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Friday, 06 Mar 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Locally Integrated Menus (LIM) Set As Default In Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 8:22pm
Story Raspberry Pi, oh my: From classrooms to the space station Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 8:16pm
Story Node.js fork JXcore goes open source, aims for mobile developers Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 8:16pm
Story GDB 7.9 released Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 8:12pm
Story Linux-based desktops work despite Windows app prevalence Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 8:05pm
Story Demand for Linux developers on the rise Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 8:00pm
Story It Could Be A While Before Seeing The Tamil GPU Driver Code Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:41pm
Story Wine 1.7.37 Adds Multi-Channel Audio Support, Fixes 71 Bugs Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:36pm
Story Untangling the intense politics behind Node.js Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:34pm
Story Enterprise Software Giants Live In An Open Source World Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:31pm

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE

A Prediction: 2020 the year of (PC-)BSD on the desktop

Filed under
BSD

I am going to make a prediction right now that FreeBSD is going to take off in a big way on or before 2020, perhaps even to the point where it threatens Linux Desktop share.

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Netrunner 15 – Prometheus (64bit)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are proud to announce the official release of Netrunner 15 – Prometheus (64bit).
Netrunner 15 is revised from the ground up: As the first distribution, it officially ships the new KDE Plasma Desktop 5.2.

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Sony SmartWatch 3 Review: The Best-Performing Android Smartwatch Yet

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Sony’s been trying the smartwatch thing for years, but the original SmartWatch and the SmartWatch 2 both…what’s the word I’m looking for here? Sucked? Yeah. But the SmartWatch 3 has solid performance and two nifty features you won’t find on any other Android Wear. It’s the first with built-in GPS and a screen you can read without backlighting.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Three Things That Annoy Me With Using GNOME 3

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews

At the beginning of this month I wrote how I switched back to Fedora Linux on my main system to replace Ubuntu and also wrote about changes I made when installing Fedora 21 on my main system, a new ThinkPad ultrabook with Broadwell processor. There's three small things that annoy me the most though about using GNOME 3.x.

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Some Linux distributions never change

Filed under
Reviews

In comparison, the set-up of Arch Linux was a breeze and extremely fast once the hard drive partionning was figured out. I got a laptop that does not isn’t UEFI enabled so I had more choices and did not have to go through the rather complex tools such as parted or gdisk. I got to use cfdisk which I have relied on for several years.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Works Great As A Linux Ultrabook

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Lenovo's new X1 Carbon is made of carbon-fiber construction as implied by its name and is very thin and light at 0.70" and just under three pounds. Lenovo claims that the X1 Carbon can last up to 10.9 hours with its lone battery, and continues with all of the features collected over the years with the various ThinkPad laptops/ultrabooks. This third-generation X1 Carbon also has much anticipated improvements to the keyboard and touchpad/trackpoint.

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Red Hat wants you to contain yourself and your workloads

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat's newest push in the virtualization realm is containers. You know, the good old BSD jail-type containers that leverages your hardware better than any other virtualization technology? Yes, that one.

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CrunchBang rises from the ashes

Filed under
Debian

An open source project never dies. CrunchBang just showed this. The developers of the project recently announced that they are shutting it down and move on to do other things. The users were suggested to look for alternatives. It didn’t take that long for someone else to take over the helm.

A site called CrunchBang Plus Plus is bringing the distro back. They have already made a beta available for testing. They will be using Debian Jesse packages for the distro.

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OpenPi review – a Pi of Things

Filed under
Development
Linux
Reviews

The OpenPi on first look is a curious device – a nondescript black box with merely an HDMI and a microUSB slot. There’s no real indication of what it might be, however cracking it open reveals a custom board connected to a Raspberry Pi compute module. Inside as standard is a wireless dongle and a bluetooth receiver for a mini-wireless keyboard/mouse combo. It seems quite simple, and to be fair in this state it is – it’s basically just a (fully-functioning) Raspberry Pi.

That’s actually the point of it though. With the compute module and the OpenPi board, you have full access to the usual Raspberry Pi power and settings and such. The selling point of the OpenPi though is that you can then take this board – which is completely open hardware – and modify the plans yourself to make a custom board that fits your needs. Wireless Things thinks of it as an easier way to create an internet of things, and they’ve succeeded in creating the platform to do this really.

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End of the m0n0wall project

Filed under
Security
BSD

on this day 12 years ago, I have released the first version of m0n0wall to the public. In theory, one could still run that version - pb1 it was called - on a suitably old PC and use it to control the Internet access of a small LAN (not that it would be recommended security-wise). However, the world keeps turning, and while m0n0wall has made an effort to keep up, there are now better solutions available and under active development.

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Release of KDE Frameworks 5.7.0

Filed under
KDE

February 14, 2015. KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.7.0.

KDE Frameworks are 60 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms.

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The Staging Pull For Linux 3.20 Has A Lot Of Changes All Over The Place

Filed under
Linux

The latest pull requests sent in for the Linux 3.20 kernel are the various subsystems maintained by Greg Kroah-Hartman. The changes for the USB drivers, char/misc, driver core, staging, and TTY/serial aren't too jaw-dropping, but for staging at least is the usual heavy churn between kernel cycles.

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Also: Changes Already For Linux 3.20 (Linux 4.0?) Are Very Exciting

5 Reasons To Use Linux Mint And Not Ubuntu

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

On the surface there isn't much difference between Linux Mint and Ubuntu as Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu (except for Linux Mint Debian Edition) and apart from the desktop environment and default applications there isn't really a difference.

In this article I am going to list 5 reasons why you would choose Linux Mint over Ubuntu. Now I am well aware that Ubuntu users are going to come back and say that there are loads of reasons to use Ubuntu over Linux Mint and so the counterargument to this list will be made available later in the week.

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MakuluLinux KDE 7.0 is Live !

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Finaly the wait is over, the new MakuluLinux KDE 7 has been released, grab your copy from the KDE section in menu or simply click here.

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elementary OS: is financial support the only way to help a project grow?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

elementary OS is in news again, and for wrong reasons. In the latest blog post, the team accused those users of ‘cheating’ who chose not to ‘pay’ for the software.

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