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Tuesday, 20 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New in LWN About Linux (Now Outside Paywall) Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 10:02am
Story LLVM Release Schedules and DragonFFI Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 10:01am
Story ​Linus Torvalds slams CTS Labs over AMD vulnerability report Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 9:12am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 1:19am
Story Open source project aims to build embedded Linux hypervisor Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 1:12am
Story Microsoft is Still Evil and Dangerous Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 12:46am
Story Sound Open Firmware (SOF) and Nvidia-Docker Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:10pm
Story Software: AMP, GCompris, Terminus, PyCharm, Rcpp, Curl Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:09pm
Story Linux Foundation: Ads, Events, and Memberships Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:08pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:05pm

Debian: Nageru, Free Software Activities, Bug Squashing and Diversity

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  • Nageru 1.7.0 released

    I've just released version 1.7.0 of Nageru, my free software video mixer. The poster child feature for this release is the direct integration of CEF, yielding high-performance HTML5 graphics directly into Nageru. This obsoletes the earlier CasparCG integration through playing a video from a socket (although video support is of course still very much present!), which were significantly slower and more flimsy. (Also, when CEF gets around to integrating with clients on the GPU level, you'll see even higher performance, and also stuff like WebGL, which I've turned off the for time being.)

    Unfortunately, Debian doesn't carry CEF, and I haven't received any answers to my probes of whether it would be possible to do so—it would certainly involve some coordination with the Chromium maintainers. Thus, it is an optional dependency, and the packages that are coming into unstable are built without CEF support.

  • My Free Software Activities in February 2018

    Welcome to Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Alexandre Viau: testeduploads - looking for GSOC mentor

    I have been contributing to Debian for a couple of years now and I have been a Debian Developper since 2015. For now, I have mostly been conttibuting to packaging new software and fixing packaging-related bugs.

  • Bug Squashing and Diversity

    Every time I go there, female developers (this is a hotspot of diversity) ask me if they can host the next Mini DebConf for Women. There have already been two of these very successful events, in Barcelona and Bucharest. It is not my decision to make though: anybody can host a MiniDebConf of any kind, anywhere, at any time. I've encouraged the women in Tirana to reach out to some of the previous speakers personally to scope potential dates and contact the DPL directly about funding for necessary expenses like travel.

BLOCKS unveils Project OpenWatch: open source, Android-based smartwatch framework

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There are three big names in the smartwatch operating system space at the moment: Apple’s WatchOS, Google’s Android Wear, and Samsung’s Tizen. But the makers of the upcoming BLOCKS modular smartwatch couldn’t use any of those because they wouldn’t support the plug-and-play modules BLOCKS wanted to support. So the company developed its own Android-based software.

Now BLOCKS is kicking off an initiative that could help make it easier for other developers to build a smartwatch OS.

Project OpenWatch is open source project that provides a Linux kernel and an Android Oreo Board Support Package for watches that use the same MediaTek MTK6580M chipset used in the BLOCKS smartwatch.

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Applications: Notepadqq, Best Editor, Museeks

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  • Notepadqq, a Notepad++-Like Editor for Linux, Now Available as a Snap on Ubuntu

    More and more apps are getting ported as Snaps for Ubuntu and any other Snap-powered GNU/Linux distribution, and Notepadqq is one of the most recent examples.

    If you never heard of Notepadqq, it's an open-source and free Notepad++-like general purpose editor for Linux systems, designed by developers for developers. It's written by Daniele Di Sarli in Qt and features syntax highlighting for over 100 different languages, code folding, multiple selection, file monitoring, color schemes, and much more.

  • Best Editor

    Readers' Choice winner Vim is an extremely powerful editor with a user interface based on Bill Joy's 40-plus-year-old vi, but with many improved-upon features including extensive customization with key mappings and plugins. Linux Journal reader David Harrison points out another great thing about Vim "is that it's basically everywhere. It's available on every major platform."

    The very features that make Vim so versatile also have been known to intimidate beginners. Perhaps that's why Linux Journal has featured nearly 100 articles on Vim so far. Readers generally agree though, any learning curve is worth the effort, and again this year, they award Vim the Best Editor title.

  • Museeks, the open source music player, has a new release out

    But like the sophomore follow-up to a platinum best-seller (Museeks has been downloaded over 20,000 times), the app is back, hoping to impress.

    If you’ve not head of Museeks before then you’re in for a treat. The app is open source, it’s classy and well design, it’s cross-platform, and …Oh, okay. I’ll stop stalling: it’s built with Electron.

    For some, Museek’s use of Electron will be a deal breaker. Others (myself among them) care less about the codebase and more about whether the app is any good at what is does.

    And, I’m pleased to say, Museeks is very good at what it does (which is playing music, incase that bit passed you by).

    Did the world “need” another music player? No, just as I didn’t really “need” another pair of Vans shoes. And yet here I am, writing a post about yet-another-music-player while rocking some comfy size 7s

​Linux beats legal threat from one of its own developers

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In a German court earlier this week, former Linux developer Patrick McHardy gave up on his Gnu General Public License version 2 (GPLv2) violation case against Geniatech Europe GmbH. Now, you may ask, "How can a Linux programmer dropping a case against a company that violates the GPL count as a win?"

It's complicated.

First, anyone who knows the least thing about Linux's legal infrastructure knows its licensed under the GPLv2. Many don't know that anyone who has copyrighted code in the Linux kernel can take action against companies that violate the GPLv2. Usually, that's a non-issue.

People who find violations typically turn to organizations such as the Free Software Foundation, Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC), and the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) to approach violators. These organizations then try to convince violating companies to mend their ways and honor their GPLv2 legal requirements. Only as a last resort do they take companies to court to force them into compliance with the GPLv2.

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

Devices: Purism Phones, Taicenn for Cars, Linux for Devices, and Samsung TVs

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  • Purism to Bring Hardware Encryption to Its Librem 5 Privacy-Focused Linux Phone

    Purism announced today that it partnered with leading cryptography pioneer Werner Koch to integrate hardware encryption into its upcoming Librem 5 Linux phone and future laptops products.

    Purism is a computer manufacturer known for its security-focused and privacy-oriented laptops powered by the PureOS Open Source Linux-based operating system based on Debian GNU/Linux. The company recently announced that it now has the most secure Linux laptops thanks to the implementation of Heads integrated TPM (Trusted Platform Module) chips in the coreboot firmware in its Librem 13 and Librem 15 laptops.

    Now, the company says that it wants to push the industry forward and set unparalleled protection for end-user devices by planning to include hardware cryptography by default in its forthcoming Librem 5 Linux smartphone and all future revisions of the Librem 13 and Librem 15 laptops, as well as the yet-to-be-announced Librem 11 model. Purism will be able to achieve this goal by manufacturing hardware with its own software and services.

  • In-vehicle panel PC has up to 10.4-inch touchscreen

    Taicenn's Linux-ready, IP65 protected “TPC-DCXXXC1E” in-vehicle panel PC runs on a Bay Trail Celeron J1900, and has an 8- to 10.4-inch capacitive touchscreen, 2x GbE ports, SATA, mSATA, and wide-range power.

  • The Shift to Linux Operating Systems for IoT

    As IoT devices become more full-featured, the Operating System that drives them is shifting from Real Time Operating Systems (RTOS) to Linux.


    By this time (circa 2005), Linux was widely used in certain computing environments such as servers and was enjoying a steadily increasing footprint for some embedded environments such as TVs. It was quickly seen as a good building block for smartphones, as it brought out of the box a modern full-featured Operating System with very good device driver support, and that was considered both scalable for the new generation of devices and had the added benefit of being royalty free.

  • Samsung announces its 2018 Tizen TV lineup

    Samsung is hitting us with its best shot as the tech company unveils its 2018 Smart TV lineup. The line up which was unveiled at an event in New York has Samsung offering us details of its new QLED model which includes the Q9F, Q8F, Q7C and Q6F. The new QLED line with enhanced picture quality, design element and also integrated with Bixby. Samsung also gave details of its expanded lineup of Ultra HD certified, Premium UHD and Super Big Screen TVs.

Games: SteamVR, GOG, Tannenberg & Verdun, Hearts of Iron, Cities: Skylines, Northgard, EARTHLOCK

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Latest Linux 4.15.7 Kernel and LibreOffice 6.0.2

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On the first day of the month, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed received the KDE Plasma 5.12.2 LTS desktop environment, Gawk 4.2.1, GNU C Library (Glibc) 2.27, and GnuPG 2.2.5. The second day of March brought the latest Linux 4.15.7 kernel to Tumbleweed users, along with the OpenJDK security patch.

"openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed has had five snapshots so far this month and a lot of those snapshots have includes several GNU packages," said Douglas DeMaio. "There were many other packages and the first snapshot of the month included an update for KDE Plasma."

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Kubuntu, Ubuntu 17.10 Users Can Now Install the Latest KDE Plasma 5.12.3 Desktop

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The KDE Project released earlier this week the third bugfix update to their long-term supported KDE Plasma 5.12 desktop environment, and Ubuntu/Kubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) users are among the first to install it. The update brings an impressive list of improvements for the Plasma Discover package manager.

While Kubuntu/Ubuntu 17.10 users are already receiving the most recent stable KDE Plasma packages, it looks like Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) early adopters will have to wait a little longer for the new updates, as the upcoming operating system is currently in Beta freeze and the repositories are blocked.

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Open-spec, dual-core ARM SBC runs Debian with Linux 4.4.8

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Technologic’s “TS-7800-V2” drop-in replacement for its venerable ARM9-based V1 board advances to a dual-core -A9 Armada 385 and a Cyclone V FPGA, plus new features like eMMC, USB 3.0, CAN, mini-PCIe, and a -40 to 85°C range.

Technologic has upgraded its popular TS-7800 SBC, which debuted in 2007, and received a faster boot system in 2008. For the TS-7800-V2, Technologic has swapped out the old ARM9 based, 500Mhz Marvell Orion 88F5182 processor for Marvell’s headless, dual Cortex-A9, 1.3GHz Armada 385, which has fueled products such as the Turris Omnia router.

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Deepin Desktop Props Up Pardus Linux

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The Pardus Community Edition offers 24x7 live technical support. Its goal is to find solutions to users' problems rapidly through constantly available help agents and access to an active user forum. Storage applications are added and removed in line with users' requests.

The more current versions and more organized website make the Pardus Enterprise Edition a better choice. Unless you have a diehard attraction for XFCE, the Deepin desktop is a worthy alternative.

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Open source HummingBoard and CuBox rev’d with new i.MX8M module

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SolidRun unveiled a 47 x 30mm “i.MX8 SOM” module that runs Linux or Android on an NXP i.MX8M, and is available as part of a dual-GbE HummingBoard Pulse SBC and 50mm CuBox Pulse mini-PC.

SolidRun has opened pre-orders for an i.MX8 SOM compute module with industrial temperature support, as well a new commercial temperature HummingBoard Pulse SBC and CuBox Pulse mini-PC driven by it. The products update the company’s similarly open-spec, but i.MX6-based, MicroSOM modules, which fueled several earlier, sandwich-style HummingBoard SBCs and CuBox mini-PCs.

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Security: Updates, DDOS. US and Election

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  • Security updates for Thursday
  • It just got much easier to wage record-breaking DDoSes

    Now, two separate exploits are available that greatly lower the bar for waging these new types of attacks. The first one, called Memcrashed, prompts a user to enter the IP address to be targeted. It then automatically uses the Shodan search engine to locate unsecured memcached servers and abuses them to flood the target. Here's a screenshot showing the interface: [...]

  • Push to bolster election security stalls in Senate

    But Lankford on Wednesday was forced to table an amendment to a bill moving through the Senate that was aimed at improving information-sharing between federal and state election officials on election cyber threats. State officials objected to the amendment.

  • Senate committee approves bill reorganizing Homeland Security’s cyber office

    A key Senate panel on Wednesday advanced legislation to reauthorize the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that includes a measure reorganizing the department’s cybersecurity wing.

    The bill includes language that would reorganize and rename the office within the department that protects federal networks and critical infrastructure from physical and cyber threats, currently known as the National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD). Under the legislation, the entity would be transformed into an operational agency called the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency.

Ghostery Liberated

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  • Ad-Blocker Ghostery Just Went Open Source—And Has a New Business Model

    In privacy-focused, anti-establishment corners of the internet, going open source can earn you a certain amount of street cred. It signals that you not only have nothing to hide, but also welcome the rest of the world to help make your project better. For Ghostery though, the company that makes Edward Snowden’s recommended ad blocker, publishing all its code on GitHub Thursday also means clearing up some confusion about its past.

  • Ghostery tool for web privacy goes open source

    Ghostery, a browser extension that blocks advertisers and web publishers from tracking your online behavior, has opened up its code so anyone with some programming chops can see exactly what's going on.

    Making Ghostery open-source software -- a program anyone can copy, modify and distribute -- means it's now possible for interested outsiders to get involved in its development, said Jeremy Tillman, director of product at Ghostery. And it should help clear the air lingering around Ghostery because of how its owner until last year, Evidon, did business.

BSD: LLVM 6.0.0 Release and syspatches

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  • LLVM 6.0.0 Release

    I am pleased to announce that LLVM 6 is now available.

    Get it here:

    This release is the result of the community's work over the past six
    months, including: retpoline Spectre variant 2 mitigation,
    significantly improved CodeView debug info for Windows, GlobalISel by
    default for AArch64 at -O0, improved scheduling on several x86
    micro-architectures, Clang defaults to -std=gnu++14 instead of
    -std=gnu++98, support for some upcoming C++2a features, improved
    optimizations, new compiler warnings, many bug fixes, and more.

  • LLVM 6.0 Released With C++14 Default, Intel/AMD Scheduling Improvements

    Today marks the long-awaited release of LLVM 6.0 as the slightly late half-year update to this open-source compiler stack and its sub-projects like Clang, LLD, etc.

  • Chrome 65, LLVM 6.0.0, Tumbleweed, Kubernetes and More

    The Chrome 65 release has moved to the stable channel. This release includes 45 security fixes and stronger ad blocking. See the log for more details.

    LLVM 6.0.0 is now available. This long-awaited release includes "retpoline Spectre variant 2 mitigation, significantly improved CodeView debug info for Windows, GlobalISel by default for AArch64 at -O0, improved scheduling on several x86 micro-architectures, Clang defaults to -std=gnu++14 instead of -std=gnu++98...many bug fixes and more." See the release announcement for more info, and download it here.

  • syspatches will be provided for both supported releases

    Good news for people doing upgrades only once per year: syspatches will be provided for both supported releases.

Bringing Open-Source, Automated Benchmarks To Windows 10 / Windows Server 2016

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Moving forward the Phoronix Test Suite will be offering Microsoft Windows support that's at near feature parity to the automated, reproducible, open-source benchmarking support we have offered the past decade for Linux as well as BSD, macOS, and Solaris platforms. This is brand new, rewritten Windows support with a focus on Windows 10 x64 and Windows Server 2016.

Back around the Windows 7 days I did the basic port of the Phoronix Test Suite to Win 7 x64 but it wasn't anywhere close to parity with the software when running on Linux or even BSD/Solaris/macOS, but was basically a hobby port. I would use it when wanting to run a few OpenGL Windows vs. Linux gaming benchmarks or so, but it only offered a handful of these basic OpenGL test profiles, the hardware/software detection was quite basic, and there were many other features not available compared to when running the Phoronix Test Suite on other supported operating systems.

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today's leftovers

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Software: Keybase, FreeTube, Cockpit, Foxit

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  • Keybase – A Fully Encrypted Slack-like Messenger for Geeks

    Keybase is a brand new open-source chatting application for computers and mobile phones and it is powered by public-key encryption.

  • FreeTube – An Open Source Desktop YouTube Player For Privacy-minded People

    You already know that we need Google account to subscribe channels and download videos from YouTube. If you don’t want Google track what you’re doing on YouTube, well, there is an open source YouTube player named “FreeTube”. It allows you to watch, search and download Youtube videos and subscribe your favorite channels without an account, which prevents Google from having your information. It gives you complete ad-free experience and allows you to watch videos in your default HTML5 player, like VLC or MPlayer. It is also another advantage, because we’re not using the built-in YouTube player. Hence Google can’t track the “views” and the video analytics from us. FreeTube only sends your IP details, but this also can be overcome by using a VPN. It is completely free, open source and available for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows.

  • Cockpit 163

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 163.

  • Foxit Launches PDF Compressor for Linux

    Foxit's PDF Compressor is designed to apply advanced image compression to scanned documents, reducing file size so they are easier to share and transmit, more accessible, searchable, and easier to process on a large-scale basis. With best in class optical character recognition (OCR) and dramatic file compression, the solution not only integrates with existing workflows, but also improves them by producing significantly more manageable files. This allows organizations to spend less time managing their digital files and more time on value-producing tasks.

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Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Purchased a PlayStation 3 Between 2006 and 2010? You May Be Entitled to $65
    PS3 owners first qualified to receive compensation from Sony following the settlement of a lawsuit in 2016. That case dealt with the "OtherOS" feature that came with the console when it debuted. With OtherOS, Sony promised a new PlayStation that would operate like a computer, allowing users to partition their hard drive and install third-party operating systems like the open-source Linux software.
  • Moro – A Command Line Productivity Tool For Tracking Work Hours
    Keeping track of your work hours will give you an insight about the amount of work you get done in a specific time frame. There are plenty of GUI-based productivity tools available on the Internet for tracking work hours. However, I couldn’t find a good CLI-based tool. Today, I stumbled upon a a simple, yet useful tool named “Moro” for tracking work hours. Moro is a Finnish word which means “Hello”. Using Moro, you can find how much time you take to complete a specific task. It is free, open source and written using NodeJS.
  • Twenty years, 1998 – 2018
    curl 4.0 was just a little more than 2000 lines of C code. It featured 23 command line options. curl 4.0 introduced support for the FTP PORT command and now it could do ftp uploads that append to the remote file. The version number was bumped up from the 3.12 which was the last version number used by the tool under the old name, urlget.
  • What’s New in ArchLabs 2018.03
    ArchLabs 2018.03 is the latest release of Linux distribution based on Arch Linux featuring the Openbox window manager as the primary desktop interface. The project’s latest release ArchLabs 2018.03 brings a few fixes and improvements and improve the user. Powered by Linux kernel 4.15 series and based-on latest version of Arch Linux. LUKS and encryption is now working, for those security concious users out there you should be all go on the encryption side. There have been a few installer updates, base-devel is included at install time. Also the mirrorlist is optimised at the same time.
  • [Older] openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018: Call for Host
    The openSUSE.Asia organization committee is accepting proposals to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit during the second half of 2018. The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia.
  • TidalScale Software-Defined Servers Now Support SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
    TidalScale, the leader in Software-Defined Servers, announced today that working in partnership with SUSE, the world’s first provider of Enterprise Linux, TidalScale has achieved SUSE Ready certification to ensure full compatibility with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. TidalScale’s breakthrough scaling platform allows multiple industry standard servers to be combined into a single Software-Defined Server running a single instance of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.
  • 8 Best Radio Apps For Android To Stream Online Music In 2018

Kernel and Graphics: Torvalds, Linux Foundation, Nouveau and libinput

  • Which Linux Distribution Does Linus Torvalds Use in 2018?
    We know a sizeable amount of his views on Linux distros, thanks to an interview he took long ago in 2007, but who knows – could he have changed his mind? In a 2007 interview, Linus professed that he didn’t use Debian because he found it hard to install, a statement I find interesting because he’s the guy who wrote GIT in C. Anyway, he buttressed his reason for not using Debian in a later interview from 2014, when he explained that because he is responsible for maintaining his computer and all the computers used by his household, he likes to use an OS with virtually no installation hassle. [...] As far as I know, he uses Fedora on most of his computers because of its fairly good support for PowerPC. He mentioned that he used OpenSuse at one point in time and complimented Ubuntu for making Debian accessible to the mass. So most of the flak on the internet about Linus disliking Ubuntu isn’t factual.
  • Linux Foundation, Intel launch open source IoT hypervisor
    The Linux Foundation has unveiled plans for a new open source project to provide streamlined embedded hypervisors for IoT devices. Called Acrn, the project has been assisted by Intel, which contributed code and engineering. The main thrust of the project is to create small, flexible virtual machines. ACRN comprises two main components: the hypervisor and its device model, complete with I/O mediators. The Linux-based hypervisor can run many ‘guest’ operating systems at the same time.
  • Nouveau NIR Support Appears Almost Baked, NV50 Support Added
    Karol Herbst at Red Hat started off this week by publishing his latest patches around Nouveau NIR support as part of the company's effort for getting SPIR-V/compute support up and running on this open-source NVIDIA driver. Red Hat's grand vision around open-source GPGPU compute still isn't entirely clear especially with Nouveau re-clocking not being suitable for delivering high performance at this point, but it must be grand given the number of developers they have working on improving the Linux GPU compute stack at the moment.
  • xf86-input-libinput 0.27.0 Released
    Aside from a few touchpad issues and other minor random issues with select hardware, libinput these days is mostly in great shape for being a generic input handling library that is working out well for both X.Org and Wayland users.

KDE: KDE Applications 18.04, KDE Connect, KMyMoney 5.0.1 and Qt Quick

  • KDE Applications 18.04 branches created
    Make sure you commit anything you want to end up in the KDE Applications 18.04 release to them :)
  • KDE Connect – State of the union
    We haven’t blogged about KDE Connect in a long time, but that doesn’t mean that we’ve been lazy. Some new people have joined the project and together we have implemented some exciting features. Our last post was about version 1.0, but recently we released version 1.8 of the Android app and 1.2.1 of the desktop component some time ago, which we did not blog about yet. Until now!
  • KMyMoney 5.0.1 released
    The KMyMoney development team is proud to present the first maintenance version 5.0.1 of its open source Personal Finance Manager. Although several members of the development team had been using the new version 5.0.0 in production for some time, a number of bugs and regressions slipped through testing, mainly in areas and features not used by them.
  • Qt Quick without a GPU: i.MX6 ULL
    With the introduction of the Qt Quick software renderer it became possible to use Qt Quick on devices without a GPU. We investigated how viable this option is on a lower end device, particularly the NXP i.MX6 ULL. It turns out that with some (partially not yet integrated) patches developed by KDAB and The Qt Company, the performance is very competitive. Even smooth video playback (with at least half-size VGA resolution) can be done by using the PXP engine on the i.MX6 ULL.