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Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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OSS Leftovers

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  • Apache Milagro: A New Security System for the Future of the Web

    With 25 billion new devices set to hit the Internet by 2025, the need for a better worldwide cryptosystem for securing information is paramount. That’s why the Apache Milagro project is currently incubating at the Apache Software Foundation. It’s a collaboration between MIRACL and Nippon Telegram and Telegraph (NTT), and Brian Spector, MIRACL CEO and Co-Founder, discussed the project in his keynote at ApacheCon in May.

    Spector said the project was born in a bar on the back of a napkin after a brainstorm about how one would rebuild Internet security from the ground up. That sounds like a lot of work, but Spector believes it's absolutely necessary: the future of the Web is going to be very different from the past.

  • Flanders to publish soil erosion monitoring tool

    The new method, now used by 5 soil erosion specialists, is based on well-known open source Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools, including the data viewing tool QGis and the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library. "QGis is the perfect platform for building GIS applications", Huybrechts said at the FOSS4G 2016 conference in Bonn last August. "It’s open source, it is supported by a great community and it comes with a collection of tools and toolkits."

  • DE radiation protection agency overcomes lock-in

    Germany's Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz, BfS) is taking steps to rid itself of IT vendor lock-in. Within the next few years, it plans to have replaced its legacy proprietary analysis and reporting tools by modern, open source-based tools. Moreover, the new system, which is being tested, will improve the geographic information capabilities, and will lower costs significantly.

    The radiation protection agency was in set up in 1989, three years after the catastrophic nuclear accident in Chernobyl. Its main task is to protect population and environment from damages due to radiation.

    To help with decision-making and with generating of reports, the BfS’ crisis unit has for years been using a customised, proprietary software solution. This ‘Integrated Measuring and Information System’ (IMIS) lets BfS make sense of the data generated by some 1800 radiation measuring stations across the country. IMIS continuously monitors the environment and is able to detect small changes in radioactivity. Its results are merged, evaluated, refined and presented in well-arranged documents.

  • Announcing Google Code-in 2016 and Google Summer of Code 2017

    The Google Open Source Programs Office has announced Google Code-in 2016 and Google Summer of Code 2017. Google Code-in is for students from 13-17 years of age who would like to explore open source. "Students will find opportunities to learn and get hands on experience with tasks from a range of categories. This structure allows students to stretch themselves as they take on increasingly more challenging tasks." Students will begin on November 28.

  • Cloudera Accelerates Portfolio of Self-Paced Big Data Training Courses
  • Survey Finds OpenStack Deeply Entrenched in the Telecom Space

    What percentage of players in the telecom industry now consider the OpenStack cloud platform to be essential or important to their success? According to a survey commissioned by the OpenStack Foundation, a whopping 85.8 percent of them do. That is more hard evidence that we are seeing actual deployments take the place of evaluation when it comes to OpenStack in the enterprise.

    The survey was executed by Heavy Reading and received 113 responses from representatives of telecom companies around the world: 54 percent from the US, 14.2 percent from Europe, 11.5 percent from the Asia Pacific region, 8.9 percent each from Central/South America and Canada; and 2.7 percent from the Middle East. Here are more of the key findings.

Linux Devices

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Has Linux lost the Unix Philosophy?

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How closely is that followed today? Relatively well, so far as using text stream goes. A majority of Linux programs continue to use plain text configuration files, which means that users can easily edit them, using the text editor of their choice.

However, there are a few exceptions. GRUB 2, for example, discourages manual editing, automating new entries after a new kernel or operating system is added. Similarly, Systemd uses binary files for its logs, while KDE's Akonadi, by making use of a database, ensures that any failure will be catastrophic, and unrepairable manually.

Such changes are usually made in the name of efficiency. All too often, however, the efficiency is gained by interfering with the do-it-yourself ethos that should almost be a fourth pillar of the Unix Philosophy.

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Also: DevOps toys, looking at new and old tools

Early Fedora 26 Features To Talk About: PHP 7.1, OpenSSL 1.1 & More

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While Fedora 25 isn't even being released until mid-November, with now being past the change completion deadline for F25 and Rawhide continuing to move along, early Fedora 26 features are beginning to be talked about.

Some of the latest self-contained proposals for Fedora 26 include PHP 7.1 and BIND 9.11. Given their routine package updates and non-controversial components, they should be approved easily by FESCo. PHP 7.1 will be released before 2016 is through and is one of the updates I'm looking forward to.

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Debian News

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  • GNOME Shell and Mutter Get Ready for GNOME 3.22 Desktop's First Point Release

    The GNOME Project prepares to unleash the first of two point releases for their latest and most advanced GNOME 3 desktop environment, version 3.22.1, so they're currently updating various core components and applications.

    GNOME 3.22 was officially unveiled last month, on September 21, 2016, and it brought numerous interesting new features and improvements. The first point release, GNOME 3.22.1, should improve your GNOME 3.22 experience, as well as to fix some of those annoying issues and annoyance that you've reported lately.

  • This Week in GTK+ – 19
  • GTK+ 4.0 Toolkit Development Is Warming Up

    With GNOME/GTK+ 3.22 having been released at the end of September, developer focus is beginning to shift to GNOME 3.24 or in the case of GTK+ developers it's about GTK+ 4.0 development per the toolkit's new development process.

    GTK+ 4.0 was opened for development in Git a few days ago. While not any exciting changes have yet landed in Git master, this branch is prepping the removal of GTK 3.x deprecated APIs and this branch will remove the deprecated style API.

Fedora 25 Beta Ready, HandyLinux Pas Parle Anglais

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Fedora 25 Beta was released today for early testers bringing Wayland by default and new server SELinux troubleshooter. Phoronix is already looking ahead to Fedora 26. Elsewhere, HandyLinux has decided to drop its English support and Bruce Byfield asked if Linux has lost the Unix philosophy.

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Clear Linux Continues To Maintain Slight Graphics Lead Over Ubuntu 16.10

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Back in April I did tests showing how Intel's Clear Linux distribution showed much potential for HD/Iris Graphics performance, something that intrigued many Phoronix readers since Clear Linux would generally be seen as a workstation/cloud/container-optimized Linux distribution and something with not much emphasis on the desktop or gaming. Those earlier tests were with Ubuntu 16.04, bur with Ubuntu 16.10 coming out this week, here are some fresh tests of Clear Linux and Ubuntu Yakkety Yak on an Skylake HD Graphics system.

For curiosity sake, I ran some fresh Ubuntu 16.10 vs. Clear Linux (10820) benchmarks on the same Core i5 6600K system with an MSI Z170A GAMING PRO motherboard, 16GB DDR4-2133MHz memory, and 256GB TS256GSSD370S SSD. The mid-range i5-6600K is equipped with HD Graphics 530.

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Linux Foundation and Linux

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  • Linux 5.0 Kernel is Coming in 2017

    It's very likely that the Linux 5.0 kernel will debut at some point in 2017. Linux creator Linus Torvalds hasn't yet officially set a date, but that's not quite how he works or how the Linux development process pushes releases.

    In a Google Plus post Torvalds noted that after the Linux 4.8 release, we're now half-way between Linux 4.0 and 5.0.

    Torvalds isn't just counting the release number here either. Linux 3.20 was renumbered as Linux 4.0 during it's development cycle in early 2015.

  • How Linux has influenced modern IT

    A quarter of a century is a long time in IT, but Linux, which has turned 25, is now at the heart of many hugely successful enterprises.

    Martin Percival, senior solutions architect at Red Hat, said: “Linux was regarded as an alternative to proprietary Unix. But RHEL switched it to becoming an alternative to Windows Server.”

  • AllSeen Alliance Merges into Open Connectivity Foundation for IoT

    The AllSeen Alliance is merging with its erstwhile rival the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF). The two efforts will now operate under the Open Connectivity Foundation as a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project.

  • NVDIMM Updates For The Linux 4.9 Kernel
  • Btrfs Gets Fixes For Linux 4.9, Linux 4.10 To Be More Exciting

Linux Graphics

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GNU/Linux Desktop

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  • System76 Launches New Ubuntu-Powered Lemur Laptop with Intel Kaby Lake CPUs

    Today, October 11, 2016, System76, a US-based computer manufacturer specializing in the distribution of notebooks, desktop and server computers powered by the Ubuntu Linux operating system, launch a new model of their famous Lemur laptop.

    If you're currently enjoying your excellent Lemur laptop from System76, you should know that a better version is now available, featuring 7th generation Intel i3-7100U or i7-7500U Kaby Lake processors that provide stunning performance and much faster Intel HD 620 graphics. The new Lemur laptop also features up to 32 GB of dual-channel DDR4 RAM.

  • System76 updates its affordable Ubuntu Linux 'Lemur' laptop with Intel Kaby Lake

    Dell recently updated its XPS 13 Developer Edition laptop with Kaby Lake processors. While that company's laptop is beautiful, it is also very expensive. For developers and home users looking for a solid laptop running Ubuntu Linux, System76's 'Lemur' has historically been a great value. Not only is the affordable machine both powerful and well supported, but it is built like a tank too.

    Today, System76 updates the aforementioned Lemur with Kaby Lake processors. While Dell's XPS 13 starts at $949, the Lemur begins at a much more reasonable $649.

    That starting price gets you a solid machine. It has a Core i3-7100U processor, 4GB of RAM and a 500GB HDD. If you want more power, storage, or memory, you can configure to your heart's content. Not everyone needs the most hardcore specifications and unlike Dell's machine, the Lemur will better meet the needs of those on a budget.

  • Apple Mac shipments take a beating in the third quarter as PC shipments decline

    Sales of Windows PCs fared better than Apple Macs during the third quarter this year.

    Third-quarter PC shipments declined by 3.9 percent compared to the same quarter last year, but Mac shipments dropped by 13 percent. PC shipments totaled 68 million units, according to IDC.

    The declines weren't as bad as expected, and were roughly 3.2 percent ahead of IDC's initial projections, the research firm said.

    In the top five PC companies, fourth-placed Apple registered the largest decline, with the 13 percent drop in Mac shipments. Apple's Mac sales totaled 5 million units during the quarter, declining from 5.76 million units in the same quarter a year ago.

  • PC industry is now on a two-year downslide

    The state of the PC industry is not looking great. According to analyst firm Gartner, worldwide PC shipments fell 5.7 percent in the third quarter of 2016 to 68.9 million units. That marks the "the eighth consecutive quarter of PC shipment decline, the longest duration of decline in the history of the PC industry," Gartner writes in a press release issued today. The firm cites poor back-to-school sales and lowered demand in emerging markets. But the larger issue, as it has been for quite some time, is more existential than that.

Security News

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  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Systemd and Ubuntu users urged to update to patch Linux flaws

    Linux users should beware of a recently discovered systemd vulnerability that could shut down a system using a command short enough to send in a tweet and Ubuntu users should update to new Linux kernel patches affecting supported operating systems.

    SSLMate founder and Linux administrator Andrew Ayer spotted the bug which has the potential to kill a number of critical commands while making others unstable, according to Betanews.

  • Microsoft: No More Pick-and-Choose Patching

    Adobe and Microsoft today each issued updates to fix critical security flaws in their products. Adobe’s got fixes for Acrobat and Flash Player ready. Microsoft’s patch bundle for October includes fixes for at least five separate “zero-day” vulnerabilities — dangerous flaws that attackers were already exploiting prior to today’s patch release. Also notable this month is that Microsoft is changing how it deploys security updates, removing the ability for Windows users to pick and choose which individual patches to install.

  • Ministry of Defence CIO – defending the data assets of the nation

    An interesting example of knowing what is actually important, such as being ‘secure’ does not mean pulling up drawbridges and never talking. It does seem possible that the MoD has lesson it can teach industry in building security defences in depth, using a wide range of tools, that then map onto the future world of mobile and cloud infrastructures.

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Fedora News: Release of Beta and Other News

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Red Hat

Android Leftovers

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Build your own Raspberry Pi tornado warning system

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At 4:30 in the afternoon on November 15, 1989, an F4 tornado ripped through Huntsville, Alabama killing 21 people. It could have been much worse save for the quick thinking of the people running the after-school program at Jones Valley Elementary. They took the children under the stairs as soon as the power went out. They survived, though the top floor was torn from the building. A mother out front who had come to pick up her child was among the 21 casualties.

That was my brother's school. My church and several others were destroyed. My route to school changed for months while they rebuilt and cleared the area. These are the sorts of stories you collect living in the #1 place for tornadoes per capita. And it is these stories that instill a healthy respect for tornadoes, and heeding tornado warnings.

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Couchbase and the future of NoSQL databases

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Well, I've built and led developer communities for 10+ years at Sun, Oracle, and Red Hat, so I have experience in leading crossfunctional teams to develop and execute strategy, planning, and execution of content, and marketing campaigns and programs. I've also led engineering teams at Sun, and I’m a founding member of the Java EE team.

At Couchbase, a developer advocate helps developers become effective users of a technology, product, API, or platform. This can be done by sharing knowledge about the product using the medium where developers typically hangout. Some of the more common channels include blogs, articles, webinars, and presentations at conferences and meetups. Answering questions on forums and Stack Overflow, conversations on social media, and seeking contributors for open source projects are some other typical activities that a developer advocate performs on a regular basis.

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7 Linux command line tools you didn’t know you need

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The Linux world offers an incredible range of free and open source tools to do everything you can think of and lots of things you probably haven’t ever thought of. In this roundup we highlight seven command line utilities you probably haven’t run into before and we’ve got everything from monitoring file system events to running re-attachable ssh sessions to printing banners.

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27 Open Source DevOps Tools In 7 Easy Bites

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I recently wrote an article featuring 25 DevOps vendors worth watching. However, in the world of DevOps, there are an awful lot of good tools that don't really have a vendor attached, and I thought it was time to give the open source tools their due.

While I wrote that there are tools that don't have vendors, there are vendors that are attached to some of these open source tools. Those vendors provide development support, along with, in some cases, customer support and even proprietary versions of some of the tools that exist alongside their open source cousins. As long as there was an open source version that wasn't "crippleware," it was eligible for the cut.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Puppet Rolls Out New Docker Image Builds
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Earlier this year, Puppet Labs rebranded as simply Puppet, and also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who came to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president. Now, at PuppetConf, the company has announced the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build, which "automates the container build process to help organizations as they define, build and deploy containers into production environments." This new set of capabilities adds to existing Puppet functionality for installing and managing container infrastructure, including Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos, among others.
  • Five Cool Alternative Open Source Linux Shells
    We are going to look at some of the available Linux shells out there that users have access to free of charge since they are open source, they come in a number of different licenses and this mainly depends on the software creator but in essence one doesn’t have to pay to use the system; so that a major plus in whichever way we look at it. We find that there are different kinds of users when it comes to Linux, the ones who tread carefully preferring to stick to tried and tested software, the other kinds are the ones who dive into the deep end of cutting edge software; head first.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/42
    This was week 42 – The openSUSE LEAP week of the Year. It can’t be a co-incidence that the Release Candidate 1 was announced in Week 42, on the 2nd day (42.2 – European counting, we start our week on Monday, not on Sunday). But also in Tumbleweed things are not standing still: of course many of the things are well in line with what Leap received (like for example Plasma updates), but Tumbleweed rolls at a different pace ahead of the game.

Red Hat News

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • The Open Source Way
    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large. It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community.
  • Another rift in the open source BPM market: @FlowableBPM forks from @Alfresco Activiti
    In early 2013, Camunda – at the time, a value-added Activiti consulting partner as well as a significant contributor to the open source project – created a fork from Activiti to form what is now the Camunda open source BPM platform as well as their commercial version based on the open source core.
  • Pydio, an Open Source File Sharing and Sync Solution, Out in New Version
    If you've followed us here at OStatic, you've probably seen our coverage of open source file sharing, cloud and synchronization tools. For example, we've covered ownCloud and Nextcloud extensively. Not so many people know about Pydio, though, which is out in a new version Pydio7. It's an open source file sharing & sync solution that now has a host of new features and performance upgrades. It's worth downloading and trying. Through a new partnership with Collabora Productivity (the LibreOffice Cloud provider), Pydio7 now combines file sharing, document editing and online collaboration. Users can now not only access documents online, but also co-author new content and work collaboratively.
  • Chrome 55 Beta: Input handling improvements and async/await functions
    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.
  • Chrome 55 Beta Brings Async/Await To JavaScript
    Google is ending this week by rolling out the Chrome/Chromium 55 web-browser beta. Chrome 55 Beta brings support for the async and await keywords to JavaScript for Promise-based JavaScript coding. Great to see them finally improving the asynchronous JS support.
  • Open-Source Innovations Driving Demand for Hadoop
    AtScale, provider of BI (Business Intelligence) on Hadoop, has released its study titled "The Business Intelligence Benchmark for SQL-on-Hadoop engines," which is a performance test of BI workloads on Hadoop. The report also studies the strengths and weaknesses of Hive, Presto, Impala and Spark SQL, which are the most popular analytical engines for Hadoop.
  • Microsoft CEO Offers SQL Server for Linux Update [Ed: bad idea to use it [1, 2]]
  • New SafariSeat wheelchairs made from bicycle parts help East Africans roam rough terrain
  • SafariSeat, an Open Source Wheelchair for Rural Offroading
    If you’re disabled in a poorly developed part of the world, even a great modern wheelchair may be next to useless. What’s needed is a more off-road design that’s made to be easy to manufacture and repair than something built for a city with sidewalks. SafariSeat is a newly designed open-source wheelchair that hopes to make a big impact for disabled people the world over. It uses push bars for power and has large front wheels and small rear ones to easily roll over large objects. In a novel move, the designers included a moving seat that shifts bit every time you push the bars to help prevent pressure sores on the butt.
  • Five 3D printing projects for Halloween
    With Halloween fast approaching I figured it was time to add some 3D printed decorations to the office. Below are some of my pictures for fun Halloween-themed prints. I tried to pick some models that demonstrate varied printing techniques.