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Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 26/09/2016 - 10:26am
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 26/09/2016 - 10:25am
Story Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2016 - 10:00am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 26/09/2016 - 9:37am
Story Letter to the Federal Trade Commission regarding Lenovo blocking Linux and other operating system installations on Yoga PCs. Roy Schestowitz 26/09/2016 - 9:18am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/09/2016 - 9:16am
Story digiKam 5.2.0 Linux RAW Image Editor Introduces a New Red Eyes Tool, Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2016 - 8:18am
Story wattOS 10 Microwatt Edition Comes with Less of Everything, Based on Ubuntu 16.04 Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2016 - 8:16am
Story How to throw a tarball over the wall Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2016 - 8:15am
Story Debian-Based Robolinux 8.6 Adds Over 275 Important Security and Software Updates Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2016 - 2:53am

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Android takes on Apple's tvOS with open-source Poplar developer board

    Android isn't as popular in TVs as tvOS, which powers the Apple TV media box. But Linaro, a non-profit organization that champions Android, wants to change that.

    A new $79.99 open-source TV board called Poplar, made by Tocoding, brings Android to enthusiasts who want to make set-top boxes at home for broadcast TV and streaming media. It was made based on specifications set by Linaro, which is working hard to make Android a viable TV OS.

    Poplar is capable of processing and delivering 4K video. It can work with external tuner cards to deliver video streams from cable or satellite sources, but you'll need to hook up extra hardware for that.

  • Google wants to show Samsung and Huawei what Android should look like

    Google has always been a reluctant hardware maker, even though its Android operating system powers more than 80 percent of smartphones around the globe. But next month it plans to launch two new "Made by Google" smartphones running a unique version of Android with new features unavailable on any other phone.

    Google's hope is that by producing unique phones — and selling lots of them — it can take back control of Android, which is used freely by smartphone manufacturers from Samsung to Huawei which barely mention Android and are increasingly adding their own apps and services on top to stand out, and diluting Google's vision of Android in the process.

  • Non-blurry photos of the Google Pixel and Pixel XL leak
  • BlackBerry DTEK60 running Android spotted on company website
  • Google gets more time to counter EU antitrust charge on Android [Ed: Microsoft initiated this whole mess]

Web browsers for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

GNOME/GTK News

Filed under
GNOME
  • MATE 1.16 Ready For Release, More GTK2 GNOME-Forked Code Ported To GTK3

    The various components of the GNOME2 desktop forked MATE code were checked in as version 1.16 today in preparation for announcing this next release.

    MATE 1.16 is being released in time to hopefully make it in Ubuntu 16.10 and Fedora 25, which are among the goals for this release. During MATE 1.16 development that began following MATE 1.14 in April, there's been more porting of GTK+ 2 code to GTK+ 3.

  • A Look At The Exciting Features/Improvements Of GNOME 3.22

    If all goes well, GNOME 3.22 will be officially released tomorrow, 21 September. Here is a recap of some of the new features and improvements made over this past six month development cycle plus some screenshots of the near-final desktop that will power the upcoming Fedora 25 Workstation.

Servers (Linux Foundation and IBM)

  • How blockchain will grow beyond bitcoin

    Since its advent in 2009, bitcoin’s decentralized, broker-less and secure mechanism to send money across the world has steadily risen in popularity and adoption. Of equal — if not greater — importance is the blockchain, the technology that supports the cryptocurrency, the distributed ledger which enables trustless, peer-to-peer exchange of data.

  • The end of Moore’s Law and the expansion of Linux; what do these mean to IBM?

    As many organizations are finding out, open-source computing is a game-changer. Many businesses now rely on open-source tools to lower costs, increase flexibility and freedom, and enhance security and accountability.

    Stefanie Chiras, VP of IBM Power Systems Offering Management, Systems of Engagement, at IBM, joined Stu Miniman (@stu) and Dave Vellante (@dvellante), cohosts of theCUBE, from the SiliconANGLE Media team, during IBM Edge, held at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, NV, to discuss the changing landscape around open source, the end of Moore’s Law, and how the cloud drives innovation for clients.

  • Cloud Foundry launches its new Docker-compatible container management system

    Cloud Foundry, the Pivotal- and VMware-incubated open source platform-as-a-service project, is going all in on its new Diego container management system. For a while now, the project used what it called Droplet Execution Agents (DEA) to manage application containers. After running in parallel for a while, though, the team has now decided to go all in on its new so-called “Diego” architecture. Thanks to this, Cloud Foundry says it can now scale to running up to 250,000 containers in a single cluster.

Start-up sells a stamp-sized Linux server for $5

Filed under
Linux

A start-up has completed a crowdfunding campaign for a stamp-sized Linux server development kit that has integrated Wi-Fi and on-board flash storage for DIYers to build hardware or IoT applications.

Boston-based Onion Corp. began its Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign in July and by Aug. 23 had already received more than $773,400 in pledged funding -- 4,400 times its funding goal.

Read more

Samsung open sources its HbbTV media player

Filed under
OSS

Samsung’s Hybrid boradcast broadband TV (HbbTV) media player has now taken the open source path which the company announced in a press release earlier today. The project is available on GitHub as HbbPlayer and app developers as well as broadcasters can utilize it to test their services on any HbbTV 1.5 compliant TV which most of Samsung’s smart TVs are.

Read more

21 Open Source Projects for IoT

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OSS

The Internet of Things market is fragmented, amorphous, and continually changing, and its very nature requires more than the usual attention to interoperability. It’s not surprising then, that open source has done quite well here -- customers are hesitant to bet their IoT future on a proprietary platform that may fade or become difficult to customize and interconnect.

In this second entry in a four-part series about open source IoT, I have compiled a guide to major open source software projects, focusing on open source tech for home and industrial automation. I am omitting more vertical projects related to IoT, such as Automotive Grade Linux and Dronecode, and I’m also skipping open source, IoT-oriented OS distributions, such as Brillo, Contiki, Mbed, OpenWrt, Ostro, Riot, Ubuntu Snappy Core, UCLinux, and Zephyr. Next week, I’ll cover hardware projects -- from smart home hubs to IoT-focused hacker boards -- and in the final part of the series, I’ll look at distros and the future of IoT.

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Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • mrxvt looking for maintainers

    mrxvt is a cool light-weight terminal emulator, not tied to a specific desktop environment and with minimal dependency. This was also one of my very first bigger contributions to Free Software. Well I had patches here and there before, but that’s one project where I stuck around longer and where I was quickly given commit rights. So it is dear to my heart. It was also my first big feature attempt since I started a branch to add UTF-8 support (actually any-encoding support), which is the normal way of things now but at the time, many software and distributions were still not working with UTF-8 as a default. Then I left for years-long wandering our planet on a motorcycle (as people who know me are aware) and because of this, drastically slowed down FLOSS contributions until a few years ago. Back as a contributor, mrxvt is not my main project anymore (you know which these are: GIMP and ZeMarmot!). I moved on.

  • Flowblade 1.8 Released, Supports Keyboard Trimming, Clip Snapping

    The open-source video editor Flowblade has a new release available for download.

    Flowblade 1.8 arrives with a batch of key improvements into, including the ability to trim clips using the arrow keys on your keyboard.

    This way of working, say the Flowblade team, feels “more convenient and precise then always working with a mouse

  • News about Blender second release candidate and other projects.

    The Chairman Blender Foundation and producer Blender Institute, Mr. Ton Roosendaal comw with this news about second release candidate and other projects...

  • Microsoft Updates Skype for Linux to Version 1.8 [Ed: malicious software]
  • Opera for Desktop Gets Free VPN on Windows, Linux, and Mac

    After bringing its free VPN services to iOS and Android, Opera has now released a free, no-login VPN for desktop users as well. The VPN is bundled in to the Opera browser and requires no sign-in or any setup - using it is as simple as the press of a single button. What this does is make using a VPN simple even for users who are not technologically-inclined. Opera's browser VPN was first launched as a beta in April this year.

    A month later, Opera VPN was available as a standalone app on iOS. The VPN was then launched for Android in August before finally rolling out the final version for desktop users now.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • WebKitGTK+ 2.14

    These six months has gone so fast and here we are again excited about the new WebKitGTK+ stable release. This is a release with almost no new API, but with major internal changes that we hope will improve all the applications using WebKitGTK+.

  • Looking forward GNOME 3.22

    is still true! Between backend reworks, Summer of Code projects and spontaneous contributions from awsome random contributors, here are the things that I’m looking forward with GNOME 3.22 release.

  • We’re going to partay, karamu, fiesta, forever

    GNOME release 3.22 happens to be during one of the core days of the Libre Application Summit Hosted by GNOME (LAS GNOME) On top of a high rise, in Portland Oregon, we’re going to celebrate GNOME 3.22 in grand style with the conference participants and end the core days at LAS GNOME!

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • International Business Machines Corp. & Red Hat Inc Expand Collaboration on Enhancing Hybrid Cloud

    Both hardware and software businesses are poised on making the lives of their consumers easier through further extension of their partnership to provide better solutions

  • Red Hat Prepares for OpenStack Newton Improvements

    The next major milestone release of OpenStack, dubbed "Newton," is currently scheduled to debut the week of October 3. While the release is not yet finalized, product teams at Red Hat already have a grip on what they see as the big improvements that OpenStack Newton will bring.

  • Herzog dons a Red Hat in a private Cloud

    HTI chose to build its new PTC system on a “private Cloud” powered by Red Hat Enterprise Linux and managed by Red Hat Satellite and Red Hat CloudForms. The Enterprise Linux platform “allows for easier scaling for IoT (Internet of Things)-type network deployments and helps minimize the hosting footprint in Herzog’s datacenter, thanks to the flexible, stable foundation that it provides,” HTI said. Red Hat CloudForms, an “open hybrid Cloud management platform,” has helped Herzog transform its existing virtualized infrastructure into a private Cloud, through its on-demand scaling functionality. Red Hat Satellite helps Herzog maintain greater platform security and compliance with various regulatory standards, as well as manage its software lifecycle from testing through production. Herzog also worked with Red Hat Consulting to help bring its new offering to market.

  • How to partner with external marketing agencies

    A community-powered approach to working with the broad ecosystem of marketing agencies—to which more and more firms are turning these days—can produce new and inspiring results.

    I've seen it myself since I began leading marketing at Red Hat, especially during something we call our annual agency workshop. The workshop is our opportunity to strengthen the relationships, values, and shared knowledge that bind our community of marketing firms together.

  • What to Expect When Red Hat (RHT) Posts Q2 Results
  • Red Hat (RHT) Q2 Earnings: What's in the Cards this Time?
  • Red Hat Earnings On Tap: Margin Expansion Key

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • AsciiBind all the things!

    I have finally finished a, probably way too long, proposal for implementing a new Fedora Docs publishing toolchain using AsciiBinder.

    The proposal, also published using AsciiBinder, suggests that we definitively adopt AsciiDoc and convert our DocBook sources to it without delay. Further we should begin publishing with AsciiBinder, ideally by Fedora 26.

  • What is the Fedora Code of Conduct?

    We all live in a society. Every society has customs, values, and mores. This is how homo sapiens are different from other species. Since our childhood, in school, then college, and then at work, we follow a shared set of social values. This shared set of values creates a peaceful world. In the open source world, we strive for values that lead to us all being welcoming, generous, and thoughtful. We may differ in opinions or sometimes disagree with each other, but we try to keep the conversation focused on the ideas under discussion, not the person in the discussion.

    Fedora is an excellent example of an open source society where contributors respect each other and have healthy discussions, whether they agree or disagree on all topics. This is a sign of a healthy community. Fedora is a big project with contributors and users from different parts of the world . This creates a diverse community of different skills, languages, ages, colors, cultural values, and more. Although it is rare in Fedora, sometimes miscommunication happens and this can result in situations where the discussion moves from the idea to the person.

  • Wheee, another addition.

    I’m thrilled to announce that Jeremy Cline has joined the Fedora Engineering team, effective today. Like our other recent immigrant, Randy Barlow, Jeremy was previously a member of Red Hat’s Pulp team.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Why China is the next proving ground for open source software

    Western entrepreneurs still haven't figured out China. For most, the problem is getting China to pay for software. The harder problem, however, is building software that can handle China's tremendous scale.

    There are scattered examples of success, though. One is Alluxio (formerly Tachyon), which I detailed recently in its efforts to help China's leading online travel site, Qunar, boost HDFS performance by 15X. Alluxio CEO and founder, Haoyuan Li, recently returned from China, and I caught up with him to better understand the big data infrastructure market there, as China looks to spend $370 million to double its data center capacity in order to serve 710 million internet users.

  • Samsung releases Open Source HbbTV media player

    Samsung Electronics announced that its Hybrid broadcast broadband TV (HbbTV) media player will be available as an open source project named HbbPlayer on github, an open source developer community. This will enable broadcasters and application developers who are writing HbbTV applications to test and validate them on a platform which can be implemented on any HbbTV 1.5-compliant TV.

  • How to make Open Source work for you

    Business today is all about adapting, pivoting and expanding quickly. With market conditions changing ever so rapidly, open source has become the key to helping companies modify their solutions while keeping their IT expenditures and development time to a minimum.

    Today, we're starting to see a new crop of developers who grew up using open source methodologies to develop open source components. As these developers make their way into enterprise IT departments, they're bringing their familiarity with and desire for open source with them.

    Accordingly, we've been seeing tremendous amounts of innovation come from open source projects. The focus of many open source projects is on helping to solve the complex technology challenges that most businesses face today such as how to work with big data and how to build the best cloud applications.

    So how can and should enterprises go about making open source work for them in the best way possible? Here are some factors to take note of.

  • Do you have a business or a hobby? Open source versus proprietary in the real world

    The open-source world is an endlessly interesting and exciting place for developers. The inventory of technologies is always growing, and bleeding-edge software platforms often debut in open source marketplaces. For these same reasons, however, enterprises can grow weary of open source, a seemingly endless tweaking and tinkering game to customize software for business purposes. Some say a proprietary solution that utilizes open source is preferable for businesses that need to make moves in real life.

  • Dear younger self, here are four tips for reaching your goals
  • How a free mobile app fights Ebola and other global epidemics

    Luckily an open medical record platform already existed: OpenMRS. In 2015, Save the Children International identified the need for medical data collection in the Ebola treatment centers and reached out to the OpenMRS community. Around the same time, Google Crisis Response and Doctors Without Borders were working on a similar project Project Buendia, an Android client built on top of an OpenMRS server.

    Founded in 2004, OpenMRS is a free, modular open-source electronic medical record platform used in more than 60 low- and middle-income countries. As the OpenMRS site explains, OpenMRS is a multi-institution, non-profit collaborative led by Regenstrief Institute, a medical informatics research leader, and Partners In Health, a Boston-based philanthropic organization with a focus on improving the lives of underprivileged people worldwide through health care service and advocacy.

    OpenMRS includes many features out of the box, such as a centralized dictionary that allows for coded data, user authentication, a patient repository, multiple identifiers per patient (i.e., patient can have multiple medical record numbers), data entry for electronic forms, data export, patient workflows (so patients can be put into programs and tracked through various states), relationships (to track relationships between two people, such as relatives and caretakers), and reporting tools. Add-on modules are also available or can be developed.

  • Nexenta to Showcase Its Open Source-driven Software Defined Storage Solutions at OpenStack Days Nordic 2016
  • Were New York, Minnesota Attacks Open-Source Jihad?[Ed: Microsoft-connected ‘news’ channel MSNBC. No comment needed. Microsoft loves Linux.]
  • Emacs 25.1 released
  • LLVM contemplates relicensing

    The LLVM project is currently distributed under the BSD-like NCSA license, but the project is considering a change in the interest of better patent protection. "After extensive discussion involving many lawyers with different affiliations, we recommend taking the approach of using the Apache 2.0 license, with the binary attribution exception (discussed before), and add an additional exception to handle the situation of GPL2 compatibility if it ever arises."

  • Netflix's Meridian, an open source benchmark disguised as a original program

    The 12 minute long Netflix Original "Meridian" might not be the most exciting program they've ever released but it is among one of the most interesting. The program is available to anyone, via the Creative Commons license they attached to it, up to an including competitors such as iTunes and Hulu. This seemly strange move is because it is actually a benchmark for encoding streamed video and the more people that see it the more information Netflix and others will gain. It is originally filmed in 4k resolution at 60fps, which is far more than most displays can handle and much larger than residential data infrastructure is used to handling.

  • Vienna, KDZ release Open Government Implementation Model

    The City of Vienna and KDZ have released version 3.0 of their Open Government Implementation Model to the public in German as well as English. The Model describes five stages of a strategy as well as practical recommendations for politicians and administrations to implement open government.

  • Tube Heartbeat open data project reveals pulse of London Underground

    Oliver O'Brien, a Senior Research Associate at University College London (UCL), has created a wonderful visualisation of the volume of passengers traveling the London Underground on a typical workday. His Tube Heartbeat project builds on the outcomes of the TfL Rolling Origin and Destination Survey (RODS), which was made publicly available under the UK Open Government Licence (OGLv2). It shows the numbers entering and exiting each of the 268 stations and the numbers traveling each of the 762 links in between.

Open-source Startup Bags $5 Million

Filed under
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

New Releases

  • Security-Oriented Qubes OS 3.2 Improves the Integrated Management Infrastructure
    Today, September 29, 2016, Joanna Rutkowska announced the general availability of the second point release of the Qubes OS 3 stable series of the security-oriented and open-source Linux-based computer operating system. Qubes OS 3.2 is a maintenance release, which means that it mostly adds general fixes and improvements to various of the distribution's core components and functionalities, including the integrated management infrastructure that was introduced as part of the previous update, Qubes 3.1, allowing users to also manage the "insides" of a virtual machine.
  • Alpine Linux 3.4.4 Is Out, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.4.22 LTS, OpenSSL Patches
    Today, September 28, 2016, Alpine Linux creator and lead developer Natanael Cop has the pleasure of announcing the release of the fourth maintenance update to the latest stable Alpine Linux 3.4 server-oriented operating system series. Alpine Linux 3.4.4 is out as the most advanced version, powered by the recently released, long-term supported Linux 4.4.22 kernel and bringing up-to-date components to make your Alpine Linux-based server(s) more stable and reliable than ever. Most of the core components have been updated, but the most important one is OpenSSL 1.0.2j, which received the latest security fixes, just like in the rest of the GNU/Linux distros.

Leftovers: Software

  • Web Publishing and Development: Free Tools Abound
    Are you involved in DevOps and web development, or are you aiming to be? If so, you're probably very aware of many of the tools from the open standards and open source arenas that can make your work easier. Still, these are always spreading out at a fast clip and there are some applications and tools that are rarely discussed. Here at OStatic, we try to regularly update our collections focused on them. In this post, you'll find our latest roundup of free resources for web development that range from complete online courses available for free to unsung applications.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.6.1 Released
  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.9 Adds a Dark Theme, Notification Muting
  • GNOME Calendar Pencils In Great New Features
    GNOME Calendar is one of the few decent desktop calendaring apps available on Linux — and it's going to get better.
  • The future of GNOME Calendar
    Today, the Calendar Team had the first meeting in history. Isaque, Lapo, Renata, Vamsi and I attended it, and the meeting was extremely productive! In fact, we were able to sketch out the general direction that GNOME Calendar will head towards.

More Android Leftovers

  • ​Google beats back Oracle again in Java Android case
    To recap, Oracle claimed the 37 Java application programming interface (API) packages Google used to develop Android are covered by copyright. Of course, that's not really the issue. True, the the US Federal Circuit Court of Appeals foolishly ruled that APIs could be copyrighted. But the US District Court for the Northern District of California ruled in May 2016 that Google's use of the Java APIs were not subject to copyright licensing fees. Instead, Android's use of the APIs was covered by "fair use."
  • Google’s Open Source Fuchsia OS: The Mystery Linux Distro
    Few things are more tantalizing than a good mystery, and Google is making waves for an open source-centric mystery that may end up having profound implications. It all started in August when an extensive and unusual code repository for a new operating system called Fuchsia was discovered online, and now the growing source code set is on GitHub. Thus far, Google officials have been mostly mum on the aim of this operating system, although they have made a few things clear in chat forums. Two developers listed on Fuchsia's GitHub page — Christopher Anderson and Brian Swetland — are known for their work with embedded systems. The Verge, among other sites, has made a few logical deductions about the possible embedded systems focus for Fuchsia: “Looking into Fuchsia's code points gives us a few clues. For example, the OS is built on Magenta, a “medium-sized microkernel” that is itself based on a project called LittleKernel, which is designed to be used in embedded systems,” the site reports. The GitHub postings that confirm that Fuchsia is based on Magenta are particularly notable because Magenta has had applications in the embedded systems space. Here are some direct quotes: "Magenta is a new kernel that powers the Fuchsia OS. Magenta is composed of a microkernel as well as a small set of userspace services, drivers, and libraries necessary for the system to boot, talk to hardware, load userspace processes and run them, etc. Fuchsia builds a much larger OS on top of this foundation."
  • As Blackberry pulls out of handset business it has some big patent strategy calls to make

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Budgie-Remix Makes Progress With Ubuntu 16.10 Base, Beta 2 Released
    Budgie-Remix, the unofficial Ubuntu spin making use of the Budgie Desktop, has released its 16.10 Beta 2 milestone following this week's Yakkety Yak Beta 2 release. Budgie-Remix is re-based to the latest Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety package changes. In addition, a number of the Budgie-0Remix packages have been working their way into Debian proper and thus are available to Ubuntu 16.10 users via the official channels. Now available this way is the budgie-desktop package, Moka icon theme, Faba icon theme, and the Arc theme. The Ubuntu repository has also pulled in the Budgie artwork and wallpaper packages too.
  • Yakkety Yak Final Beta Released
  • Canonical Launches Commercial Support for Kubernetes
    Canonical, the lead commercial vendor behind the open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system, is getting into the Kubernetes market. Canonical now offers a freely available implementation of Kubernetes as well as commercial-support options. "I have no doubt that Kubernetes will be one of the major container co-ordination systems," Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu, told ServerWatch.
  • [How To] Build an Ubuntu Controlled Sous-Vide Cooker
    I’ll be honest with you from the off: I had zero idea what sous-vide cooking was before I started writing this post. Wikipedia dutifully informs me that’s Sous-Vide is a style of cooking that involves a vacuum, bags, and steam.
  • Mintbox Mini Pro Linux Mini PC Launches For $395
    This week a new version of the popular Mintbox Mini Linux PC has been launched for $395 in the form of the Mintbox Mini Pro which is now equipped with 120 GB of SSD mSATA together with 64-bit AMD A10-Micro6700T system-on-a-chip with Radeon R6 graphics and features 8GB of DDR3L. The latest Mintbox Mini Pro is shipped preloaded with the awesome Linux Mint 18 operating system and includes a microSD card slot a serial port, and a micro SIM card reader. The new Mintbox Mini Pro is the same size as the original and measures 4.3 x 3.3 x 0.9 inches in size and weighs in at around 255g. The Linux mini PC incorporates a fanless design and features an all-metal case made of aluminium and zinc.