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Saturday, 25 Oct 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Elive Is an Interesting Debian-Based Distro with a Beautiful Enlightenment Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:27pm
Story NVIDIA's NVPTX Support For GCC Is Close To Being Merged Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:22pm
Story The Future of the Internet - 20 Years Ago Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:18pm
Story Kodi 14.0 Beta Is Getting Closer to Release Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:14pm
Story TOR GUI `SELEKTOR` SEES NEW MAJOR RELEASE Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 7:19pm
Story Six licks of Google's Android Lollipop Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 7:17pm
Story Chief Architect of Cloudera on growth of Hadoop Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 7:12pm
Story Linux Kernel Working Towards GNU11/C11 Compatibility Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 7:09pm
Story Linux-optimized IP core promises 4200 DMIPS Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 6:50pm
Story Samsung and Intel Stay Committed to Chromebooks Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 6:49pm

For Ada Lovelace Day, highlighting FSF sysadmin Lisa Maginnis

Filed under
GNU

Today is Ada Lovelace Day, when we share stories of women in technology and their achievements.

The holiday is named after a 19th-century English mathematician who is considered by many to be the first programmer. Though generations passed before her contribution was fully acknowledged, she was a pioneer both as a scientist and as a challenger of rigid gender roles. For this Ada Lovelace Day, we're profiling Lisa Maginnis, who is the FSF's senior systems administrator.

As the leader of the technical team, Lisa is responsible for choosing, configuring, and maintaining the FSF's office computers and servers. She uses extensive knowledge of hardware, networking, and electrical engineering to maintain a complex array of all-free software. An alert system sends text messages to her OpenMoko if servers have problems, and she's no stranger to urgent after-hours trips to the office to get something back online.

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Firefox 33 gets released with Openh264

Filed under
Moz/FF

Today Firefox 33 has been released, among it’s main features is OpenH264, an open source, Cisco provided solution for viewing H.264 content over webRTC. OpenH264 is a free H.264 codec plugin that Firefox downloads directly from Cisco. Cisco published the code to Github making it open source. Mozilla and Cisco have set up a process where the binary is verified to be built from the source on Github so that users trust the integrity of the binary that is shipped with the browser.

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Also: Firefox 33 Has Been Officially Released. How To Install Firefox 33 On The Most Popular Linux Systems

GOG Linux Update: We've reached the 100-title mark

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Not even two months ago we've rolled out a feature that you, dear GOGgers, have requested almost since day one of our service: support for Linux games. It took us some time to do it the GOG-way, but we managed to unite our ideals of how DRM-free gaming should be, with the idea of the truly free OS, so passionately loved by many. We've kick-started our Linux games catalog with a selection of 50 titles, old and new, many of them available officially for that OS for the very first time! Doing that, we've mentioned our plans to expand this offer to over 100 titles in the coming months. Well, the day has come. With today's 15 additions we've passed the 100-title. And, boy, what great additions these are! Just look at those titles:

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The Linux Setup - Eric Hameleers, Slackware Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews
Slack

When you’re interviewing a Slackware developer, you have certain expectations about what they’ll say in terms of controlling your own system and Eric delivers. In fact, he makes the case that Slackware, known as a more challenging system to setup and maintain, is valuable because it requires so much thought. Which is true—I’ve always seen Slackware as one part distro and one part teaching tool. The rest of Eric’s interview is great as he’s a very smart guy who’s spent a lot of time thinking about what makes a distro work, not just in terms of specific software, but also in terms of what’s ultimately best for the user in the long-term.

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Unity 8 Desktop Still Planned In Time For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

While much of Canonical's recent focus has been about reading Unity 8 for mobile devices, their plan is still to ship Unity 8 by default on the Ubuntu Linux desktop ahead of its next LTS release.

Their plan for a while has been to use Mir by Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on the desktop spin along with using Unity 8 to replace Unity 7 + Compiz + X.Org Server. Will Cooke, the team manager of the new Desktop Team at Canonical, did a guest post on Michael Hall's blog to reiterate these plans.

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The Divisive Linux Community

Filed under
GNU
Linux

For the most part, this friction has led to new ideas that have provided ease of use and in some instances, improved functionality. Distros such as Ubuntu best showcase this example, despite the grief it gets from parts of the Linux community. Digging deeper beyond the surface, however, some of this friction has proven to be more divisive than productive.

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Allwinner reveals new octa-core and 64-bit quad-core SoCs

Filed under
Android
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Allwinner unveiled octa-core, Cortex-A7 based “A83T” and “H8″ SoCs for tablets and media-streaming boxes, respectively, plus a quad-core, 64-bit “H64″ SoC.

Allwinner system-on-chips based on the ARM Cortex-A7, such as the dual-core A20 and quad-core A31, have become the darlings of Android- and Linux-based open source single board computer projects and media players. Now, the fast growing Chinese chipmaker is increasingly going octa-core.

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AMD Radeon R9 285 Tonga Performance On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

Announced over the summer when AMD was celebrating their 30 years of graphics celebration was the Radeon R9 285, a $250 graphics card built on the company's latest GCN graphics processor technology to replace the Radeon R9 280. We finally have our hands on a Radeon R9 285 "Tonga" for delivering the first look at its Linux performance.

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7 free tools every network needs

Filed under
OSS
Security

From device discovery to visibility into systems, networks, and traffic flows, these free open source monitoring tools have you covered

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

KDE Plasma 5 Now Available for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn)

Filed under
KDE

A lot of users are anxious to use the latest Plasma desktop because it's quite different from the old one. We can call it "the old one" even if the latest branch, 4.14.x, is still maintained until November.

The KDE developers split the project into three major components: Plasma, Frameworks, and Applications. Plasma is actually the desktop and everything that goes with it, Frameworks is made up of all the libraries and other components, and Applications gathers all the regular apps that are usually KDE-specific.

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Manjaro Unity Community Edition Is Arch Linux-Based and Powered by Unity

Filed under
Linux

Manjaro Unity Community Edition is a new respin of the Manjaro Linux distro, an operating system based on Arch Linux. This is one of the few distros outside of the Ubuntu ecosystem to adopt Unity, so it should be a very interesting experiment.

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The Big DRM Graphics Driver Changes Land In Linux 3.18

Filed under
Linux

The much anticipated DRM feature pull was merged over the night for the Linux 3.18 kernel that's now in its early stages of development.

Highlights of the graphics / Direct Rendering Manager driver changes for the Linux 3.18 merge window include:

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Self-documentation of code

Filed under
Development

The inadequacy or lack of documentation of software is a recurring issue. This applies just as often to proprietary software as it does to free software. Documentation of code has two main purposes: to make the code readable for other programmers, and to make the code useable. Good documentation of free software is vital for users, and contributing to the documentation (or translation to a minority language) of a free software project is a good way to get involved for those who don’t know where to start, or how to program, and want to know how it’s done. The problem is a shortage of recruits.

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LXQT 0.8.0 RELEASED WITH FULL QT5 SUPPORT, VARIOUS IMPROVEMENTS

Filed under
KDE

LXQt 0.8.0 ships with full Qt5 support (and the Lubuntu daily PPA already provides packages built with Qt5) however, Qt4 is still supported. For the next release though, Qt4 will be "dropped entirely", mentions the release announcement.

With this LXQt release, PCManFM (Qt), which was the first LXDE component to use Qt, has received support for single-click to active items, drag & drop support on the desktop, Ark archive manager integration as well as improved readability in icon view. Here's a screenshot with the latest PCManFM (Qt) 0.8.0:

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Can GNOME Make a Comeback?

Filed under
GNOME

Five years ago, GNOME was the main contender for the Linux desktop. It battled KDE, and, more often than not, came out on top. Today, it is down -- if far from out -- to the extent that any observer has to ask: Can GNOME ever regain its former predominance?

True, GNOME technology still dominates the desktop, with Cinnamon, GNOME, MATE, and Unity all using GNOME-based applications and utilities. However, the last few years have not been kind to the former giant.

First, the early releases of GNOME 3 were different enough that many users deserted it after a quick glance, turning to Xfce and Linux MInt's Cinnamon and MATE -- neither of which would probably exist otherwise. In the Linux Journal's Readers' Choice Awards of 2013, GNOME was the choice of only 14%. It did even worse in the 2013 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards, with only 10%. By themselves, these are hardly definitive numbers, but their consistency is enough to make them ominous.

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Good Karma

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

If you are doing it yourself or if you hire someone, you might still need to know how to install GNU/Linux. There are literally hundreds of sources of GNU/Linux. I’ve been using GNU/Linux for many years and only dealt with a few of them. You can hunt for a distribution of GNU/Linux at Distrowatch. You can get the software by downloading an image file of a CD and burning a CD, buying a CD or receiving a copy from a friend, or getting files to put on a USB drive… or… That’s why geeks are useful.

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