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Wednesday, 17 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story NVIDIA GeForce vs. AMD Radeon Linux Gaming Performance At The Start Of 2018 Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2018 - 2:03am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 11/01/2018 - 1:03am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2018 - 9:48pm
Story Software: Cockpit, notmuch, Jumble Password, Tableau and GNOME Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2018 - 9:47pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2018 - 9:42pm
Story Debian Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2018 - 9:35pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2018 - 9:33pm
Story Security: Updates, Apple, Microsoft, Intel, IBM and Linux Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2018 - 9:31pm
Story Kubuntu 17.10 upgrade - Should you? Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2018 - 9:24pm
Story OSMC's December update is here with Debian Stretch and Kodi 17.6 Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2018 - 9:02pm

IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 117 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

The first Core Update is ready to be released today and it comes withh a huge number of various bug and security fixes.

Read more

GNOME: GtkSourceView, Friends of GNOME, GIMP, OpenType

Filed under
GNOME
  • GtkSourceView fundraising – November/December report

    I prefer to set expectations, I haven’t worked hard on GtkSourceView and Tepl this time around, because the fundraising is not as successful as I would like. Since I’m paid less than one hour per week for that project, I don’t feel forced to work > 10 times more, I think it’s understandable.

  • A (more) random act of kindness

    I’d like to take this opportunity to thank all the people who became Friends of GNOME, whether they chose me or someone else for the postcard, or even if they opted out. Your donation to the GNOME Foundation helps us a lot. And if you’re not already a donor, consider becoming one!

  • New “mypaint-brushes” package

    Since January 1st, GIMP depends on the “mypaint-brushes” repository which I am maintaining until MyPaint project finally takes it alongside its other repositories.

    I am hoping that I won’t have to maintain this for long and am looking forward for the MyPaint developers to take care of it (and last I heard of it, in the bug report, they wanted to). So this blog post is also to say that I am not trying to fork MyPaint or anything. I am just taking a little advance because we cannot wait much longer unfortunately since GIMP now uses libmypaint and we are really looking into releasing GIMP 2.10 as soon as we can.

  • More fun with fonts

    As you may remember from my last post on fonts, our goal was to support OpenType font variations. The Linux text rendering stack has multiple components: freetype, fontconfig, harfbuzz, cairo, pango. Achieving our goal required a number of features and fixes in all these components.

    Getting all the required changes in place is a bit time-consuming, but the results are finally starting to come together. If you use the master branches of freetype, fontconfig, harfbuzz, cairo, pango and GTK+, you can try this out today.

GNU/Linux on Desktops: Dell, New York Times, Pros and cons of Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Dell XPS 13 with 8th-gen Intel Core now available (with Windows or Ubuntu)

    Dell’s new XPS 13 laptop is thinner than its predecessors, features slimmer bezels, and adds a Windows Hello-compatible infrared camera. There’s also a brand new white model if you prefer that to the black and silver version Dell’s been offering for the past few years.

  • Taking a Look at Linux

    Linux, the open-source operating system project first developed by Linus Torvalds in 1991, is now used by millions of people on desktop computers, mobile devices and servers; Google’s Android and Chrome OS even have Linux roots. Because the software has been free and open for developers to enhance and improve for years, Linux is now available in many versions (typically called “distributions”) that vary in complexity and user interface.

    In terms of being able to do everything a Windows desktop can do, a Linux system is certainly capable of most common tasks, like browsing the web, sending and receiving email, creating documents and spreadsheets, streaming music and editing photos. Many Linux distributions include all the basic programs you need, and you can install others from Linux software repositories online, but make a list of everything you need to do on the computer and make sure you have a Linux solution for it.

  • Pros and cons of Linux

    Windows today beats almost all the markets thanks to its simplicity and large number of programs and games in a free access. We are used to Windows since there are no compatible systems like Windows. However, it is not true. Only a small number of people might have heard about Linux. This operating system started at the beginning of 90th and quickly gained popularity for supercomputers and huge server rooms. Today, you will actually be able to compare all the advantages and disadvantages of Linux operating system to understand whether it is worth your attention or not. Maybe, you will be even convinced of switching over to Linux after all. So let's start with advantages and disadvantages and then a small summary that I hope will help you to process all the newly acquainted information.

The inventor of Linux is furious at Intel

Filed under
Security

Linux inventor and founder Linus Torvalds is not known for holding back strong opinions he has about computers, which is why he's become one of the loudest voices critical of Intel's handling of the so-called Meltdown bug, which was revealed on Wednesday and could enable an attacker to steal confidential information, including passwords.

"I think somebody inside of Intel needs to really take a long hard look at their CPU's, and actually admit that they have issues instead of writing PR blurbs that say that everything works as designed," Torvalds wrote in a sharply-worded email sent on to a Linux list on Wednesday.

Read more

Also: SUSE Responds to Meltdown and Spectre CPU Vulnerabilities in SLE and openSUSE

Plasma 5.11.5 bugfix release available in backports PPA for Artful Aardvark 17.10

Filed under
KDE

The 5th and final bugfix update (5.11.5) of the Plasma 5.11 series is now available for users of Kubuntu Artful Aardvark 17.10 to install via our Backports PPA.

This update also includes an upgrade of KDE Frameworks to version 5.41.

Read more

Also: Kubuntu 17.10 Users Can Now Update to the KDE Plasma 5.11.5 Desktop Environment

Latest on Hardware Catastrophe

Filed under
Hardware
Security

More Linux Mint 19 Release Details

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Mint 19 Release Date and Codename Has been Announced

    This is a continually updated article to inform you about Linux Mint 19 release date, features and everything important associated with it.

    Linux Mint 19 codename has just been released. The first release of the upcoming Linux Mint 19 series will be called “Tara”.

  • Linux Mint 18.3: A breath of fresh air? Well, it's a step into the unGNOME

    The Linux Mint project turned out to be an early Christmas present, as it usually does, but this release is perhaps more important than usual given that Mint is much more alone in the Linux distro world than it was just one year ago.

    2017 saw Ubuntu abandon the Unity desktop and come back to the GNOME fold, which means that Linux Mint is now the most popular distro that doesn't ship with GNOME. Mind you, Linux Mint doesn't just not ship GNOME by default, it doesn't ship a GNOME version at all. That doesn't just make it unique, but also more important than ever.

  • Linux Mint 19 “Tara” Release Date Announced: Know Expected Features Here

    The latest release of Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” kicked off the development of the new Linux Mint 19.x series. In a recent blog post, the development team shared some brief updates on the same. It has been confirmed that the first release in this series will be called Linux Mint 19 “Tara.” “Tara is a popular name here in Ireland, and the name of someone we really like,” the announcement read.

  • Linux Mint team targets May or June 2018 for Linux Mint 19 release

    The release of Linux Mint 18.3 in November 2017 put the development focus of the team on Linux Mint 19, the next major version of the popular Linux distribution.

    Linux Mint 19 is the first significant release of the operating system since June 2016 when Linux Mint 17, codename Sarah, was released by the team.

And we return to Munich's migration back to Windo- it's going to cost what now?! €100m!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Munich City officials could waste €100m reversing a 15-year process that replaced proprietary software with open source following an official vote last year.

Munich officials in 2003 voted to migrate to an in-house custom version of Ubuntu Linux called LiMux and tailor digital docs to be compatible with LibreOffice. Now the councillors have decided that Munich will switch some 29,000 PCs to Windows 10 and phase out Linux by early 2023.

The cost of the U-turn could be even more catastrophic if another council vote by the end of 2018 fails to take a more reasoned tally. An approval would replace the open-source office suite LibreOffice with Microsoft Office.

That decision will cost the city upwards of €50m plus another €50m to revert to Windows 10, according to reports. The bill results from a combination of buying Windows 10 licences and converting some 12,000 LibreOffice templates and macros along with developing a new templating system for Microsoft Office.

Read more

VM Performance Showing Mixed Impact With Linux 4.15 KPTI Patches

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The initial benchmarks of these security patches published yesterday were focused on Intel desktop hardware following all the media attention around this "Intel CPU bug" now known as Meltdown and Spectre following the disclosure today by Google's Project Zero.

In those initial benchmarks most of the overhead from these page table isolation patches to improve the Linux kernel security were found to slowdown select I/O workloads. Our continued testing through today has found for desktop-type hardware to mostly be impacted on that front with no severe slowdowns in other common desktop workloads. I provided a summary this afternoon of further analyzing the performance on more systems.

Read more

Meltdown And Spectre CPU Flaws Put Computers, Laptops, Phones At Risk

Filed under
Linux
Server

Today Google security blog has posted about the two vulnerabilities that put virtually many computers, phones, laptops using Intel, AMD and ARM CPUs at risk. Using the two major flaws hackers can gain read access to the system memory that may include sensitive data including passwords, encryption keys etc.

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more

Librem Tablet In 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Purism Planning To Release Their Librem Tablet In 2018

    Not only is Purism working on their Librem 5 smartphone this year with hopes of still readying the software and hardware for shipping to consumers in 2019, but they are also planning to unveil their tablet this year.

    Todd Weaver, the founder and CEO of Purism, posted today about the company's goals for 2018. Besides releasing the development board for the Librem 5 phone this year and working on other efforts for their smartphone plans, they are also planning to "release the much-anticipated Librem tablet."

  • Happy New Year! Purism Goals for 2018

    Purism has some lofty goals that seem more attainable with each advancement that we make. Our pace for these achievements is already impressive, and we plan on maintaining and exceeding that pace in 2018.

Bye bye Windows 10, and good riddance

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

At this point I’d had more than enough of Microsoft Windows. I used my laptop to download the ISO for Lubuntu 17.10 and create a LivePendrive, and I installed Lubuntu on the Aspire XC600. Although I run a source-based Linux distribution on two laptops, for ease and speed of installation and maintenance I opted to install a binary-based distribution on the family PC. I chose Lubuntu specifically because it uses the LXDE desktop environment, which is closer in look and feel to classic Windows than e.g. the Unity or GNOME desktop environments in Ubuntu, and is not as processor-hungry as KDE. I found that Lubuntu worked extremely well out-of-the-box, including scanning and printing using my Canon MP510 MFP. I used the GUI Software utility (‘System Tools’ > ‘Software’ from the LXDE application menu) to uninstall AbiWord and Gnumeric and install the LibreOffice suite. I added user accounts for all my family (‘System Tools’ > ‘Users and Groups’). Since the machines on my home network use SMB to share files, I installed samba and sambaclient and edited the smb.conf file via the command line, and browsing SMB shares worked first time. We have a decent family PC again.

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​Major Linux redesign in the works to deal with Intel security flaw

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Security

Long ago, Intel made a design mistake in its 64-bit chips -- and now, all Intel-based operating systems and their users must pay the price.

Linux's developers saw this coming early on and patched Linux to deal with it. That's the good news. The bad news is it will cause at least a 5-percent performance drop. Applications may see far more serious performance hits. The popular PostgreSQL database is estimated to see at least a 17-percent slowdown.

How bad will it really be? I asked Linux's creator Linus Torvalds, who said: "There's no one number. It will depend on your hardware and on your load. I think 5 percent for a load with a noticeable kernel component (e.g. a database) is roughly in the right ballpark. But if you do micro-benchmarks that really try to stress it, you might see double-digit performance degradation."

Read more

today's leftovers: OpenWrt/LEDE, Mapzen and More

Filed under
Misc
  • Now What?

    Linux Journal was a print magazine for 17+ years, then a digital one for the next 7+. What shall we be now? That's the Big Question, and there are many answers, some of which are already settled.

  • Steve Jobs’s worst decision was promoting Tim Cook

    Fifteen years later, 2 billion smartphones have shipped worldwide, and Microsoft’s mobile OS share is just 1%.

  •  

  • Amazon Linux Moves Beyond the Cloud to On-Premises Deployments

    For nearly as long as Amazon Web Services (AWS) has been in operation there has been a Amazon Linux operating system that runs on it. Initially Amazon Linux was just an optimized version of Red Hat's community Fedora Linux, adjusted to work on AWS, but it has evolved over the years.

  • The future of DevOps is mastery of multi-cloud environments

    DevOps is a set of practices that automates the processes between software development and IT teams so they can build, test, and release software more quickly and reliably. The concept of DevOps is founded on building a culture of collaboration between IT and business teams, which have historically functioned in relative siloes. The promised benefits include increased trust, faster software releases, and the ability to solve critical issues quickly.

    That said, implementing a successful DevOps organization requires IT leaders to think more broadly about how to spur a cultural and organizational shift within both their team and the broader organization, as opposed to simply deploying new technologies. A successful DevOps strategy requires a merged focus from both development teams and operational teams on what the company needs to meet its digital transformation objectives. Thus, it is about breaking down siloed groups of people and responsibilities, and—in their place—building teams that can multitask on technical issues and goals.

  • The Linux 2017 GOTY Awards are now open for nominations

    Continuing our tradition and a day later than last year, the Linux 2017 GOTY Awards are now open for nominations.

  • The Markets Are Undervaluing these stock’s: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), KB Home (KBH)
  • Announcing the OpenWrt/LEDE merge

    The OpenWrt and LEDE projects have announced their unification under the OpenWrt name. The old OpenWrt CC 15.05 release series will receive a limited amount of security and bug fixes, but the current LEDE 17.01 series is the most up-to-date.

  • Announcing the OpenWrt/LEDE merge

    Both the OpenWrt and LEDE projects are happy to announce their unification under the OpenWrt name.

    After long and sometimes slowly moving discussions about the specifics of the re-merge, with multiple similar proposals but little subsequent action, we're happy to announce that both projects are about to execute the final steps of the merger.

    The new, unified OpenWrt project will be governed under the rules established by the LEDE project. Active members of both the former LEDE and OpenWrt projects will continue working on the unified OpenWrt.

    LEDE's fork and subsequent re-merge into OpenWrt will not alter the overall technical direction taken by the unified project. We will continue to work on improving stability and release maintenance while aiming for frequent minor releases to address critical bugs and security issues like we did with LEDE 17.01 and its four point releases until now.

    Old pre-15.05 OpenWrt CC releases will not be supported by the merged project anymore, leaving these releases without any future security or bug fixes. The OpenWrt CC 15.05 release series will receive a limited amount of security and bug fixes, but is not yet fully integrated in our release automation, so binary releases are lacking behind for now.

  • GIS company Mapzen to shut down but users can still avail open-source data

    But for the admirers of the company, there is still a silver lining: as the data and code is available in open source and users will still be able to run the projects they built using Mapzen tools, as well as some of the company’s tools. Until February 1, when the company will shut down its APIs and support, users are free to grab all that they require.

  • Driving Open Standards in a Fragmented Networking Landscape

    Once upon a time, standards were our friends. They provided industry-accepted blueprints for building homogeneous infrastructures that were reliably interoperable. Company A could confidently build an application and — because of standards — know that it would perform as expected on infrastructure run by Company B.

    Standards have somewhat fallen out of favor as the speed of digital innovation has increased. Today innumerable software applications are created by innumerable developers at an accelerating pace. Standards — once critical for achieving interoperability — have failed to adapt in this brave new world.

    [...]

    The bottom line is that we need to accept that “the only constant is change.” Innovation in software can bring many good things, but we need to learn how we can eliminate the silos, guard against new ones forming, create better interoperability, and simplify operational complexity. The examples above show that by taking a programmatic approach to standards, this degree of interoperability can be achieved even today.

KDE: Neon and KMyMoney

Filed under
KDE

Calamares 3.2 Plan

Filed under
Software
  • Calamares 3.2 Upgraded Linux Installer Could Be Here In March

    The Calamares project as a reminder aims to be the universal installer framework for Linux systems that is distribution-agnostic and already used by Manjaro and KaOS and OpenMandriva. Calamares 3.2 is being worked on as the installer framework's next major release.

    Now that we're into 2018, a Calamares 3.2-RC2 release has been made available and they hope to officially ship Calamares 3.2.0 in March.

  • Calamares 3.2 Plan (Revised)

    It’s a new year, and the Calamares 3.1 series has reached 3.1.12, and I’ve been saying that it’s time to switch to Calamares 3.2 development in earnest for some time now. Let’s revisit the Calamares 3.2 plan, and talk about the next three months.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Programming: LLVM 7.0, FarmBot, Mozilla and Rust

Filed under
Development
  • LLVM 7.0 / Clang 7.0 Is Now Under Development

    LLVM/Clang 6.0 has been branched, thus making LLVM/Clang 7.0 open for development on master.

    The LLVM 6.0 branching has taken place a few weeks earlier than is traditionally done to satisfy an unnamed, large user of LLVM to jive with that company's internal testing processes. The branching / feature development is now over but the release candidates will not begin until mid-January.

  • FarmBot Wants to Cultivate an Open-Source Future for Remote Farming

    “Farm from anywhere” is a phrase we’re likely to hear more and more of as technology enables easier access to fresh, locally grown food. We just wrote about Babylon Micro-Farms, a remote, hydroponic farm you can keep inside your living room. There’s also a healthy urban farming market: thanks to companies like Farmshelf and Smallhold, restaurants, schools, and the average consumer get better access to fresh food and more involved in the food production itself.

  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: New Year's Rust: A Call for Community Blogposts

    ‘Tis the season for people and communities to reflect and set goals- and the Rust team is no different. Last month, we published a blogpost about our accomplishments in 2017, and the teams have already begun brainstorming goals for next year.

    Last year, the Rust team started a new tradition: defining a roadmap of goals for the upcoming year. We leveraged our RFC process to solicit community feedback. While we got a lot of awesome feedback on that RFC, we’d like to try something new in addition to the RFC process: a call for community blog posts for ideas of what the goals should be.

    As open source software becomes more and more ubiquitous and popular, the Rust team is interested in exploring new and innovative ways to solicit community feedback and participation. We’re commited to extending and improving our community organization and outreach- and this effort is just the first of what we hope to be many iterations of new kinds of community feedback mechanisms.

  • This Week in Rust 215

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Mozilla Will Delete Firefox Crash Reports Collected by Accident

    Mozilla said last week it would delete all telemetry data collected because of a bug in the Firefox crash reporter.

    According to Mozilla engineers, Firefox has been collecting information on crashed background tabs from users' browsers since Firefox 52, released in March 2017.

    Firefox versions released in that time span did not respect user-set privacy settings and automatically auto-submitted crash reports to Mozilla servers. The browser maker fixed the issue with the release of Firefox 57.0.3.

  • Mozilla GFX: WebRender newsletter #11

    Newsletter #11 is finally here, even later than usual due to an intense week in Austin where all of Mozilla’s staff and a few independent contributors gathered, followed by yours truly taking two weeks off.

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More in Tux Machines

Librem 5 Phone Progress Report

  • Librem 5 Phone Progress Report – The First of Many More to Come!
    First, let me apologize for the silence. It was not because we went into hibernation for the winter, but because we were so busy in the initial preparation and planning of a totally new product while orienting an entirely new development team. Since we are more settled into place now, we want to change this pattern of silence and provide regular updates. Purism will be giving weekly news update posts every Tuesday, rotating between progress on phone development from a technology viewpoint (the hardware, kernel, OS, etc.) and an art of design viewpoint (UI/UX from GNOME/GTK to KDE/Plasma). To kickoff this new update process, this post will discus the technological progress of the Librem 5 since November of 2017.
  • Purism Eyeing The i.MX8M For The Librem 5 Smartphone, Issues First Status Update
    If you have been curious about the state of Purism's Librem 5 smartphone project since its successful crowdfunding last year and expedited plans to begin shipping this Linux smartphone in early 2019, the company has issued their first status update.

Benchmarking Retpoline-Enabled GCC 8 With -mindirect-branch=thunk

We have looked several times already at the performance impact of Retpoline support in the Linux kernel, but what about building user-space packages with -mindirect-branch=thunk? Here is the performance cost to building some performance tests in user-space with -mindirect-branch=thunk and -mindirect-branch=thunk-inline. Read more

An introduction to Inkscape for absolute beginners

Inkscape is a powerful, open source desktop application for creating two-dimensional scalable vector graphics. Although it's primarily an illustration tool, Inkscape is used for a wide range of computer graphic tasks. The variety of what can be done with Inkscape is vast and sometimes surprising. It is used to make diagrams, logos, programmatic marketing materials, web graphics, and even for paper scrapbooking. People also draw game sprites, produce banners, posters, and brochures. Others use Inkscape to draft web design mockups, detail layouts for printed circuit boards, or produce outline files to send to laser cutting equipment. Read more

Behind the scenes with Pop!_OS Linux

In October, Linux PC maker System76 released its homegrown version of Linux, Pop!_OS, giving users the choice between its legacy Ubuntu operating system or the new Pop!_OS flavor of Linux. Recently Opensource.com gave away a System76 laptop with Pop!_OS installed, which made me curious about the company and this new version of Linux, so I spoke with Cassidy James Blaede, Pop!_OS's user experience (UX) designer. Blaede joined System76 in 2014, fresh out of college at the University of Northern Iowa and marriage to his wife, Katie. While in college, he co-founded the elementary OS project and interned at UX consultancy Visual Logic, both of which influenced his work for System76. He started at System76 as a front-end developer and was later promoted to UX architect. Read more