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Wednesday, 07 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Debian News Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 11:56am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 11:21am
Story Ubuntu still isn't free software Rianne Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 9:58am
Story Enlightenment 0.21.4 Desktop Release Adds 106 Changes, Improves Wayland Support Rianne Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 9:49am
Story Ardour 5.5 DAW Adds Support for Steinberg CC121 and Avid Artist Control Surfaces Rianne Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 9:47am
Story Razer is now a member of the consortium responsible for Vulkan-based graphics Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 9:19am
Story Servers/Networks Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 9:16am
Story Chrome 55 Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 8:57am
Story Christmas Gift Ideas For Linux Fans Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 8:42am
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 7:39am

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • List of Productive GNOME Shell Extensions for Daily Usage

    In this article I listed my favorite GNOME Shell Extensions (GSE) that I, myself, had ever used. GSE in GNOME is similar with Addons in Firefox, they add and extend desktop functionality with many features. I listed here GSE for screen recording, proxy, network indicator, and some more.

  • I spy, with my little eye, Gnome Pie

    Regardless of the factual conclusion of this article, you are already sold on it just based on the title. Anyway. Humans are really good at solving problems, especially, or possibly only, if they are linear. It is not a coincidence that we have manuals that follow through a simple top-down logic or that navigation systems use turn-by-turn instructions. Square root of 7443 anyone? But this is not a biology lesson. And yet, it is.

    Operating systems are designed to help users translate their linear thinking into instructions. When they do this successfully, we have what we call intuitive interfaces. When they don’t, we have nerdy things that no one wants to use. The system menu is probably the most important ingredient of any desktop, as it’s the gateway to all we do on a computer. Most of these solutions are linear. Things go bad otherwise. Just check my Fedora 18 review for a quick reminder. Windows 8 anyone? Now Linux wise, there’s also this thing called Gnome Pie. It’s a radical answer to the idea of a system menu, and a challenge to the whole linearity concept. Does it work?

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Gwenview Importer is back

    I spent some time over the last weeks to port Gwenview Importer to KDE Frameworks 5, as I was getting frustrated with importing pictures by hand. It's a straight port: no new features.

    Here is a screenshot after I filled my SD Card with random pictures of my daughter and cat for the purpose of illustrating this blog post Smile

  • Time to craft

    It's time for KDE Emerge to emerge as Craft.

    After many years of being the KDE Windows build tool we want to make KDE Emerge more visible and a tool for all developers.

    People associate Emerge with Gentoo, and they are right about it. This was a problem for many years now.

    For that reason Emerge will be called Craft from now on.

  • Functional reactive programming at Meeting C++

    There were couple of really nice talks – some less technical like the one from Jon Kalb of CppCon to the low level ones like the Rainer’s talk about the memory model of C++. Also, seing Bjarne Stroustrup in-person was a pleasure.

  • New Supernovae Data Source in KStars!

    The initial support for Supernovae in KStars was added back in 2011, but it relied on parsing an HTML page using a Python script to extract the necessary information on the latest discovered supernovae. It was obviously a very crude and hackish way to get the data, and I longed to rely on a better source for our data.

    The Harvard page we were relying on for supernovae updates suddenly stopped posting any further updates, its last update was made in 2015. Thankfully, we discovered a new gold trove of information: The Open Supernovae Catalog project!

  • Watching org.libelektra with Qt

    libelektra is a configuration library and tools set. It provides very many capabilities. Here I’d like to show how to observe data model changes from key/value manipulations outside of the actual application inside a user desktop. libelektra broadcasts changes as D-Bus messages. The Oyranos projects will use this method to sync the settings views of GUI’s, like qcmsevents, Synnefo and KDE’s KolorManager with libOyranos and it’s CLI tools in the next release.

  • Windows installer for Kate 16.08.3 KF5.28
  • Welcome new Kubuntu Members

    Friday November 18 was a productive day for the Kubuntu Community, as three new people were questioned and then elected into Membership. Welcome Simon Quigley, José Manuel Santamaría, and Walter Lapchynski as they package, work on our tooling, promote Kubuntu and help users.

  • Testing the untestable

    Admit it: how many times you have seen “software from this branch is completely untested, use it at your own risk” when you checked the latest code from any FOSS project? I bet you have, many times. For any reasonably modern project, this is not entirely true: Continuous Integration and automated testing are a huge help in ensuring that the code builds and at least does what it is supposed to do. KDE is no exception to this, thanks to build.kde.org and a growing number of unit tests.

  • From window killing to screenshot

    Last week I concentrated most of my development work on screenshot support through spectacle in a KWin Wayland session. Now I am happy to announce that we merged support for capturing a screenshot of a window with the help of an external application like spectacle.

    To explain why this is a great achievement we first need to look at X11. On X11 taking a screenshot of a window is easy. It’s part of the X protocol to read the pixmap data of the root window and you get the position and size of each window. Thus one is able to cut out the window and have it as a screenshot. That’s the most simple variant to do it, spectacle and previously ksnapshot do it differently. More on that later on.

  • New features in Ark 16.12

    Ark, the file archiver and compressor developed by KDE, has seen a lot of development for the upcoming 16.12 release. This blog post provides a summary of the most important changes.

Linux 4.8.11

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.11 kernel.

All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.8.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.4.35

NVIDIA vs. AMDGPU-PRO vs. RadeonSI OpenGL Comparison For Holidays 2016

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

If you are planning to upgrade your graphics card in a Linux system this holiday season, here are some fresh benchmarks of several different AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards with various Linux gaming tests under Ubuntu. The AMD tests were done both with the latest RadeonSI Gallium3D stack as well as the AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver.

Tested on the AMD side was the Radeon R9 285, R9 290, RX 460, and RX 480 with both the fully-open driver stack (Linux 4.9 Git + LLVM 4.0 SVN + Mesa 13.1-dev Git as of the end of the week) and then AMDGPU-PRO 16.40.

Read more

What Is Rasberry Pi Project?

Filed under
Linux

The Raspberry Pi is a series of single-board, low-cost, high-performance computer first developed in the UK by the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The Raspberry Pi 3 is the sixth and latest iteration to be released in the series and it just keeps getting better.

Read<br />
more

AV Linux Update: Good but Not Better

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

If you plan on checking out AV Linux, keep in mind that the live session ISO (which you must run in order to install or even load) requires a user name and a password to log in. You will find these necessities hidden in the ISO file name.

For the 64-bit version, the user name is isotester. The password is avl64. The 32-bit version is similar. Use isotester with avl32. For security reasons, you can not access root accounts on the LiveISO.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Plans Unveiled for R3s Corda to Move to Open Source

    Head over to corda.net on November 30 for links to the codebase, simple sample applications and a tutorial to get started writing your own CorDapps.

  • How to Get Certified for Top Open Source Platforms and Applications

    The cloud computing and Big Data scenes are absolutely flooded with talk of shortages in people with deployment and management expertise. There just are not enough skilled workers to go around. The OpenStack Foundation, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation and other organizations are now taking some important steps to address the situation.

    As 2017 approaches, here are some of the best ways to get certified for the open source cloud and Big Data tools that are makng a difference.

    As part of its efforts to grow the OpenStack talent pool and global community, the OpenStack Foundation has announced professional certification programs that are meant to provide a baseline assessment of knowledge and be accessible to OpenStack professionals around the world. Some of the first steps in advancing the program are taking place now, and Red Hat is also advancing OpenStack certification plans.

  • Open-source Darwin now available to download for Apple MacOS Sierra
  • How open source hardware is defining data centre innovation
  • More Offloading Code Hits GCC Mainline For Both HSA & NVPTX

    For those following GCC's offloading capabilities to devices like GPUs, more work continued being mainline this week. We are onto stage 3 development of GCC 7 but items that were still being reviewed at that time are still being allowed to land. It looks like in 2017 we may finally see more GCC support come to reality when it comes to AMD HSA support and OpenMP / OpenACC offloading to NVIDIA GPUs.

  • Dutch Drecht cities published first batch of open datasets

    The Drecht cities (Drechtsteden), a collaboration of six municipalities in the delta region of the Netherlands, have published a first batch of open datasets. The data has been made available on several public open government data platforms. It includes information on complaints, monumental trees, groundwater levels, monuments, playgrounds, dumpsters, and real estate values. More datasets will follow in the near future.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Final Station Post-Apocalyptic 2D Side-Scrolling Shooter Out Now on Linux

    On Thanksgiving day, Russian developer Do My Best Games was proud to announce the availability of the Linux port of their post-apocalyptic train simulator and zombie shooter game, The Final Station.

    Developed by Do My Best Games and published by tinyBuild Games the game was launched on the 30th of August 2016 on Valve's Steam gaming distribution platform, but only for Windows and Mac operating systems.

  • My top list of must-have strategy games on Linux as of right now

    Are you a new Linux gamer wondering what strategy games we have? Or perhaps you’re just in the mood for something new! Here’s my current top list of Linux strategy games.

  • 'The Final Station' released on Linux

    I'm very glad to see that after a long journey, The Final Station has finally arrived at the Linux platform, with a hefty discount this Autumn Steam Sale.

    The game is very atmospheric and the story reminds me of works by Zajdel and Strugatsky brothers. The nostalgia of the dying world and the inevitability of moving forward, even at the price of leaving something or someone behind really spoke to me. But don't take my word for it, go and experience it on your own!

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Linux hardening: a 15-step checklist for a secure Linux server [Ed: paywall]

    Most people assume Linux is secure, and that’s a false assumption. Imagine your laptop is stolen without first being hardened. A thief would probably assume your username is “root” and your password is “toor” since that’s the default password on Kali and most people continue to use it. Do you? I hope not.

  • Homeland Security Issues 'Strategic Principles' For Securing The Internet Of Broken Things

    For much of the last year, we've noted how the rush to connect everything from toasters to refrigerators to the internet -- without adequate (ok, any) security safeguards -- has resulted in a security, privacy and public safety crisis. At first, the fact that everything from Barbies to tea kettles were now hackable was kind of funny. But in the wake of the realization that these hacked devices are contributing to massive new DDoS botnet attacks (on top of just leaking your data or exposing you to hacks) the conversation has quickly turned serious.

    Security researchers have been noting for a while that it's only a matter of time before the internet-of-not-so-smart-things contributes to human fatalities, potentially on a significant scale if necessary infrastructure is attacked. As such, the Department of Homeland Security recently released what they called "strategic principles" for securing the Internet of Things; an apparent attempt to get the conversation started with industry on how best to avoid a dumb device cyber apocalypse.

  • Microsoft gives third-parties access to Windows 10 Telemetry data

    Microsoft struck a deal with security company FireEye recently according to a report on Australian news magazin Arn which gives FireEye access to all Windows 10 Telemetry data.

GNU/Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Meet Pinebook, A Low Cost Linux Laptop That Looks Like A MacBook

    PineBook is a budget laptop running an Allwinner quad-core 64-bit processor. The device comes in two screen sizes both of them having 2GB RAM and 16GB eMMC storage along various ports and connectivity options. PineBook supports a number of Linux distros and Android versions.

  • Meet the Pinebook, a $89 ARM Laptop That Runs Ubuntu

    The Pine64 Pinebook is an ARM laptop priced from $89. It can run Android, ChromiumOS and various flavours of Linux, including Ubuntu.

  • Light and Thin 64-bit ARM based Open Source Notebook
  • The 12 Most Ridiculous Windows Errors of All Time

    Computers and humans are so different. While computers are infinitely faster at processing information, they run into trouble if they try to stray from their course. These “fast idiots” contrast to people, who can’t think as fast as machines but can adapt much more easily.

    These relations have produced some hilarious situations where novice users failed to grasp the basics of using Windows. On the other side of this are error messages. When a computer runs into an unexpected scenario, it usually throws up a message box for the user to review.

Debian News

Filed under
Debian
  • Starting the faster, more secure APT 1.4 series

    We just released the first beta of APT 1.4 to Debian unstable (beta here means that we don’t know any other big stuff to add to it, but are still open to further extensions). This is the release series that will be released with Debian stretch, Ubuntu zesty, and possibly Ubuntu zesty+1 (if the Debian freeze takes a very long time, even zesty+2 is possible). It should reach the master archive in a few hours, and your mirrors shortly after that.

  • Debian package build tools

    When I was first introduced to Debian packaging, people recommended I use pbuilder. Given how complex the toolchain is in the pbuilder case, I don’t understand why that is (was?) a common recommendation.

  • vmdebootstrap Sprint Report

    This is now a little overdue, but here it is. On the 10th and 11th of November, the second vmdebootstrap sprint took place. Lars Wirzenius (liw), Ana Custura (ana_c) and myself were present. liw focussed on the core of vmdebootstrap, where he sketched out what the future of vmdebootstrap may look like. He documented this in a mailing list post and also presented (video).

    Ana and myself worked on live-wrapper, which uses vmdebootstrap internally for the squashfs generation. I worked on improving logging, using a better method for getting paths within the image, enabling generation of Packages and Release files for the image archive and also made the images installable (live-wrapper 0.5 onwards will include an installer by default).

  • Quicker Debian installations using eatmydata

    Two years ago, I did some experiments with eatmydata and the Debian installation system, observing how using eatmydata could speed up the installation quite a bit. My testing measured speedup around 20-40 percent for Debian Edu, where we install around 1000 packages from within the installer. The eatmydata package provide a way to disable/delay file system flushing. This is a bit risky in the general case, as files that should be stored on disk will stay only in memory a bit longer than expected, causing problems if a machine crashes at an inconvenient time. But for an installation, if the machine crashes during installation the process is normally restarted, and avoiding disk operations as much as possible to speed up the process make perfect sense.

Tizen News

Filed under
Linux
  • App: Navitel Navigator is available in Tizen Store for Samsung Z2 & Z1

    Navitel Navigator is a satnav application that was first available for the Samsung Z2, but has now been released for the Z1 but still not on the Z3 yet ? but it’s still worth a mention to our readers The application boasts that it is a precise offline GPS navigation app with free geosocial services and detailed maps of 64 countries. It has had over 20 Million downloads and ranks as one of the Top 5 Navigation apps in 12 countries.

  • Gujarat Lions – A new Cricket Game added to the Tizen Store

    Indian cricket fans will be delighted to hear about a new cricket game, created by Zapak Mobile Games Pvt. Ltd, released in the Tizen Store named Gujarat Lions and is for the Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3, with a download file size of 43MB.

  • T20 Cricket Champion 3D game for Tizen Smartphones

    Zapak Multimedia Pvt. Ltd. has released another cricket game in the Tizen Store named T20 Cricket Champion 3D. You can play this game with your favorite country team. Many countries are available including India, Bangladesh, England, South Africa, Pakistan etc. You can play this game in two different modes: Quick Match and T20 Cricket Champions. In Quick Play mode you can select your favorite team and your opposing team and in Tournament mode you’ve to select your best team to play for. You can also play this game in 3,5,10 or 20 overs and easy, medium or hard (3 difficulties.) Also you get a chance to play in different places in India ie. Mohali, Delhi & Rajkot. A store is available where you can purchase power-ups and different articles. There is also a spinwheel machine available where you can earn coins like a lottery play. Daily rewards also available. The cheerleaders will dance when you hit a six or a four. This is a realistic 3D Cricket Game on your Tizen smartphone.

  • Game: Super Truck Parking is Available in Tizen Store

    Super Truck Parking is a game created by Black Cobra Studios Ltd and run on all Tizen smartphones such as the Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3. This game is about parking your trucks and passing your lessons / the ultimate test. You need to go through your lessons (try to do well on each of them) to come to what is called the ultimate test, yes, your driving test, the test that will finish it all! You have to navigate your way across the city, starting from the Greenhorn Driver Only Backyard Zone and then travel across the city to the Warehouse Noob Transport Truck Driver zone and complete the ultimate parking simulation with The Circuit Only for Real Truck Driver Load Zone.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • grep-2.27 released
    There have been 40 commits by 4 people in the 9 weeks since 2.26. Note that there were many additional important changes via gnulib.
  • GCC 6.3 Should Be Here By Christmas
    For those looking toward the next maintenance release of GCC 6, the GNU Compiler Collection 6.3 is aiming to be out by Christmas.
  • Yum! GNOME Recipes is a New Cooking App for Linux
    Do you like to cook? No, me neither. And that’s largely because I don’t know how to cook. Could a desktop cooking app help? GNOME’s Matthias Clasen is hoping so, and has started work on a brand-new desktop recipe app that you — and anyone you know — can help contribute to.
  • Heron Animation, Free Stop Motion Software for Linux
    Looking for free stop motion animation software? If so, you’ll definitely want to check out Heron Animation. A free program, Heron Animation lets you take a series of pictures from a connected webcam and assemble each shot into a real moving animation. The tool, which is written in web technologies, pitches itself as ‘perfect for beginners and more experienced animators alike’. That sort of balance is notoriously hard to achieve.
  • EasyTAG 2.4.3 Audio Tag Editor Supports MP4 Files with the .aac File Extension
    EasyTAG, an open-source, simple, free, and cross-platform application for viewing and editing tags in audio files, supporting MP3, MP4, FLAC, Ogg, MusePack, Monkey's Audio, and WavPack files, was updated to version 2.4.3. It's been more than nine months since EasyTAG 2.4.2 was released, and we're now finally able to update the software on our GNU/Linux or Windows operating systems. Version 2.4.3 is out as of December 5, 2016, bringing support for MP4 files that use the .aac file extension, as well as Adwaita-style artist and album icons.
  • FSF Blogs: Seventeen new GNU releases in November
  • IceCat 45.5.1 release
    GNUzilla is the GNU version of the Mozilla suite, and GNU IceCat is the GNU version of the Firefox browser. Its main advantage is an ethical one: it is entirely free software. While the Firefox source code from the Mozilla project is free software, they distribute and recommend non-free software as plug-ins and addons. Also their trademark license restricts distribution in several ways incompatible with freedom 0.
  • Permabit Hits New Milestone in 2016 by Delivering the First Complete Data Reduction for Linux
  • FOSS DOS for 21st Century Hardware
    The founder and coordinator of the FreeDOS Project writes about FreeDOS 1.2, which is scheduled for a Christmas Day release. There is good news for classic gamers and nostalgia buffs: this one’s got games.
  • A Look At Async/Await JavaScript For Firefox 52
    While Chrome 55 has JavaScript async/await support, the Firefox support isn't coming until the Firefox 52.0 stable release in March while currently it's available in the latest Firefox Developer Edition and early alpha builds. Mozilla developer Dan Callahan wrote a post today on hacks.mozilla.org for the async/await support in Firefox and can be used if you are running the latest Firefox Developer Edition. Check it out if you're interested in JavaScript async await support for more asynchronous programming for the web.
  • Chrome bug triggered errors on websites using Symantec SSL certificates
  • Announcing openSUSE’s GPG Key Server – keyserver.opensuse.org
    Does it happen to you, too, that there are moments where you ask yourself why others want something from you that is there already since a while? Exactly this happened with https://keyserver.opensuse.org/: the original machine was set up a long time ago to make it easier for people attending the openSUSE GPG key-signing parties, but it looks like nobody officially announced this “new service” for our users… …and so here we are: the openSUSE Heroes team is pleased to announce that keyserver.opensuse.org is up and running as public GPG keyserver. We are of course also part of the official keyserver pool, which means that some people might already noticed us, as they got redirected to our server with their requests. (And for those who are interested to setup their own SKS keyserver: we have also written a nice monitoring plugin that helps you keeping an eye on the pool status of your machine and the ones of your peers.)

Office Suites

  • Microsoft Office, Google Docs beware: This open-source startup is after your users
    "That was one of the reasons why we chose an open-source model. We want be open, want people to trust us, want to overcome that barrier they have in mind, those strong beliefs that there's nothing but Microsoft Office, that nothing better could be created. We won't change our mind about open source." Bannov says he ultimately sees OnlyOffice becoming a firm that provides consulting, technical support and remote managed services to companies using its open-source products.
  • Collabora Online 2.0 Puts LibreOffice In the Cloud, Adds Collaborative Editing
    Today, December 7, 2016, Collabora Productivity, through Michael Meeks, is proud to inform Softpedia about the general availability of the long anticipated Collabora Online 2.0 office suite based on the LibreOffice, Nextcloud, and ownCloud technologies. After being in development for the past six months, Collabora Online 2.0 is finally here as the powerful cloud-based office suite that promises to protect users' privacy and freedom of expression while editing various documents formats online. Collabora Online is mainly targeted at the enterprise world, hosting and cloud businesses.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Why Is Microsoft Showing So Much Interest In Linux? [Ed: Someone needs to explain to Mathew Lodge what EEE is and how it works. Is the Linux Foundation (including Rorvalds as well) still permitted to criticise Microsoft or is it frowned upon internally?]
  • Linux on the Mac — state of the union
    The MacBook Pro introduction in October caused unusually negative reactions among professional users due to the realization that Apple no longer caters equally to casual and professional customers as it had in the past [YouTube video]. Instead, the company appears to be following an iOS-focused, margin-driven strategy that essentially relegates professionals to a fringe group. This has well-known developers such as Salvatore Sanfilippo (of the Redis project) consider a move back to Linux. Perhaps that's a good moment to look at the current state of Mac hardware support in the kernel. While Macs are x86 systems, they possess various custom chips and undocumented quirks that the community needs to painstakingly reverse-engineer.
  • How well does the Linux kernel support Mac hardware?
    There is an interesting subset of Linux users that prefer to run it on a Mac. Yes, a Mac. That might seem odd given how Apple is known for its closed ecosystems and high cost hardware, but the Linux on Mac folks really do exist out there. But how well does the Linux kernel support Mac hardware? LWN.net has a “state of the union” article for Linux on the Mac that could be quite helpful if you are thinking about installing Linux on your Mac.
  • New Kernel Vulnerability Allows Local Root For Unprivileged Processes
    There is yet another new Linux kernel vulnerability being disclosed today that allows for unprivileged processes to gain kernel code execution abilities. This new vulnerability is CVE-2016-8655 but it doesn't seem to be getting too much attention yet. CVE-2016-8655 comes down to a race condition within the af_packet.c code for gaining local root access. The researcher that found it was able to write an exploit to gain root shell on an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system and defeats SMEP/SMAP protection too.
  • Avoiding CVE-2016-8655 with systemd
    Just a quick note: on recent versions of systemd it is relatively easy to block the vulnerability described in CVE-2016-8655 for individual services. Since systemd release v211 there's an option RestrictAddressFamilies= for service unit files which takes away the right to create sockets of specific address families for processes of the service. In your unit file, add RestrictAddressFamilies=~AF_PACKET to the [Service] section to make AF_PACKET unavailable to it (i.e. a blacklist), which is sufficient to close the attack path. Safer of course is a whitelist of address families whch you can define by dropping the ~ character from the assignment. Here's a trivial example:
  • The Best Features Of The Linux 4.9 Kernel