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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 8:48am
Story What’s New in Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 6:52am
Story Linux fragmentation - The Sum of All Egos Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 5:51am
Story A short history of Gentoo copyright Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 5:49am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 5:21am
Story Red Hat leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 5:16am
Story GNOME: GNOME Boxes and More Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 4:20am
Story KDE/Qt: Krita, Calamares and Qt Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 4:18am
Story Events: Fractal Hackfest, FOSS-North, OpenDev, MiniDebConf Hamburg Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 4:17am
Story Ubuntu 18.10 and Ubuntu in Microsoft Prison Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 4:15am

Fedora: Fedora 28, FLISoL 2018 Mexico, New PHP RCs

Filed under
Red Hat

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Join the Orvium Innovation, first open source and decentralized framework for managing scholarly publications

    Knowledge is power. This phrase holds the truest form when it comes to publication of knowledge. One of the most lucrative markets in the world, the publication houses work in a manner that where the cost of publishing is on the publisher’s end. Work submitted by authors is selected carefully, the basis being relevancy, the interest of the readers and the commercial viability. Authors are then compensated for their works. Publication houses pay more to their content submitters if they have a higher quality of work, while another may agree to print an article easily, but with limited reader reach, it will pay out much less.

    [...]

    The ORV token is used in the Orvium platform for the exchange of monetary matters, such as payment for reviews, publications, copyrights etc. The ORV’s ICO is yet to be announced. A total of 379 million ORVs will be available for the public through its ICOs.

  • HP Elitebook 8770w Ported To Coreboot, But Need To Disassemble The Laptop For Flashing

    If you happen to have an HP Elitebook 8770w laying around from Intel's Ivy Bridge era, that Hewlett Packard laptop has now been freed by Coreboot.

    This Intel Ivy Bridge quad-core laptop with SO-DIMM memory modules and using MXM 3.0b graphics cards can now work with Coreboot Git. Though if you have this laptop, for performing the initial port you first need to disassemble the laptop down to the motherboard. But at least when the initial Coreboot flash is done, subsequent flashes can be done using the Flashrom software.

  • Terratest - an Open Source Go Library for Automated Infrastructure Testing

    Gruntwork open sourced their Go framework Terratest which can be used to write automated tests for testing infrastructure. The library comes with support for Terraform and Packer.

    Terratest was developed internally at Gruntwork to maintain their Infrastructure as Code (IAC) library, a repository of tools based on Terraform, Python, Go and bash for managing infrastructure on AWS. IAC is available to paying Gruntwork users.

    Writing tests in Terratest involves using Go's inbuilt package testing mechanism. A test run creates real infrastructure components like servers, deploys applications on them and validates the expected behaviour using Terratest tools. At the end of the test, Terratest can undeploy the apps and cleanup resources using Go's defer mechanism, similar to JUnit's teardown method. Can Terratest run against an existing infrastructure deployment instead of creating it from scratch each time? The tool wiki recommends against this as it might create undesirable changes in the environment. However, this can be difficult to follow for some teams who have complex infrastructure topologies and do not wish to create an entirely new setup to run the tests. A feature called namespacing can isolate resources by using unique identifiers. Note that namespacing here does not translate to the generally understood term of isolating components by tagging them with labels, but rather to ensuring unique identifiers for resources and using only those resources for testing which have the identifiers generated in the test framework.

  • Fractal Hackfest

    This week, I was able to attend to the Fractal Hackfest. My train from Paris arrived at Strasbourg at 12:45, so I missed the beginning of the Hackfest in the morning but I could be there for the afternoon. I stayed until the middle of Saturday’s afternoon.

    On Thursday, I wasn’t there on the morning but there was a sum up of the important part of the morning’s discussions.

    There can be two main use cases for Matrix: one for friends, family and other small group discussions, where there are a low volume of messages and you care about all of them; and another for huge and noisy rooms in which there is a lot going on and you don’t necessarily care about most of it (for instance, you would want to be able to focus on the messages mentioning you). Both of these use cases could motivate to split Fractal in two apps: “Barbecue” (for the first use case) and “Banquet” (for the second one).

  • Mozilla Officially Unveils Firefox 60 Quantum Web Browser as the Next ESR Series

    Mozilla officially announced today the release of its Firefox 60 web browser as the next ESR (Extended Support Release) series for all supported platforms on the desktop, including Linux, Mac, Windows, and Android.

    Firefox 60 "Quantum" was launched today as the next ESR (Extended Support Release) series of the widely-used open-source and cross-platform web browser, ready for deployments in enterprise environments thanks to a new policy engine, as well as Group Policy support that helps IT professionals easily configure the browser using a cross-platform JSON file or Windows Group Policy.

  • Important: Pale Moon users and NoScript support (Parody)

    Yesterday our readers discovered problems with the Pale Moon web browser, which according to the NoScript website has either security, compatibility or usability issues when using popular add-ons like NoScript:

    One reader who uses NoScript found the plugin was displaying the above window and offering to disable the Pale Moon browser, rather than have it cause users any further trouble.

  • CVE-2018-8897
  • shutil module in Python

    File Management and Handling file objects are considered to be one of the most tricky tasks in all programming languages. Some programming languages provide us with some tools which abstract away the difficult parts of File Handling with easy to use functions and interfaces. This is exactly what Python‘s shutil module does as well.

Security: Malware Found In The Ubuntu Snap Store, Google/Android Patches, ATMs with Windows, Oracle WebLogic Holes, USBGuard, Valve

Filed under
Security

Linux 4.17 Reaches RC5

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.17-rc5

    Things continue to look fairly normal. About half the rc5 release is driver
    updates, with amdgpu standing out but mainly because everything else is
    really pretty small, not because the amdgpu patches are all that big.

    Outside of drivers, there's a random collection of changes all over: some
    filesystems (ceph and cifs), some networking, some core kernel, some small
    arch updates, and some tooling.

    There's a fair number of changes in there (shortlog appended as usual), but
    a lot of them really are one- or two-liners.

    So I think we're in pretty good shape. Please go keep testing, though, to
    make sure we're not missing anything.

    Linus

  • Linux 4.17-rc5 Released As Another Normal Weekly Test Release

    Linus Torvalds has done a Mother's Day release of the Linux 4.17-rc5 kernel.

    Linus notes that this latest Linux 4.17 release candidate continues looking "fairly normal" with about half of the changes being driver updates and then a random collection of other changes. He notes that so far they are in fairly good shape.

  • Linux 4.17 Gets More Spectre V1 Fixes

    Thomas Gleixner this morning sent in the latest batch of x86/pti updates for containing the latest mitigation improvements around Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities.

    This latest pull request has several fixes, including a possible deadlock fix. There have also been a number of Spectre Variant One access restrictions.

KDE: KDE Connect, Management of LVM VGs in Calamares and More

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Connect Junior Jobs

    One of KDE’s Community goals for the next years is streamlined onboarding of new contributors. It’s very important that new people regularly join the community for various reasons. First of all, there will always be something to do and the more contributors the merrier! But there are also people becoming very inactive or leaving the community and these people need to be replaced. Furthermore new people bring in new and fresh ideas. It’s important to have people from diverse backgrounds in the community.

  • Management of LVM VGs in Calamares

    I talked in my last post about some of my LVM studies for the first goal of GSoC. This post is an addition to the last one, focused more in explaining how I want to implement it and talking a little bit about some application concepts from Calamares that I’ve studied.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 18

    Image operations in Gwenview that have been undone can now be re-done too (Peter Mühlenpfordt, KDE Applications 18.08.0)

GNU/Linux Releases: CRUX 3.4, Antergos 18.5, SparkyLinux 4.8

Filed under
GNU
Linux

How To Check Ubuntu Version and Other System Information

Filed under
HowTos

Wondering which Ubuntu version are you using? Here’s how to check Ubuntu version, desktop environment and other relevant system information.
Read more

Best Linux applications (2018)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Over the years, I have compiled several articles detailing the best-of software for Linux and Windows, starting as early as 2008, and then making the last bundle in 2012. Six years is a very long time in the software sphere, so I thought about making another compilation.

My criteria for the inclusion and nomination are relatively simple: Applications need to be robust and stable, they need to accessible, the installation process should be relatively straightforward, and ideally, these will be cross-platform tools that run on other operating systems, too. There's a certain degree of personal taste, too, but I believe my choices are pragmatic, useful and fun. With the necessary expectation for a certain amount of hype, let us proceed. And do note, in some cases, you will see older and/or official screenshots, but that's mostly for aesthetic purposes.

Read more

Also: Testing out Sumatra: a tool for managing iterations of simulations/analyses

Security: Malicious JS, Microsoft/NSA Back Doors, and Malicious Software in Ubuntu Snap Store

Filed under
Security
  • Google YOLO [iophk: "javascript"]

    Actually don't even click anything. Malicious websites can simply track your cursor's position and change the invisible button/iframe's position accordingly. So even if you make a click by mistake you will be forced to click on something else.

  • One year on from the WannaCry attack, are we more vulnerable than ever? [Ed: The ToryGraph repeats Microsoft's lies about Windows XP; all versions of Windows have NSA back doors and XP was hardly the problem in this case. The problem is Microsoft collusion with NSA.]

    The hackers, reportedly from North Korea, didn’t intentionally target the UK’s health service: it was collateral damage. WannaCry entered computers through a glitch, discovered by the US National Security Agency, in early Windows operating systems. The 33 affected NHS practices were hit because they hadn’t updated their Windows XP software for many years.

    [...]

    One of the biggest problems facing the UK, as WannaCry showed, is a lack of technical proficiency. There just aren’t enough defenders in the face of highly trained foreign criminals and state-sponsored hackers, Hannigan explains.

    [...]

    The fight doesn’t end with education. Hannigan’s other suggestions have included the creation of an international cyber war treaty. In the meantime, he welcomes the news that all NHS computers will be upgraded to Windows 10 and that the Government will spend £150 million in the next three years to improve the service’s security.

  • Malicious Package Found on the Ubuntu Snap Store

    An attentive Ubuntu user has spotted today a cryptocurrency miner hidden in the source code of an Ubuntu snap package hosted on the official Ubuntu Snap Store.

    The app's name is 2048buntu, a clone of the popular 2024 game, packaged as an Ubuntu snap —a relatively new app format for Ubuntu OS.

    According to a GitHub user named Tarwirdur, the app contained a cryptocurrency mining application disguised as the "systemd" daemon, along with an init script that provided boot persistence.

Wine-Staging 3.8 Gets Fixes For Star Citizen, Direct3D 11

Filed under
Software

For those looking to enjoy Windows-only games on Linux this weekend, Wine-Staging 3.8 has been released as the newest experimental build of Wine.

Wine-Staging 3.8 is based off Friday's release of Wine 3.8 while adding in more experimental patches. In addition to the re-basing of nearly one thousand existing patches atop the upstream Wine source tree, this Wine-Staging 3.8 release has a few more enhancements.

Read more

Bigger than Linux: The rise of cloud native

Filed under
Linux
Server

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s first KubeCon + CloudNativeCon of the year took place in the Bella Center, Copenhagen. A giant greenhouse of a building with snaking industrial pipework and connecting concrete bridges; it's a vast container made of glass letting in light. A suitable setting for an industry that’s evolved rapidly from the release of Docker’s superstar container technology back in 2013.

Attendance has rocketed to 4,300, according to Dan Kohn, executive director of the CNCF, which almost triples attendance from a year ago in Berlin, but that’s not surprising as cloud native computing industry is meeting the business world’s demand for more scalable, agile applications and services that can be run across multiple geographical locations in distributed environments.

Read more

A look at Scribus – Open-Source Desktop Publisher on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

As a print journalist by trade, I’ve had to use more Adobe InDesign than I care to get into. I swear I kern text in my dreams or something at this point.

The problem is that Adobe InDesign is not native to GNU/Linux and did not work as expected when running through WINE in the past (I can’t say if I have got it to work yet in Wine 3.X, as I haven’t honestly tried yet.) and so, I’ve had to learn to use alternatives from time to time when I don’t have InDesign handy – Like Scribus.

Scribus for all intents and purposes, is designed to fulfil the same role as Adobe InDesign, and can be used for all kinds of different purposes; from creating and laying out magazine or newspaper pieces, to creating a not-a-boring-word-document-resume for finding employment, or even business cards or comic strips.

Read more

Linux-Friendly Arduino Simplifies IoT Development

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Arduino’s support for Linux IoT devices and single-board computers (SBCs) announced at the Embedded Linux Conference+Open IoT Summit NA in March cemented Arduino’s focus on cloud-connected IoT development, extending its reach into edge computing. This move was likely driven by multiple factors — increased complexity of IoT solutions and, secondarily, by more interest in Arduino boards running Linux.

In a “blending” of development communities for the masses — Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and BeagleBone — Arduino’s support for Linux-based boards lowers the barrier of development for IoT devices by combining Arduino’s sensor and actuator nodes with higher processor-powered boards like Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone. Top this with a user-friendly web wizard to connect the Linux boards via the cloud and it simplifies the entire process.

The expanded support for more architectures by the cloud-connected Arduino Create web platform is an inevitable and natural evolution of Arduino’s mission that was born out of a thought to simplify complex technologies with easy-to-use and open-source software, enabling anybody to innovate by making complex technologies simple to use.

Read more

Games: Steam, Hyper Sentinel, Rocket League

Filed under
Gaming

KDE Frameworks 5.46.0

Filed under
KDE
  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.46.0

    KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.46.0.

    KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

    This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.46 As The Latest Add-Ons Update

    KDE Frameworks 5.46.0 is out today as the newest version of this collection of add-on libraries used by KDE applications and more for complementing the Qt5 tool-kit.

KDE vs. GNOME, X.Org vs. Wayland Radeon Linux Gaming Performance With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering how the Radeon Linux gaming performance is changed between desktop environments when testing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS out-of-the-box, here are some benchmarks. Not only is it looking at the performance between GNOME Shell 3.28.1 and KDE Plasma 5.12.4, but it's also comparing each desktop environment with its X.Org and Wayland session support. Additionally, these tests were done with both AMD Radeon Polaris and Vega graphics cards.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

  • XWayland Gets Patches For Better EGLStreams Handling
    While the recently released X.Org Server 1.20 has initial support for XWayland with EGLStreams so X11 applications/games on Wayland can still benefit from hardware acceleration, in its current state it doesn't integrate too well with Wayland desktop compositors wishing to support it. That's changing with a new patch series.
  • Intel Mesa Driver Finally Supports Threaded OpenGL
    Based off the Gallium3D "mesa_glthread" work for threaded OpenGL that can provide a measurable win in some scenarios, the Intel i965 Mesa driver has implemented this support now too. Following the work squared away last year led in the RadeonSI driver, the Intel i965 OpenGL driver supports threaded OpenGL when the mesa_glthread=true environment variable is set.
  • Geometry & Tessellation Shaders For Mesa's OpenGL Compatibility Context
    With the recent Mesa 18.1 release there is OpenGL 3.1 support with the ARB_compatibility context for the key Gallium3D drivers, but Marek Olšák at AMD continues working on extending that functionality under the OpenGL compatibility context mode.
  • Mesa Begins Its Transition To Gitlab
    Following the news from earlier this month that FreeDesktop.org would move its infrastructure to Gitlab, the Mesa3D project has begun the process of adopting this Git-centered software.

Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Comment Ubuntu 18.04, launched last month, included a new Welcome application that runs the first time you boot into your new install. The Welcome app does several things, including offering to opt you out of Canonical's new data collection tool. The tool also provides a quick overview of the new GNOME interface, and offers to set up Livepatch (for kernel patching without a reboot). In my review I called the opt-out a ham-fisted decision, but did note that if Canonical wanted to actually gather data, opt-out was probably the best choice. Read more

How CERN Is Using Linux and Open Source

CERN really needs no introduction. Among other things, the European Organization for Nuclear Research created the World Wide Web and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest particle accelerator, which was used in discovery of the Higgs boson. Tim Bell, who is responsible for the organization’s IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group, says the goal of his team is “to provide the compute facility for 13,000 physicists around the world to analyze those collisions, understand what the universe is made of and how it works.” Read more