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Thursday, 14 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security: Wiindows/LockCrypt, Uber Ransom, Windows Botnets and Windows at NSA Causes Leak Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 3:39pm
Story 8 Holiday Projects with Raspberry Pi and Arduino Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 3:25pm
Story Virtualbox Vs. Container Mohd Sohail 07/12/2017 - 12:42pm
Story LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of Nitrux Linux Mohd Sohail 07/12/2017 - 12:40pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 11:23am
Story Releases: Puppy Linux, Uruk GNU/Linux, deepin GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 11:10am
Story Everything In Its Right Place Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 11:07am
Story Commercetools uses Ubuntu on its next-generation ecommerce platform Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 10:36am
Story How to use Fossdroid to get open source Android apps Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 10:14am
Story Office Suites: OffiDocs, SoftMaker, LibreOffice, WPS Office Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 7:28am

Security: WordPress, Apple, NSA, Microsoft and Uber

Filed under
Security

Deepin 15.5 Linux OS Debuts with HiDPI and Flatpak Support, Fingerprint Scanning

Filed under
OS
Linux

Known as one of the most beautiful GNU/Linux distributions, Deepin provides a safe, secure, reliable, and easy-to-use computer operating system for users of all ages and genre. The latest release, Deepin 15.5, is now available for download bringing full support for HiDPI displays, as well as support for the Flatpak universal binary format.

"Deepin 15.5 mainly added HiDPI, fingerprint scanning and Flatpak application format. Deepin Desktop Environment and various components fully support the adaptation of HiDPI, auto-identify the appropriate resolution for HiDPI. The interface, fonts and icons are shown more clearly and harmoniously," reads today's announcement.

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Arch Linux-Based ArchEX Distro Now Shipping with Deepin 15.5 Desktop, LXQt 0.12

Filed under
Linux

Powered by the Linux 4.13.12 kernel, ArchEX 2018 Linux distro is the first of its kind to offer users the recently released Deepin 15.5 Desktop, which we have to admit that it's a gorgeous user interface. The developer previously shipped Deepin 15.5 Desktop in his ExTiX 18.0 GNU/Linux distribution.

"In this new version, which I call ArchEX 2018, I have added the Deepin 15.5 (latest) Desktop environment," said Arne Exton in the release announcement. "I came to like Deepin very much when I installed it in ExTiX 18.0. So I thought why not install Deepin also in ArchEX?"

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Lakka 2.1 Linux Operating System Will Turn Your PC into a Retro Gaming Console

Filed under
Gaming

Based on the latest LibreELEC 8.2 embedded Linux operating system, Lakka 2.1 uses the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel for the Allwinner images and the Linux 4.4.99 LTS kernel for Rockchip images. It supports S812 Amlogic TV boxes, improves HDMI audio for WeTek Play 2 systems, and fixes boot arguments of Odroid-XU3 and Odroid-XU4.

"We now have completely new builds for Allwinner boards, based on the mainline kernel and u-boot. With this new project, we can support many new boards with very little efforts. Being based on a recent kernel increase compatibility with newer joypads and dongles. These new images will replace the a10, a20, H3 and Bananapi images," reads the release announcement.

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Compact IoT gateway has optional WiFi, BT, 3G, and GPS

Filed under
Android
Linux

VIA’s “Artigo A630” is a slim IoT gateway that runs Linux or Android on a dual -A9 SoC, and offers LAN, HDMI, serial, USB, DIO, and optional WiFi or 3G/GPS.

VIA announced its latest Artigo IoT gateway, following up on last year’s i.MX6-based Artigo A830. Like the earlier Artigo A900, the new Artigo A630 runs on a dual-core Cortex-A9 SoC from VIA. In this case, however, it’s a 1GHz WonderMedia WM8880 with Mali-400 GPU. (The WM880 previously appeared on VIA’s short-lived, Firefox OS driven VIA Vixen tablet.)

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Automotive Grade Linux plumbing reveals familiar Linux faces

Filed under
Linux

At Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Konsulko’s Matt Porter and Scott Murray dig into AGL plumbing — and it turns out it’s not so scary after all.

Among the sessions at the recent Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) — 57 of which are available on YouTube — are several reports on the Linux Foundation’s Automotive Grade Linux project. These include an overview from AGL Community Manager Walt Miner showing how AGL’s Unified Code Base (UCB) Linux distribution is expanding from in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) to ADAS. There was even a presentation on using AGL to build a remote-controlled robot.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Security: KAISER, Coppersmith Attack, Updates, and Web Threats

Filed under
Security
  • KAISER: hiding the kernel from user space

    Since the beginning, Linux has mapped the kernel's memory into the address space of every running process. There are solid performance reasons for doing this, and the processor's memory-management unit can ordinarily be trusted to prevent user space from accessing that memory. More recently, though, some more subtle security issues related to this mapping have come to light, leading to the rapid development of a new patch set that ends this longstanding practice for the x86 architecture.

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • ROCA: Return Of the Coppersmith Attack

    On October 30, 2017, a group of Czech researchers from Masaryk University presented the ROCA paper at the ACM CCS Conference, which earned the Real-World Impact Award. We briefly mentioned ROCA when it was first reported but haven't dug into details of the vulnerability yet. Because of its far-ranging impact, it seems important to review the vulnerability in light of the new results published recently.

  • Some Websites Are Mining Cryptocurrency Using Your CPU Even When You Close Browser

    The advent of cryptocurrencies was bound to spark the interest of cybercriminals who are always looking to exploit some technology to steal some clicks or install malware. In the recent times, we’ve come across reports of a huge number of websites using your PCU power to mine cryptocurrency; the browser extensions and Android apps aren’t untouched by this epidemic. Developers have also come up with different options to ban this practice altogether.

    In the previous research work conducted by security firms, it was found that a miner could be run as long as the browser was running; close the browser and mining activity stops. However, as per the latest technique spotted by Malwarebytes, some dubious website owners can mine digital coins like Monero even after browser window is closed.

  • Top 10 Common Hacking Techniques You Should Know About

    Using simple hacks, a hacker can know about your personal unauthorized information which you might not want to reveal. Knowing about these common hacking techniques like phishing, DDoS, clickjacking etc., could come handy for your personal safety.

Graphics: Intel and AMD Drivers, GNU/Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • 16-bit Vulkan/SPIR-V Support Revised For Intel's Driver

    Igalia developers have published their latest version of the big patch-set implementing 16-bit support within Intel's Vulkan driver and supporting the necessary 16-bit storage SPIR-V changes.

    Developers at consulting firm Igalia have been tasked the past few months with getting this 16-bit data "half float" support in place for the Intel open-source Vulkan driver with VK_KHR_16bit_storage and SPIR-V's SPV_KHR_16bit_storage along with the necessary plumbing to Mesa's GLSL and NIR code.

  • The Many Open-Source Radeon Linux Driver Advancements Of 2017

    There were many sizable open-source Radeon Linux driver accomplishments this year. It was this year in which the RadeonSI OpenGL driver matured enough to compete with -- and sometimes surpass -- the Radeon Windows driver when talking raw OpenGL performance, RadeonSI can also outperform the AMDGPU-PRO OpenGL hybrid driver in many Linux gaming tests, the RADV Vulkan driver matured a lot, and many other milestones were reached.

    Given the latest round of Windows vs. Linux Radeon gaming tests yesterday and the end of the year quickly approaching, I figured I would provide a list now about some of the major feats reached this year for the open-source Radeon graphics driver stack.

  • Compute Shader & GLSL 4.30 Support For R600 Gallium3D

    After recently getting some older Radeon GPUs to OpenGL 4.2 with new R600g patches and making other improvements to R600g, David Airlie has now sent out a set of patches for getting compute shaders and GLSL 4.30 working for some older pre-GCN GPUs with the R600 Gallium3D driver.

    Airlie sent out today patches getting compute shaders and GL Shading Language 4.30 working in R600g. It seems to be working out the best at the moment with the Radeon HD 6400 "Caicos" graphics cards while the HD 6900 "Cayman" series currently hangs on compute. For running OpenGL 4 on R600g, the HD 5800 series and HD 6900 series generally tends to be the best due to having real FP64 support working where as the other generations of hardware only expose OpenGL 3.3 by default (but can use a version override to later GL4 versions if not needing FP64 support).

  • The fastest and slowest versions of Linux

    To see which version of Linux is the quickest, Phoronix has conducted a set of benchmarks measuring the total boot time of 11 Linux distributions.

    The tests also measured the boot time of separate components, such as the loader and kernel of each distribution.

    Systemd benchmark, part of Phoronix Test Suite 7.4.0, was used to benchmark the boot time of the distributions, and the results were published on OpenBenchmarking.org.

    The tests show that the boot time of Linux distributions can vary substantially, with some systems taking over twice as long to boot up as others.

Games: Black Mirror, Radline, Dominions, Albion Online

Filed under
Gaming

Devices: AGL, Raspberry Pi, Eurotech

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Inside AGL: Familiar Open Source Components Ease Learning Curve

    Among the sessions at the recent Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) — 57 of which are available on YouTube -- are several reports on the Linux Foundation’s Automotive Grade Linux project. These include an overview from AGL Community Manager Walt Miner showing how AGL’s Unified Code Base (UCB) Linux distribution is expanding from in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) to ADAS. There was even a presentation on using AGL to build a remote-controlled robot (see links below).

    Here we look at the “State of AGL: Plumbing and Services,” from Konsulko Group’s CTO Matt Porter and senior staff software engineer Scott Murray. Porter and Murray ran through the components of the current UCB 4.0 “Daring Dab” and detailed major upstream components and API bindings, many of which will be appear in the Electric Eel release due in Jan. 2018.

    Despite the automotive focus of the AGL stack, most of the components are already familiar to Linux developers. “It looks a lot like a desktop distro,” Porter told the ELCE attendees in Prague. “All these familiar friends.”

  • Wide Reach

    Router coverage gaps often have different causes, which repeaters and access points (APs) can remedy. A repeater usually connects to the router over WiFi and amplifies the signal into areas where the router alone is not sufficient, whereas an AP wired to the router by cable sets up a private WiFi network with its own network identifier (SSID). The AP therefore provides additional access to the local network.

    A highly portable Raspberry Pi is ideal for setting up a small and cheap WiFi AP suitable for many applications. For example, you could stretch a network into the back garden or provide Internet to an awkwardly located conference room.

    The easiest route is to use a Raspberry Pi 3 (RPi3), which already has a WiFi module. Previous models can be prepared for the new task with a dongle, available for just a few dollars. Even the Rasp Pi 3 could benefit from a WiFi stick, because the internal connections of the installed module do not deliver the performance of a good dongle.

    In this article, you'll see how to set up a wireless AP, and then I will show you how to provide an additional entry into your local area network through the integration of Nextcloud on an external disk connected to the Rasp Pi.

  • Rugged 10GbE- and PCIe-rich module runs Linux on Xeon-D

    Eurotech’s “CPU-162-23” COM Express Type 7 module runs Linux on Xeon and Pentium D-1500 CPUs with 2x 10GbE, up to x32 PCIe, and up to 64GB DDR4 ECC RAM.

Software: VirtualBox DDX, PHP, Undistract-me, Translate Shell, TLDR, Inboxer

Filed under
Software
  • VirtualBox DDX Released As xf86-video-vboxvideo 1.0

    As part of the push for upstreaming VirtualBox guest driver support in Linux, not only are kernel drivers being upstreamed driver-by-driver, but their DDX driver has now done its official X.Org christening.

    Michael Thayer of Oracle announced this first release of the vboxvideo DDX driver as part of "upstream X.Org" today.

  • PHP 7.2.0 Release Announcement

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.2.0. This release marks the second feature update to the PHP 7 series.

  • PHP 7.2 Officially Released

    PHP 7.2 has made it out on time as the latest annual feature update to the PHP7 programming language.

  • Undistract-me : Get Notification When Long Running Terminal Commands Complete

    A while ago, we published how to get notification when a Terminal activity is done. Today, I found out a similar utility called “undistract-me” that notifies you when long running terminal commands complete. Picture this scenario. You run a command that takes a while to finish. In the mean time, you check your facebook and get so involved in it. After a while, you remembered that you ran a command few minutes ago. You go back to the Terminal and notice that the command has already finished. But you have no idea when the command is completed. Have you ever been in this situation? I bet most of you were in this situation many times. This is where “undistract-me” comes in help. You don’t need to constantly check the terminal to see if a command is completed or not. Undistract-me utility will notify you when a long running command is completed. It will work on Arch Linux, Debian, Ubuntu and other Ubuntu-derivatives.

  • Translate Shell – A Tool To Use Google Translate From Command Line In Linux

    I love to work and share about CLI apps since i’m very much interested on CLI applications. Basically i prefer CLI because most of the time i will be sitting in front of the black screen and it’s became habit for me to go with CLI apps instead of GUI.

    We have wrote many articles about CLI applications in past. Recently i came to know about google CLI utilities such as “Google Translator”, “Google Calendar”, and “Google Contacts”. so, i just want to share about it.

  • TLDR pages: Simplified Alternative To Linux Man Pages

    Working on the terminal and using various commands to carry out important tasks is an indispensable part of a Linux desktop experience. This open-source operating system possesses an abundance of commands that makes it impossible for any user to remember all of them. To make things more complex, each command has its own set of options to bring a wider set of functionality.

  • Inboxer – An Unofficial Google Inbox Desktop Client

    There is no doubt that Gmail is most popular and most-widely used free Email service provided by Google. The users can access Gmail on the web and through mobile apps for Android and iOS, as well as through third-party programs. Today, we are going to see one such third-party program called “Inboxer”. It is a free, open source and unofficial Google inbox desktop client built with Electron. Using this application, you can access your Gmail as the way you do in web or through any mobile apps. The application looks almost the same as the Google Inbox web version and you won’t find any major difference while using it.

Flatpak Linux App Sandboxing Now Supports Stateless Systems, Native GTK+ Themes

Filed under
Red Hat

The Flatpak 0.10 stable branch of the open-source universal binary format for GNU/Linux distributions has been updated recently to first point release.

Flatpak 0.10.1 is now the latest version of the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework (formerly XDG-App), adding new commands to display information about applications in a remote (flatpak remote-info) and to allow you to search the appstream data from the command-line (flatpak search).

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Games: Cutthroat, Son of Scoregasm, Failed State, GemRB

Filed under
Gaming

Scrot: Linux command-line screen grabs made simple

Filed under
Linux

There are great tools on the Linux desktop for taking screen captures, such as KSnapshot and Shutter. Even the simple utility that comes with the GNOME desktop does a pretty good job of capturing screens. But what if you rarely need to take screen captures? Or you use a Linux distribution without a built-in capture tool, or an older computer with limited resources?

Turn to the command line and a little utility called Scrot. It does a fine job of taking simple screen captures, and it includes a few features that might surprise you.

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Making open source evergreen

Filed under
OSS

Danese Cooper is one of open source's strongest advocates, credited with advancing the open sourcing of technology at major companies including Sun Microsystems, Intel, and now PayPal, where she has served as head of open source since 2014.

In her Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, "Making Open Source Evergreen," Danese presented a ringing call to arms about what she considers open source's most pressing problem: "Not knowing how to make the right choices for the future of the movement."

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More in Tux Machines

5 Kubernetes must-reads: Tips and trends

Kubernetes is having a moment – but don’t look for its popularity to wane anytime soon. As enterprises move beyond experimenting and start working in earnest with containers, the number of containers multiply: So do the manual chores. Orchestration tools like Kubernetes add automated help. “Running a few standalone containers for development purposes won’t rob your IT team of time or patience: A standards-based container runtime by itself will do the job,” Red Hat technology evangelist Gordon Haff recently noted. “But once you scale to a production environment and multiple applications spanning many containers, it’s clear that you need a way to coordinate those containers to deliver the individual services. As containers accumulate, complexity grows. Eventually, you need to take a step back and group containers along with the coordinated services they need, such as networking, security, and telemetry.” (See Haff’s full article, How enterprise IT uses Kubernetes to tame container complexity.) Read more

Australian Securities Exchange completes Red Hat migration

The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) has completed the migration of "mission-critical" legacy applications to the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). ASX first deployed JBoss EAP in 2011 to modernise its legacy technologies and to facilitate the introduction of new web applications after it realised its legacy application server platform was becoming increasingly inconsistent, unstable, and expensive. After the initial ASX Online Company migration was complete in 2012, ASX used JBoss EAP to build the ASX.com API, as well as its Sharemarket Game, which gives players the opportunity to learn how the share market works. Read more

Programming/Development: GAPID 1.0 and Atom 1.23

  • Diagnose and understand your app's GPU behavior with GAPID
  • GAPID 1.0 Released As Google's Cross-Platform Vulkan Debugger
    Back in March we wrote about GAPID as a new Google-developed Vulkan debugger in its early stages. Fast forward to today, GAPID 1.0 has been released for debugging Vulkan apps/games on Linux/Windows/Android as well as OpenGL ES on Android. GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and allows for analyzing rendering and performance issues with ease using its GUI interface. GAPID also allows for easily experimenting with code changes to see their rendering impact and allows for offline debugging. GAPID has its own format and capturetrace utility for capturing traces of Vulkan (or GLES on Android too) programs for replaying later on with GAPID.
  • Hackable Text Editor Atom 1.23 Adds Better Compatibility for External Git Tools
    GitHub released Atom 1.23, the monthly update of the open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor application loved by numerous developers all over the world. Including a month's worth of enhancements, Atom 1.23 comes with the ability for packages to register URI handler functions, which can be invoked whenever the user visits a URI that starts with "atom://package-name/," and a new option to hide certain commands in the command palette when registering them via "atom.commands.add." Atom 1.23 also improves the compatibility with external Git tools, as well as the performance of the editor by modifying the behavior of several APIs to no longer make callbacks more than once in a text buffer transaction. Along with Atom 1.23, GitHub also released Teletype 0.4.0, a tool that allows developers to collaborate simultaneously on multiple files.

Red Hat GNU/Linux and More