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Thursday, 27 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNU/Linux Review: Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2017 - 1:14pm
Story KDE: Okular 1.1, Plasma 5 for Slackware, Kdenlive 17.04, LaKademy 2017 and More Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2017 - 1:08pm
Story Desktop GNU/Linux for Beginners Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2017 - 1:06pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2017 - 1:06pm
Story Linux and Linux Foundation Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2017 - 12:01pm
Story Android 6.0.1 Released for Asus Tinker Board Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2017 - 11:58am
Story Libreboot May Become GNU Project Again Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2017 - 11:56am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2017 - 11:07am
Story Debian and Devuan Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2017 - 10:25am
Story Games and Wine Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2017 - 10:14am

GNU/Linux Review: Xubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

Filed under
Reviews

Please welcome Xubuntu 17.04, a newly released GNU/Linux OS with very low memory consumption and pretty desktop interface. It ships with XFCE 4.12, Firefox 52, and LibreOffice 5.3. It consumes only around 330MB of RAM at idle time, very convenient for low-end and old computers. It provides complete and large number of software on official repository, a big win for powerful computers for serious purposes. Xubuntu 17.04 is released at same day as Ubuntu 17.04, April 13th 2017. And this is a review to introduce you how great Xubuntu 17.04 is.

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Graphics in Linux: Mesa 17.0.4 and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Enjade Wants to Recreate the Unity Desktop on KDE Plasma

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
Ubuntu

A new project aims to recreate the Unity desktop using KDE Plasma.

“The Enjade desktop environment is a community project to recreate and continue the Unity desktop environment,” reads the initiative’s website.

“From the versatile Dash down to the global menu, Enjade promises to offer the familiar experience Ubuntu users love while adding new features to keep it up with the latest trends,”

Noble ambitions that give ardent Unity admirers an alternative to the official Compiz version.

Unity 7 itself is still supported until 2021. But although it won’t stop working overnight it’s unlikely to receive any major new features. That leaves it to forks and pseudo-forks (like this one) to evolve the desktop in pace with wider software and usability trends.

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In Defence of Dmitry Bogatov

Filed under
Security
Debian
  • Statement concerning the arrest of Dmitry Bogatov

    The Debian Project is concerned to hear that one of our members, Dmitry Bogatov, has been arrested by Russian authorities.

    Dmitry is a mathematics teacher, and an active Debian contributor. As a Debian Maintainer, he worked in the Debian Haskell group and currently maintains several packages for command line and system tools.

  • Statement regarding Dmitry Bogatov

    What we know right now is that serious accusations of wrongdoing have been made against a valued member of our community, a person who has, among other things, been a Tor relay operator, Debian Developer, GNU developer, and privacy activist. We are collecting facts, monitoring the situation closely, and sharing information with allied organizations and individuals.

  • Debian Issues Statement Over Arrested Russian Developer

    Debian developer Dmitry Bogatov was arrested by Russian authorities for running a Tor exit node and accused of supporting terrorism.

The five best Linux distros

Filed under
GNU
Linux

There are so many different versions of Linux available, it can be hard to decide which one that’s right for you. So we’ve picked five that you should try first, as it’s likely that at least one of them will fit your Linux needs precisely.

They're all free of course, so try them all.

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Leftovers: Debian

Filed under
Debian
  • Elected Debian Project Leader

    I'd like to thank the entire Debian community for choosing me to represent them as the next Debian Project Leader.

  • DPL elections 2017, congratulations Chris Lamb!
  • Calibre on Debian

    Calibre is the prime open source e-book management program, but the Debian releases often lag behind the official releases. Furthermore, the Debian packages remove support for rar packed e-books, which means that several comic book formats cannot be handled.

today's leftovers

Security Leftovers and Fixes

Filed under
Security

Ten Reasons You Should Try Linux Today

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I know despite the posts about how great Linux is and why I like it, many of you are probably still hesitant to try Linux. I understand. I remember years ago when I first heard about it, even I was slow to try it at first. After all, Windows just worked. Everything I needed Windows would do, so why bother trying something else that may or may not work for me. Of course, back then, Linux was quite different from what it is today.

Over the years, Linux has evolved to become one of the most powerful operating systems in the world. In addition to computers, did you know that it powers a wide range of devices including routers, switches, your smartphones and even your televisions. That’s right, when your fancy television boots up chances are its running a customized version of Linux. Most web servers today are powered by Linux as well, including the one that is serving this site out to you.

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It’s Windows Time in Linux Land Again

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Windows being Windows, a monkey wrench was thrown into the machinery right off. I booted the laptop into Windows, which then refused to connect with the Wi-Fi. It found the on-board Broadcom Wi-Fi just fine, but every time I’d try to get it to connect, it’d throw up an “unknown error” notice and ask if I’d like to enable logging so I could figure it out myself. This was odd, considering I’d used the machine to do my taxes last year, and it connects with the Wi-Fi just fine in Linux. But I wasn’t going to spend the better part of a day trying to fix it — I had no desire to start relearning my way around Windows. Time for Plan B, which was the reverse of Plan A: boot the desktop to Windows and use the laptop in Linux for finding all my facts and figures.

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Maui Linux 17.03

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Reviews

On the whole I enjoyed using Maui, more than I had expected. There was not any one feature or program which really stood out as amazing, but I liked the overall style of the distribution. Maui provides a lot of software and features out of the box, offers a stable core based on an Ubuntu LTS release and includes cutting edge KDE Plasma software. I like that the application menu is full of useful software while avoiding overlap in functionality. I also appreciate how easy it is to use the Calamares installer and how quickly Calamares sets up the operating system. Mostly, I like that the distribution provides distinct windows, large fonts and a high-contrast theme which I found easy to look at over longer periods.

I ran into just two issues or concerns while using Maui. One was the performance of the desktop with its default settings in the virtual test environment. Maui performed well on my desktop computer, but Plasma was slow to respond when running in VirtualBox. It is possible to improve performance by adjusting some items in the System Settings panel, but it would have been nice if the desktop had defaulted to more efficient settings.

My second issue was not a bug, but rather a matter of style. Maui has a friendly look, lots of simple configuration modules and, over all, a very modern and easy to use approach. Everything looks new and tasks are typically performed through slick, graphical wrappers. The one exception I found was Synaptic. The venerable package manager works well, but is a bit cryptic compared to most modern software managers. I like Synaptic for its speed and flexibility, but I think something like GNOME Software or mintInstall might be more in line with Maui's newcomer-friendly approach.

On the whole, I like Maui. The distribution is easy to set up, friendly and generally stayed out of my way while I was working. This seems like a fairly beginner friendly desktop distribution which does a good job of making things easy without distracting the user or doing too much hand holding.

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GNU/Linux Review: Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

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Reviews
Ubuntu

This is a review of Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus with both Unity 7 and 8 desktop environments. This release is beautiful as always, ready for serious use, and complete with more than 70000 packages on official repository. It will be supported for 9 months until January 2018. Finally, I hope this review helps people to find how Ubuntu is and what's interesting from 17.04. Enjoy!

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today's howtos/technical

Filed under
HowTos

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Trying AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 On Ubuntu 17.04

    In early April AMD released the AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 driver as their first hybrid proprietary driver update in some time. With this update came support for Ubuntu 16.04.2 (and also 16.10, unofficially) but to little surprise it doesn't work out-of-the-box with this week's Ubuntu 17.04 release. But it can be made to work.

  • RadeonSI Polaris: Mesa 12.0 vs. 13.0 vs. 17.0 vs. 17.1 Git

    With Mesa 17.1 branching this weekend I figured it would be a fun Easter running benchmarks of Mesa Git compared to previous branches with a Radeon RX 470 Polaris graphics card. Here are these Mesa 17.1 benchmarks while other tests and on more GPUs is forthcoming.

  • Nouveau In Linux 4.13 Will Support HDMI Stereo 3D
  • Vulkan 1.0.48 Released

    There's another weekly update available to the Vulkan API, but this Easter update is on the small side.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Comprehend X86 Assembly Language with Open Source Books

    An assembly language is a low-level programming language for a computer, or other programmable device. Assembly language is used by almost all modern desktop and laptop computers. It is as close to writing machine code without writing in pure hexadecimal. It is converted into executable machine code by a utility program referred to as an assembler.

  • Xfce Session Manager 4.13 Released, Ported To GTK3

    An updated version of the Xfce4 session manager was released this Easter weekend.

    The xfce4-session 4.13.0 package was released today and it's a significant step forward for Xfce's session manager.

  • Relm: A GTK-Based GUI Library In Rust For Async GUI Apps

    With there being many Rustlang fans reading Phoronix, many of you will probably be interested in Relm: a new GUI library for Rust.

    Relm is a new crate/library for developing asynchronous GUI applications in Rust. Using GTK up to now in Rust looks rather messy, but Relm aims to change that and also make the applications more responsive by making the user-interface asynchronous and makes use of the language's futures capability.

Linux 4.11-rc7

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.11-rc7

    You all know the drill by now. We're in the late rc phase, and this
    may be the last rc if nothing surprising happens.

    Things have been pretty calm this past week (the beginning of the week
    seemed particularly calm, and then as usual Friday happened..). We
    have a number of reverts for things that didn't work out and aren't
    worth trying to fix at this point, that's also normal (and people will
    look at it for the next version instead).

    So not too big, and things look very normal with two thirds of the
    changes being to drivers, and the rest being a mixture of arch updates
    (arm, x86, ia64, parisc), networking and filesystems (btrfs, cifs,
    orangefs). With a smattering of other stuff (tooling, header files,
    core kernel).

  • Linux 4.11-rc7 Kernel Released: Final Might Come Next Week

    Linus Torvalds has announced the seventh weekly test build of the upcoming Linux 4.11 kernel.

Devil-Linux 1.8.0 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Devil-Linux 1.8.0 has been released! This is a major overhaul of Devil-Linux. Most programs and libraries have been updated and unmaintained ones have been removed. The main file system has been switched to squashfs, to further reduce the iso size. See the changelog for additional details.

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More in Tux Machines

Development News: Rust 1.17 and SourceForge

  • Announcing Rust 1.17
    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.17.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.
  • Rust 1.17 Released
    Judging by the massive Rust fan base in our forums, those of you reading this will be delighted today about the newest version of Rustlang, v1.17.
  • SourceForge: Let's hold hands in a post-CodePlex world [Ed: Microsoft Gavin needlessly interjects Microsoft into it. Like CodePlex was EVER relevant…]
    President Logan Abbott has said he’ll seek tighter integration between SourceForge’s tools and those of others – including giant rival GitHub.

Nouveau Re-Clocked With DRM-Next Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev vs. NVIDIA 381 Driver

A few days back I posted benchmarks of the initial GTX 1050/1060/1070/1080 Nouveau 3D support. As expected, the performance was rather abysmal with re-clocking not being available for Pascal (or Maxwell) GPUs on this open-source NVIDIA Linux kernel driver. For those trying to use Nouveau for Linux games or care about your GPU clock speeds, currently the GTX 600/700 "Kepler" series is still your best bet or the GTX 750 "Maxwell 1" is the last NVIDIA graphics processors not requiring signed firmware images and can properly -- but manually -- re-clock with the current Nouveau driver. Read more

Coverage From Recent Linux Conferences

Supply Chain Case Study: Canonical and Ubuntu

I love talking about supply chain management in an open source software context, especially as it applies to managing collaborative processes between upstream projects and their downstream products. In the article linked above, I called out a couple of examples of supply chain management: an enterprise OpenStack distribution and a container management product utilizing Kubernetes and Docker for upstream platforms. What about anti-patterns or things to avoid? There are several we could call out. At the risk of picking on someone I like, I’ll choose Canonical simply because they’ve been in the headlines recently for changes they’ve made to their organization, cutting back on some efforts and laying off some people. As I look at Canonical from a product offering perspective, there’s a lot they got right, which others could benefit from. But they also made many mistakes, some of which could have been avoided. First, the good. Read more