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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Project crowdfunds effort to bring Allwinner VPU support to the Linux kernel Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2018 - 4:57pm
Story LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of PCLinuxOS Mohd Sohail 12/02/2018 - 2:30pm
Story Events: SCaLE 16X Discount, Fosdem 2018 Reports Roy Schestowitz 12/02/2018 - 11:23am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 12/02/2018 - 11:21am
Story Red Hat: .NET Promotion, Leaving Red Hat to Join Linaro, Supplemental Wallpaper for Fedora 28 and More Roy Schestowitz 1 12/02/2018 - 11:13am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2018 - 11:00am
Story An open source Instagram desktop photo uploader Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2018 - 10:54am
Story MX Linux 17: An upgraded distro made for beginners Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2018 - 10:52am
Story Review: Solus 3 and the Budgie desktop Roy Schestowitz 12/02/2018 - 10:51am
Story What’s New in Linux Lite 3.8 Roy Schestowitz 12/02/2018 - 10:48am

How to start an open source program in your company

Filed under
OSS

Many internet-scale companies, including Google, Facebook, and Twitter, have established formal open source programs (sometimes referred to as open source program offices, or OSPOs for short), a designated place where open source consumption and production is supported inside a company. With such an office in place, any business can execute its open source strategies in clear terms, giving the company tools needed to make open source a success. An open source program office's responsibilities may include establishing policies for code use, distribution, selection, and auditing; engaging with open source communities; training developers; and ensuring legal compliance.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • SUSE polishes openSUSE Leap 15

    The development version of openSUSE Leap 15 has reached its beta phase builds and snapshots are available for testers.

    As a free and open source (FOSS) operating system, Leap is derived from the source code of SUSE Enterprise Linux (known not as SEL, but SLE) and so is positioned in much the same space as CentOS (from Red Hat) and Ubuntu (from Canonical).

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Hot Stock in Focus
  • Skylake-based Nano-ITX SBC offers 4x GbE and 8x stackable PCIe

    ADL’s rugged “ADL120S” SBC runs Linux or Windows on 6th Gen Core CPUs, and offers dual 4K DP ports, 4x GbE ports, 4x USB 3.0 ports, and expansion via 2x M.2 slots and 8x stackable PCIe slots.

  • Block ads on your network with Raspberry Pi and pi-hole

    Got an old Raspberry Pi lying around? Hate seeing ads while browsing the web? Pi-hole is an open source software project that blocks ads for all devices on your home network by routing all advertising servers into nowhere. What's best is it takes just a few minutes to set up.

    Pi-hole blocks over 100,000 ad-serving domains, blocks advertisements on any device (including mobiles, tablets, and PCs), and because it completely blocks ads rather than just hiding them, this improves overall network performance (because ads are never downloaded). You can monitor performance and statistics in a web interface, and there's even an API you can use.

  • Verizon Folds To Government Pressure To Blacklist Huawei Without A Shred Of Public Evidence

    Earlier this month, AT&T cancelled a smartphone sales agreement with Huawei just moments before it was to be unveiled at CES. Why? Several members of the Senate and House Intelligence Committees had crafted an unpublished memo claiming that Huawei was spying for the Chinese government, and pressured both the FCC and carriers to blacklist the company. AT&T, a stalwart partner in the United States' own surveillance apparatus was quick to comply, in part because it's attempting to get regulators to sign off on its $86 billion acquisition of media juggernaut Time Warner.

Debian: easy-peasy-devicetree-squeezy and more

Filed under
Debian
  • easy-peasy-devicetree-squeezy

    I've created a new program, with a silly name, that solves a silly problem with devicetree overlays. Seem that, alhough there's patches to fully support overlays, including loading them on the fly into a running system, it's not in the mainline kernel, and nobody seems to know if/when it will get mainlined.

    So easy-peasy-devicetree-squeezy is a hack to make it easy to do device tree overlay type things already. This program makes it easy peasy to squeeze together the devicetree for your board with whatever additions you need. It's pre-deprecated on release; as soon as device tree overlay support lands, there will be no further need for it, probably.

    [...]

    It supports integrating into a Debian system so that the devicetree will be updated, with your additions, whenever the kernel is upgraded.

  • My Debian Activities in January 2018

    This was my forty third month that I did some work for the Debian LTS initiative, started by Raphael Hertzog at Freexian.

  • Debian packaging with Git notes

    I finally found the time today to update my notes on how I package for Debian using Git. They're rather long (even after dropping my beginner Git tutorial, which seemed pointless given how many good ones there are now), so I'm not including the full text here. Take a look if you're curious.

Systemd and Openwashing

Filed under
Misc
  • DistInst Updates, Boot Sequence Optimization (installer work), Misc. Upstream News

    Another interesting development that’s been coming along over the past two weeks is a conversation centered around an overhaul of the entire boot process. The goal is to reduce the amount of time we get to the desktop by optimizing the boot sequence from the moment you turn on your computer.  Instead of using grub to load the kernel and the initramfs on UEFI systems, we’re going to be using systemd-boot, the modern incarnation of gummiboot. But to make this work, we need a mechanism to copy the kernel and initramfs images to the EFI System Partition(ESP) where systemd-boot expects them to be in order for the boot to initiate. Since the Ubuntu kernels do not have an existing mechanism to these operations, we use kernelstub. Kernelstub, when it runs, copies the kernel image and initramfs image onto the ESP and configures systemd-boot with the entries for the copied files. If you need to change kernel parameters, kernelstub has a manual mode that will allow you to do so in case your machine needs additional parameters. The general use is that kernelstub can copy the kernel and the generated initramfs when a new kernel becomes available. This current work is still in the experimental phase and part of the new installer and initial login work that is ongoing.

  • System76's Pop!_OS Switching From GRUB To Systemd-Boot

    System76's Pop!_OS started off mostly as a re-branded spin of Ubuntu for the company's pre-loaded Linux laptops/desktops, but lately they have been venturing to more interesting changes at varying levels of the stack.

    Aside from various desktop and theming changes, they have been working on reworking the installation process, possible disk encryption by default, and better HiDPI support. The latest is they are planning to use systemd-boot as their bootloader.

  • Exploring the open source challenges Open Banking brings to incumbent firms

    Open Banking, which came about as a result of the result of the PSD2 rules around opening customer data, promises customers a better service experience. The concept has spread and is now a global trend, albeit in different guises. But as night follows day, Open Banking, with its emphasis on open source technologies, brings challenges.

    As financial firms position themselves for success in this rapidly evolving environment, open source technologies play a key role in industry organizations. According to Axel Winter, former global head of enterprise architecture at Standard Chartered Bank in Singapore and currently CTO at Thai business conglomerate Central Group.

  • Open source PowerShell not a straight swap for Windows PowerShell [Ed: Microsoft is just openwashing the malware writers' favourite shell to make it the 'standard']

KDE and GNOME: WikiToLearn , Krita, GTK, and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • MongoDB for WikiToLearn migration

    Today i want to talk about my experience with the WikiToLearn migration.

    The problem of every migration is getting your hands on the data in a way such that you can work on it.

    Starting from the mysql backend and trying to have everything into a versioned object storage (python eve is the one we are tring now) is not an option.

    The solution is to use a temporary database to keep the data, process the data in this temporary storage and afterwards uploading everything in the destination.

    After some tries we managed to have the pipeline that reads all the MediaWiki pages, parses the structure and uploads everything in eve, using mongodb as a temporary storage.

  • [Krita] Interview with Owly Owlet

    Hello. I’m Maria, more often I use my nickname: Owly Owlet. I have a youtube channel, where I make video tutorials (in Russian) about how to use art software, mostly Krita.

  • GTK4 Ejects The Mir Backend & Drops The Big GDK Lock

    After adding the Mir back-end for the GTK+ 3.16 cycle, GTK+ 4.0 is dropping this back-end for the Canonical-developed display server.

    The Mir back-end has been removed from the latest GTK+ code. This clears out about 6,500 lines of code from the tool-kit's codebase. The removal of the Mir back-end is coming since Mir has been focusing on Wayland protocol support to which GTK+ has more mature Wayland support than Mir. Since Mir's change of focus last year and the work the past number of months, the Wayland support on Mir has become more viable.

  • Ibus-Hangul and Compose key: the incredible journey of a simple patch

    Today I decided to tell how I reported a bug (then ended up fixing it) on a non-GIMP related project. Well I do regularly this kind of stuff, and this could have just been one more of these silent commits to a random project as I did many times in my life. But since I decided recently to post more articles, well… I may as well tell a story as one-time contributor (as opposed to “regular contributor”) for once!

    Also I think the whole process of reporting a bug on projects you don’t know at all — worse! A whole stack of software you don’t know much! — is quite interesting for people wondering how they should report bugs happening to them.

  • On GNOME 3.27.90, time management, and a goodbye

    It’s been a long time I don’t write here. These past months were excruciatingly busy and intense, and lots of things happened but I didn’t manage to keep up with the blog posts. I’ll try to condense everything that happened and is still happening and will happen here.

Software and Games: XenServer Clone, Rancher, GRV, Flatpak, Steam and Godot

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • New Open Source Project Takes Aim at XenServer

    An initial Kickstarter campaign to raise $7,500 to begin development of a XenServer clone has already pulled in over $32,000.

  • Rancher – A Complete Container Management Platform For Production Environment

    Docker is a cutting-edge software used for containerization, that is used in most of IT companies to reduce infrastructure cost.

    By default docker comes without any GUI, which is easy for Linux administrator to manage it and it’s very difficult for developers to manage. When it’s come to production then it’s very difficult for Linux admin too. So, what would be the best solution to manage the docker without any trouble.

  • GRV - A Tool to View Git Repo from Linux Terminal

    GRV is an opensource tool to display git repository on Linux terminal. This tool provides screens to view refs, branches and diffs in separate tabs. The behaviour and style can be customized through configuration. A query language can be used to filter refs and commits. In this article, I will show GRV features and installation steps on Ubuntu 16.04.

  •  

  • Flatpak, Steam Cloud, and XDG Base Directories

    If you’ve installed Steam on Linux through Flathub, chances are that Steam Auto-Cloud — Steam’s free game progress synchronization service — won’t work for many of your games that are built with the markets most popular game engines. I have dug into why it isn’t working, and discuss two possible solutions to fix the problem.

    Disclaimer: The Steam for Flatpak package on Flathub is a third-party community effort and isn’t endorsed nor supported by Valve Corporation.

    I’ll need to establish quite a bit of context regarding where games and applications store their configuration files and user data, and how they decide on where to store it. If you’re already familiar with the XDG Base Directory specification, you can glance at the tables and skip straight to the third section.

  • Open-source game dev tool Godot Engine adds VR support

Graphics Leftovers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Coffee Lake Support Finally Lands In Beignet OpenCL

    Intel Coffee Lake CPUs began shipping in October and while their UHD Graphics are effectively re-branded Kabylake graphics, it's taken until today to get mainline support for Coffee Lake OpenCL support on Linux with Beignet.

  • AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch Added To The OpenGL Registry

    For years AMD has had the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension for supporting half floats in shaders and based on the NV_gpu_shader5. The AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch extension is extending that AMD_gpu_shader_half_float functionality to allow drivers to support half-precision floating-points in both shader texture functions and shader image memory functions.

  • Mesa 12.0 To Mesa 18.0 Benchmarks Show The OpenGL/Vulkan Radeon Evolution

    Last week I provided some benchmarks showing how the RADV and RadeonSI performance changed with Mesa 18.0 while in this comparison is a look at how the Mesa 18.0 performance has evolved since Mesa 12.0 for Radeon open-source Linux graphics driver performance.

  • ~80 Patches Are Left For Having Intel i965 SPIR-V Support

    In addition to Igalia developers being at FOSDEM 2018 to talk about their work on Chromium porting for Wayland, Alejandro Piñeiro of this Spain consulting firm talked about their contributions towards SPIR-V support within Mesa and particularly for the Intel i965 OpenGL driver.

  • Kepler Clock Gating Queued In Nouveau DRM, Lowering Power Use

    Red Hat's Lyude Paul has been spending the past number of weeks working out clock-gating support for NVIDIA Kepler GPUs with the open-source Nouveau DRM kernel driver.

    Clock-gating can drop the GPU power consumption by several Watts but isn't being enabled by default until more testing has been done. The support can be enabled via the nouveau.config=NvPmEnableGating= kernel module parameter. There's also Fermi support in progress but Kepler1/Kepler2 (GTX 600/700 series) is where the support is currently best positioned.

Linux 4.16, LF's CNCF, and dNOS

Filed under
Linux
  • OverlayFS Adds NFS Export Support In Linux 4.16

    The OverlayFS union mount file-system of the Linux kernel gains a big new feature in Linux 4.16.

  • CNCF to Host Vitess

    Today, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) voted to accept Vitess as the 16th hosted project, alongside Kubernetes, Prometheus, OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, containerd, rkt, CNI, Envoy, Jaeger, Notary, TUF and Rook. Vitess has been accepted as an incubation-level project, under the CNCF Graduation Criteria v1.0.

    The TOC’s Graduation Criteria provides every CNCF project an associated maturity level of either inception, incubating or graduated. As an incubating project, Vitess must document it is being used successfully in production by at least three independent end users, have a healthy number of committers and demonstrate a substantial ongoing flow of contributions.

  • Open Source Storage System Vitess Joins CNCF

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) accepted its second cloud-based storage project, Vitess, just a week after voting in its first storage project Rook.

    The second storage project — and CNCF’s 16th hosted project — is a database orchestration system for horizontal scaling of MySQL. YouTube originally developed Vitess in 2010 as a better way to scale massive amounts of traffic.

  • CoreOS, Red Hat and Kubernetes Competition

    announced intention to buy CoreOS might affect the rest of the container ecosystem. Container runtime development will go forward, with perhaps more emphasis on the Kubernetes container runtime interface (CRI-O) project. However, the engineers at Docker, CoreOS and Red Hat continue to make contributions to other container runtime projects, such as containerd, rkt and Atomic. CoreOS’ Container Linux appears to be end-of-life in favor of Red Hat’s offering. CoreOS-led etcd and Flannel are already core components of many Kubernetes stacks and that will likely continue. Red Hat may also take the container registry Quay and bundle it into their larger container offering.

    [...]

    Our analysis of a Cloud Native Computing Foundation survey provides some answers. Out of the 34 CoreOS Tectonic users identified, five also use Red Hat’s OpenShift. Thus, the combined entity would still have just 14 percent of respondents using it to manage containers. Only 4 percent of Docker Swarm users said they also used Tectonic.

  • New AT&T Open Source Project Supports 'White-Box' Networking Hardware

    As an alternative to traditional integrated networking equipment, AT&T last week said it will donate the Disaggregated Network Operating System (dNOS) project, putting the OS purposely built for white-box hardware under the direction of The Linux Foundation. "We think white box will play a big part in the future of our industry," AT&T said when touting the white-box approach last summer. "Our goal is to help this ecosystem grow in a way that benefits everyone."

Events: FOSDEM, Open Collaboration Conference, INDEX (IBM) and Linux Foundation Events

Filed under
OSS
  • notes from the fosdem 2018 networking devroom

    I am on my way back from FOSDEM and thought I would share with yall some impressions from talks in the Networking devroom. I didn't get to go to all that many talks -- FOSDEM's hallway track is the hottest of them all -- but I did hit a select few. Thanks to Dave Neary at Red Hat for organizing the room.

  • Heptio Kubernetes Subscription, FOSDEM, Upcoming Events and Replika (the Emotional Chatbot)

    The Free Open Source Developers European Meeting (FOSDEM) 2018 just happened over the weekend. You can watch the recently uploaded videos on the official YouTube channel.

  • Video: ITProTV Interview with Jason Callaway of Redhat at BSides Delaware
  • Open Collaboration Conference CFP Now Open

    Earlier last year I announced last year that I was partnering up with the Linux Foundation to create the Open Community Conference as part of their Open Source Summit events in North America and Europe.

    Well, the events happened, and it was (in my humble opinion) an enormous success. We had 120+ papers submitted to the North American event and 85+ papers submitted to the European event. From there I whittled it down to around 40 sessions for each event which resulted in some fantastic content and incredible discussions/networking.

  • Linux and Open Source: A Recipe for Innovation

    That’s the idea behind the first-ever INDEX community event coming up February 20-22 in San Francisco, which will feature a keynote presentation from The Linux Foundation’s executive director, Jim Zemlin. Harnessing the power of shared innovation is crucial to remaining competitive in today’s markets, and Jim will discuss building sustainable open source projects to advance the next generation of modern computing.

  • Submit a Proposal to Speak at LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China

    We have opened the LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China (LC3) 2018 call for proposals, and we invite you to share your expertise in this exploding open source market. Proposals are due March 4, 2018.

  • Vint Cerf, Andre Fuetsch, Nick McKeown to Keynote at Open Networking Summit North America 2018

    Open Networking Summit (ONS) is the industry’s premier open networking event gathering enterprises, cloud and service providers, from across the ecosystem to share learnings, highlight innovation and discuss the future of Open Source Networking.

    Hear from industry visionaries and leaders on the latest updates and the future of Networking beyond SDN/NFV including 5G & IoT; cloud networking (Kubernetes & Cloud Foundry); AI & ML applied to networks; and the use of networking in industry verticals like FinTech and Automotive.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Genode Is Developing A GPU Multiplexer For Intel Graphics Hardware

    Besides talking about GNU Hurd in 2018 one of the other interesting talks in FOSDEM's micro-kernel track this year was on an Intel GPU resource multiplexer being developed by the Genode project.

    Thanks to hardware-based features for isolation on Intel Broadwell "Gen 8" graphics and newer, Genode OS has been working on GPU resource multiplexing for their operating system framework.

  • Why enterprises are flocking to open source

    As the leader of an open source foundation, I have a unique perspective on the way open source technologies are catalyzing the digital transformation of enterprises around the world. More than half of the Fortune 100 is using Cloud Foundry. If you’re wondering why, there are two main reasons: one is the allure of open source, and the other is the strength of the platform itself.

  • GNU's Ring Continues Trying To Be Like Skype/WhatsApp For FLOSS/Privacy-Minded Fans

    Ring that joined the GNU project in late 2016 to focus on decentralized, multi-device communication has high hopes for 2018.

    GNU Ring is still striving as a "free universal distributed communication platform" and to offer similar functionality to say Skype or WhatsApp but while being open-source and respecting the privacy of its users in part by being decentralized.

  • Review: 6 slick open source routers

    Hackers of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but the lousy stock firmware your routers shipped with.

    Apart from smartphones, routers and wireless base stations are undoubtedly the most widely hacked and user-modded consumer devices. In many cases the benefits are major and concrete: a broader palette of features, better routing functions, tighter security, and the ability to configure details not normally allowed by the stock firmware (such as antenna output power).

  • Kodi 18 Is Coming But They Are Already Thinking About Kodi 19

    At this weekend's FOSDEM event in Brussels, Martijn Kaijser of the Kodi project provided an update on their current activities for 2018.

    After going over their successful Kodi 17 release, the focus turned to talking about Kodi 18 "Leia" that they have been working on since the end of 2016. Their design goals with Kodi 18 are to improve the architecture and implementation of this open-source, cross-platform media player. As part of improving the code-base they are focusing on C++11 support, improving the code quality, dropping unmaintained features/code, and other cleanups. They are also working on moving non-core features out to add-ons.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: A-Painter performance optimizations
  • GFX-RS Continues Advancing For High-Performance, Portable Graphics In Rust

    GFX-RS has been the Rust programming language project for a high-performance, portable graphics API that can map to Vulkan, Apple's Metal, Direct3D, etc from a single Rust API.

    Dzmitry Malyshau of Mozilla and Markus Siglreithmaier talked about this portable graphics abstraction project at the Free Open-Source Developers' European Meeting in Belgium. GFX-RS has been in development since 2013~2014 but is currently undergoing a "total rewrite" in trying to better this single Rust API that supports backends for all major graphics APIs.

  • Jahia Updates DX Platform, Magnolia's New Financial Partner, More Open Source News

    Jahia has kicked off 2018 by releasing Jahia DX 7220 — the latest edition of its digital experience platform.

    Jahia DX 7220 boasts a new user interface (UI), code-named ‘Anthracite’ which, “reflects feedbacks gathered from customers focus groups carried out along the development phase.”

RISC-V Coverage (Libre Hardware)

Filed under
Hardware
  • Hi-Five Unleashed: The first Linux-capable RISC-V single board computer is here

    For roughly a decade, x86-64 has held hegemony over the desktop and server market. In the mobile space, ARM is the popular platform—for which a glut of cheap ARM processors have led to the rise of mass-produced single-board computers (SBCs) like the Raspberry Pi and competitors. However, proprietary "binary blob" drivers make using these devices somewhat more cumbersome, particularly for developers attempting to learn how devices work or ensuring complete device control.

  • The State of RISC-V Hardware & Software In Early 2018

    Palmer Dabbelt who maintains the RISC-V ports of GCC, Binutils, Linux, and glibc while working at RISC-V company SiFive spoke at FOSDEM 2018 this weekend about the software/hardware state of this royalty-free open-source CPU ISA.

    Palmer's presentation covers the RISC-V instruction set, the origins of it, a brief comparison to other CPU architectures, and the Linux state.

Security: Updates, Meltdown/Spectre and Microsoft/NSA Back Doors

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Meltdown/Spectre Status for Red Hat and Oracle
  • NetBSD Has SVS To Mitigate Meltdown, Still Working On Spectre

    The NetBSD project has issued an update concerning recent security efforts for this popular BSD operating system.

    NetBSD has landed "Separate Virtual Space" (SVS) within their development repository as their mitigation effort for the Meltdown CPU vulnerability. SVS unmaps kernel pages when running in user-space. Initially only the PTE area is being unmapped. After tuning the past month, NetBSD developers now consider SVS to be stable but at the moment has not yet been back-ported to their stable branches. SVS for now is only supported on x86 64-bit.

  • Talking to normal people about security
  • 3 leaked NSA exploits work on all Windows versions since Windows 2000

    Oh, good, three NSA exploits previously leaked by The Shadow Brokers have been tweaked so they now work on all vulnerable Windows 2000 through Server 2016 targets, as well as standard and workstation counterparts.

    Before this, EternalSynergy, EternalRomance, and EternalChampion had partially been used in the NotPetya cyber attack. However, they had not been used by malicious actors nearly as much as EternalBlue because they didn’t work on recent Windows versions. That has now changed thanks to RiskSense security researcher Sean Dillon, aka @zerosum0x0, who ported the Microsoft Server Message Block (SMB) exploits to work on Windows versions released over the past 18 years.

  • NSA exploits leaked by hackers tweaked to work on all versions of Windows since 2000

    A trio of NSA exploits leaked by hacking group TheShadowBrokers has been ported to work on all versions of Windows since Windows 2000.

    The EternalChampion, EternalRomance and EternalSynergy exploits were made public by the group last year, and now a security researcher has tweaked the source code so they will run on nearly two decades' worth of Microsoft operating systems -- both 32- and 64-bit variants.

  • Every NHS trust tested for cybersecurity has failed, officials admit

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Peppermint 8 Respin-2 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Team Peppermint are pleased to announce the latest iteration of our operating system ISO images Peppermint 8 Respin-2. This is a security refresh of the Peppermint 8 ISO images to include all updates to date (as of 3rd Feb 2018), including the Meltdown and Spectre mitigations such as the new HWE kernel 4.13.0-32 and the latest Chromium web browser version 64. The new ISO also contains bug fixes for flash content in ICE SSB’s, and Chromium not remembering user selected xdg-open preferences for magnet and mailto links..
There is no need for Peppermint 8 or Peppermint 8 (first) Respin users to reinstall this version, the mitigations and bug fixes have already been pushed as automatic updates to the earlier Peppermint 8 versions.

Read more

Linux Kernel Release Model

Filed under
Linux

This post is based on a whitepaper I wrote at the beginning of 2016 to be used to help many different companies understand the Linux kernel release model and encourage them to start taking the LTS stable updates more often. I then used it as a basis of a presentation I gave at the Linux Recipes conference in September 2017 which can be seen here.

With the recent craziness of Meltdown and Spectre , I’ve seen lots of things written about how Linux is released and how we handle handles security patches that are totally incorrect, so I figured it is time to dust off the text, update it in a few places, and publish this here for everyone to benefit from.

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Why KDE's Plasma Mobile is the ideal platform for Linux fans and developers

Filed under
KDE
Linux

For the last decade, the mobile market has been under complete lockdown. Unless you were Android or iOS, you didn't stand a chance at making much of a run at success. Canonical failed miserably with the Ubuntu Phone. Blackberry had to resort to their own take on Android. Firefox OS couldn't even get off the ground.

And yet, thanks to the Purism Librem 5, there's another attempt at creating an open source mobile platform on the horizon. Many of us prognosticators and pundits have been ansty to see what's to come for this platform, and finally someone has made some headway, and that's KDE. The platform is Plasma Mobile. From the looks of it, KDE is on to something.

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LMMS Guide Part 1: Creating Simple Melodies Using Sounds And Instruments

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How To Create Shell Scripts

Having to type the same command over and over again can be a daunting task and tiresome for that matter. The shell scripts are really easy to create and run saving you from a lot of misery and anguish if you really prefer using the terminal over using the GUI for running tasks. Read
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Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.