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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 1:25am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 1:16am
Story The Importance of Following Community-Oriented Principles in GPL Enforcement Work Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 12:52am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 12:49am
Story Linux and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2016 - 12:46am
Story How To Upgrade to Linux Mint 18 matthartley 19/07/2016 - 9:12pm
Story Coin-sized COM could be world’s smallest Raspberry Pi clone Rianne Schestowitz 19/07/2016 - 8:52pm
Story Fedora-based Korora 24 'Sheldon' Linux distro now available -- 32-bit ISO dead Rianne Schestowitz 19/07/2016 - 6:06pm
Story Can you name these Linux distributions? Rianne Schestowitz 19/07/2016 - 4:48pm
Story OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 RC1 arrives!! Rianne Schestowitz 19/07/2016 - 4:35pm

GNU/Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux 2017 – The Road to Hell

    The Year of Linux is the year that you look at your distribution, compare to the year before, and you have that sense of stability, the knowledge that no matter what you do, you can rely on your operating system. Which is definitely not the case today. If anything, the issues are worsening and multiplying. You don’t need a degree in math to see the problem.

    I find the lack of consistency to be the public enemy no. 1 in the open-source world. In the long run, it will be the one deciding factor that will determine the success of Linux. Sure, applications, but if the operating system is not transparent, people will not choose it. They will seek simpler, possibly less glamorous, but ultimately more stable solutions, because no one wants to install a patch and dread what will happen after a reboot. It’s very PTSD. And we know Linux can do better than that. We’ve seen it. Not that long ago. That’s all.

  • Voice of the Masses: How did you discover Linux?

    For our next podcast, we want to hear how you got into GNU/Linux. Where did your journey begin? Maybe you saw it on the coverdisc of a magazine somewhere, or a friend recommended that you try it. Perhaps your company switched to Linux which encouraged you to install it at home, or you simply became so enraged with Windows that you had to find something else.

GNU Health and GIMP

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Health 3.0.2 patchset released !

    We provide "patchsets" to stable releases. Patchsets allow applying bug fixes and updates on production systems. Always try to keep your production system up-to-date with the latest patches.

    Patches and Patchsets maximize uptime for production systems, and keep your system updated, without the need to do a whole installation.

  • GIMP 2.8.18 Open-Source Image Editor Released with Script-Fu Improvements, More
  • GIMP 2.9.4 Released

    We have just released the second development version of GIMP in the 2.9.x series. After half a year in the works, GIMP 2.9.4 delivers a massive update: revamped look and feel, major improvements in color management, as well as production-ready MyPaint Brush tool, symmetric painting, and split preview for GEGL-based filters. Additionally, dozens of bugs have been fixed, and numerous small improvements have been applied.

    GIMP 2.9.4 is quite reliable for production work, but there are still loose ends to tie, which is why releasing stable v2.10 will take a while. Please refer to the Roadmap for the list of major pending changes.

Ubuntu 16.10 Getting Nautilus 3.20 Soon, Radiance Theme Fully Ported to GTK 3.20

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

We reported two weeks ago on the upcoming availability of a major GTK+ 3.20 / GNOME Stack 3.20 update for the now-in-development Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system.

At that moment in time, Ubuntu developer Iain Lane told us that he managed to port the Ambiance theme to the latest GTK+ 3.20 technologies, and that he also updated some of the GNOME components Ubuntu is using, such as the Nautilus file manager, and Baobab disk usage analyzer tool, along with the GTK+ port of Mozilla Firefox 47.0 for Ubuntu 16.10.

Read more

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • David A. Wheeler: Working to Prevent the Next Heartbleed

    The Heartbleed bug revealed that some important open source projects were so understaffed that they were unable to properly implement best security practices. The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative , formed to help open source projects have the ability to adopt these practices, uses a lot of carrot and very little stick.

  • The First iPhone Hacker Shows How Easy It Is To Hack A Computer

    Viceland is known for its extensive security-focused coverage and videos. In the latest CYBERWAR series, it’s showing us different kinds of cyber threats present in the world around us. From the same series, recently, we covered the story of an ex-NSA spy that showed us how to hack a car.

    In another spooky addition to the series, we got to see how easily the famous iPhone hacker George Hotz hacked a computer.

    George Hotz, also known as geohot, is the American hacker known for unlocking the iPhone. He developed bootrom exploit and limera1n jailbreak tool for Apple’s iOS operating system. Recently, he even built his own self-driving car in his garage.

  • Beware; Adwind RAT infecting Windows, OS X, Linux and Android Devices

    Cyber criminals always develop malware filled with unbelievable features but hardly ever you will find something that targets different operating systems simultaneously. Now, researchers have discovered a malware based on Java infecting companies in Denmark but it’s only a matter of time before it will probably hit other countries.

  • 7 Computers Fighting Against Each Other To Become “The Perfect Hacker”

    Are automated “computer hackers” better than human hackers? DARPA is answering this question in positive and looking to prove its point with the help of its Cyber Grand Challenge. The contest finale will feature seven powerful computer fighting against each other. The winner of the contest will challenge human hackers at the annual DEF CON hacking conference.

netOS Server 7 Service Pack 1 Released, netOS Core Server Available for Download

Filed under
OS

Roberto J. Dohnert from Black Lab Software (PC/OpenSystems LLC) has informed Softpedia today, July 14, about the immediate availability of the first Service Pack (SP) for the netOS Server 7 operating system, as well as the GA of netOS Core Server.

Read more

How Drupal can save taxpayers' time and money

Filed under
OSS

Providing web services for the government of one of the most populous U.S. states (Georgia) is no small task, but it's made a bit easier thanks to Drupal, open source software, and the work of Kendra Skeene and the GeorgiaGov Interactive team.

In her lightning talk at Great Wide Open 2016, Skeene explains the role Drupal and open source software play in the Georgia's efforts to save taxpayer time and money.

Read more

Linux Kernel 4.1.28 LTS Is a Massive Update with XFS, MIPS and ARM Improvements

Filed under
Linux

Linux kernel developer Sasha Levin has announced the release of the twenty-eighth maintenance update for the Linux 4.1 long-term supported kernel series, version 4.1.28.

Linux kernel 4.1.28 LTS has been in development for the past three weeks since the June 23 debut of the previous maintenance release, Linux 4.1.27 LTS. During all this time, it has received a huge number of improvements, updated drivers, and core kernel changes. According to the appended shortlog, the update changes a total of 334 files, with 3,165 insertions and 2,032 deletions.

Read more

Also: H.264 VA-API Encode Comes To Gallium3D

AT&T's ECOMP code to land soon at Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

AT&T says it's just about ready to release its virtualisation automation software, amounting to more than eight million lines of code: its Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy platform – ECOMP – will soon land at the Linux Foundation.

The company says the platform is the basis for its target to virtualise 75 per cent of its network by 2020, something chief strategy officer John Donovan says is necessary to respond to huge and unpredictable traffic growth.

Read more

Also: AT&T ECOMP SDN platform move to open source community

You & Linux, Small Business Distros, FreeDOS

Filed under
-s

The Linux Voice asked readers today, "How did you discover Linux?" Many of the comments are from those who started in the mid 1990's or earlier. ComputerWorld featured an interview with Jim Hall who's been spearheading the project to keep FreeDOS alive and TechRadar recommended the best distributions for small business. Elsewhere, the next Slackware will use UTF-8 by default and Dedoimedo said, "Linux is slowly killing itself."

Read more

Untangle NG 12.1 Linux Firewall Released with New Geolocation Capabilities, More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Today, July 13, 2016, Untangle Inc. security software and appliance company proudly announced the release of the Untangle Next Generation (NG) Firewall 12.1 operating system.

Read more

Best Universal Package Manager for Linux?

Filed under
Linux

In fact, considering that Flatpak, Fedora and Red Hat's candidate for a universal package manager, was rushed out a few days after Snappy was announced, it appears that the issue is not necessity so much as a corporate rivalry that is being played out in the Linux community -- the last place that it belongs.

Still, accepting the claims about universal package managers at face value, which one would benefit Linux the most? Some choice must surely be made, or the main result of trying to implement a universal package manager, as many point out, would be to replace the longtime rivalry between Debian and RPM packages with yet another conflict between competing standards, which would remove one of the main rationalizations for raising the issue.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Mozilla begins process of letting Firefox rust

    Mozilla has announced it has taken a small step towards replacing much of Firefox's C++ code with its safer alternative language, Rust.

    When Firefox 48 ships on August 2, it will contain a Rust-built mp4 track metadata parser that will be available on Windows and 32-bit Linux desktops for the first time. Users of Mac OS X and 64-bit Linux have had the new parser available since Firefox 45.

  • Mirantis Embracing Kubernetes and Containers for OpenStack Cloud

    The world of containers and OpenStack clouds are increasingly coming together, as organizations of all sizes look to become more agile. While the idea of running containers inside of OpenStack is one option, a powerful idea that is now taking shape is to run OpenStack itself as a set of containers, which is then managed by the Kubernetes container orchestration system.

    Among the vendors that are working on enabling OpenStack to run as a set of containers is Miranits, which is currently developing a new version of its Fuel platform to make use of Kubernetes. To date, Fuel has heavily relied on Puppet configuration management technology to help enable many functions. Moving forward, Puppet will still be a part of future Fuel releases, though not quite in the same depth as before.

  • Better networking with open-source EtherCAT [Ed: openwashing as it has nothing to do with OSS]

    Semiconductor manufacturers and their suppliers – both process tool vendors and providers of sub-fab systems – are looking to an open-source industrial networking methodology, EtherCAT, developed by Beckhoff Automation (Verl, Germany; m.beckhoff.com) to address the increasingly stringent control requirements of emerging high-precision processes.

    During SEMICON West, early adopters are promoting EtherCAT as a next-generation real-time Ethernet control solution, with a variety of attributes: it is fast (good for controlling ever-more precise process recipes), open source, and extendable to many more nodes than existing networking protocols. Those attributes make EtherCAT attractive to tool makers such as Applied Materials, Lam Research, and Tokyo Electron Ltd., as well as sub-systems suppliers such as Edwards (Crawley, England).

  • EU-FOSSA needs your help – A free software community call to action

    The EU-FOSSA project’s mission is to “offer a systematic approach for the EU institutions to ensure that widely used critical software can be trusted”. The project was triggered by recent software security vulnerabilities, especially the Heartbleed issue. An inspired initiative by EU parlamentarians Max Andersson and Julia Reda, the pilot project “Governance and quality of software code – Auditing of free and open source software” became FOSSA. Run under the auspices of DIGIT, the project promised “improved integrity and security of key open source software”. I had been interviewed as a stakeholder by the project during work package 0 (“project charter, stakeholder interviews and business case”), and later worked with the FSFE group that provided input and comments to the project to EC-DIGIT. While I believe that the parliamentary project champions and the people involved in the project at EC-DIGIT are doing great work, I am worried that the deliverables of the project are beginning to fall short of expectations. I also think the free software community needs to get more involved. Here is why.

  • A Data Model to Support the Publishing of Legislation as Linked Open Data

    Citizens, professionals in the legal domain, businesses as well as civil servants need to know what legislation is in force. Legislation is often amended, repealed and codified, making it difficult to have a clear view of what text is in force at any specific point in time. In this context, the Hellenic Ministry of Interior and Administrative Reconstruction and the Italian Anti-corruption Agency contacted the ISA Programme of the European Commission to develop a pilot that has the two fold objective of making legislation available in both human and machine readable format and visualising the evolution of legislation over time, to enable user friendly consultation.

  • Big Data At Ancestry.com: Why Data Stewardship And Open Source Matter So Much

    With more and more businesses becoming aware of the value locked inside the data they collect, many are becoming aware of a pressing problem.

  • SiFive Launches Freedom FOSS SoC Platforms
  • Startup Releases Open Source System-on-Chip

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Download This Security Fix Now — All Versions Of Windows Operating System Hackable

    As a part of its monthly update cycle, Microsoft has released security patches for all versions of Windows operating system. This update addresses a critical flaw that lets an attacker launch man-in-the-middle attacks on workstations. This security vulnerability arises as the print spooler service allows a user to install untrusted drivers with elevated privileges.

  • The Truth About Penetration Testing Vs. Vulnerability Assessments

    Vulnerability assessments are often confused with penetration tests. In fact, the two terms are often used interchangeably, but they are worlds apart. To strengthen an organization’s cyber risk posture, it is essential to not only test for vulnerabilities, but also assess whether vulnerabilities are actually exploitable and what risks they represent. To increase an organization’s resilience against cyber-attacks, it is essential to understand the inter-relationships between vulnerability assessment, penetration test, and a cyber risk analysis.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • UNH-IOL Tackles SDN Interoperability with New Consortium
  • From DevOps to BizDevOps: It’s All About the People
  • DevOps: Chef offers enterprise-wide analytics with Automate tool

    Already know a vendor of software automation tools, Chef software has launched a new tool that combines Chef's existing software into one, single-interface product.

    Aimed at software development teams the app combines Chef Delivery and Chef Compliance into one tool. According to the company the aim is to speed up the software delivery process.

    Chef Automate includes a new Visibility feature that offers analytics of all the resources managed by Chef through a single interface, the company says, and should help organisations, "safely deploy infrastructure and applications at high velocity and scale".

  • A survey for developers about application configuration

    Markus Raab, the author of Elektra project, has created a survey to get FLOSS developer’s point of view on the configuration of application.

  • Reduce the cost of virtualization with open source Proxmox

    Thanks to its open source availability and full-featured graphical interface, Proxmox makes for an excellent alternative to more expensive virtualization platforms.

  • Know a rising open source star? Nominate her for a WISE Award

    Christine Flounders, Regional Manager for Engineering at Bloomberg L.P. London tells us about an amazing open (source) opportunity for women – the WISE International Open Source Award.

  • The Merits of the Open Source Philosophy

    Tonight, I sent my fourteen year old daughter a sample from the book “Libertarianism For Beginners.” If she likes it, I’ll gladly buy the full book for her to add to her library. The purchasing process was reasonably painless as there was a clean interface guiding me from product discovery all the way through delivery. As an added bonus, the underlying architecture for the whole thing was Linux. This is what you might call Software As a Service or SAAS. In fact, most of the SAAS systems we rely upon for our most common daily activities utilize the most popular kernel ever created and deployed in the history of computing – Linux.

    So what does the book have to do with SAAS? There’s a reason I shared a book about Libertarian philosophy with Eliza and it wasn’t just because it’s a book with pictures. It’s because she recently stumbled onto watching the Atlas Shrugged movies and was intrigued by the clear way the characters present their thoughts. She could understand how individualism benefits society and how forced charity can lead to destruction. It’s not a philosophy that everyone reading this agrees to, nor should they, but it’s neat to see a young lady become infatuated with ideas instead of boys, fashion, or makeup.

16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 News

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.12.1 Snap Creator Tool for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    Today, July 13, Canonical's Sergio Schvezov announced the availability of the first point release of the Snapcraft 2.12 Snappy creator tool for the Ubuntu Linux operating system.

    Snapcraft 2.12.1 has landed in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) software repositories, bringing multiple improvements and fixes, among which we can mention a new store endpoint that tracks the status of pushed Snaps and offering feedback directly on the command-line in case a manual action is needed or everything is good.

  • A Video Of X11 Apps Running On Mir With Ubuntu 16.10 Using Libertine

    Libertine is the new Ubuntu/Canonical project for running X11 Debian packages on the next-gen Ubuntu desktop powered by Mir and Unity 8. There's now a video of showing off their new tech for running X11 apps under Unity 8.

64-bit Banana Pi runs Linux on Allwinner A64, has WiFi, BT, GbE

Filed under
Android
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

Sinovoip revealed an open “Banana Pi BPI-M64” SBC based on a quad-core, Cortex-A53 Allwinner A64 SoC, with 2GB RAM, up to 64GB eMMC, plus WiFi, BT, and GbE.

SinoVoip, one of the two competing companies that emerged along with LeMaker (Banana Pro) from the original Banana Pi open source project, has unveiled its first 64-bit hacker SBC, featuring an Allwinner A64 SoC. The A64, which has four 1.2GHz Cortex-A53 cores and a dual-core Mali 400 MP2 GPU, is found on Pine64’s $15-and-up Pine A64, which last month came in 7th in our reader survey of 81 open-spec hacker boards last.

Read more

NethServer 7 Beta 1 Released with Beautiful New Theme, Exciting Features

Filed under
Red Hat

Today, July 13, 2016, Softpedia was informed by NethServer's Alessio Fattorini about the immediate availability for download of first Beta release towards the NethServer 7 Linux operating system.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. Read more

Introduction to Modularity

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Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more