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Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Intro to LimeSurvey: An open source, feature-rich polling platform Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 2:57pm
Story How I use Linux for theoretical physics Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 2:55pm
Story Hands-On: Updating Fedora 23 to 24 via Gnome Software Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 2:47pm
Story Keeweb A Linux Password Manager Mohd Sohail 22/07/2016 - 12:31pm
Story ​Nextcloud 10 beta includes two-factor authentication security Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 6:07am
Story Ubuntu 16.04 Updated, Remembering Mandriva, Leap 42.2a3 Report Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 5:28am
Story Opensuse Leap 42.2 alpha3 Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 5:27am
Story Games: Stardew Valley and Life is Strange Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 5:22am
Story Splice Machine News Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 4:34am
Story 10 Best Open Source Collaboration Software Tools Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2016 - 4:31am

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Apcera Announces Support of New Open Source NATS Streaming Solution

    Apcera has announced that it is providing support for the new NATS Streaming solution, a performant, secure and simple open source messaging platform. NATS Streaming offers features that enable support for new classes of applications such as IoT and big data analytics. The platform is tightly coupled but loosely integrated with NATS, providing enterprise grade features without sacrificing NATS’ core simplicity.

  • Chef and Puppet lead the charge in open source cloud automation

    IT pros increasingly turn to Chef and Puppet for open source cloud automation and orchestration. But other options, such as TOSCA, are also worth exploring.

  • How Open Source Is Becoming the Core of All Software

    This panel discussion, recorded at this year’s OSCON in Austin, Texas, with two Cisco open source folks and a Capital One person is fascinating. Learn about how enterprises are acknowledging their use of OSS and taking greater responsibility for contributing back to it. Learn how people are more often using GitHub contributions as their resume. Learn how the open model allows companies to iterate faster in a rapidly changing world. If open source is becoming the default methodology, how is this changing mindsets within the enterprise?

  • Submit presentations for Seattle GNU/Linux Conference

    Proposals for talks at the Seattle GNU Linux Conference are due by August 1st. SeaGL is a grassroots technical conference dedicated to spreading awareness and knowledge about the GNU/Linux community and free/libre/open-source software/hardware. Our goal for SeaGL is to produce an event which is as enjoyable and informative for those who spend their days maintaining hundreds of servers as it is for a student who has only just started exploring technology options. SeaGL welcomes speakers of all backgrounds and levels of experience—even if you've never spoken at a technical conference. If you're excited about GNU/Linux technologies or free and open source software, we want to hear your ideas.

  • Oracle v. Google Not Over Yet: Oracle Seeks Another New Trial While Google Seeks Sanctions On Oracle's Lawyers

    Basically, Oracle is continuing to falsely pretend that fair use only applies to non-commercial use (it doesn't), and that creating something new with an API isn't transformative unless it's like artwork or something (this is wrong). Oracle's interpretation of fair use is not supported by the history or case law of fair use, and it would be shocking to see the court accept it here.

    Meanwhile, on the flip side, Google is looking to punish Oracle's lawyers and asking for sanctions against them for revealing in open court sensitive information that had been sealed by the court.

  • Errata and patches released!

    Now would be a good time to check http://www.openbsd.org/errata59.html as a number of patches related to reliability and security have been released as follows.

    This appears to be in response to fuzz testing as documented further in this mailing list archive: http://marc.info/?l=oss-security&m=146853062403622&w=2

    Tim Newsham and Jesse Hertz of NCC Group appear to have done most of the research related to these discoveries so far, and I know at least one of them has had patches committed to the OpenBSD project in the past, so it is nice to see continual collaboration from professional researchers contributing back to project!

  • Notes from the fourth RISC-V workshop

    The lowRISC project, which is an effort to develop a fully open-source, Linux-powered system-on-chip based on the RISC-V architecture, has published notes from the fourth RISC-V workshop.

  • New Journal Will Focus on Open Source Hardware for Science

    Mention the term open source to most people, and they'll immediately think of community-driven software, but open source hardware concepts have been around for some time, and there is even an official Open Source Hardware (OSHW) definition that can be referred to here. Open Source Hardware refers to machines, devices, or other physical things whose design has been released to the public for modification and distribution.

    Now, to usher in more scientific hardware to the open source fold, and to reward scientists that create it, Elsevier, has launched a new open access journal: HardwareX.

Fedora Atomic Two Week Release (Based on Fedora 24)

Filed under
Red Hat

Hello all, On behalf of many various groups within the Fedora Project including the Release Engineering and Tooling teams, Websites Team, and Cloud Working Group I would like to announce the Fedora Atomic Host Two Week Release now based on Fedora 24 and powered by an all new Compose process and tooling, brand new AutoCloud, updates to the website code, as well as updates to the release tool.

Read more

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Final preparations for usability tests

    I wanted to take a moment to reflect on the schedule. A few weeks ago, I commented on moving to the project phase of usability testing.​ I included a calendar of our remaining work. If you refer back to the calendar, you will note we are nearing the end of week 8. Next week is week 9 (starting 18 July) so Diana, Renata and Ciarrai have another week to refine their usability tests.

  • Using Gedit, Nautilus with Pkexec Will Soon Be Less Hassle

    Here’s the deal: ‘gksu’ (the once recommended way to run GUI apps as root) was deprecated in favour of ‘pkexec’, a graphical fronted for PolicyKit, several years back. Ubuntu no longer ships with gksu installed.

    For all its benefits there’s a big ol’ “problem” with pkexec: it’s a total butt-ache to use to run certain GUI apps as root. In fact, to use pkexec with applications like Gedit or Nautilus you need to have a requisite PolicyKit file installed in your “/usr/share/polkit-1/actions” directory for each app you’re trying to run as root.

  • GNOME Maps Hits A Dead End, Can No Longer Display Maps

    If you were set to plan your weekend activities using the GNOME Maps application, you’ll need to change course.

    As of this week the nifty desktop navigation app can no longer fetch maps tiles to display.

    MapQuest, the application’s tile provider, has amended its usage policy and discontinued direct tile access. GNOME developers have the choice of paying to keep using the service or, ultimately, using a new one.

    And that won’t be easy.

    “I will need some help with contacting OpenStreetMap [and] with finding solution to our tile issue. I think we are going to need our own tiles.gnome.org for a map application/platform to be feasible,” says Jonas Danielsson, Maps’ chief developer.

'Good' Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Europe Is Going After Google Hard, and Google May Not Win

    Microsoft pulled the strings.

    At least, that’s what Google and so many business and tech journalists said when the search giant first faced antitrust complaints in Europe six years ago. And indeed, Microsoft had filed one of those complaints. It was also the money-wielding mastermind behind the Initiative for a Competitive Online Marketplace, a group that lobbied the European Union and helped others bring complaints against arch-rival Google. But all these years later, Microsoft has removed itself from the fight, reaching an agreement with Google that says both companies will drop all regulatory complaints against each other. And yet, Google’s antitrust problems are only getting worse.

  • Study Backed By Microsoft Corporation (MSFT) Claims Enterprises Can Save Millions by Switching To Windows 10 [Ed: Forrester ‘Research’ is again being paid by Microsoft to lie to the public. Previously for anti-Linux too. Microsoft propaganda being framed as ‘study’ to promote malware.]

    Microsoft Corporation (NASADQ:MSFT) has backed a study conducted by Forrester Research...

  • Windows 10 a failure by Microsoft's own metric – it won't hit one billion devices by mid-2018

    When Windows 10 launched, Microsoft claimed it would have the new operating system on a billion devices by mid-2018. That isn't going to happen, however, Redmond has now admitted.

  • One in five consumers upgraded to Win10 for free instead of buying a PC

    Microsoft’s free upgrade of Windows 10 hit PC makers where it hurt though the extent of this was apparently a surprise to the software giant, data druids at Gartner have claimed.

    According to a survey by the holders of the Magic Quadrant, one in five consumers that upgraded to the free version of the OS decided they didn’t actually need to replace their client after all.

Prpl Foundation demos first open source hypervisor for MIPS IoT

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Prpl Foundation demoed the “prplHypervisor,” an open source, Linux-ready hypervisor for MIPS-based IoT with multiple secure domains for different OSes.

The prplSecurity framework is one of the chief projects of the Imagination Technologies backed, Linaro-like prpl Foundation, which is developing open source Linux and Android code for MIPS processors. The latest piece is the prplHypervisor, which prpl calls “the industry-first light-weight open source hypervisor specifically designed to provide security through separation for the billions of embedded connected devices that power the Internet of Things.”

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Openwashing of Proprietary Software and Surveillance

Filed under
OSS

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Keysign new GUI and updates
  • GSoC Updates: ownCloud music Ampache API

    Continuing from the grilo owncloud plugin last month, I’ve been working towards integrating the source with GNOME Music. In order to minimize the network requests, we’ve decided to cache the results in a local database. This would also improve user experience since cached results would populate relatively faster in the UI. Victor Toso suggested I look into GOM for implementing the cache and querying the data. My initial thought was to use raw SQL queries to query an sqlite database but this abstraction would help indeed.

  • Future of relative window positioning

    With emerging display server technologies, toolkits sometimes need to adapt how they implement the features they provide. One set of features that needs adaptation is how GTK+ positions popup windows such as menus, popovers and tooltips, so that they will be placed within the work area of the monitor.

    In the old days, when GTK+ wanted to position a menu, it would first look up the global position of the parent window of the menu. It would then look up the work areas of all the monitors connected. With the given work areas, the global position of the parent window, and the intended menu position relative to the parent window it wanted to place the menu, GTK+ would use a clever algorithm calculating a reasonable position for the menu to be placed so that it would be visible to the user. For example, if the File menu doesn’t have enough space to popup below the parent menu item, then GTK+ would re-position it above the parent menu item instead.

  • Window/Menu Positioning Improvements For GTK+ On Wayland/Mir

    Red Hat's Jonas Ådahl has shared work being done to the GTK+ toolkit for avoiding global window positions for tooltips/menus/popovers and instead refactor it down to GDK and allow relative positioning.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Room for Application Security Improvement

    Using open source components is a common software development process; just how common, however, may come as a surprise -- even a shock -- to some. The average organization uses 229,000 open source components a year, found research by Sonatype, a provider of software development lifecycle solutions that manages a Central Repository of these components for the Java development community.

    There were 31 billion requests for downloads from the repository in 2015, up from 17 billion in 2014, according to Sonatype.

    The number "blows people's minds," said Derek Weeks, a VP and DevOps advocate at Sonatype. "The perspective of the application security professional or DevOps security professional or open source governance professional is, 'This really changes the game. If it were 100, I could control that, but if it is 200,000 the world has changed."

  • Ubuntu Forums Suffer Data breach; Credit Goes to SQL Flaw

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

How To Setup A Web Server And Host Website On Your Own Linux Computer

Filed under
Linux
Server
Web
HowTos

Welcome to small tutorial series of hosting website on Linux machine. This series of articles will teach how to setup a web server on Linux computer and make it available online. The website we'll host on our personal computer can be accessed from around the globe. In this article(Part 1), we are going to install all the required tools to setup web server. So let's get started and start our own setup web server. ​

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Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Google
  • Google Developers Improve Mesa's Android EGL Support
  • Nouveau DRM Code Updated For Linux 4.8

    The Nouveau open-source NVIDIA DRM driver changes have been queued in DRM-Next for the Linux 4.8 kernel.

    Nouveau updates this time around include GK20A/GM20B Tegra K1/X1 voltage and clock improvements as well as initial support for GP100 and GP104 GPUs. The latter provides initial KMS support for the GeForce GTX 1000 series. While NVIDIA did release some Pascal firmware, it ended up being only for the GP100 and not the GP104 or GP106. Thus with Linux 4.8 there isn't any hardware-accelerated support for the consumer GeForce GTX 1060/1070/1080 cards on the open-source driver stack. For those cards it comes down to un-accelerated kernel mode-setting support until NVIDIA releases the rest of the Pascal firmware in the future.

Servers News

Filed under
Server
  • Operators Are Migrating From NFV MANO Trials to Reality

    Some operators are progressing from network functions virtualization (NFV) management and orchestration (MANO) trials to the launching of commercial services, according to a new report from Current Analysis.

    While some of those commercial services are at the virtualized infrastructure manager (VIM) levels of orchestration, some are at the virtual network function manager (VNFM) level and even the NFV orchestrator level, the analyst firm says. This is happening even though ETSI hasn’t released final MANO specifications.

  • The Emerging Containers as a Service Marketplace

    While many developers are enthusiastic about the way containers can speed up deployments, administrators and operators may be a bit more wary, given the considerable amount of retooling that their internal systems may need to go through to support container-based pipelines.

    Which is why the emerging Containers as a Service (CaaS) approach may prove popular to both camps.

  • ​IBM to open blockchain innovation centre in Singapore

    IBM plans to open its first blockchain innovation centre in Singapore, with one of its first projects to focus on developing trade solutions using blockchain technology to improve the efficiency of multi-party trade finance processes and transactions.

    According to IBM, the centre -- to be staffed by Singaporean-based talent and researchers from IBM Research Labs worldwide -- together with the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB) and the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) will work with government, industries, and academia to develop applications and solutions based on blockchain, cybersecurity, and cognitive computing technologies.

  • What Has the Open Container Initiative Achieved in Its First Year?

    The Open Container Initiative (OCI) was formed in June 2015. Their main goal was to establish common standards for software containers. It was originally named the Open Container Project and later became a Linux Foundation project. Founding members included CoreOS, Amazon Web Services, Apcera, Cisco, EMC, Fujitsu, Goldman Sachs, Google, HP, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Joyent, Mesosphere, Microsoft, Pivotal, Rancher Labs, Red Hat, and VMware Docker.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • GNU Guile 2.0.12 released

    We are delighted to announce the availability of GNU Guile 2.0.12, a maintenance release in the current stable 2.0 series.

  • Update from La Mapería

    La Mapería exists right now as a Python program that downloads raster tiles from Mapbox Studio. This is great in that I don't have to worry about setting up an OpenStreetMap stack, and I can just worry about the map stylesheet itself (this is the important part!) and a little code to render the map's scale and frame with arc-minute markings.

    I would prefer to have a client-side renderer, though. Vector tiles are the hot new thing; in theory I should be able to download vector tiles and render them with Memphis, a Cairo-based renderer. I haven't investigated how to move my Mapbox Studio stylesheet to something that Memphis can use (... or that any other map renderer can use, for that matter).

  • You Can Now Use Netflix on Vivaldi and Other Chromium-Based Web Browsers

    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard managed to create a handy script that would allow you to watch Netflix movies on Vivaldi, as well as any other Chromium-based web browser.

    As you're probably aware of by now, Netflix only supports the Google Chrome and Opera web browsers when we talk about watching movies streamed via their online platform on Linux kernel-based operating systems. On Windows and Mac the there are more browsers supports, including Mozilla Firefox and Safari.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Get the Look of KDE Plasma 5 on Your GNOME Desktop

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
HowTos

The airy aesthetics have won Plasma 5 an army of admirers, and helped to cement the new visual impression of the KDE desktop experience redux.

But what if you’re not using KDE? Well, you don’t have to miss out.

Read more

SBC, COM, and dev kit tap octa-core, Cortex-A53 Samsung SoC

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

sModule’s SBC, COM, and development kit run Ubuntu 12.04 or Android 4.4 on a 1.4GHz octa-core, Cortex-A53 Samsung S5P6818 SoC.

Shenzhen-based sModule Technology is a subsidiary of CoreWind that has primarily made wireless modules, but has recently jumped into Linux- and Android-ready computer-on-modules and development kits, as does CoreWind itself. Recently, sModule released several boards based on the octa-core, Cortex-A53 Samsung S5P6818, clocked at 1.4GHz: a $75 iBox6818 SBC, a $56 Core6818 COM, and a CORE6818-equipped, $119 SBC-x6818 development kit.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.6.5

I'm announcing the release of the 4.6.5 kernel. All users of the 4.6 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.6.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.6.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... thanks, greg k-h Read more Also: Linux 4.4.16 Linux 3.14.74

today's leftovers

Leftovers: Software

  • The Linux Deepin File Manager Is a Thing of Beauty
    China-based Linux distro Deepin has shown off its all-new desktop file manager. And to say it's pretty is an understatement.
  • GRadio Lets You Find, Listen to Radio Stations from the Ubuntu Desktop
    Love to listen to the radio? My ol’ pal Lolly did. But let’s say you want to listen to the radio on Ubuntu. How do you do it? Well, the Ubuntu Software centre should always be the first dial you try, but you’ll need to sift through a load of static to find a decent app.
  • Reprotest 0.2 released, with virtualization support
    reprotest 0.2 is available in PyPi and should hit Debian soon. I have tested null (no container, build on the host system), schroot, and qemu, but it's likely that chroot, Linux containers (lxc/lxd), and quite possibly ssh are also working. I haven't tested the autopkgtest code on a non-Debian system, but again, it probably works. At this point, reprotest is not quite a replacement for the prebuilder script because I haven't implemented all the variations yet, but it offers better virtualization because it supports qemu, and it can build non-Debian software because it doesn't rely on pbuilder.
  • Calibre 2.63.0 eBook Converter and Viewer Adds Unicode 9.0 Support, Bugfixes
    Kovid Goyal has released yet another maintenance update for his popular, open-source, free, and cross-platform Calibre ebook library management software, version 2.63.0. Calibre 2.63.0 arrives two weeks after the release of the previous maintenance update, Calibre 2.62.0, which introduced support for the new Kindle Oasis ebook reader from Amazon, as well as reading and writing of EPUB 3 metadata. Unfortunately, there aren't many interesting features added in the Calibre 2.63.0 release, except for the implementation of Unicode 9.0 support in the regex engine of the Edit Book feature that lets users edit books that contain characters encoded with the recently released Unicode 9.0 standard.
  • Mozilla Delivers Improved User Experience in Firefox for iOS
    When we rolled out Firefox for iOS late last year, we got a tremendous response and millions of downloads. Lots of Firefox users were ecstatic they could use the browser they love on the iPhone or iPad they had chosen. Today, we’re thrilled to release some big improvements to Firefox for iOS. These improvements will give users more speed, flexibility and choice, three things we care deeply about.
  • LibreOffice 5.2 Is Being Released Next Wednesday
    One week from today will mark the release of LibreOffice 5.2 as the open-source office suite's latest major update. LibreOffice 5.2 features a new (optional) single toolbar mode, bookmark improvements. new Calc spreadsheet functions (including forecasting functions), support for signature descriptions, support for OOXML signature import/export, and a wealth of other updates. There are also GTK3 user-interface improvements, OpenGL rendering improvements, multi-threaded 3D rendering, faster rendering, and more.
  • Blackmagic Design Finally Introduces Fusion 8 For Linux
  • Why Microsoft’s revival of Skype for Linux is a big deal [Ed: This article is nonsense right from the headline. Web client is not Linux support. And it's spyware (centralised too).]

today's howtos