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Thursday, 05 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Gorgeous Live Voyager 16.04 Linux OS Comes Hot on the Heels of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2016 - 5:37am
Story BlackArch Linux Now Provides over 1,400 Penetration Testing Tools, New ISO Lands Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2016 - 5:11am
Story If I needed to leave Android, I'd use Sailfish OS Rianne Schestowitz 01/05/2016 - 5:08am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2016 - 11:36pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2016 - 11:35pm
Story Mozilla News Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2016 - 11:23pm
Story OpenStack Roundup Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2016 - 7:13pm
Story Ubuntu 16.04 vs. vs. Clear Linux vs. openSUSE vs. Scientific Linux 7 Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2016 - 4:55pm
Story GhostBSD 10.3 ALPHA1 is now ready for Testing Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2016 - 3:06pm
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2016 - 2:26pm

You can buy the Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition today

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you've been waiting for a powerful Ubuntu smartphone, today is your lucky day. Canonical has announced that the Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition is now on sale, officially giving Ubuntu a flagship phone to offer users.

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5 humanitarian crises where open source projects aimed to bring stability

Filed under
OSS

An annoyed user couldn’t fix his printer as the printer’s source code wasn’t available to users. This was the reason that led to the start of the open source movement. Organizations have saved billions of dollars and man hours by collaborating and innovating on the open source platform. The open source software has been used almost everywhere, and most importantly, technologists are taking full advantage of it when the world needs it to solve humanitarian problems.

Here are some humanitarian crises that technologists have built open source platforms for, just to give a new life to those badly affected by it.

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Korean Government Developed Open-source Cloud Computing Platform

Filed under
Server
OSS

On April 26, the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning and the National Information Society Agency (NIA) unveiled the first version of the PaaS-TA, which is an open-source platform as a service for cloud computing service development.

The ministry worked on the cloud computing platform with the Ministry of the Interior from March 2014. At present, the domestic PaaS sector is characterized by various companies’ different development environments and a low level of compatibility, which have caused software service providers to repeat their development processes for services on different platforms.

The South Korean government developed the PaaS-TA at this time in order to address this problem. Supporting at least six development languages and diverse cloud computing infrastructure services, it is open-source software and can be utilized by anyone. In addition, it comes with the standard e-government framework and is capable of realizing e-government services on the cloud computing platform.

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Today in Techrights

Filed under
News

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • LFNW 2016 - Docker Must Die
  • The Linux Foundation’s Jim Zemlin To Keynote ITS America 2016 San Jose Day Two “Infrastructure of Things”
  • OBS Studio 0.14 Adds NVIDIA NVENC Video Encoding Support
  • The ‘Year of the Linux desktop’ never came, and it never will [Ed: Ignoring Chromebooks for self-fulfilling prophecies and FUD]

    Every culture has its myths and prophecies. For Linux users, it was “The Year Of The Linux Desktop.” The idea: someday in the future, likely soon, everyone is going to notice how great Linux is and just switch over, en masse.

  • RcppMgsPack 0.1.0

    Over the last few months, I have been working casually on a new package to integrate MessagePack with R. What is MessagePack, you ask? To quote its website, "It's like JSON, but fast and small."

  • Shotwell 0.23.0 Is the First Major Release in a Year, Comes with a Warning

    After informing the community two weeks ago that he picked up the maintenance of the well-known Shotwell open-source image viewer and organizer software, developer Jens Georg now released the first major version since Shotwell 0.22.0.

    It has been more than a year since Shotwell 0.22.0 was released, back on March 24, 2015, and on April 16, 2016, the new maintainer pushed a very small point release, version 0.22.1, updating some translations and making sure everything is OK for him to continue the development of the acclaimed software.

  • QRegion will be iterable in Qt 5.8

    Apart from providing a non-allocating, non-throwing way to inspect a region, there are other positive effects. Because no QVector is returned that needs to be destroyed by the caller, even in projects (such as QtGui) that are compiled with exceptions disabled, porting even a few loops to the new construct saves more than 1KiB in text size on optimized GCC 5.3 Linux AMD64 builds, not to mention countless memory allocations at runtime.

  • Starting KWin/Wayland on another virtual terminal

    So far when one started KWin/Wayland on a virtual terminal it took over this virtual terminal. This made it difficult to read the debug output and even more difficult to run the complete session through gdb.

    The reason for this behavior is that KWin interacts with logind and needs to take session control on the current logind session. This is needed to have logind open the restricted device files like /dev/dri/card0 or the /dev/input/event* files.

  • Google Summer of Code 2016

    Hello everyone! I am participating in the Google Summer of Code program for the second time with GNOME, this year working on Epiphany. I am one of the two students working on this product, the other person being a friend of mine. We are both excited to leave our mark with some serious contributions.

  • Black Lab Linux 7.6 Released

    Today we are releasing Black Lab Linux 7.6. Black Lab Linux 7.6 is the latest release of our stable 7.x series of OS's. Black Lab Linux 7.6 is supported long term until April 2019.

  • Pisi-Linux-2.0-Beta-KDE5

    After the last Pisi-Linux-Alpha 7 Release, the Team has work on a lot of bug fixes, to give you a good stable beta Pisi Linux.

  • openSUSE to Mentor Six Google Summer of Code Students

    Google made an announcement April 22 that 1,206 students were selected for the Google Summer of Code and six of those students will be mentored through the openSUSE Project, which is one of 178 mentoring organizations in this year’s GSoC.

  • Global Big Data Infrastructure Market 2016-2020 - Increasing Presence of Open Source Big Data Technology Platforms - Research and Markets
  • Which field of research would you like to see more collaboration in?
  • 10 SQL Tricks That You Didn’t Think Were Possible

    But once your database and your application matures, you will have put all the important meta data in place and you can focus on your business logic only. The following 10 tricks show amazing functionality written in only a few lines of declarative SQL, producing simple and also complex output.

  • ‘New’ Windows Security Flaw Runs Apps Without Admin Rights

    Newly discovered Windows security hole bypasses AppLocker and lets apps run without admin rights. Proof-of-concept code published.

  • HTTPS is Hard

    This blog post is the first in a regular tech series from the Yell engineering team looking at challenges they face and problems they solve across Yell’s various digital solutions.

    Here, Yell’s Head of Web Engineering, Steve Workman, looks back over Yell.com‘s seven-month transition to HTTPS, (a secure version of the HTTP protocol – which sends data between a browser and a website) to raise awareness of the issues with the move in the industry and to make the adoption process easier for other engineering teams.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Powers Planetary Exploration with Red Hat OpenStack Platform
  • OpenStack and Red Hat ready for hybrid deployments | #OpenStack

    As the enterprise moves toward its digital transformation, OpenStack is becoming a key player in the arena of hybrid cloud. The changes in open-source software and the growth of OpenStack has enabled the enterprise to develop a dynamic infrastructure that will help them migrate workloads to and from the cloud, working with on-premise and with legacy systems.

  • How to create Fedora feed in Jekyll

    Across the Linux communities, there are several people that write and maintain their own blogs across all four corners of the world. From low-skills men to professionals, a lot of contents are posted everyday and informations at all levels are available on the Internet. What about to stay in touch with Fedora people that publish on the web?

  • Fedora 24 Linux Default Wallpapers Revealed, They're Truly Gorgeous

    Fedora Project's Sirko Kemter announced the winners of the community wallpapers that will be included in the upcoming Fedora 24 Linux operating system, due for release on June 7, 2016.

    The Fedora 24 Linux distribution is currently in heavy development, and it only saw a first Alpha release until now, unveiled at the end of last month, so it's now time for early adopter and public beta testers to get their hands on the Beta build of the upcoming Linux kernel-based operating system sponsored by Red Hat.

    As with every new release of the Fedora Linux OS, the artwork is being tweaked, optimized, and revamped, with a new default wallpaper, as well as a brand-new set of supplemental desktop background images contributed by various members of the Fedora community as part of a well-organized contest.

  • Refreshed Look of Fedora Developer Portal

    I have just deployed a new version of Fedora Developer Portal. The most visible part is refreshed look with more uniform layout. I have also compressed all the images in titles (from ~1.2MB to ~50kB in average) – so the loading should be much faster.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • How Do You Pronounce Ubuntu?

    You all know the the word ‘Ubuntu’’ — and if you don’t, how’d you end up here?! — but do you know the correct way to pronounce it?

  • Ubuntu Snap Packages: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

    Without a doubt, Ubuntu 16.04 is said to be the biggest and most significant release of the distro in years. In my opinion, the reason for this release's perceived significance comes down to one thing – Ubuntu snap packages.

    The idea (from the user's perspective) behind snap packages is that Ubuntu enthusiasts can have access to the latest software packages without needing to worry about rushing to a new release of Ubuntu. Obviously, one must have 16.04 or higher going forward, but the general idea stands.

  • Lubuntu 16.04 Screenshot Tour

Thunderbird's fate

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Finding a new home for Thunderbird
  • Thunderbird Evolving

    Since December, Simon has been working on a report describing the options the leaders of the Thunderbird mail client community have for hosting their project now that Mozilla is ready to take the last steps of separation they have long trailed. The report was published today and is now being considered by the Thunderbird community. While it considers a number of potential destinations, it recommends a choice between the Software Freedom Conservancy, The Document Foundation and a new, arms-length status at the Mozilla Foundation.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
  • Experimenting with the Raspberry Pi Sense HAT

    So we decided to try one out ourselves. We grabbed a side room at our offices in Red Hat Tower and spent an hour or two learning what it can do.

    First step, attaching the device. Easy enough!

  • Intel releases the Arduino 101 firmware source code

    We’re very happy to announce that the source code of the real-time operating system (RTOS) powering the Arduino 101 and Genuino 101 is now available for hacking and study purposes.

    The package contains the complete BSP (Board Support Package) for the Curie processor on the 101. It allows you to compile and modify the core OS and the firmware to manage updates and the bootloader. (Be careful with this one since flashing the wrong bootloader could brick your board and require a JTAG programmer to unbrick it).

  • UDOO planning to bring x86 Arduino-compatible maker board to market

    Without doubt, the maker space has gathered real momentum over the last half decade with significant interest in the various incarnations of the Raspberry Pi as well the numerous boards that support Arduino platform.

    UDOO has already made a name for itself in the Arduino space with its UDOO Dual and UDOO Quad single board computers launching on Kickstarter back in April 2013. These were followed up by the UDOO Neo, launching two years later in April 2015. Both campaigns were successfully funded and fulfilled despite some delays in the shipment of all units.

Leftovers: More BSD

Filed under
BSD

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Distro Choices

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Should beginners install Kali Linux on their computers?

    Kali Linux is bird of a slightly different feather, in terms of Linux distributions. Kali's focus is on security and forensics, but some Linux novices have been installing it without knowing much about either thing. DistroWatch has a full review of Kali Linux 2016.1 and doesn't think it's really appropriate for beginners.

  • Download ready-to-use Linux virtual machines from OSBoxes

    VirtualBox is a great tool for trying out some new Linux distro, but you’ll usually have to spend a while finding a download and setting up your VM and operating system, first.

    OSBoxes.org makes life easier by providing 40+ prebuilt VirtualBox (VDI) and VMware images for Android x86, CentOS, Debian, Fedora, FreeBSD, Gentoo, Linux Mint, Remix OS, Ubuntu and many more.

  • Infographic: Which Linux Distribution Is Right For You?

    When setting up a new web server for your website, one of the most important decisions you have to consider making is which operating system you are going to use. If you’ve moved past the Windows Server versus Linux Server debate and decided to go host your website on a Linux Server, you have a whole host of distributions to chose from.

    Every Linux Distribution will have its pros and cons, and all of those pros and cons are dependent on your own needs and requirements for the project.

    In this infographic, the team at Future Hosting takes a look at three of the most popular Linux distributions to try to help you answer all of these questions while guiding you along the path to choosing the right operating system for your next website.

elementary OS 0.3.2 "Freya" review

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The most recent version of elementary OS, codenamed Freya, was released in December 2015 and is based on Ubuntu's 14.04 Long Term Support distribution. I downloaded the distro's ISO from their website, for a paltry fee of $0.00, and loaded it onto a USB using Unetbootin. After the quick Unetbootin boot-up screen, I found a familiar install process. elementary's installation process is beautiful, simple, and works. This is because the installation software, much like everything else in this distro, is based off of Ubuntu. Using the Ubuntu installer is very easy, but elementary turns it into an exercise in beauty as well. The install was quick, taking only about ten minutes to complete.

The first thing I noticed about elementary was the dock. The dock is located at the bottom of the screen and includes the applications that the elementary team thinks you will use most. Initially included on the dock are applications for music, pictures, videos, mail, the calendar, the web browser, and the settings panel.

The desktop environment on elementary is called Pantheon. Pantheon includes the dock at the bottom and the panel at the top. The panel at the top is a picture of sheer beauty, and I mean sheer. Where previously the panel was a solid bar at the top of the screen with text in it, it is now completely transparent. This gives the effect that the words are part of the screen. The panel includes the applications on the left, a clock in the middle, and the indicators on the right to show wi-fi, alerts, and battery life, among other things. Pantheon was overall a big hit for me, and I would love to see this desktop environment get ported over into other big distros. Unfortunately, Pantheon crashed many times during my use. Each time it automatically restarted and prompted me to send a bug report; I am disappointed by this instability.

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Should MS Buy Canonical, No Year of Linux Desktop

Filed under
-s

With Microsoft and Canonical's new chummy relationship still on the minds of many, Janakiram MSV today said "Microsoft's Open Source strategy is incompletely" without them. He said with Microsoft trying to change their image away from being Windows-only, it only makes sense to buy Canonical. Ubuntu has millions of users and "an army of developers and system administrators." Besides people, Canonical comes with LXD, Snappy Ubuntu Core, and Juju - all things that could make Microsoft more competitive in the cloud and IoT. To Janakiram, there are no downsides for Microsoft.

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A GNOME Software Hackfest report

Filed under
GNOME
  • A GNOME Software Hackfest report

    The incarnation of GNOME Software used by endless looks pretty different from what the normal GNOME user sees, since it’s adjusted for a different audience and input method. But it looks great, and is a good example for how versatile GS already is! And for upstream GNOME, we’ve seen some pretty great mockups done by Endless too – I hope those will make it into production somehow.

  • GNOME Software Package Manager Prepares for GNOME 3.22, Gets Steam Support

    For those of you not in the loop, the GNOME Project is currently working hard on implementing new features of the upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, and they are about to seed the first development milestone.

    GNOME 3.21.1 will be the first development version towards the major GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, due for release on September 21, 2016, and it should be ready for deployments tomorrow, April 27, 2016, according to the release schedule. And, as part of this first GNOME 3.22 milestone, several core components have been updated with new features and bug fixes.

Verizon and NASA Double Down on Red Hat OpenStack

Filed under
Red Hat

The OpenStack Austin Summit gets under way today in Austin, Texas, and with it comes news of continuing momentum among some big-name organizations. Verizon is announcing a major OpenStack cloud networking milestone, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory reveals it is using Red Hat's OpenStack Platform, and Red Hat now claims to have trained 10,000 IT professionals on OpenStack.

Read more

Yu Yunique to Lenovo Vibe P1m: Best Android phones under Rs 7000

Filed under
Android

Like with any technology, smartphones get better while staying at the same price. And while we would have been a little more hesitant to recommend cheaper phones till a couple of years ago, that’s not the case any more. In fact, the quality of Android phones you can now get for less than Rs 7,000 is astounding. Let’s take a look at some of the best budget phones your money can buy.

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More in Tux Machines

European Unified Patent Court goes Open Source

Using Private Cloud and Drupal as a starting point together with small expert partners and agile management the new platform for the European UPC has been shaped to the exact requirements and quickly adapted while more needs surfaced. The only ready to use Open Source tool used has been Zarafa Collaboration Platform which integrated with the Case Management System will provide secure email, instant messaging, file sharing and video conferencing to the platform's users. The result is that, thanks to Open Source based platform and by working with SMEs, the UK IPO team has been able to deliver to the Unified Patent Court team the project earlier than planned and under budget. Read more

Linux Foundation: Open Source Programming and DevOps Jobs Plentiful

Open source can help you make money, especially if you have skills in programming or DevOps, which is emerging as one of the hottest areas of interest for hiring managers seeking open source admins and developers. That's according to the latest Open Source Jobs Report from the Linux Foundation, which is out this week. Read more Also: The 2016 Open Source Jobs Report: Companies Hungry for Professional Open Source Talent

Basho Open Sources Some Bits

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • The Simply Ubuntu Desktop
    Over on Flickr, fosco_ submitted this simple Ubuntu desktop, with just a few things tweaked for a cleaner experience. Like we’ve said, sometimes less is more, and this desktop makes good use of a few widgets to make a great UI even better.
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.5 Supports Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Debian 8.4
    The team of developers behind the HPLIP (short for HP Linux Imaging and Printing) project, announced a few moments ago the availability of the fifth maintenance build in the 3.16 stable series of the software. For those of you who are not in the loop, HP Linux Imaging and Printing is an open-source initiative to bring the latest HP (Hewlett-Packard) printer drivers to GNU/Linux operating systems. The software has a pretty active development team working behind it, releasing maintenance builds at least once a month.
  • Convergence delayed: Unity 8 won’t be the default desktop in Ubuntu 16.10
    Canonical’s vision of convergence—a single, highly adaptive environment that spans mobile and desktop uses—has been delayed yet again. The Unity 8 desktop and Mir display server, which are key to that vision, won’t be used by default in Ubuntu 16.10, according to discussion in the Ubuntu Online Summit.
  • Questions and answers: Ubuntu bq tablet
    After Jack Wallen's recent review of the bq Aquaris M10 tablet, he was hit with a number of questions about the tablet. Jack addresses some of those questions to help you decide if the Ubuntu tablet is a worthy investment.