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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 7:56am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 7:55am
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 7:53am
Story Development News: RcppTOML, Rust, NetSurf Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 7:53am
Story TheSSS 21.0 Live Linux Server OS Arrives with MariaDB 10.1.21 and Apache 2.4.25 Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 12:56am
Story 10 Open Source Challenges Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 12:49am
Story This Custom Compiled Chromium OS Is Designed for Desktop and Laptop Computers Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 12:33am
Story GNOME Software 3.24 to Handle APT & Snap URLs for Easy Installation of Packages Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 12:31am
Story Best Linux Email Clients Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 12:28am
Story Linux Lite 3.4 to Revamp Lite Welcome to Help Windows Users Accommodate Faster Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2017 - 12:26am

Android Wear 2.0 review: Google's second swing at smartwatches

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Android
Reviews

Wear 2.0 is launching first on a pair of new watches from LG that were designed in conjunction with Google: the $349 Watch Sport and the $249 Watch Style. And if you happen to be one of those people who did buy an Android Wear watch before, it’s likely coming to your wrist, too.

The Watch Sport and Watch Style are meant to showcase all of the new features found in Wear 2.0, from Android Pay, to LTE connections, to the improved Google Assistant. They are the cutting edge of Google-powered watches, but they won’t be alone for long — you can expect many more Android Wear watches running the platform to arrive this year.

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LG K8 Review: The Best Looking Budget Android Phone Around

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Android
Reviews

The high-end segment of the smartphone space is dominated by Apple and Samsung. This has been the case for a good couple of years now, and most other OEMs seldom get a look in.

Apple shifted over 70 million iPhones during its last financial quarter; that is an insane number of units – even more so when you consider how much iPhones cost.

For this reason – and plenty more besides – many Android phone makers are focussing their efforts on the sub-£150 segment of the phone market. Here things are equally competitive, as tech brands constantly innovative and redefine what we consider to be a budget-friendly phone, but, importantly, there is no Apple and there’s more room to manoeuvre.

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

KDE Plasma Leaning Towards Focusing On Flatpak Over AppImage/Snaps

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KDE
  • KDE Plasma Leaning Towards Focusing On Flatpak Over AppImage/Snaps

    Veteran KDE developer Sebastian Kügler has written a blog post following the Plasma Sprint that just happened recently in Stuttgart. A few interesting details were shared.

    While right now we've seen some KDE efforts around Flatpak (formerly XDG-App) and Snaps along with some in the AppImage space, KDE developers are looking to center their efforts around one next-gen packaging solution moving forward. With focusing around one app bundling solution, they hope to be able to deliver their software to more end-users directly across the distribution spectrum.

  • Plasma Meeting: Web, browsers and app bundles

    This year’s Plasma Sprint is kindly being hosted by von Affenfels, a software company in Stuttgart, Germany, focusing on mobile apps. Let me try to give you an idea of what we’re working on this week.

NethServer 7 Linux OS Released with Nextcloud 10 Support, Based on CentOS 7.3

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Red Hat

Softpedia was informed today, February 8, 2017, by NethServer Community Manager Alessio Fattorini about the general availability of the NethServer 7 Linux-based operating system.

Based on CentOS 7.3, NethServer 7 launches with the ability for the Linux server OS to act as a Samba 4 Active Directory controller, replacing a Microsoft Active Directory domain controller. This is possible by implementing support for native Microsoft Windows management tools like AD PowerShell and RSAT.

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UBports Community Successfully Ports Canonical’s Ubuntu OS to the Fairphone 2

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Ubuntu

We were informed by Canonical a few moments ago that the UBports community initiative lead by Marius Gripsgard has sucessfully launched the Ubuntu mobile OS for Fairphone 2 devices.

The UBports project is well known among members of the Ubuntu Phone community, as they are porting Canonical's Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system on a bunch of devices that are a lot more popular than what Canonical currently offers.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Arch Linux: A simpler kind of Linux?

    Arch Linux certainly has its share of fans, with some being quite passionate about their favorite distribution. Recently a writer at Linux.com wrote a post about Arch and considered it to be a “simpler kind of Linux.”

  • HDMI Audio Patches Posted For Raspberry Pi's VC4 Driver

    If these patches land soon, the Raspberry Pi could beat newer AMD graphics cards to having mainline HDMI audio support via their respective Linux kernel DRM drivers (with the AMDGPU audio support still being held up by DAL/DC mainlining efforts). Eric Anholt managed to finally put out the VC4 HDMI audio code for review.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Awesome vim plugins for writers

    Vim is one of the most popular text editors among programmers, web developers, and power users of GNU/Linux. This is not surprising, because Vim offers high-speed editing, has extensibility, and is pre-installed on most Linux-based distributions.

    In addition, Vim offers great benefits to writers, regardless of whether they are technically minded or not. I personally use it not only for editing configuration files and web pages, but for writing blogs, software documentation, notes, and presentation slides. In my opinion, the only potential issue it has might be its relatively steep learning curve. I remember that it took me about two weeks to become comfortable working in it, but since then, editing any kind of text has felt noticeably more fluent compared to other editors I used before.

  • FFmpeg 3.2.3 "Hypatia" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Released with 35 Fixes

    The major FFmpeg 3.2 "Hypatia" open-source multimedia framework recently received its third maintenance release, versioned 3.2.3, which brings up-to-date components and a bunch of various improvements.

    FFmpeg 3.2.3 was released on February 6, 2017, and comes exactly two months after the previous point release, namely FFmpeg 3.2.2, announced on December 5, 2016. It is now considered the latest stable FFmpeg release from the 3.2 "Hypatia" series, which was officially unveiled on October 26, 2016.

  • Video: LCA 2017 - Package Managers All the Way Down

    Anyone who has been using Linux for a while is familiar with package managers and package management. Being a Fedora user, I have noticed a few projects that Fedora has in the works to augment package management. For example, Fedora Atomic does not the traditional package manager (dnf) but uses rpm-ostree instead. Why would Fedora be working on additional packaging systems? What is wrong with existing package managers? I have been asking myself those questions for some time now.

  • Vivaldi 1.7 Web Browser Is Out with Built-In Screenshot Tool, New History Panel

    Today, February 8, 2017, Vivaldi Technologies have had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of the Vivaldi 1.7 web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

    Vivaldi 1.7 comes two months after the release of version 1.6, which launched on December 15, 2016, as the world's first web browser to display notifications in tabs for web pages that offer content in real time, such as Facebook and Twitter, and promises to introduce various new features that we bet many of you will love. First off, you should know that Vivaldi 1.7 is based on the open-source Chromium 56.0.2924.88 browser.

HITMAN on GNU/Linux

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Gaming

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • On Epiphany Security Updates and Stable Branches

    One of the advantages of maintaining a web browser based on WebKit, like Epiphany, is that the vast majority of complexity is contained within WebKit. Epiphany itself doesn’t have any code for HTML parsing or rendering, multimedia playback, or JavaScript execution, or anything else that’s actually related to displaying web pages: all of the hard stuff is handled by WebKit. That means almost all of the security problems exist in WebKit’s code and not Epiphany’s code. While WebKit has been affected by over 200 CVEs in the past two years, and those issues do affect Epiphany, I believe nobody has reported a security issue in Epiphany’s code during that time. I’m sure a large part of that is simply because only the bad guys are looking, but the attack surface really is much, much smaller than that of WebKit. To my knowledge, the last time we fixed a security issue that affected a stable version of Epiphany was 2014.

  • This week in GTK+ – 33

    The past two weeks we’ve had DevConf and FOSDEM back to back, so the development slowed down a bit. Expect it to pick up again, now that we’re close to the GNOME 3.24 release.

    In these last two weeks, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 34 commits, with 20973 lines added and 21593 lines removed.

  • Maps at FOSDEM

    I went to FOSDEM again this year, my fourth year running. I go with a great group of friends and it is starting to become quite the tradition.

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Fedora: The Latest

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Red Hat
  • Major update to Nagios in Fedora Rawhide and EPEL-7 [moving to 4.2.4]
  • Major update to Fedora/EPEL moving to nrpe-3.0.1
  • openQA and Autocloud result submission to ResultsDB

    One of the big topics at Devconf and around the RH offices was the ongoing effort to modernize both Fedora and RHEL’s overall build processes to be more flexible and involve a lot more testing (or, as some people may have put it, “CI CI CI”). A lot of folks wearing a lot of hats are involved in different bits of this effort, but one thing that seems to stay constant is that ResultsDB will play a significant role.

    ResultsDB started life as the result storage engine for AutoQA, and the concept and name was preserved as AutoQA was replaced by Taskotron. Its current version, however, is designed to be a scalable, capable and generic store for test results from any test system, not just Taskotron. Up until last week, though, we’d never quite got around to hooking up any other systems to it to demonstrate this.

  • Ambassadors LATAM: Year in Review

    Throughout 2016, the Fedora community in Latin America was active promoting Fedora in local events and showing the Fedora Project objectives and foundations to possible new contributors and helping them find their way into different subprojects, as part of the global Fedora community. We had a presence in all relevant events in Latin America with talks, workshops and stands promoting ours four foundations to the world.

  • The Fedora Diversity FAD

    DevConf.cz featured many great talks and a fantastic hallway track. It also hosted the Fedora Activity Day for the Fedora Diversity team. The FAD spanned three days of working on ways we can learn more about our community, encourage greater diversity and more. This team has a high level of overlap with Marketing, CommOps, and the Magazine so we didn’t restrict ourselves to thinking about just diversity issues. More will be forthcoming as the team does its final outbound reporting, but I wanted to share some of my observations as a someone privileged to get to work with this amazing group of people.

Tizen News

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Linux

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • 10 trends that will impact open-source tech in Saudi Arabia

    OPEN source has become an integral piece of every developer’s arsenal. The power of the community, the wisdom of many, and the ability to hook into various systems and solutions make open source incredibly powerful.

    At A10, we contribute to and embrace open-source solutions and provide APIs to empower developers to integrate their tools into our systems.

  • Netflix open-sources a Slack bot that helps devs manage GitHub repos [Ed: What good is "Open Source" that requires proprietary software to do anything?]

    Netflix announced today the release of HubCommander, an open source Slack bot to track and manage GitHub organizations and repositories.

    Netflix is the second large company to launch a Slack bot today. Earlier in the day, PayPal released its Slack bot for peer-to-peer payments.

  • IBM pushes accessibility with open-source projects

    Today, IBM began a new push to make applications accessible to users with disabilities. The company announced that is has made two accessibility projects available under open-source licenses. These projects are designed to help developers determine if their applications support the needs of those with limited mobility or vision.

    The two new projects are AccProbe and Va11yS. AccProbe is a standalone Eclipse RCP application designed to help developers test and debug accessible applications.

  • New Options for Valuable Hadoop and Spark Training

    Metis, which bills itself as "an accredited intensive data science bootcamp," is steadily moving forward with its big data processing courses, which teach students how to work with Hadoop and Spark, two of today’s most widely used distributed computing paradigms. As we've reported, enterprises are finding tools like Hadoop hard to work with. Gartner, Inc.'s Hadoop Adoption Study, involving 284 Gartner Research Circle members, found that only 125 respondents who completed the whole survey had already invested in Hadoop or had plans to do so within the next two years. The study found that there are difficulties in implementing Hadoop.

  • Charlie Reisinger’s ‘The Open Schoolhouse’

    Charlie Reisinger is the IT Director of the Penn Manor School District, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He recently finished writing a spellbinding book describing how his school district decided to adopt open source software and methods. When reading this book, I sent an email to Charlie saying: “This book reads as if it’s your doctoral thesis — it’s a multiyear capstone project.” Charlie responded, “It felt in some way like that while writing the book.” Charlie went on to tell me that the reason he wrote the book was to help other school districts make the plunge into open source. “Come on in – the water is warm!” is the reassuring tone throughout the book.

    Here is my video review of this book. Note — at 27-minutes long, it’s much longer than my other video book reviews. I had no choice but to give the book its due. It’s a masterful piece of storytelling that offers hope to students and teachers everywhere.

  • IKEA’s ‘Open Source’ Sofa Lets Builders Customize It To Their Liking

    Hacking IKEA furniture is a global trend, attracting creatives and technologists alike from around the globe to give items alternative usages or personalized touches. Their modest price tag and widespread availability make IKEA furniture a true gem for the hacker community who share their designs on dedicated websites, blogs, Pinterest boards and even books.

  • openbsd changes of note 6

    In a bit of a hurry, but here’s some random stuff that happened.

    Add connection timeout for ftp (http). Mostly for the installer so it can error out and try something else.

  • Don't Send An Engineer To Do A Lawyer's Job

    A thread on an open source project mailing list offers seven lessons on how to engage an open source community over legal issues.

    A thread on an Apache mailing list (Now safely in the past) provides a great illustration of what not to do when your employer's interests seem to need engagement in an open source community. Instead of asking a suitably-trained lawyer to directly engage, the company asked an engineer to engage when they wanted special terms for a contribution. They went on to propose custom terms, a custom CLA and even implied that they wanted private bilateral negotiations. This session runs through the thread and draws seven lessons for approaching an open source community with your legal issues.

  • Is the GPL a copyright license or a contract under U.S. law?

    In this talk I will summarize the case law on the contract or license question in the U.S. Certain obligations under the GPL may be merely contractual, meaning there are less damages and enforcement mechanisms available to a plaintiff, while other obligations may have more teeth. I will use this analysis to help the community think about how it might craft software licenses in the future.

  • Looking for a job? 6 questions to ask your recruiter

    Who owns the copyright to my open source contributions? You should carefully review any employment contract because some companies may claim ownership of anything you create while employed by them, regardless of whether it was created during your personal time. There is no right or wrong, but it is good to know before you start. Understanding the equipment and time that you can use for your personal open source contributions is of the upmost importance when signing any contracts.

  • 5 elements for getting teams organized

    In his book The Open Organization, Dr. Philip Foster defines governance as "the system and process by which power is managed and thus instills order where potential conflict threatens the opportunities to realize mutual gains which is essential for open organizations." According to Dr. Foster, open governance models for 21st Century businesses should contain five core elements: independence, pluralism, representation, decentralized decision making, and autonomous participation.

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
OSS
  • FOSDEM 2017 Day 3: Talks & Chats

    Today I got early up, going with Andreas to the venue, arriving at 8.30 AM. He was going there to open the Open Source Design room, I was going there to open the GNOME booth. After the shift I then decided to wandered around to collect stickers and speak to various projects at their booths.

  • syslog-ng at FOSDEM 2017

    I spent the weekend at Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting, or as it is better known: FOSDEM – as I did in the past several years as well. This time I delivered two presentations on syslog-ng, and as usual, I spent the rest of the time in devrooms and in the exhibition areas.

  • DebConf17: Call for Proposals

    The DebConf Content team would like to Call for Proposals for the DebConf17 conference, to be held in Montreal, Canada, from August 6 through August 12, 2017.

    You can find this Call for Proposals in its latest form at: https://debconf17.debconf.org/cfp

    Please refer to this URL for updates on the present information.

  • Speak at ApacheCon 2017: 4 Days Left to Submit a Talk

    ApacheCon gathers attendees from over 60 countries to learn about core open source technologies directly from the Apache developer and user communities.

FOSS CMS News

Filed under
OSS
Security
  • Migrated blog from WordPress to Hugo

    My WordPress blog got hacked two days ago and now twice today. This morning I purged MySQL and restored a good backup from three days ago, changed all DB and WordPress passwords (both the old and new ones were long and autogenerated ones), but not even an hour after the redeploy the hack was back. (It can still be seen on Planet Debian and Planet Ubuntu. Neither the Apache logs nor the Journal had anything obvious, nor were there any new files in global or user www directories, so I’m a bit stumped how this happened. Certainly not due to bruteforcing a password, that would both have shown in the logs and also have triggered ban2fail, so this looks like an actual vulnerability.

  • WordPress 4.7.2

    When WordPress originally announced their latest security update, there were three security fixes. While all security updates can be serious, they didn’t seem too bad. Shortly after, they updated their announcement with a fourth and more serious security problem.

    I have looked after the Debian WordPress package for a while. This is the first time I have heard people actually having their sites hacked almost as soon as this vulnerability was announced.

  • 4 open source tools for doing online surveys

    Ah, the venerable survey. It can be a fast, simple, cheap, and effective way gather the opinions of friends, family, classmates, co-workers, customers, readers, and others.

    Millions turn to proprietary tools like SurveyGizmo, Polldaddy, SurveyMonkey, or even Google Forms to set up their surveys. But if you want more control, not just over the application but also the data you collect, then you'll want to go open source.

    Let's take a look at four open source survey tools that can suit your needs, no matter how simple or complex those needs are.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Letter from Jolla CEO: a strong Sailfish year ahead of us!

Filed under
OS

Ahoy all Jolla & Sailfish OS developers, fans, and followers,

A new year has again started, and moved fast to the second month. This is my first post as Jolla CEO, and I’d like to give all of you a proper update on last years’ events and what we expect for 2017. Here we go!

As a summary, the year 2016 was a good one for Sailfish OS and full of deliveries. We launched the Aqua Fish device together with Intex Technologies in India, brought the Jolla C along with the Community Device Program for our dear community, got a major deal and partner in Russia (more about it below), and started shipping with Turing Robotics. Sailfish OS 2.0 is now fully out there and making a mark to the world.

Read more

Also: Jolla Still Working On Open-Sourcing More Of Sailfish OS, Including UI/Apps

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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