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Saturday, 21 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security and FUD Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 12:25pm
Story LG’s Linux-based webOS Goes Open Source, Again! itsfoss 17/04/2018 - 11:48am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 10:54am
Story Integrate Your Android Phone With Gnome Shell Without KDE Dependencies With GSConnect Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 10:48am
Story Israeli Government Shifting Its Software Code to Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 10:45am
Story How to develop the FOSS leaders of the future Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 10:41am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 1:04am
Story Should Your Business Switch to Open Source? Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 12:59am
Story Best Linux Distro for Programming Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 12:56am
Story 96Boards CE Extended SBC runs Linux or AOSP on Kirin 970 Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 12:46am

NVIDIA 396.18 Linux Benchmarks, Testing Their New Vulkan SPIR-V Compiler

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday NVIDIA released their first 396 Linux driver beta in the form of the 396.18 release and its biggest addition is a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler to replace the compiler that's been hobbled together since the Vulkan 1.0 debut. Here are some fresh NVIDIA Vulkan Linux benchmarks and more on this new SPIR-V compiler.

Read more

Best open source CRM software

Filed under
OSS

When it comes to customer relationship management (CRM) software, Salesforce.com has quickly grown into the dominant player with its software-as-a-service (SaaS) model. With this popularity comes cost, and alongside other proprietary big players like Microsoft Dynamics 365 and Oracle CRM, prices can be anything between £20-£240 per user.

For the more cost-conscious organisations there are open source solutions for storing that all important customer relationship data, and solutions that are far more configurable. The downside is proprietary software often comes with best-in-class features, including more and more machine learning capabilities, the upside is you can save some money and not be at the mercy of major vendors who hold your all-important data.

So what are the open source CRM alternatives? Here are some of the best on the market.

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OSI's Simon Phipps on Open Source's Past and Future

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

It would be difficult for anyone who follows Linux and open source to have missed the 20th birthday of open source in early February. This was a dual celebration, actually, noting the passing of 20 years since the term "open source" was first coined and since the formation of the Open Source Initiative (OSI), the organization that decides whether software licenses qualify to wear that label.

The party came six months or so after Facebook was successfully convinced by the likes of the Apache Foundation; WordPress's developer, Automatic; the Free Software Foundation (FSF); and OSI to change the licensing of its popular React project away from the BSD + Patents license, a license that had flown under the radar for a while.

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Gemini: Vulture gives PDA some Linux lovin'

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

During my month with Gemini I went from initial disappointment (mainly with the keyboard) through to acceptance and now, having been able to bring up a Linux desktop, being impressed with the potential.

It certainly is not for everyone. The keyboard will disappoint many at first and the lack of a display and camera on the back is frustrating. However, as a device for someone with a need to write on the move or a person who would like a penguin in their pocket without having to resort to a Bluetooth keyboard, the Gemini merits a closer look.

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Security: Updates, 'Cloud' Hardening, Two Factor Authentication, Launchpad

Filed under
Security

Graphics: Igalia Preps 16-bit Integer Support For Intel's Vulkan Driver, X.Org Server 1.20 RC4 Released, AMD Posts KFD Support For GFX9/Vega

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Igalia Preps 16-bit Integer Support For Intel's Vulkan Driver

    Igalia developers have been working on shaderInt16 support Intel's open-source "ANV" Vulkan driver to provide 16-bit integer support.

    The consulting firm Igalia has been tasked with getting the 16-bit integer support in Vulkan shaders ready for the Intel Vulkan Linux driver. This 16-bit int support is available for "Gen8" Broadwell graphics hardware and newer.

  • [ANNOUNCE] xorg-server 1.19.99.904
  • X.Org Server 1.20 RC4 Released, EGLStreams For XWayland Might Still Land

    On Tuesday a new X.Org Server 1.20 release candidate was issued by Red Hat's Adam Jackson for this prolonged development cycle now stretching well more than one and a half years.

    This latest X.Org Server 1.20 release candidate has around three dozen fixes, mostly involving Direct Rendering Infrastructure 3 (DRI3) and GLAMOR 2D acceleration.

  • AMD Posts KFD Support For GFX9/Vega

    With the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel there is the long-awaited discrete GPU support in good shape at least for hardware like Polaris and Fiji. While the latest and greatest AMD GPUs are the Vega family, more work has been needed for AMDKFD support. Unfortunately those Vega changes didn't make it in for Linux 4.17, but those patches are now available.

Games: Privacy Settings in Steam and GNU/Linux in Humble Strategy Bundle

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve Offers Up New Privacy Settings For Steam Gamers

    In wake of recent privacy scandals in the tech world, Valve is now offering new privacy settings for Steam users.

    The expanded Profile Privacy Settings Page offers greater control of what Steam account information is shared publicly, including what can be accessed by Steam friends or publicly to others on Steam. There are now controls over who can view your game details, the ability to keep total game playtime privacy, and more.

  • New Profile Privacy Settings
  • Steam revamps profile privacy settings, Steam Spy no longer able to operate

    While I was asleep Valve announced some new profile privacy settings which are good for users, but it seems Steam Spy is likely going to shut down as a result.

  • The Humble Strategy Bundle has a few interesting Linux games

    Love your strategy games? You can pick up a few that support Linux in the latest Humble Strategy Bundle (affiliate link). I will only note the games that support Linux, as there's a bunch that don't.

    For $1 you will get Planetary Annihilation: TITANS and some Company of Heroes 2 DLC designed for the WDC charity.

A Look at Solus 3 Budgie, GNU/Linux Distribution

Filed under
Reviews

The last time I tried Solus, it was still in its infancy stages, and it wasn’t to my tastes really. I had been thinking of which Linux distro to take a look at next, and I wanted to pick something that wasn’t based off Debian / Ubuntu / Arch / Gentoo / OpenSUSE or any of the majors, so I decided to give Solus 3 a try, being a completely independent distro – And it wasn’t bad.

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Ubuntu 18.04 Makes it Easier to Install Kernel Updates without Rebooting

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Canonical is making it super easy to take advantage of Linux kernel live patching.

Live patching lets you install and apply critical Linux kernel security updates without rebooting your system.

This means you can keep your computer safe at kernel level without any impact on your uptime or productivity.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Server development summary – 10 April 2018

Mozilla: Accessibility, Rust, Internet Health Report

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Introducing the Accessibility Inspector in the Firefox Developer Tools

    The built-in Firefox Developer Tools just received a new family member. The Accessibility Inspector allows you to inspect your website’s exposure to assistive technologies.

  • This Week in Rust 229

    Always wanted to contribute to open-source projects but didn't know where to start? Every week we highlight some tasks from the Rust community for you to pick and get started!

  • Rust all-hands (dev-tools stuff)

    Last week (sigh, the week before last now) we held an 'all-hands' event in Berlin. It was a great event - fantastic to meet so many Rust people in real life and really energising to see how much is being planned and implemented. There is a blog post describing the whole event on the Rust blog.

    In this post I want to summarise some of the important dev-tools stuff that happened. Our planning and notes from some meetings is in the dev-tools team repo.

  • Notes v4 with multi-note support

    Multi-note support is now available in the new Test Pilot Notes v4 update. This was the most requested feature after going through all of the user research and feedback. You may also notice more UX changes to make Notes feel more like the rest of Firefox by following the Photon design system guidelines.

  • Mark Surman: A scandal, a napkinand the health of the internet

    Today marks the launch of Mozilla’s first full edition of the Internet Health Report, an open source effort to explore the state of human life on the internet.

    As we put our final touches on the report, the United States scrambled to prepare for testimony by Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, following revelations about user data obtained by Cambridge Analytica. The conversation: what should the Senate and Congress ask him?

    The list of questions is long.What do we do about the data of up to 87 million people floating around, unrecoverable? Can artificial intelligence help address suspicious behaviour around elections? What are Facebook’s responsibilities to users and the public? Unsurprisingly, it was also quite scattered. We do not yet have a collective mental map of how issues like these connect.

  • The Internet has serious health problems, Mozilla Foundation report finds

    Of particular concern were three issues:

    • Consolidation of power over the Internet, particularly by Facebook, Google, Tencent, and Amazon.
    • The spread of "fake news," which the report attributes in part to the "broken online advertising economy" that provides financial incentive for fraud, misinformation, and abuse.
    • The threat to privacy posed by the poor security of the Internet of Things.

How Netflix Deploys Open Source AI to Reveal Your Favorites

Filed under
Sci/Tech

In this AI based Science article, we explore How Netflix adopted an Open Source Model to improve their Entertainment Recommender Systems.
Read more

Make your first contribution to an open source project

Filed under
OSS

It's a common misconception that contributing to open source is difficult. You might think, "Sometimes I can't even understand my own code; how am I supposed to understand someone else's?"

Relax. Until last year, I thought the same thing. Reading and understanding someone else's code and writing your own on top of that can be a daunting task, but with the right resources, it isn't as hard as you might think.

Read more

Linux 4.17 Additions and Donald Becker's New Career Move

Filed under
Linux
  • Laptop Support Improvements Head Into Linux 4.17

    Andy Shevchenko has submitted the platform-drivers-x86 updates for the Linux 4.17 kernel merge window that largely benefit modern x86 laptops running Linux.

  • Linux 4.17 To Support Microsemi Ocelot MIPS SoCs

    There are old CPU architectures being dropped from the Linux 4.17 kernel while also some new CPU support added. The latest work added with the busy Linux 4.17 development cycle is support for the MIPS-based Microsemi Ocelot SoCs.

    The Ocelot SoCs are manufactured by Microsemi and used to power a range of Ethernet switches and other devices from security cameras to industrial controls. Ocelot has been around since 2016. The onboard MIPS processor appears to run around 500MHz.

  • ZEDEDA Hires Open-Source Pioneer Donald Becker

    Prior to joining ZEDEDA, Becker was an early primary contributor to the Linux kernel, focusing on high-performance networking and distributed computing. He founded and led the Beowulf Project at NASA, which directly led to Linux becoming the OS of choice for high performance distributed computing. Along with researchers at other centers, he received the Gordon Bell Prize in 1997 for his work using Beowulf clustering software on PCs to solve math problems previously run on purpose-built supercomputers.

Games: Steam Machines and Feral GameMode

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve should stick to Linux for Steam Machines: here’s why

    Steam Machines have failed, at least commercially. There’s hardly any argument there. Even Valve itself admits as much. Valve, however, would not concede defeat and promises to remain committed to pushing Linux gaming forward. Some might see it as simple lip service to calm SteamOS fans. Others might see it as a pointless endeavor and business suicide. And yet, if Valve’s dreams are to become reality, it really doesn’t have much choice to stick to its Linux guns for the long term and these are the reasons why.

  • Feral has created a new frame-rate boosting mode for Linux games

    Feral Interactive, the outfit responsible for bringing titles such as Hitman to Linux, has released a new open source tool which is designed to ensure that Linux users get the best performance from its games.

  • A Quick Look At Feral GameMode / P-State Powersave vs. Performance

    With today's release of the Feral GameMode library/daemon of course I am running some benchmarks... Here is some initial numbers while this has spurred some fresh benchmarks looking at the P-State vs. CPUFreq performance and their respective frequency scaling governor options.

    I will be doing some fresh Linux gaming benchmarks using P-State/CPUFreq and their governor options while testing with both Radeon and GeForce graphics cards. First up is the Intel Core i7 8700K tests to be followed by similar AMD Ryzen tests with CPUFreq.

Graphics: DRM and NVIDIA 396.18 (Blob) Beta

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Finally A Discussion Is Back Concerning FreeSync / Adaptive-Sync / VRR DRM Support

    While AMD has plumbed in FreeSync variable-rate refresh support with their AMDGPU DC display code stack, it's not yet all happy on the open-source mainline kernel as the missing piece has been over having a unified API for the Direct Rendering Manager drivers that can be used for supporting Free-Sync or the VESA-approved AdaptiveSync or HDMI VRR (Variable Refresh Rate). The discussion over having this common API for DRM drivers is back to being discussed.

  • NVIDIA 396.18 Linux Driver Reaches Beta With New Vulkan SPIR-V Compiler

    NVIDIA has rolled out an exciting beta Linux driver today, the first in their upcoming 396 driver series.

    The NVIDIA 396.18 Linux beta driver is now available and it's quite exciting. Exciting me the most with the NVIDIA 396 driver series is the introduction of a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler. The goal of this new compiler is to reduce shader compilation time and shader system memory consumption. This new SPIR-V compiler is enabled by default but for now the old compiler is still around and can be toggled with the __GL_NextGenCompiler= environment variable.

  • NVIDIA 396.18 beta driver is out with a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler to reduce shader compilation time

    The new NVIDIA 396.18 beta is officially out and it's one of the more interesting driver releases from NVIDIA.

    The biggest thing included in the driver, is the brand new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler. NVIDIA say this will help to reduce shader compilation time and shader system memory consumption. Their older compiler will be removed in a future driver version, but if you have issues with the new one which is on by default, you can use the "__GL_NextGenCompiler=" (0 or 1) environment variable to disable it.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Confirms RHEL 8 Will Drop Python 2

    While it could have been pretty much assumed up until now that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 would ship without Python 2 considering that next enterprise Linux OS release isn't even out yet, its long-term maintenance support, and Python 2 reaching EOL at the start of 2020, but now it's been made official.

    As part of today's Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 release, Red Hat issued their latest deprecation notices. Most notable this time around with RHEL 7.5 as a new deprecation notice is that of Python 2.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 Officially Released, Enhances Hybrid Cloud Security

    Red Hat announced today the general availability of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 operating system with new features and security enhancements needed for hybrid cloud environments and the enterprise world.

    The fifth maintenance update of Red Hat's enterprise-ready Linux-based operating system, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 is here to add yet another layer of performance and security enhancements to existing installations, as well as a plethora of new features with new deployments, which would mostly benefit enterprise customers on the desktop, server, and cloud infrastructures.

  • RHEL 7.5, ​the latest version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, arrives

    Red Hat has come a long way in 25 years. Now, the Linux company is continuing to drive forward both in the Linux server business and in the cloud with its latest distribution release: Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.5.

    The Raleigh, N.C.-based Red Hat emphasized in this release not the newest RHEL's Linux improvements, but rather, how RHEL can be used "as a consistent foundation for hybrid cloud environments ... [and] further integration with Microsoft Windows infrastructure both on-premise and in Microsoft Azure."

  • Red Hat boss urges automation for disruption

    Automating “as much as possible” can help telecoms operators and other enterprises move at a pace akin to the world’s technology giants, according to Jim Whitehurst, president and CEO of open source solutions provider Red Hat (pictured).

    Whitehurst told Mobile World Live one of the biggest issues facing the telecoms industry and other enterprises was an inability to make their operations move faster, and implementing automation processes was essential to achieving business transformation.

    “It’s about creating a layered architecture, it’s thinking about business process systems and the culture around how to make sure people are doing things that people need to do and you can automate everything else around and make it as simple as possible,” he said.

  • The investing case for Red Hat, why TD is steering away from marijuana stocks, and trouble for the TSX
  • Red Hat Still Pointed Higher
  • Application Software Stocks' Research Reports Released on RealPage, Red Hat, RingCentral, and SAP
  • DevConf’18 and CommOps FAD

    DevConf.cz 2018 is the 10th annual, free, Red Hat sponsored community conference for developers, admins, DevOps engineers, testers, documentation writers and other contributors to open source technologies such as Linux, Middleware, Virtualization, Storage, Cloud and mobile where FLOSS communities sync, share, and hack on upstream projects together in the beautiful city of Brno, Czech Republic.

  • Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 0)

Linux Foundation: LFN, Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), Open Container Initiative (OCI)

Filed under
Linux
  • NETSCOUT Joins Linux Foundation Networking

    LFN was formed on January 1, 2018 as a new entity within The Linux Foundation that increases collaboration and operational excellence across its networking projects. LFN integrates the governance of participating projects to improve operational excellence and simplify member engagement.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Continues Growth with Five New Members

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, is announcing that five new members have joined the project including ARKAMYS, IVIS, Paragon Software, SiFive, and Trillium Software. The steady growth of AGL demonstrates continued momentum and community support for the project, which now has more than 120 members.

  • Open Container Initiative Announces Distribution Specification Project

    The Open Container Initiative (OCI), an open source community for creating open standards around containers, today announced the launch of the Distribution Specification project to standardize container image distribution based on the specification for the Docker Registry v2 protocol, which supports the pushing and pulling of container images.

  • ​Open Container Initiative nails down container image distribution standard

    The Open Container Initiative (OCI), the open-source community in charge of creating container standards, has announced the launch of the Distribution Specification project to standardize container image distribution. This new standard is based on the Docker Registry v2 protocol. It standardizes container image distribution, which supports the pushing and pulling of container images.

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today's leftovers

  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes
    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.
  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless
    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.
  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage
    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all. The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.
  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)
    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.
  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27
    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system. Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.
  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018
    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.
  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!
    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.
  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875
    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

OSS Leftovers

  • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
    OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
  • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

    Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

  • Gui development is broken

    Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.

OpenBSD and NetBSD

Security: Twitter and Facebook

  • Twitter banned Kaspersky Lab from advertising in Jan
     

    Twitter has banned advertising from Russian security vendor Kaspersky Lab since January, the head of the firm, Eugene Kaspersky, has disclosed.  

  • When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data
     

    A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

  • The Security Risks of Logging in With Facebook
     

    In a yet-to-be peer-reviewed study published on Freedom To Tinker, a site hosted by Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, three researchers document how third-party tracking scripts have the capability to scoop up information from Facebook's login API without users knowing. The tracking scripts documented by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan represent a small slice of the invisible tracking ecosystem that follows users around the web largely without their knowledge.

  • Facebook Login data hijacked by hidden JavaScript trackers
     

    If you login to websites through Facebook, we've got some bad news: hidden trackers can suck up more of your data than you'd intended to give away, potentially opening it up to abuse.