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Thursday, 18 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora 21 Alpha to slip by one week Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 8:52pm
Story There is no reason at all to use MySQL: Michael Widenius Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 8:45pm
Story Kolab creates a privacy refugee camp in Switzerland Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 8:06pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 7:51pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 7:50pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 7:50pm
Story Red Hat Software Collections 1.2 beta: New software for Linux developers Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 7:42pm
Story Catalyst For X.Org Server 1.16 Readied, Updates In Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 5:13pm
Story Tizen IVI build with Yocto now available Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 5:08pm
Story Mozilla Officially Releases Thunderbird 31.1.1 Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 5:01pm

WordPress 4.0 for Debian

Filed under
OSS
Web
Debian

Yesterday WordPress released version 4.0 or “Benny” of WordPress. I have now downloaded it and packed up for Debian users.

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Canonical Has Joined The Khronos Group To Contribute To The Creation Of Mir/Wayland Drivers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

For now, both Mir and Wayland are under massive development, none of them being used on desktop yet. While Mir is testable via the Ubuntu Touch Next Image, Wayland will be added to the default repositories of Fedora, but will not be used as default.

At first, Canonical intended to use Red Hat’s Wayland on their Ubuntu Touch, but it was difficult for them to submit patches and customizations for the mobile device and so, they decided to do the work themselves and created Mir.

Recently, Canonical has joined the Khronos Group to contribute to the creation of Mir/Wayland drivers.

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Los Angeles schools need to think outside the iPad

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

Foisting computers on schools has been a lucrative business, one easily disguised as charity. Among Pearson’s allies is the Gates Foundation, which works alongside Microsoft’s education arm to promote the Common Core in schools and support libraries, with Microsoft software in hand. Gates’ competitor for the richest-person-in-the-world slot, Mexican telecom monopolist Carlos Slim, has proposed to bypass schools altogether by bankrolling the online-only Khan Academy. Now Rupert Murdoch is trying to enter the education tech business with a tablet of his own.

[...]

One might, for instance, consider replacing the iPad with a little device called a Raspberry Pi. About the size of a credit card, it’s a fully featured computer, though a keyboard and screen need to be plugged in separately. It comes as a single circuit board with no casing, which reflects its philosophy; the basic parts of the machine are plain for a student to see — the video card, the CPU, the power system, the USB ports. The nonprofit Raspberry Pi Foundation sells it for as little as $25, compared with $299 to $929 for an iPad. One Laptop per Child (OLPC), another nonprofit project, produces low-cost laptops and tablets with education in mind.

Software can be even cheaper. The Raspberry Pi and OLPC run on Linux, a free, open-source operating system, which is constantly being improved and expanded by thousands of programmers around the world. An enormous variety of free, community-developed programs, including fully featured office suites, graphics tools and games — as well as popular commercial programs such as Skype and Dropbox — can be installed on the device. Apple and Microsoft often tell us that open-source software is unreliable and unfriendly to use, but that hasn’t stopped Linux from being the basis of Android phones, many everyday appliances and most of the Internet. The computer I used to write this article runs Linux.

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The Wrong Way To Install GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Now, the newbie does not need to create a shopping list with thousands of entries. Many of the Debian packages are libraries shared by multiple applications so start with the major applications the newbie needs: a web browser or two, an office suite or two, some graphics applications for producing drawings or editing images, some multimedia software, various utilities like file-manager, search engine (yes you can have powerful tools on your desktop), database, etc. Make a short list of a few dozen or less packages that give the newbie what he/she wants. Then consider the desktop itself. The newbie can have none at all (strange but true), simple iconified desktops, brave new world shortcut-driven searchable-everything desktops and even some combinations like several different desktops running in virtual machines… Here the possibilities are numerous but there should be some combination that suites the user. If the user like most runs a few applications routinely and has a small total number of applications ever used, a rather finite desktop like XFCE should work. It’s a lot like XP with a task bar (or not), actual menus and such. If the user is some kind of genius with a huge number of applications, too many to hide behind icons, a search-engine base might be the way to go. You just start typing the name/description of an application and you find it just like URI’s autocompletion in your browser. Then choose KDE or GNOME.

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A Linux Accessibility Advocate's Top 3 LinuxCon Takeaways

Filed under
Linux

Chicago has many outstanding qualities, and provided an excellent backdrop to this year’s LinuxCon. Three things stuck out this year that were significant to my own experience...

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Cisco, Red Hat broaden partnership, eye integrated OpenStack systems

Filed under
Red Hat

Cisco and Red Hat on Thursday announced integrated systems designed for OpenStack cloud deployments.

The companies also said they would collaborate more on OpenStack as well as Cisco's Application Centric Infrastructure and Intercloud efforts.

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Acer Chromebook 13 review

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The best Chromebooks all have one thing in common: they’re small. The most popular Chromebooks have small, low-resolution 11.6-inch displays. They may offer a low price, stellar battery life, and fast performance — but sometimes you just want a bigger computer.

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Does Docker Need an Open Source Foundation?

Filed under
Server
OSS

The open source Docker container virtualization project got started in March of 2013 and has since grown to become one of the most talked about virtualization technologies in the industry.

Docker was started by Solomon Hykes, while Hykes was running a PaaS company known at the time as dotCloud. The dotCloud business has since been sold and Hykes is the CTO of Docker, Inc. which is the lead commercial sponsor behind Docker.

In some cases with open source software, there is a push from the broader community for a vendor neutral foundation to help run the project. That's not likely to be the case for Docker.

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Microsoft is part of the problem, not the solution for Munich

Filed under
LibO
Microsoft
OOo

The new mayor of Munich is a self-proclaimed Microsoft fan and he wants to waste all the money that was invested in moving away from Microsoft’s vendor lock and incompatible technologies. His deputy is also a Microsoft fans so it’s not surprising that the new office of the mayor wants to bring back Microsoft technologies.

But that will be a very dangerous move for Munich.

Josef Schmid, teh deputy, points out two issues with LiMux – one is incompatibility with Microsoft technologies and other was increased support calls.

Incompatibility with Microsoft products is a huge problem and it’s a problem for everyone who is using Microsoft technologies. Linux or Open Source are not the cause of the problem as Schmid says, they are victims.

Then what is the cause?

In a recent interview one of the directors of The Document Foundation disclosed how Microsoft users various tricks to break compatibility and that leads to people like Schmid to blame open source technologies without fully understanding where the problem lies.

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Microsoft’s cheap assault on Android tablets is about to begin

Filed under
Android
Microsoft

Microsoft is copying competitor’s models so vigorously that they should move their head quarters to China. After pushing ‘cheap’ (in terms of price and performance) Netbooks to combat Chromebooks, Microsoft is now about to flood the market with ‘cheap’ Windows tablets.

Toshiba is going to be the first company to launch cheap 7-inch Windows tablet. The tablet will be launched at IFA tradeshow in Berlin.

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Free Software Foundation adds libreCMC to its list of endorsed distributions

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced the addition of libreCMC, an embedded GNU/Linux project, to its list of recommended distributions.

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Avoiding lock-in when building open ICT systems: How to make better use of standards in public procurement?

Filed under
OSS

Professor Björn Lundell from University of Skövde - Sweden, has been researching the Open Standards phenomenon -particularly in public procurement-, for a number of years. He is one of the few academics in Europe that have tackled the analysis of benefits of using standards in public procurement of ICT.

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How to Make the Most Out Of Pushbullet For Android and Chrome

Filed under
Android
HowTos

Since its release, Pushbullet has quickly become a favorite amongst many Android users. This free application lets you "push" any link or image to your mobile phone right from your desktop or browser. This means that you don't have to get up and type in a link that you see on your desktop on to your smartphone.

However, besides pushing links, Pushbullet can be used to do a lot more. The following article helps you get more out of the service.

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Consumer risks of having a reseller that doesn't offer enterprise open source products

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

This message is not intended to sell you anything but more to be an "exclamation mark" in the strategy decisions being made in the consumer's IT environment. By Russell Gill, general manager at Linux Warehouse.

If you speak to IT professionals, Gartner etc, the majority agree that open source products are playing a larger part in the consumer's IT environment. But here's the conundrum: it's more profitable for the average reseller out there to sell the proprietary product than to have their customers subscribe to enterprise open source software. Coupled with this, the resellers have to ensure that their staff are up to date with ever-changing trends and that they are able to support the IT environment.

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New Gentoo, Just Peachy, and Tuxmachines Now

Filed under
-s

A new Gentoo liveDVD was released last week featuring Linux 3.15 and KDE 4.13. Jack Wallen follows Jack Germain in tests of a new "fresh and juicy" Linux. The Reg test drives Ubuntu 14.10. And finally today, Christine Hall takes a look at my old Website, Tuxmachines.org, under its new management.

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LLVM 3.5 Is Finally Available For Download

Filed under
Development
BSD

LLVM 3.5 is now available for fans just not looking for a more liberally licensed compiler but for those dependent upon AMD's GPU LLVM compiler back-end and the other innovative use-cases provided by the LLVM stack.

While no official announcement has yet to hit the mailing lists, LLVM 3.5 and its sub-projects doing 3.5 releases are now available via the download page. LLVM 3.5 brings many new features ranging from better support of new C++ standards to improved back-end compiler targets. Benchmarks on conventional x86_64 Linux targets have shown LLVM/Clang 3.5 performing well but the in-development GCC 5.0 still performing better.

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Gentoo Linux 20140826 Iron Penguin Edition -- open source fans, download now!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo

There are so many Linux distributions to choose from. Depending on your perspective, this can be a good or bad thing. You see, for many, using Linux is about choice -- you get to choose the distro, packages and environment. There is truth to this; however, many others, including myself, often wonder if the community's efforts are too fragmented. In other words, when talent is spread thin, progress may be slowed.

One distro which should not be discussed in this debate is Gentoo; it has been around for 12 years and is not some recently launched project. Hell, Google chose this distro as the base for Chrome OS, so it must be good; seriously, the search-giant's operating system is pretty darn stable. Gentoo Linux has reached version 20140826 and it looks like a winner.

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Total chooses Linux for its supercomputer

Filed under
GNU
Linux

French oil firm Total has revealed that its supercomputer is now running on a Linux Enterprise Server operating system.

The oil giant chose the Linux Enterprise Server - provided by software company SUSE - as it was the best value for money, according to the Total's high power computer (HPC) engineer, Diego Klahr.

The IT deployment comes as Total looks to bolster its oil production process. In 2013, with oil and gas reserves diminishing, the Exploration and Production (Total E&P) department needed to improve how it located new oil and gas reserves.

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Benjamin Kerensa on Firefox OS & Internet Freedom

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

According to the Mozilla Developer Network, Firefox OS is an open source mobile operating system based on Linux, open web standards and Mozilla’s Gecko technology.

But there’s more to it that that: Firefox OS is about reinventing what mobile platforms can be, about pushing the boundaries of what is possible with the Web on mobile and about enabling entirely new segments of users to come online with their smartphone at various levels of participation, from users to developers.

Mozilla's Benjamin Kerensa
Benjamin Kerensa, Mozilla’s Early Feedback Community Release Manager.
Earlier this week, I took some time to talk with Benjamin Kerensa, the Early Feedback Community Release Manager for Mozilla, to discuss Firefox OS and the community around it.

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Netrunner – The Best Distro You’ve Barely Heard Of

Filed under
KDE

My overall conclusion with Netrunner Rolling is that there is no better Arch platformed Linux distro with KDE as the default environment out there. It just works. It gets out of the way and it gives the end user a clean, crisp and efficient desktop right out of the gate. You don’t have to know binary to get it installed, updated, and running. You don’t have to sacrifice a goat to Cthulhu (I’ve heard that comes later?) to have a pleasing KDE experience for your desktop. I keep saying this, but it just works.
I found it really odd that I hadn’t heard very much about Netrunner in the past but I readily admit that I hadn’t kept up with KDE based distributions in the past few years due to my fascination with Openbox. Netrunner has won me over though…I will definitely be paying attention to this fine distribution in the future as it has taken its place as the top KDE distribution I’ve ever tried. I hope you’ll give it a try in the future (if you haven’t already) and kudos the developers and community of Netrunner.

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