a PoE-driven LoRa gateway.

In August, Gumstix announced several LoRa add-ons to its Geppetto board design service that work with a RisingHF LoRa module, and launched LoRa boards based on its Overo module, Arduino boards, and the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (RPi CM3). Now, the company has introduced a Power-over-Ethernet ready version of its Pi Conduit PoE called the Gumstix Pi Conduit PoE, and launched a Gumstix Pi Newgate breakout board that works with the RPi CM3 and the original compute module. Gumstix also launched a HAT add-on for the Raspberry Pi 3 SBC called the Gumstix Pi Stepper HAT.

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Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board election call for nominations

Filed under
Linux

The next election for members of the Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory Board will be held on October 25 at the Kernel Summit in Prague. The call has gone out for candidates to fill the five available seats. "The Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board (TAB) serves as the interface between the kernel development community and the Foundation. The TAB advises the Foundation on kernel-related matters, helps member companies learn to work with the community, and works to resolve community-related problems before they get out of hand. The board has ten members, one of whom sits on the LF board of directors."

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Games: Interstellar Marines, PS3 emulator RPCS3, and HEADLINER

Filed under
Gaming

Graphics: Mesa, Mir, and Phoronix Test Suite

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa Is Up To About 8,000 Commits This Year, 2.2 Million Lines

    Now being into Q4, I've been meaning to run some fresh Mesa Git development statistics to see how this year is pacing for this important piece of the open-source graphics ecosystem and Linux desktop.

    As of this morning, Mesa's Git tree is made up of 5,633 files representing a total of 2,243,544 lines. This came about over 96,443 commits from more than 800 different authors. Mesa is still seeing on average about 13 commits per day.

  • Mir 1.0 Is Ready For Release

    There is just one week to go until the Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" release but it looks like the Mir 1.0 release will still happen in time.

    It's been the goal of the remaining Mir developers to release version 1.0 during the Artful cycle. As of a few weeks back they were still aiming for that goal and to pursue a feature freeze exception. As of yesterday, all blocker bugs have been cleared for releasing Mir 1.0.

  • MESA_tile_raster_order Added To The OpenGL Registry

    The new OpenGL extension MESA_tile_raster_order proposed by Eric Anholt at Broadcom has now been merged to the Khronos registry.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 7.6-Alvdal Milestone 1 Released

Security: Updates, Deloitte Crack, 'Optionsbleed', Browsers Will Store Credit Card Details

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Deloitte hack hit server containing emails from across US government

    The hack into the accountancy giant Deloitte compromised a server that contained the emails of an estimated 350 clients, including four US government departments, the United Nations and some of the world’s biggest multinationals, the Guardian has been told.

    Sources with knowledge of the hack say the incident was potentially more widespread than Deloitte has been prepared to acknowledge and that the company cannot be 100% sure what was taken.

    Deloitte said it believed the hack had only “impacted” six clients, and that it was confident it knew where the hackers had been. It said it believed the attack on its systems, which began a year ago, was now over.

    However, sources who have spoken to the Guardian, on condition of anonymity, say the company red-flagged, and has been reviewing, a cache of emails and attachments that may have been compromised from a host of other entities.

  • Apache Patches Optionsbleed Flaw in HTTP Server

    The Apache HTTP Web Server (commonly simply referred to as 'Apache') is the most widely deployed web server in the world, and until last week, it was at risk from a security vulnerability known as Optionsbleed.

  • Browsers Will Store Credit Card Details Similar to How They Save Passwords

    A new W3C standard is slowly creeping into current browser implementations, a standard that will simplify the way people make payments online.

    Called the Payment Request API, this new standard relies on users entering and storing payment card details inside browsers, just like they currently do with passwords.

Quick Look to Uruk GNU/Linux

Filed under
Reviews

Uruk GNU/Linux is a complete, user-friendly desktop operating system with strong commitment in free software that is derived from Trisquel. Uruk 2.0 is derived from Trisquel 8 Flidas (that is still in Beta now) that is derived from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Uruk features MATE Desktop as its interface, with LibreOffice and VLC there, plus Emacs and GIMP preinstalled, and completed with Ubiquity to easily install the system. If you kindly want a 100% free distro (despite for now, it hasn't been recognized by FSF) that is user-friendly and actively developed, I wish you'll be happy with Uruk. So here's a quick look to its live session. Enjoy!

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Debian: Generating 3D prints, pristine-tar, other developments

Filed under
Debian
  • Generating 3D prints in Debian using Cura and Slic3r(-prusa)

    At my nearby maker space, Sonen, I heard the story that it was easier to generate gcode files for theyr 3D printers (Ultimake 2+) on Windows and MacOS X than Linux, because the software involved had to be manually compiled and set up on Linux while premade packages worked out of the box on Windows and MacOS X. I found this annoying, as the software involved, Cura, is free software and should be trivial to get up and running on Linux if someone took the time to package it for the relevant distributions. I even found a request for adding into Debian from 2013, which had seem some activity over the years but never resulted in the software showing up in Debian. So a few days ago I offered my help to try to improve the situation.

  • pristine-tar updates

    pristine-tar is a tool that is present in the workflow of a lot of Debian people. I adopted it last year after it has been orphaned by its creator Joey Hess. A little after that Tomasz Buchert joined me and we are now a functional two-person team.

  • Debian LTS work, September 2017
  • My Free Software Activities in September 2017

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

GNU/Linux (GNOME/KDE) Phones are Alive, Windows Phones Are Dead

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Linux 4.9.54, 4.4.91, and 3.18.74

Filed under
Linux

Q4OS 2.4 Scorpion, stable

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are proud to announce the immediate availability of the brand new stable Q4OS 2.4 version codenamed 'Scorpion'. This is a long-term support LTS release, to be supported for at least five years with security patches and software updates. Q4OS Scorpion is based on Debian Stretch 9.2 and Trinity 14.0.5 desktop environment and it is available for 64bit and 32bit/i686pae computers, as well as i386 systems without PAE extension. We are working hard to release Q4OS Scorpion editions for 64bit and 32bit ARM architectures as soon as possible.

Q4OS offers its own exclusive utilities and features, especially the 'Desktop profiler' for profiling your computer into different professional working tools, 'Setup utility' for the smooth installation of third-party applications, a 'Welcome Screen' with several integrated shortcuts to make system configuration easier for novice users, KDE5, XFCE, LXDE, Cinnamon and LXQT alternative environments installation option and many more.

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Designing tabletop games with open source

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

The print-on-demand industry is one of my favorite products of technological innovation. It removes gatekeepers and eliminates the bottleneck of physical bulk production. It gives anybody with a good idea and the drive to produce it a way to get their work out into the world.

Print-on-demand combined with open source software is even more powerful, letting independent publishers generate content at whatever price they can afford at the time (or for nothing at all). And the tools are a pleasure to use.

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Linux Mint: Inside the Top Linux Distro

Filed under
Linux

While Ubuntu has been refocusing their efforts, Linux Mint has managed to supersede other distributions in becoming what some have argued is the most popular Linux Distro of all time. Obviously there is no hard data to support this, however I’ve found that on YouTube and in the forums, Linux Mint is the go-to distro for most Linux newcomers.

What most newcomers might not realize is that Linux Mint wasn’t always that polished. As a matter of fact, Linux Mint used to be nothing more than Ubuntu with codecs and a green theme installed. Flash forward to the current state of the project, Linux Mint supports a number of desktop environments and even offers Mint specific tools as well.

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Linux Foundation Launches OpenMessaging Project

Filed under
Linux

The roster of Linux Foundation Collaborative Project is growing again, this time with the launch of OpenMessaging project.

According to the project's GitHub projec page, the goal of the effort is to provide a vendor-neutral open standard for distributed messaging and stream.

"OpenMessaging, which includes the establishment of industry guidelines and messaging, streaming specifications to provide a common framework for finance, e-commerce, IoT and big-data area," the project states. "The design principles are the cloud-oriented, simplicity, flexibility, and language independent in distributed heterogeneous environments.

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How To Protect Your Privacy On Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

It’s easy to have a false sense of security, thinking that other operating system might be more targeted than Linux, but there are plenty of risks and vulnerabilities for all types of Linux devices. Keep your guard up regardless of your OS.

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Kenrel: RISC, RC4, Linux Foundation Adds 15 New Silver Members

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Gets Its First Multi-Core, RISC-V Based Open Source Processor

    Last year, Silicon Valley Startup SiFive released the first open source SoC (system on a chip), which was named Freeform Everywhere 310. Now, going one step ahead from the embedded systems, the company has released U54-MC Coreplex IP, which is the world’s first RISC-V based 64-bit quad-core CPU that supports fully featured operating systems like Linux.

    Before telling you about the new U54-MC, let me introduce you to the basics of RISC-V CPUs. The traditional Complex Instruction Set Computing (CISC) and Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) do justice to their names and focus on the difficulty level of instructions as well as optimizations.

  • Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS Expected to Arrive Early Next Month, RC4 Ready for Testing

    A day later than expected, the fourth RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Linux 4.14 LTS kernel series has been announced earlier today by Linus Torvalds, who gives us an insight into the development cycle.

    According to Linus Torvalds, things are starting calming down for the development cycle of Linux kernel 4.14, which will be the next long-term support (LTS) release, and while today's RC4 milestone is bigger than a Release Candidate should be at this stage, it's still fairly normal, with the exception of a large watchdog merge.

    "In particular, ignoring that core watchdog thing, it's the usual "mostly drivers and Arch updates". This time most of the arch updates (by far) are ARM, and the drivers are dominated by networking, but there's other stuff in there too (USB, MMC, HID..). And then the usual random stuff elsewhere," said Linus Torvalds in the mailing list announcement.

  • Linux Foundation Adds 15 New Silver Members

    99Cloud: The largest OpenStack community in China and China's largest professional OpenStack training institution.

    AIG Technologies: A developer and manufacturer of personal care, cosmetic, OTC (over-the-counter) and pharmaceutical topical drug products.

    Aqua Security: Security company focused on container-based applications from development to production.

    Dynamic Coin: An open sourced, fully decentralized, peer-to-peer (P2P) currency.

    Dynatrace: A digital performance management provider offering AI-powered, full stack, automated monitoring.

    Fiberhome Technologies Group: A leading equipment vendor and global solution provider the field of information technology and telecommunications.

    GameCredits: A universal currency and virtual wallet for 2.6 billion gamers worldwide.

    Gigaspaces: Provides a leading in-memory computing platform for fast data analytics and extreme transaction processing.

    Huizhou Desay SV Automotive: Research, development and manufacturing of in-vehicle infotainment systems, climate control, driver information display systems, automotive display modules/systems, body control modules and advanced driver assistance systems.

    iconectiv: Provides solutions for the interconnection of networks, devices, and applications.

    LogDNA: A cloud-based log management system that allows engineering and DevOps to aggregate all system and application logs into a single platform.

    NGINX: A web server that is also used as a reverse proxy, load balancer and HTTP cache.

    Openet: A company that provides software solutions and consulting services primarily to telecoms.

    The Patientory Foundation: Promotes and develops new technologies and applications, especially in the fields of new open and decentralized software architectures.

    Trend Micro: is a leader in hybrid cloud, endpoint, and network security solutions.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Reasons Kubernetes is cool

    When I first learned about Kubernetes (a year and a half ago?) I really didn’t understand why I should care about it.

    I’ve been working full time with Kubernetes for 3 months or so and now have some thoughts about why I think it’s useful. (I’m still very far from being a Kubernetes expert!) Hopefully this will help a little in your journey to understand what even is going on with Kubernetes!

    I will try to explain some reason I think Kubenetes is interesting without using the words “cloud native”, “orchestration”, “container”, or any Kubernetes-specific terminology Smile. I’m going to explain this mostly from the perspective of a kubernetes operator / infrastructure engineer, since my job right now is to set up Kubernetes and make it work well.

  • Simon Phipps - President of Open Source Initiative
  • Mining Ethereum With AMD Threadrippers Paired With Four RX Vega 64 GPUs

    If you do not have time to read the full article here the short version in one sentence: No, it is not practical to run Ethereum on AMD Vega 64 graphics cards on Linux because the ROCm OpenCL stack in the AMDGPU-PRO 17.30 is very slow in Ethereum so the whole system with four Vega64 cards make 16-23Mh/s and even a single old AMD-RX470 with the old Closed-source OpenCL AMDGPU-PRO stack run ~20+ Mh/s... This all could be the effect of the exponential function Ethereum-ICE-AGE Bomb...

  • Chef Habitat Builder Debuts for Container Cloud-Native App Deployments

    DevOps vendor Chef announced the launch of its Habitat Builder software-as-a-service (SaaS) offering on Oct. 9, providing new automation capabilities for developers who work with containerized cloud-native applications.

    Habitat Builder is an extension of Chef's open-source Habitat automation technology that debuted in June 2016. With the original Habitat project, Chef provided developers with tools to help automate package code for different platforms. The new Habitat Builder effort goes a step further, providing a SaaS platform for developers to both build and deploy container applications for different cloud and container orchestration platforms.

  • fwupd hits 1.0.0

    Today I released fwupd version 1.0.0, a version number most Open Source projects seldom reach. Unusually it bumps the soname so any applications that link against libfwupd will need to be rebuilt. The reason for bumping is that we removed a lot of the cruft we’ve picked up over the couple of years since we started the project, and also took the opportunity to rename some public interfaces that are now used differently to how they were envisaged. Since we started the project, we’ve basically re-architected the way the daemon works, re-imagined how the metadata is downloaded and managed, and changed core ways we’ve done the upgrades themselves. It’s no surprise that removing all that crufty code makes the core easier to understand and maintain. I’m intending to support the 0_9_X branch for a long time, as that’s what’s going to stay in Fedora 26 and the upcoming Fedora 27.

  • Fwupd 1.0.0 Released To Advance Linux Firmware Updating

    Richard Hughes has announced the release of fwupd 1.0.0 today, the utility increasingly being used by many vendors for supporting updating of device firmware/microcode on Linux.

    With fwupd 1.0, there is ABI breakage as they removed a lot of cruft that built up over the years and also sought to improve some of the interfaces for this firmware updating project and its daemon. Fwupd 0.9 meanwhile will continue to be maintained for existing users not yet migrating to v1.0.

  • Letrs – A Cloud-Based Font Manager for Developers and Designers

    Letrs is a beautiful cloud-based font manager for developers and designers alike. It is also an ever-growing catalog of Typefaces which you can search for and activate to use on your computer and in your projects.

    It features a minimalist User Interface with a green, black, dark blue, and white color scheme. As you would expect from a cloud-based application, it works with an online account to which all your selected and uploaded fonts, teams, and search history is saved.

  • KMail User Survey Results, Part 1

    Back in August, we ran a survey to get input from our users and get a better understanding of how they use KMail. First, let me start by thanking everyone who took their time to fill in the survey. We collected over 3000 responses which is much more than we expected. Thank you very much! We got some interesting numbers and data from the survey, which I’ll analyze later, but to my big surprise, the most interesting part was the comments that many of you left at the end of the survey. We got over 1000 comments which provided us with a consistent feedback from the userbase. In this and the next blog posts, I want to address the common themes, complaints, and remarks that appeared in the comments, address the concerns raised and present some action plans that we are going to take to address those.

  • KTextEditorPreviewPlugin 0.2.0

    The KTextEditorPreviewPlugin software provides the KTextEditor Document Preview Plugin, a plugin for the editor Kate, the IDE KDevelop, or other software using the KTextEditor framework.

  • SUSE and SAP: Shared Roots Produce Fruit [Ed: This is an ad, but Linux Journal does not mark it as such]
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More in Tux Machines

Servers: Containers, 'Cloud', Microservices, and Hyperledger

  • How to Choose a Linux Container Image
    A comparison of Linux container images talks about the best-practices in choosing an image. Architecture, security and performance are among the factors, while commercial users would also look for support options. A Linux container allows separate management of kernel space and user space components by utilizing cgroups and namespaces, which are resource and process isolation mechanisms. Solaris and BSD also have abstractions similar to Linux containers but the article's focus is on the latter only. The host running the container has the operating system kernel and a set of libraries and tools required to run containers. The container image, on the other hand, has the libraries, interpreters and application code required to run the application that is being distributed in the container. These depend on underlying system libraries. This is true for interpreted languages too as the interpreters themselves are written in low level languages.
  • The Four Pillars of Cloud-Native Operations
    As organizations shift their application strategies to embrace the cloud-native world, the purpose of the cloud transitions from saving money to delivering and managing applications. Platforms such as Cloud Foundry, Kubernetes, and Docker redefine the possibilities for application environments that utilize the cloud. It’s time for us as operations professionals to rethink how we approach our jobs in this new world. We should be asking, how do our organizations take advantage of cloud-native as a new mode of application delivery?
  • How to align your team around microservices
    Microservices have been a focus across the open source world for several years now. Although open source technologies such as Docker, Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Swarm make it easier than ever for organizations to adopt microservice architectures, getting your team on the same page about microservices remains a difficult challenge. For a profession that stresses the importance of naming things well, we've done ourselves a disservice with microservices. The problem is that that there is nothing inherently "micro" about microservices. Some can be small, but size is relative and there's no standard measurement unit across organizations. A "small" service at one company might be 1 million lines of code, but far fewer at another organization.
  • Hyperledger Stitches in Another Blockchain Project
    The Linux Foundation’s open source Hyperledger Project, which works on blockchain technologies, added a sixth sub project — this one dubbed Quilt. Hyperledger Quilt started around 18 months ago and is an implementation of the Interledger Protocol (ILP), which helps facilitate transactions across ledgers.
  • Chinese Search Giant Baidu Joins Hyperledger Blockchain Consortium
    Chinese search engine giant Baidu has become the latest member of the Linux Foundation-led Hyperledger blockchain consortium. In joining the group – which focuses on developing blockchain technologies for enterprises – Baidu will assist the project's efforts alongside other member companies including Accenture, IBM, JP Morgan, R3, Cisco and SAP, among others.

Games: Steam Sale, Skirmish Line, Maia, Observer

Canonical on Path to IPO as Ubuntu Unity Linux Desktop Gets Ditched

In October 2010, Mark Shuttleworth, founder of the Ubuntu open-source operating system and CEO of Canonical, announced his grand plan to build a converged Linux desktop that would work on mobile devices, desktops and even TVs. He called the effort "Unity" and poured significant financial resources into it. Seven years later, the Unity dream is dead. On Oct. 19, Ubuntu 17.10 was released as the first Ubuntu Linux version since 2010 that didn't use Unity as the default Linux desktop. In a video interview with eWEEK, Shuttleworth details the rationale behind his decision to cancel Unity and why he has now put his company on the path toward an initial public offering (IPO). Because Ubuntu has moved into the mainstream in a bunch of areas, including the cloud, he said some of the things his company had been doing were never going to be commercially sustainable. Read more Also: Ubuntu 17.10 delivers new desktop and cloud enhancements

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