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Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 10:22pm
Story Snappy vs flatpak Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 10:10pm
Story Leftovers: Debian Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 9:21pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 9:14pm
Story Phoronix on Graphics Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 8:51pm
Story Qt News Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 8:49pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 8:01pm
Story qBittorrent’s Advanced Saving Management explained Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 7:51pm
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 7:09pm
Story Samsung to increase use of Tizen OS in its products, less Android Rianne Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 7:09pm

The cost of free software

Filed under
OSS

The change from using a dedicated build server to running builds in a virtual machine probably will not change much for Slax users, but the post does highlight a common thread I have been seeing in recent years. Many open source projects are regularly in need of funding. Back in 2009, the OpenBSD project reported it was in "dire need" of infrastructure upgrades and needed funds. This call for donations was echoed by the OpenBSD team again around the end of 2013 which resulted in a lot of public attention and, ultimately, more money flowing into the project. More recently, the HardenedBSD project has asked for help maintaining the infrastructure of the security-oriented project. Last year the NTPD project, a critical piece of software for most Internet-connected computers, was almost abandoned due to a lack of funding. The previous year, OpenSSL's Heartbleed bug highlighted how little support the critical security software had been receiving from its many users.

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Server Administration

Filed under
Server
  • What is DevOps? Michael Ducy Explains

    Start small and don't get overwhelmed. Two principles of DevOps you'll hear over and over is incremental change and continuous improvement. The DevOps space is so large these days that newcomers can easily get lost. Find a small area where you can make a change, learn from it, and iterate over those learnings to improve.

  • How Docker Has Changed the DevOps Game

    Cloud computing has paved the way for programmable infrastructure, which brought extreme automation into software development lifecycle. The ability to provision resources, configuring them on the fly, deploying applications, and monitoring the entire process led to the DevOps culture where developers and the operators are collaborating throughout the application lifecycle. While provisioning and configuration are best left to tools such as Chef, Puppet, and Ansible, one open source software that became the cornerstone of DevOps is Jenkins.

  • Portworx Aims Container Storage at Enterprise Databases

    In the days leading up to DockerCon, it seems like storage is taking its turn at being the hot topic in containers, with CoreOS and EMC recently announcing container-storage projects.

    Today, Portworx is up. The Redwood City, Calif.-based startup released a developer version of its container storage platform last year, and it’s now launching an enterprise version called PX-Enterprise.

  • TNS Research: The Present State of Container Orchestration

    After watching a year’s worth of conference presentations, it is easy to become inured by the hype around products that orchestrate containers. Yet, there still confusion in the broader tech community about what functionality is involved with orchestrating containers. The New Stack ran a survey that was able to target users of container management technology, with 70 percent of respondents using containers to some degree. We found that there is indeed uncertainty about what it means to manage and orchestrate containers. There is also a developing consensus that scheduling, cluster management and service discovery are necessary to orchestrate the use of containers in production.

  • Tesora and Mirantis Partner on Easily Deployed DBaaS Solution

    As the OpenStack cloud computing arena grows, a whole ecosystem of tools is growing along with it. Tesora, familiar to many as the leading contributor to the OpenStack Trove open source project, has focused very heavily on Database-as-a-Service tools for OpenStack deployments.

    Now, Tesora has announced a promising partnership with OpenStack heavy-hitter Miranti

  • Tesora Positions OpenStack Trove Database-as-a-Service for the Future

    Ken Rugg, CEO of Tesora, discusses the latest innovations in the OpenStack Trove project and what's coming in the Newton release cycle.

    The OpenStack Mitaka release debuted back in April of this year and with it came a series of updated open source projects, including the Trove database-as-a-service effort.

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • Flow is a mental state of intense focus for programming

    Open Source Bridge is an annual conference focused on building open source community and citizenship through four days of technical talks, hacking sessions, and collaboration opportunities. Prior to this year's event, I caught up with one of the speakers, Lindsey Bieda, who will give a talk called Hardware, Hula Hoops, and Flow.

  • LFNW – wrapup

    The conference overall drew nearly 2,000 open-source enthusiasts, setting yet another record for the event! All the openSUSE sessions were well attended, and that gave our team some excellent feedback for future sessions. We were pleasantly suprised to find that “Q&A with openSUSE board members (plus another guy)” was a standing-room-only event, with the audience providing plenty of thoughtful questions for us to answer. “Make the Leap from Dev to Production with openSUSE Leap“, co-presented by Richard Brown and James Mason, provided a thoughtful developer-oriented talk to another full room. Richard also showed some cross-distribution love for openSUSE tooling, co-presenting “openQA – Avoiding Disasters of Biblical Proportions” with Fedora’s Adam Williamson.

  • Forum - GNU Hackers' Meeting (Rennes, France)

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.5 & 8.10 Receive the Latest Debian Security Fixes, Update Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The developers of the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux operating system have announced today, June 15, 2016, that new security fixes are available for Parsix GNU/Linux 8.5 "Atticus" and Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik."

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.5 "Atticus" is the stable version of the desktop-oriented operating system, based on Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" series, which means that it has most likely received all the security fixes that landed as part of the recently released Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 update.

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Also: The shape-shifting Maru OS is now available for the Nexus 5

NVIDIA GeForce GTX

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 On Linux: Testing With OpenGL, OpenCL, CUDA & Vulkan

    If you were amazed by the GeForce GTX 1080 performance under Linux but its ~$699 USD price-tag is too much to handle, the GeForce GTX 1070 is now shipping for $399~449 USD. NVIDIA sent over a GeForce GTX 1070 and I've been putting it through its paces under Linux with a variety of OpenGL, OpenCL, and Vulkan benchmarks along with CUDA and deep learning benchmarks. Here's the first look at the GeForce GTX 1070 performance under Ubuntu Linux.

  • Running The NVIDIA 367.27 Linux Driver With The GeForce GTX 1070

    Yesterday NVIDIA released the 367.27 long-lived driver release to succeed the earlier 367 betas. That driver arrived too late for my initial round of GeForce GTX 1070 / 1080 Linux testing with that GTX 1070 review published this morning.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME

Windows 10 killed it; Linux saved it: A netbook that came back

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Trusting Microsoft's words, he went ahead and tried to upgrade it to Windows 10. Yes, that was a big mistake.

The tiny netbook, of course, was lost in what we can call the computer equivalent to a coma. Apparently, he attempted to revert the process only to discover that the Windows 10 logo simply wanted to stay as the perpetual image on the screen.

So, I took the machine with me and ran the Mageia 5 i586 install DVD. Apparently, Windows 10 butchered the MBR. I had to wipe out everything.

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GParted Live 0.26.1-1 Stable Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The GParted team is pleased to announce a new stable release of GParted Live.

This release includes GParted 0.26.1, patches for libparted for FAT file system operations, and other improvements.

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Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • The Python Kids Club

    An 11-year-old asks her grandfather how computer games are made and he tells her they’re created by programmers “using complex mathematical code.” The next thing he knows, she’s learning Python on her own, and getting her chums involved too.

  • The Quest to Make Code Work Like Biology Just Took A Big Step

    In the early 1970s, at Silicon Valley’s Xerox PARC, Alan Kay envisioned computer software as something akin to a biological system, a vast collection of small cells that could communicate via simple messages. Each cell would perform its own discrete task. But in communicating with the rest, it would form a more complex whole. “This is an almost foolproof way of operating,” Kay once told me. Computer programmers could build something large by focusing on something small. That’s a simpler task, and in the end, the thing you build is stronger and more efficient.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

​Ubuntu Snap in the Mainstream News Sites

Filed under
Ubuntu

antiX 16 Linux to Land Soon with a Custom 4.4.10 Kernel, Firefox ESR by Default

Filed under
Linux

Today, June 14, 2016, the developers behind the Debian-based antiX Linux operating system have published a brief announcement to inform the community about the availability of the Release Candidate build of antiX 16.

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KDE Applications 16.04.2 Released for the KDE Plasma 5.6.5 Desktop Environment

Today, June 14, 2016, KDE has announced the general availability of the second point release for its KDE Applications 16.04 series of the software suite used for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

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The Everyday Linux User Jargon Buster

Filed under
Linux

I received a comment at the bottom of one of my articles which expressed bemusement about all of the acronyms and terms used within my reviews.

I am therefore writing this guide to explain as much of the jargon in my own words as possible.

I will pin this to the top bar for future reference.

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Nextcloud releases ownCloud fork ahead of schedule

Filed under
OSS

When Frank Karlitschek, co-founder and former CTO of ownCloud, forked ownCloud into Nextcloud , I expected it to do well. I didn't expect it to have its first major release less than two weeks after the company opened its doors. Well, the first Nextcloud release is out now.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
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Android Leftovers

IT runs on the cloud, and the cloud runs on Linux. Any questions?

A recent survey by the Uptime Institute of 1,000 IT executives found that 50 percent of senior enterprise IT executives expect the majority of IT workloads to reside off-premise in cloud or colocation sites in the future. Of those surveyed, 23 percent expect the shift to happen next year, and 70 percent expect that shift to occur within the next four years. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Teardrop Attack: What Is It And How Does It Work?
    In Teardrop Attack, fragmented packets that are sent in the to the target machine, are buggy in nature and the victim’s machine is unable to reassemble those packets due to the bug in the TCP/IP fragmentation.
  • Updating code can mean fewer security headaches
    Organizations with high rates of code deployments spend half as much time fixing security issues as organizations without such frequent code updates, according to a newly released study. In its latest annual state-of-the-developer report, Devops software provider Puppet found that by better integrating security objectives into daily work, teams in "high-performing organizations" build more secure systems. The report, which surveyed 4,600 technical professionals worldwide, defines high IT performers as offering on-demand, multiple code deploys per day, with lead times for changes of less than one hour. Puppet has been publishing its annual report for five years.
  • Over half of world's top domains weak against email spoofing
    Over half of the world's most popular online services have misconfigured servers which could place users at risk from spoof emails, researchers have warned. According to Swedish cybersecurity firm Detectify, poor authentication processes and configuration settings in servers belonging to hundreds of major online domains are could put users at risk of legitimate-looking phishing campaigns and fraudulent emails.