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Friday, 17 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2017 - 6:20am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2017 - 6:20am
Story Security: Minix, Shadow Brokers, Kaspersky Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2017 - 6:14am
Story AMD Linux Development Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2017 - 5:42am
Story SparkyLinux 5.1 Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2017 - 5:32am
Story Blockchain, Linux, and FOSS Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2017 - 5:28am
Story Why Australian enterprises are embracing open source Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2017 - 4:26am
Story Linux Kernel 4.14 Released Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2017 - 4:11am
Story Server: MongoDB 3.6, Web Component. PHP 7.2.0 RC6 Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2017 - 6:37pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2017 - 6:34pm

Meet Gladys, a Raspberry Pi-Powered Intelligent, Open-Source Home Assistant

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Gladys is the creation of Node.js expert and backend software engineer Pierre-Gilles Leymarie, the guy who lost his MacBook Pro laptop earlier this summer and decided to replace it with a Raspberry Pi 3 computer, which he built using an old wireless mouse and USB keyboard, along with a 22-inch HDMI LCD, for one week.

Gladys is designed from the ground up to act as a central hub that interacts with a variety of smart, IoT (Internet of Things) devices you may own, from smart speakers and smart light bulbs to coffee machines and motion sensors. It supports Philips Hue lamps, Sonos speakers, Fibaro motion sensors, Mi-Light lamps and Wi-Fi bridge.

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F1 2017 On Linux With 23 Graphics Cards, NVIDIA + AMDGPU-PRO + RADV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Following various F1 2017 Linux gaming benchmarks over the past few days since this game's Linux release this past Thursday with a port to Vulkan, here is a 23-way graphics card comparison for this formula one racing game while having coverage of the NVIDIA, AMDGPU-PRO, and RADV Vulkan drivers atop Ubuntu Linux.

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Debian-Based Pardus 17.1 Linux Distro Released with Deepin Desktop Media Support

Filed under
Debian

Released in early July 2017, Pardus 17 is based on the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system and it's powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.9 kernel series. Now, the first point release, Pardus 17.1, is available to download bringing all the latest technologies from the Debian GNU/Linux 9.2 "Stretch" release.

On top of that, Pardus 17.1 makes various user-visible changes, such as to rename the Downloads folder to Downloaded, enhance the System Settings Menu, redesign the default printer test page, remove the password for the live "pardus" user, update the Symbol system theme, as well as to add a bunch of new desktop wallpapers.

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Enlightenment 0.22 Linux Desktop Environment Greatly Improves Wayland Support

Filed under
Linux

As expected for a new stable series, Enlightenment 0.22 is a major release bringing great improvements, new features, and countless bug fixes. And we'll start with the support for the next-generation Wayland display server, which was greatly improved in this release, adding support for relative pointer motion protocols, pointer constraints, and xdg-shell v6.

"The majority of development for this cycle has gone towards improving Wayland support," said Mike Blumenkrantz in the release notes. "This covers, but is not limited to: adding support for xdg-shell v6, pointer constraints, and relative pointer motion protocols. These additions improve XWayland support and increase stability across all components running under Wayland."

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Also: Enlightenment 0.22 Available For Download

ElectOS uses open source to restore trust in voting machines

Filed under
OS
OSS

When people doubt that an election will be conducted fairly, their trust in the outcome and their leaders naturally erodes. That’s the challenge posed by electronic voting machines. Technology holds the promise of letting people vote more easily and remotely. But, they’re also prone to hacking and manipulation. How can trust be restored in voting machines and election results?

Voting demands the ultimate IoT machine (to borrow a line from BMW). The integrity of these machines with their combination of sensors, security and data analysis produce the results that impact every aspect of all our lives.

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Linux Kernel 3.10 Reached End of Life, Users Are Urged to Move to Linux 4.4 LTS

Filed under
Linux

The end of life was reached this past weekend with the release of Linux kernel 3.10.108, which is the last maintenance update for the Linux 3.10 branch. Therefore, users and OEMs are now urged to upgrade to a more recent, long-term supported Linux kernel, such as the Linux 4.4 LTS series.

"It is the last one in this branch and changes the status of the 3.10 branch to end of life. Thus for once I'm *not* suggesting to upgrade to this one, except if it's just to finish your migration to a newer branch (such as 4.4)," said Willy Tarreau in the mailing list announcement.

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Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.5 Distro Coming Soon Based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

If you're wondering, there weren't any other betas released for the Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.5 operating system, so the Beta 3 release comes as a surprise to us all. It rebases the OS on Canonical's latest Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and brings various performance improvements.

For example, the driver capabilities have been increased through the inclusion of a new Linux kernel, and the operating system now offers much better performance on various devices. However, this beta release still has some known issues, especially with Microsoft Surface computers, as noted in the release announcement.

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Linux Kernel Developer: Laura Abbott

Filed under
Interviews

My full-time job is working as one of two maintainers for the Fedora kernels. This means I push out kernel releases and fix/shepherd bugs. Outside of that role, I maintain the Ion memory management framework and do occasional work on arm/arm64 and KSPP (kernel hardening).

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Linux 3.10 EoL, 15,600 Linux Developers

Filed under
Linux
  • Look back to an end-of-life LTS kernel : 3.10

    The end of the 3.10 branch is a good opportunity to have a look back at how that worked, and to remind some important rules regarding how to choose a kernel for your products, or the risks associated with buying products running unmaintained kernels.

  • The Linux Foundation Releases 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report

    The 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report has now been released by the nonprofit Linux Foundation, with updated statistics on Linux kernel development. The report has analyzed the work done by 15,600 developers over more than ten years, as well as more recent trends in kernel development.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat starts moving its OpenStack platform to containers

    Red Hat is still best known for its Linux distribution, but the company has also long offered its own OpenStack distribution and additional services as well. Today, the company launched version 12 of the Red Hat OpenStack Platform.

    This update includes all of the usual stability improvements and bug fixes, but what’s probably most important for the distribution in the long run is that Red Hat is now starting to move all of its OpenStack platform to containers.

    Version 12 of the platform is based on the OpenStack Pike release, the 16th release of OpenStack, which launched just over two months ago. Current Red Hat OpenStack Platform customers include the likes of BBVA, FICO, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and TechCrunch’s corporate overlords at Verizon.

  • Bank of America Corporation Reiterates “Underperform” Rating for Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Analyzing Red Hat (RHT) and Its Rivals

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Security and FUD

Filed under
Security

Latest on OpenStack in Sydney

Filed under
OSS
  • Commonwealth Bank to take OpenStack approach to its public cloud environment

    A survey from the OpenStack Foundation has highlighted the growth of users among mainstream, non-IT industries, with the financial services sector one of the fastest growing.

    To emphasise the importance of open source in the Australian financial services sector, head of systems engineering for analytics and information at the Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA) Quinton Anderson detailed his bank's journey, starting with OpenStack in some basic container environments before layering additional open-source technologies.

  • Open-source community has an integration problem: OpenStack

    At the OpenStack Sydney Summit, community leaders announced a new plan to overcome challenges in integrating and operating open-source technologies to solve real-world problems.

    Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the OpenStack Foundation, said on Monday the open source community hasn't historically been good at integration, and highlighted that innovation alone isn't enough to make it work.

  • Edge computing moves the open cloud beyond the data center

    When we think of cloud computing, most of us envision large-scale, centralized data centers running thousands of physical servers. As powerful as that vision sounds, it actually misses the biggest new opportunity: distributed cloud infrastructure.

    Today, almost every company in every industry sector needs near-instant access to data and compute resources to be successful. Edge computing pushes applications, data and computing power services away from centralized data centers to the logical extremes of a network, close to users, devices and sensors. It enables companies to put the right data in the right place at the right time, supporting fast and secure access. The result is an improved user experience and, oftentimes, a valuable strategic advantage. The decision to implement an edge computing architecture is typically driven by the need for location optimization, security, and most of all, speed.

    New applications such as VR and AI, with requirements to collect and process massive amounts of data in near-real-time and extremely low latency, are driving the need for processing at the edge of the network. Very simply, the cost and distance of the hub-and-spoke model will not be practical for many of these emerging use cases.

Debian. Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Reviving GHDL in Debian

    It has been a few years since Debian last had a working VHDL simulator in the archive. Its competitor Verilog has been covered by the iverilog and verilator simulator packages, but GHDL was the only option for VHDL in Debian and that has become broken, orphaned and was eventually removed. I have just submitted an ITP to make my work on it official.

    A lot has changed since the last Debian upload of GHDL. Upstream development is quite active and it has gained free reimplementations of the standard library definitions (the lack of which frustrated at least two attempts at adoption of the Debian package). It has gained additional backends, in addition to GCC it can now also use LLVM and its own custom mcode (x86 only) code generator. The mcode backend should provide faster compilation at the expense of lacking sophisticated optimization, hence it might be preferable over the other two for small projects.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in October 2017
  • debconf mailinglists moved to lists.debian.org

    Today I had the pleasure to move the debconf mailinglists to lists.debian.org.

  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E35 – Berserk Miniature Need
  • LXTerminal 0.3.1 released

    This is an security and bugfix update. However, there is also minor feature added to enhance usability. It will be integrated into Lubuntu very soon.

OpenStack in Sydney

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • OpenStack to tackle open source integration

    The OpenStack Foundation made its announcement, kicking off the OpenStack Summit currently running in Sydney at the Darling Harbour International Convention Centre.

  • OpenStack Summit Sydney Spotlights Open Infrastructure Integration
  • OpenStack says its work is largely done. Now your hard work can fill in the blanks

    The OpenStack Foundation has kicked off its summit in Sydney, Australia, with a call to current OpenStack users to help it to win more users by sharing code they've written to link OpenStack to other tools and infrastructure.

    The Foundation's decided the time is right to pursue easier integration because it feels the core of OpenStack is in good shape: its myriad modules are felt to be nicely mature and to offer the functionality that users need and want.

  • WeChat parent company Tencent joins the OpenStack Foundation as a Gold Member

    Shenzhen-based Tencent Holdings Limited, the parent company behind extremely popular services like WeChat and QQ, today announced that it is joining the OpenStack Foundation as a Gold Member. OpenStack members at the Gold level pay annual dues of 0.025 percent of their revenue with a minimum of $50,000 per year and a maximum of $200,000 to support the development of the open source cloud platform.

  • OpenStack® Board Elects Tencent as Gold Member of the Foundation
  • Sydney OpenStack Summit - Started
  • OpenStack’s next mission: bridging the gaps between open source projects

    OpenStack, the massive open source project that provides large businesses with the software tools to run their data center infrastructure, is now almost eight years old. While it had its ups and downs, hundreds of enterprises now use it to run their private clouds and there are even over two dozen public clouds that use the project’s tools. Users now include the likes of AT&T, Walmart, eBay, China Railway, GE Healthcare, SAP, Tencent and the Insurance Australia Group, to name just a few.

    “One of the things that’s been happening is that we’re seven years in and the need for turning every type of infrastructure into programmable infrastructure has been proven out. “It’s no longer a debate,” OpenStack COO Mark Collier told me ahead of the projects semi-annual developer conference this week. OpenStack’s own surveys show that the project’s early adopters, who previously only tested it for their clouds, continue to move their production workflows to the platform, too. “We passed the hype phase,” Collier noted.

Software: Teleconsole, Audacity, AtCore and More

Filed under
Software
  • Teleconsole – A Tool To Share Your Terminal Session Instantly To Anyone In Seconds

    You may already know about popular remote desktop sharing applications which is available in market such as Teamviewer, Skype, Join.me, Chrome Remote Desktop, Real VNC, Apache Guacamole, etc,.

    It’s used to share entire system but in some situation, if you want to share your terminal session alone, what you will do?

  • Audacity 2.2 Open-Source Audio Editor Brings MIDI Playback, macOS Sierra Support

    Audacity, the open-source and cross-platform audio editor for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems, has been updated this week to a new stable series, versioned 2.2.

    Audacity 2.2 wants to be a notable release of the application, introducing some substantial changes, both internal and user-visible ones. Highlights include support for playing MIDI files, which appears to be fully automatic on Windows systems, but requires Linux and macOS users to use a software synthesizer program.

  • Audacity 2.2.0 Released with Big Changes

    The Audacity audio editing software has scored a huge new update. Audacity 2.2.0 adds new themes, improved menus, and new recording behaviour.

  • AtCore’s First public beta!

    The time has finally come to release our first beta of AtCore for the general public to use. We would really like to ensure that AtCore is working with as many machines as possible so we encourage everyone who can to test AtCore and provide us with feedback on what worked and what did not. Included in this release is the Atcore Test Client a simple GUI. This is easy to use and should work well for most people. This client only for testing Atcore and we will be releaseing Atelier as our offical client at a later time.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: pinp 0.0.4: Small tweak

    A maintenance release of our pinp package for snazzier one or two column vignettes is now on CRAN as of yesterday.

    In version 0.0.3, we disabled the default pnasbreak command we inherit from the PNAS LaTeX style. That change turns out to have been too drastic. So we reverted yet added a new YAML front-matter option skip_final_break which, if set to TRUE, will skip this break. With a default value of FALSE we maintain prior behaviour.

  • Krita 3.3.2 Update Makes the Digital Painting App Render Up to 10,000 Frames

    The second bugfix release for the Krita 3.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform digital painting app arrived this week with several performance improvements and many bug fixes.

    Krita 3.3.2 comes three weeks after the first point release in the new stable series, Krita 3.3.1, to address to important regressions, namely the reading of brush presets with textures and Windows Ink tablet and wintab handling, which were broke in the Microsoft Windows 10 Build 1709 operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: New Release of HardenedBSD, Windows Leaks Details of Windows Back Doors

  • Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 11-STABLE v1100054
  • Kaspersky blames NSA hack on infected Microsoft software
    Embattled computer security firm Kaspersky Lab said Thursday that malware-infected Microsoft Office software and not its own was to blame for the hacking theft of top-secret US intelligence materials. Adding tantalizing new details to the cyber-espionage mystery that has rocked the US intelligence community, Kaspersky also said there was a China link to the hack.
  • Investigation Report for the September 2014 Equation malware detection incident in the US
    In early October, a story was published by the Wall Street Journal alleging Kaspersky Lab software was used to siphon classified data from an NSA employee’s home computer system. Given that Kaspersky Lab has been at the forefront of fighting cyberespionage and cybercriminal activities on the Internet for over 20 years now, these allegations were treated very seriously. To assist any independent investigators and all the people who have been asking us questions whether those allegations were true, we decided to conduct an internal investigation to attempt to answer a few questions we had related to the article and some others that followed it:
  • Kaspersky: Clumsy NSA leak snoop's PC was packed with malware
    Kaspersky Lab, the US government's least favorite computer security outfit, has published its full technical report into claims Russian intelligence used its antivirus tools to steal NSA secrets. Last month, anonymous sources alleged that in 2015, an NSA engineer took home a big bunch of the agency's cyber-weapons to work on them on his home Windows PC, which was running the Russian biz's antimalware software – kind of a compliment when you think about it. The classified exploit code and associated documents on the personal system were then slurped by Kremlin spies via his copy of Kaspersky antivirus, it was claimed.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source Networking Days: Think Globally, Collaborate Locally
    Something that we’ve learned at The Linux Foundation over the years is that there is just no substitute for periodic, in-person, face-to-face collaboration around the open source technologies that are rapidly changing our world. It’s no different for the open networking projects I work with as end users and their ecosystem partners grapple with the challenges and opportunities of unifying various open source components and finding solutions to accelerate network transformation. This fall, we decided to take The Linux Foundation networking projects (OpenDaylight, ONAP, OPNFV, and others) on the road to Europe and Japan by working with local site hosts and network operators to host Open Source Networking Days in Paris, Milan, Stockholm, London, Tel Aviv, and Yokohama.
  • The Open-Source Driving Simulator That Trains Autonomous Vehicles
    Self-driving cars are set to revolutionize transport systems the world over. If the hype is to be believed, entirely autonomous vehicles are about to hit the open road. The truth is more complex. The most advanced self-driving technologies work only in an extremely limited set of environments and weather conditions. And while most new cars will have some form of driver assistance in the coming years, autonomous cars that drive in all conditions without human oversight are still many years away. One of the main problems is that it is hard to train vehicles to cope in all situations. And the most challenging situations are often the rarest. There is a huge variety of tricky circumstances that drivers rarely come across: a child running into the road, a vehicle driving on the wrong side of the street, an accident immediately ahead, and so on.
  • Fun with Le Potato
    At Linux Plumbers, I ended up with a Le Potato SBC. I hadn't really had time to actually boot it up until now. They support a couple of distributions which seem to work fine if you flash them on. I mostly like SBCs for having actual hardware to test on so my interest tends to be how easily can I get my own kernel running. Most of the support is not upstream right now but it's headed there. The good folks at BayLibre have been working on getting the kernel support upstream and have a tree available for use until then.
  • PyConf Hyderabad 2017
    In the beginning of October, I attended a new PyCon in India, PyConf Hyderabad (no worries, they are working on the name for the next year). I was super excited about this conference, the main reason is being able to meet more Python developers from India. We are a large country, and we certainly need more local conferences :)
  • First Basilisk version released!
    This is the first public version of the Basilisk web browser, building on the new platform in development: UXP (code-named Möbius).
  • Pale Moon Project Rolls Out The Basilisk Browser Project
    The developers behind the Pale Moon web-browser that's been a long standing fork of Firefox have rolled out their first public beta release of their new "Basilisk" browser technology. Basilisk is their new development platform based on their (Gecko-forked) Goanna layout engine and the Unified UXL Platform (UXP) that is a fork of the Mozilla code-base pre-Servo/Rust... Basically for those not liking the direction of Firefox with v57 rolling out the Quantum changes, etc.
  • Best word processor for Mac [iophk: "whole article fails to mention OpenDocument Format"]
  • WordPress 4.9: This one's for you, developers!
    WordPress 4.9 has debuted, and this time the world's most popular content management system has given developers plenty to like. Some of the changes are arguably overdue: syntax highlighting and error checking for CSS editing and cutting custom HTML are neither scarce nor innovative. They'll be welcomed arrival will likely be welcomed anyway, as will newly-granular roles and permissions for developers. The new release has also added version 4.2.6 of MediaElement.js, an upgrade that WordPress.org's release notes stated has removed dependency on jQuery, improves accessibility, modernizes the UI, and fixes many bugs.”
  • New projects on Hosted Weblate
  • Cilk Plus Is Being Dropped From GCC
    Intel deprecated Cilk Plus multi-threading support with GCC 7 and now for GCC 8 they are looking to abandon this support entirely. Cilk Plus only had full support introduced in GCC 5 while now for the GCC 8 release early next year it's looking like it will be dropped entirely.
  • Software Freedom Law Center vs. Software Freedom Conservancy

    On November 3rd, the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) wrote a blog post to let people know that the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) had begun legal action against them (the SFC) over the trademark for their name.

  • What Is Teletype For Atom? How To Code With Fellow Developers In Real Time?
    In a short period of three years, GitHub’s open source code editor has become one of the most popular options around. In our list of top text editors for Linux, Atom was featured at #2. From time to time, GitHub keeps adding new features to this tool to make it even better. Just recently, with the help of Facebook, GitHub turned Atom into a full-fledged IDE. As GitHub is known to host some of the world’s biggest open source collaborative projects, it makes perfect sense to add the collaborative coding ability to Atom. To make this possible, “Teletype for Atom” has just been announced.
  • Microsoft Is Trying To Make Windows Subsystem For Linux Faster (WSL)
  • Microsoft and GitHub team up to take Git virtual file system to macOS, Linux

Ubuntu: New Users, Unity Remix, 18.04 LTS News

  • How to Get Started With the Ubuntu Linux Distro
    The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we’ll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.)
  • An ‘Ubuntu Unity Remix’ Might Be on the Way…
    A new Ubuntu flavor that uses the Unity 7 desktop by default is under discussion. The plans have already won backing from a former Unity developer.
  • Ubuntu News: Get Firefox Quantum Update Now; Ubuntu 18.04 New Icon Theme Confirmed
    Earlier this week, Mozilla earned big praises in the tech world for launching its next-generation Firefox Quantum 57.0 web browser. The browser claims to be faster and better than market leader Google Chrome. Now, Firefox Quantum is available for all supported Ubuntu versions from the official repositories. The Firefox Quantum Update is also now available.
  • New Icon Theme Confirmed for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
    ‘Suru’ is (apparently) going to be the default icon theme in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. That’s Suru, the rebooted community icon theme and not Suru, the Canonical-created icon theme that shipped on the Ubuntu Phone (and was created by Matthieu James, who recently left Canonical).

OnePlus 5T Launched

  • OnePlus 5T Keeps the Headphone Jack, Introduces Face Unlock and Parallel Apps
    Five months after it launched its OnePlus 5 flagship Android smartphone, OnePlus unveiled today its successor, the OnePlus 5T, running the latest Android 8.0 (Oreo) mobile OS. OnePlus held a live event today in New York City to tell us all about the new features it implemented in the OnePlus 5T, and they don't disappoint as the smartphone features a gorgeous and bright 6.0-inches Optic AMOLED capacitive touchscreen with multitouch, a 1080x2160 pixels resolution, 18:9 ratio, and approximately 402 PPI density. The design has been changed a bit as well for OnePlus 5T, which is made of anodized aluminum.
  • OnePlus 5T Launched: Comes With Bigger Screen, Better Dual Camera, And Face Unlock
    Whenever costly phones like iPhone X or Google Pixel 2 are bashed (here and here) and their alternatives are discussed, OnePlus is always mentioned. In the past few years, the company has amassed a fan base that has found the concept of “Never Settle” impressive.
  •