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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's lefftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 10:51am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 10:46am
Story Security: France, Munich, 'Smart' Meters, MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 10:43am
Story How Linux became my job Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 8:39am
Story Linux 4.16-rc2 Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 8:38am
Story OpenStreetMap in IkiWiki and Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:39am
Story Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11 Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:37am
Story Fedora and Red Hat's Finances Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:35am
Story GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:33am
Story KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:32am

Qt 5.10.1 Released

Filed under
Development
KDE

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.10.1 is released today. As a patch release, Qt 5.10.1 does not add any new functionality but provides many bug fixes and other improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.10.0, the new Qt 5.10.1 contains over 300 bug fixes and in total close to 1400 changes since Qt 5.10.0. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.10.1.

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Getting started with the RStudio IDE

Filed under
Development

For as long as I can remember, I've been toying with numbers. As an undergraduate student in the late 1970s, I began taking statistics courses, learning ways to examine and analyze data to uncover some meaning.

Back then, I had a scientific calculator that made statistical calculations much easier than ever before. In the early '90s, as a graduate student in educational psychology working on t-tests, correlations, and ANOVA, I started doing my calculations by meticulously writing text files that were fed into an IBM mainframe. The mainframe was an improvement over my handheld calculator, but one minor spacing error rendered the whole process null and void, and the process was still somewhat tedious.

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Games: Super Tony Land, Pocketsprite (GNU Inside), and Rise of the Tomb Raider Coming to GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Super Tony Land is a story-based platformer that will let you build your own awesome stories

    Super Tony Land [Official Site, Kickstarter] sounds like a platformer that I could enjoy, one that will enable you to make your own challenges, worlds and stories.

    The game will use a "block based programming language" allowing you to create some really wild stuff. Not just in the form of levels, but vehicles and all sorts of wacky creations.

  • pocketsprite game console is the open-source tamagotchi of 2018

    ...it’s open source. sure, you could in theory just turn on the pocketsprite wi-fi, connect your computer up to it, and download games via pocketsprite’s desktop interface, but where’s the challenge in that? if you understand a few youtube-tutorial’s-worth of hacking, you could upload whatever you want to this tiny emulator...

  • Rise of the Tomb Raider announced for Linux, port from Feral Interactive

    Many asked, now Feral Interactive have answered. Rise of the Tomb Raider [Steam] is officially on the way to Linux! What a fantastic way to start a Tuesday with news like this! It still amazes me to this day that Linux will have games like this, very happy with the news!

    Feral aren't saying exactly when it will arrive, but they had a tweet out that said "This Winter" which has since been deleted (Edit: replaced with this one). You can see the official confirmation on their official site which now says "This spring", so it could be here sometime between March and late June.

  • Feral Is Bringing Rise of the Tomb Raider To Linux

    Feral Interactive has announced today that they are porting Rise of the Tomb Raider to Linux.

    Rise of the Tomb Raider was released for Windows in January of 2016 as the latest in the Tomb Raider franchise. Now two years later the Linux port will be released in the months ahead. When Feral has asked the community about games coming to Linux, this title has repeatedly been brought up as a title many Linux gamers would like to see following the port of the 2013 Tomb Raider game.

Everything I know about open source I learned from SpaceX

Filed under
OSS

You probably heard, but the private rocket company SpaceX did a thing last week. And while it was really cool to watch live video from a freakin' rocket on my pocket computer, that's not all there is to it. As I thought about the Falcon Heavy launch, I realized it contains a lot of lessons from my experience in open source projects.

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The best rising Linux distros in 2018

Filed under
Linux

Linux is built for tinkering and experimentation, which means it’s always morphing and changing. New distros are popping up all the time, because all it takes is a little bit of determination, time and effort to create a custom operating system.

Not all of them hit the mark – there are stacks of Linux distros that have seen little to no action, and we’re almost certain that some have been released and never installed by anyone other than their creator.

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Top 6 Partition Managers (CLI + GUI) for Linux

Filed under
Software

Are you looking to tweak or manage your disks partitions in Linux? In this article, we will review some of the best tools that help Linux users partition and manage their disks. We will see both command line utilities as well as GUI applications for managing disk partitions in Linux.

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Also: Min: An Open Source Web Browser for Minimalists

Movie Monad – A GTK Video Player Built with Haskell

Filed under
Software
Movies

Yes, guys – another video player! “What’s special about this one?”, you ask. Well, for starters, it began as a (blog post project) for Haskell programmers interested in functional programming and who also have an interest in building GTK UI apps.

Movie Monad is a free, simple, and open-source GTK video player written in Haskell. If features a UI reminiscent of VLC Media Player, keyboard shortcuts, and the ability to play both local and remote files.

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Graphics: X.Org, RADV, Virtualized GPU

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

  • X.Org Server Patches Updated For Non-Desktop & Lease Handling

    Keith Packard has sent out his latest patches for implementing the non-desktop and DRM lease functionality from within the X.Org Server. This work also includes the relevant DDX bits being wired through for the xf86-video-modesetting driver.

    The "non-desktop" handling is the new property for indicating if a display output is not for a conventional desktop use-case, i.e. a VR HMD as the main use-case from Valve's perspective. When the VR HMD or other non-desktop output is set, it's not used by the X.Org Server and any desktop window manager so it can be reserved for the SteamVR compositor.

  • RADV Radeon Vulkan Driver Is Still A Better Bet Than AMDVLK In February 2018

    With the AMDVLK Radeon Vulkan driver that AMD open-sourced in December continuing to be updated in weekly batches with new Vulkan extensions / features / performance optimizations and the RADV Mesa-based Radeon Vulkan driver continuing to march to its own beat, I have spent the past few days conducting some fresh benchmarks between the AMDVLK and RADV Vulkan drivers with RX 560, RX 580, and RX Vega 64 graphics cards.

  • Virtualizing GPU Access

    Virtualized GPU access is becoming common in the containerized and virtualized application space. Let's have a look at why and how.

    For the past few years a clear trend of containerization of applications and services has emerged. Having processes containerized is beneficial in a number of ways. It both improves portability and strengthens security, and if done properly the performance penalty can be low.

    In order to further improve security containers are commonly run in virtualized environments. This provides some new challenges in terms of supporting the accelerated graphics usecase.

Red Hat Interview, Podcast and Financial News

Filed under
Red Hat

Annoying Windows 10 sounds could mean deeper problem, or a reason to switch to Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

If none of these tips work and you don’t really want to spend a few hundred dollars to fix the machine, I’d suggest switching to a different operating system, like Linux. A version called Ubuntu is more Windows-like and user friendly — and it’s free.

And a good resource is a Denver company called System 76, which I wrote about a few years ago: “System 76 in Denver shows how easy it is to use Ubuntu Linux computers.” The company sells Linux Ubuntu computers, but last year, it unveiled its own Linux-based operating system called Pop!_os, a trend PCWorld proclaimed “Exciting.”

Also, if you’re the type of person who prefers hand-holding when it comes to technology, System 76 does offer customer service with their machines — for life.

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Also: What Microsoft’s Antitrust Case Teaches Us About Silicon Valley

Best Open Source Accounting Software

Filed under
OSS

Researching the best open source accounting software isn't as simple as one might think. There are a number of important variables you must consider before taking the leap. This is especially important for those businesses that already have an accounting/bookkeeping solution in place. Making sure you can achieve the same level of control and functionality is very important when switching to a Linux-centric accounting application.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

Definitely, check this distribution out whenever you get the chance. It doesn’t have all of the bells, whistles, and gimmicks that are found in other distros, but this one is still a very usable solid operating system. Installing it in VirtualBox wasn’t all smooth sailing; however, if you wish to install PCLinuxOS on a physical computer, you should have a positive experience with this Linux. Installing and updating packages to keep the system up to date is easy and straightforward, so is configuring your Plasma desktop.

The only major thing that occurred was not being able to enter the password when installing the bootloader. Minor issues did present themselves, but nothing that would greatly impact the overall experience with the system. So, PCLinuxOS isn’t perfect (well, what is?), but quite a solid distribution worth trying.

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Using Linux on the GPD Win 2 (so far)

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Since Steam already works (with full game controller support) on Windows 10, I didn’t bother trying to install Steam or any heavier-duty games in Linux.

Overall I’d say that for now Linux on the GPD Win 2 is a bit of a mixed bag, at least for the prototype I’m testing. It’s usable, but I can’t think of a lot of reasons why you would really choose it over Windows 10 on this particular device… unless you either really hate Windows or really know what you’re doing and think you might be able to get the non-working hardware to function properly.

That said, there is a way to have the best of both worlds. The GPD Win 10 ships with the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update pre-installed, which means you can use the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) to install Ubuntu or OpenSUSE from the Windows Store.

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The most popular Linux desktop programs are...

Filed under
Linux

LinuxQuestions, one of the largest internet Linux groups with 550,000 members, has just posted the results from its latest survey of desktop Linux users. With approximately 10,000 voters in the survey, the desktop Linux distribution pick was: Ubuntu.

While Ubuntu has long a been popular Linux distro, it hasn't been flying as high as it once was. Now it seems to be gathering more fans again. For years, people never warmed up to Ubuntu's default Unity desktop. Then, in April 2017, Ubuntu returned to GNOME for its default desktop. It appears this move has brought back some old friends and added some new ones.

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Security: Equifax, Australian, and KDE Plasma Panic

Filed under
Security

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.43.0

Filed under
KDE

KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.43.0.

KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

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Also: KDE Frameworks 5.43 Released With KHolidays Module, glTF/Coillada Highlighting

Add-on board brings BACnet building control to the Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Contemporary Controls is launching a “BASpi” Raspberry Pi add-on that supports the BACnet building control standard and Sedona Framework, and provides 6x relay outputs and 6x inputs, including analog, temp, contact closure, pulse, and resistance inputs.

Home automation is a new phenomenon compared to more established building automation technology, which largely follows the BACnet (Building Automation Control network) standard. We have seen various Linux-ready IoT products that offer some BACnet support, including Echelon’s IzoT Router. However, Contemporary Controls’ new BASpi Raspberry Pi 3 add-on board is the first product we’ve seen that is specifically designed for the standard.

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More in Tux Machines

Server: Benchmarks, IBM and Red Hat

  • 36-Way Comparison Of Amazon EC2 / Google Compute Engine / Microsoft Azure Cloud Instances vs. Intel/AMD CPUs
    Earlier this week I delivered a number of benchmarks comparing Amazon EC2 instances to bare metal Intel/AMD systems. Due to interest from that, here is a larger selection of cloud instance types from the leading public clouds of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.
  • IBM's Phil Estes on the Turbulent Waters of Container History
    Phil Estes painted a different picture of container history at Open Source 101 in Raleigh last weekend, speaking from the perspective of someone who had a front row seat. To hear him tell it, this rise and success is a story filled with intrigue, and enough drama to keep a daytime soap opera going for a season or two.
  • Red Hat CSA Mike Bursell on 'managed degradation' and open data
    As part of Red Hat's CTO office chief security architect Mike Bursell has to be informed of security threats past, present and yet to come – as many as 10 years into the future. The open source company has access to a wealth of customers in verticals including health, finance, defence, the public sector and more. So how do these insights inform the company's understanding of the future threat landscape?
  • Red Hat Offers New Decision Management Tech Platform
    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) has released a platform that will work to support information technology applications and streamline the deployment of rules-based tools in efforts to automate processes for business decision management, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday.

Vulkan Anniversary and Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers

  • Vulkan Turns Two Years Old, What Do You Hope For Next?
    This last week marked two years since the debut of Vulkan 1.0, you can see our our original launch article. My overworked memory missed realizing it by a few days, but it's been a pretty miraculous two years for this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers
    Noralf Trønnes has spent the past few months working on generic FBDEV emulation for Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) drivers and this week he volleyed his third revision of these patches, which now includes a new in-kernel API along with some clients like a bootsplash system, VT console, and fbdev implementation.

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.