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Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME/GTK News Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 10:59am
Story Containers News Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 10:53am
Story Ubuntu 17.04: Unity's swan song? Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 10:46am
Story FOSS in European Public Services Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 10:33am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 10:32am
Story Kernel Space/Linux Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 10:31am
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 10:29am
Story Enlightenment Development Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 10:19am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 9:07am
Story AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 OpenCL vs. NVIDIA Shows Problems Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 8:38am

Chrome 58 Released

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Stable Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 58 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.

  • Chrome 58 Makes Its Debut

    Not long after the Firefox 53 release, Google has promoted Chrome 58 to stable.

    Chrome 58 is now available with a number of fixes, new features, and a number of security fixes too. A list of the CVE fixes can be found in the release announcement.

  • Google Promotes Chrome 58 to Stable Channel with 29 Security Fixes, Improvements

    Google announced a few moments ago the promotion of the Chrome 58 web browser to the stable channel for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

Tails 2.12 Anonymous Live OS Is Out, Drops I2P as Alternative Anonymity Network

Filed under
Security
Debian

The development team behind the popular and open-source Tails amnesic incognito live system announced today, April 19, 2017, the release and immediate availability for download of the Tails 2.12 maintenance update.

Tails 2.12 is the second security update to the Tails 2.x series, and possibly the last one to be published as the development of the major Tails 3.0 release nears its end. Besides addressing various long-standing issues and patching recently discovered security holes, Tails 2.12 ships with the more recent Linux 4.9.13 kernel.

Read more

deepin 15.4 Linux Officially Released with Brand New Design, Smarter Installer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The development team behind the Debian-based deepin Linux distribution announced today, April 19, 2017, the release and immediate availability for download of deepin 15.4.

deepin 15.4 has been in development for the past two months, during which it received several Beta and RC milestone that implemented many of the features users can now finally enjoy on their personal computers if they upgrade from the previous version or reinstall the operating system using the new Live ISO image.

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Wine-Staging 2.6

Filed under
Software
  • [Wine-Staging] Release 2.6

    Since a lot of users were confused after reading the development version release notes, we would like to clarify, that the command stream multithreading (CSMT) patchset has not been fully merged yet. There has been a lot of progress during the last weeks, but unfortunately the performance related optimizations are still missing in the development branch. We expect them to be merged in one of the following releases. In the meantime, Wine Staging users can continue to use the CSMT performance improvements as usual (i.e. by enabling the CSMT in the winecfg Staging tab).

  • Wine-Staging 2.6 Released

    Building off last week's Wine 2.6 release that brought partial Command Stream Multi-Threading support is now Wine-Staging 2.6.

Canonical to Make GNOME Default Session in Ubuntu 17.10, Likely Use Wayland

Filed under
Ubuntu

As most of you are aware, Canonical decided to no longer develop its Unity user interface for the main flavor of Ubuntu Linux and, instead, switch to the well-known GNOME desktop environment starting with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

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53.0 Firefox Release

Filed under
Moz/FF

Today's Firefox release makes Firefox faster and more stable with a separate process for graphics compositing (the Quantum Compositor). Compact themes and tabs save screen real estate, and the redesigned permissions notification improves usability. Learn more on the Mozilla Blog.

Read more

Also: Mozilla Firefox 53.0 Released, Drops Old Linux CPU Support

Linux desktop operating system: A beginner's guide

Filed under
OS
Linux

Linux. What is it? At one point in time it was a niche operating system run by those who wanted to show off their PC prowess and feel more alternative and l33t than the rest. But something happened on the way to the convention — Linux became accepted. Not only did this platform become accepted, it was adopted as a must-have technology by enterprise-level businesses, where reliability, flexibility, and security are key.

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Tinker Board ships in U.S. at $60

Filed under
Linux

Asus has launched its Tinker Board SBC in the U.S. for $60, featuring a quad-A17 RK3288 with 2GB RAM, a 40-pin RPi connector, and an updated TinkerOS 1.8.

Asus’ Tinker Board, which launched in the UK in January for 46 Pounds ($58) is now selling on Amazon in the U.S. for $59.99. The Raspberry Pi-like Tinker Board is the first community backed SBC from a major PC manufacturer. The specs do not appear to have changed, but the device now has an updated 1.8 version of Asus’ Debian Linux-based TinkerOS, and Asus has posted some updated detail views since our last story.

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What’s the Difference Between Linux EXT, XFS, and BTRFS Filesystems?

Filed under
Linux

Linux supports a range of file systems, including ones used on other operating systems such as Windows FAT and NTFS. Those may be supported by embedded developers but normally a Linux file system like the 4 extended file system (ext4), XFS, or BTRFS will be used for most storage partitions. Understanding the options can help in selecting the right file system for an application.

The Linux file systems covered here include ones that would typically be used in embedded applications. There is also a class of clustered file systems designed for multi-node environments like Red Hat’s Global File System (GFS), GlusterFS, and Lustre.

Read more

Mozilla Cuts

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Firefox 53.0 Released, Drops Old Linux CPU Support

    Firefox 53.0 drops pre Pentium 4 and Opteron Linux support. Firefox 53.0 also has support for WebM videos with alpha channel, lightweight theme changes along with new light and dark lightweight/compact theme options shipping, the Reader Mode can now display a time estimate for reading a given web page, and more. Mozilla also decided to remove the Aurora channel from their release cycle. There are also other changes in Firefox 53.0, but mostly affecting macOS and Windows users (like a "Quantum Compositor" being used now by Firefox on Windows)

  • Mozilla abandons experimental Aurora Firefox channel

    Mozilla is killing the channel it introduced for developers to test experimental new features in Firefox and keep pace with Chrome.

    The Aurora channel will stop receiving new code releases from 18 April, Mozilla has said.

    New code will revert to the established Firefox Nightly builds from where it will land in beta builds of Firefox Developer Edition.

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Development News: Qt, Clang. MySQL, and Apache Fortress

Filed under
Development
  • Uncovering 32 Qt best practices at compile time with clazy

    In a previous blog post we introduced clazy, a clang plugin which makes the compiler understand Qt semantics, allowing you to get compile-time warnings about Qt best practices ranging from unneeded memory allocations to misuse of API, including fix-its for automatic refactoring.

  • Clang-Based Tool Makes It Easy To Show Inefficient Qt Coding Mistakes

    Back in 2015 we wrote about the "Clazy" static analyzer for Clang as a way to uncover various coding shortcomings for KDE/Qt programs. Since then, Clazy has become much more capable.

    KDE developer and KDAB employee Sérgio Martins has written a new blog post about 32 of the best practices that Clazy can now spot at compile-time to point out to developers. He confirmed in a message to Phoronix that most of the issues brought up by Clazy are in regards to performance-sensitive areas that could be improved by the developer analyzing their code with this tool.

  • Automatic MySQL schema management with Skeema

    I first started using MySQL at a college IT job in 2003, and over the years I eventually began tackling much larger-scale deployments at Tumblr and Facebook. I’ve spent most of the past decade working on social networks, where massive high-volume database technology is fundamental to the product. I love the technical challenges present in that type of environment, as well as the huge potential impact of database automation and tooling. In companies with giant databases and many engineers, a well-designed automation system can provide a truly enormous increase in productivity.

  • 5 lessons learned when developing my first web app

    I developed my first web app as part of my final project in college. Instead of developing a web app only for the purpose of completing my project, I chose to develop one that could solve a real-world problem. I decided to create Cyber Manager, an online cyber cafe management system for cyber cafe administrators, which has been downloaded nearly 3,000 times since I first uploaded it on SourceForge.net in 2011. In this article, I'll walk through five lessons I learned during the process, which might help you during and after developing your own web app. I'll end with a quick look at Cyber Manager and how it works.

  • Secure Web Apps with JavaEE and Apache Fortress

    ApacheCon is just a couple months away -- coming up May 16-18 in Miami. We asked Shawn McKinney, Software Architect at Symas Corporation, to share some details about his talk at ApacheCon. His presentation -- “The Anatomy of a Secure Web Application Using Java EE, Spring Security, and Apache Fortress” will focus on an end-to-end application security architecture for an Apache Wicket Web app running in Tomcat. McKinney explains more in this interview.

Anaconda, Hadoop, and OpenStack

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • IBM Brings Anaconda Open Data Science Platform to its Cognitive Systems

    IBM is working with Continuum Analytics to offer the latter’s Anaconda open data science platform as part of IBM’s Cognitive Systems. Anaconda will also integrate with IBM’s PowerAI software for machine learning and deep learning.

  • Hadoop: the rise of the modern data lake platform

    Hadoop, while it may be synonymous with big data, and while it may be free to access and work with, engineering teams globally will admit that behind every Hadoop undertaking is a major technical delivery project.

    Failures are so commonplace that even the experts don’t have great expectations of 2017: at the recent Gartner Data & Analytics Summit in Sydney, research director Nick Heudecker claimed that 70% of Hadoop deployments in 2017 will either fail to deliver their estimated cost savings or their predicted revenue.

  • The best minds in open source gather at OpenStack Summit Boston

    In my keynote address a year ago at the OpenStack Summit Austin, I offered the OpenStack community an ultimatum. First, I described how our world was exploding with connected devices (50 billion by 2020) and that 400 million new servers would be needed to process and store that data, which creates a massive challenge for those of us in the infrastructure business. How will we meet the needs of users at that scale?

  • What will OpenStack R be Named?

    That time again, when members of the OpenStack community vote on the release name for the upcoming series of milestones. The current release is called Ocata, the next release is code named Pike and is set to debut August 28.

Oracle Patches Solaris 10

Filed under
Server
Security

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Microsoft and Apple Lock-in

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac

KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Calligra 3.0 Open-Source Office Suite Gets First Point Release, 26 Issues Fixed

    It's been three months since the major Calligra 3.0 release hit the streets in mid-January, and it now received its first point release to fix the various issues reported by users lately.

    Calligra 3.0.1 has been released on April 17, 2017, and while it may not yet be available in the stable software repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distributions, we can tell you about the changes implemented by the hard working development team behind this open-source office suite targeted at KDE users.

  • Minwaita GTK Theme Puts GNOME’s Adwaita on a Diet

    If you like the Adwaita theme Ubuntu GNOME ships with but don’t like the size of its title bars, here’s a theme that may be of interest.

  • I’m not looking forward 3.24

    Those who follow my work are used to read my “Looking forward ” posts, and they appear to be quite popular. This cycle, however, I’m not looking forward the next GNOME release.

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