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Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 1:45am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 11:57pm
Story Logic Supply Launches New Industrial ARM Mini PC, SBCs Running Ubuntu or Android Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 11:56pm
Story Android 7.0 Nougat review: great, but does it matter? Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:58pm
Story Out of the Trash and into the Class: Building a STEM Program by Re-Building Computers. Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:57pm
Story GNOME 3.22 "Karlsruhe" Desktop Environment Gets Its First Public Beta Release Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:53pm
Story Open Source Software for Business: 12 Leading Apps Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:51pm
Story Wine 1.8.4 Released Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:49pm
Story Gentoo Linux live DVD "Choice Edition" Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:42pm
Story Latest Slackware Version Doesn't Cut Newbies any Slack Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:41pm

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" Receives Latest Security Updates from Debian

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Parsix GNU/Linux developers have announced today, August 17, 2016, that their Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" operating system has received a bunch of security updates from the upstream Debian GNU/Linux repositories.

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i.MX6 Pico-ITX and mini-PC run Android, Ubuntu, and Yocto

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

Logic Supply’s Embux-made Pico-ITX SBC runs Android and Linux on an i.MX6 DualLite, and is also available in a mini-PC.

Logic Supply is reselling an Embux-manufactured Pico-ITX form-factor “ICM-2010 2.5”” SBC and “ICS-2010” mini-PC. The SBC starts at $193, plus $29 for an 8GB SD card equipped with Android, Ubuntu, or Yocto Project based Linux. A power adapter adds another $30. The products are designed for applications including industrial control, home automation, kiosk, digital signage, or robotics applications.

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VirtualBox 5.1.4 Released with Improved Support for Linux Kernel 4.7 and Later

Today, August 16, 2016, Oracle released a new maintenance update for the latest VirtualBox 5.1 branch, version 5.1.4, bringing numerous improvements and fixing annoying issues.

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Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Fake Linus Torvalds' Key Found in the Wild, No More Short-IDs.
  • NIST Denounces SMS 2FA - What are the Alternatives?

    Towards the end of July 2016, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) started the process of deprecating the use of SMS-based out-of-band authentication. This became clear in the issue of the DRAFT NIST Special Publication 800-63B, Digital Authentication Guideline.

  • It's pretty easy to hack traffic lights

    Researchers from the University of Michigan EE/Computer Science Department (previously) presented their work on hacking traffic signals at this year's Usenix Security Symposium (previously), and guess what? It's shockingly easy to pwn the traffic control system.

    The researchers targeted the wireless control systems at each intersection, avoiding any tampering with the actual junction boxes, which might be detected by passers-by (though seriously, some high-viz vests and a couple of traffic cones would likely serve as perfect camouflage), and worked with the permission of a local Michigan traffic authority.

FOSS and Linux Events

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Google's FOSS

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Google updates Santa Tracker open source code with changes from last Christmas

    Is it Christmas time already? Not quite, but we don't have long before kids start counting down the days to Santa's visit. When they ask, Google is again ready to provide an answer.

    Last April, Google open sourced Santa Tracker and its various components. Then it developed new experiences to show off around Christmas time. Eight months later, that code is now open source as well.

  • More News Arrives on Fuchsia, Google's Mystery Open Source OS

    Everyone loves a mystery and if you're a mystery fan you have to be paying attention to Google's mysterious new open source operating system, which is dubbed "fuchsia," alluding to what you get when you mix purple with pink. While you'll read many reports saying that nothing has been said about fuchsia officially, Google engineers actually have popped up in various online forums descrbing the new OS.

Btrfs RAID Tests On Linux 4.8

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Recently I've been carrying out a number of Btrfs RAID tests on Linux 4.7 while this past weekend I ran some comparison tests using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel.

The Btrfs feature updates in Linux 4.8 has the big ENOSPC rework as well as other clean-ups and improvements.

Read more

Development: LLVM, Go 1.7

Filed under
Development

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • NetworkManager 1.4 Feature Update Prepares For Release

    The first release candidate to NetworkManager 1.4 feature update is now available for testing.

    Among the new/improved functionality coming to NetworkManager 1.4 has IPv6 improvements, ability to create configuration checkpoints and rolling back changes after a timeout, support for oFono as modem manager, a new dns-priority property, a smaller sized executable, nmcli command line utility improvements, and various other improvements.

  • Packaging Apps for Linux the Easier Way

    One of the frustrations of developing applications for Linux comes when trying to make an application installable across all distributions. Whether you're developing for the enterprise or the consumer desktop, if you want your application to be readily available to all potential users, you're going to become much more familiar with RPM, dkpg, pacman and other packaging systems than you want to b

  • These Linux Apps Tell You When Your Fave Channels Are Live on Twitch

    With more than 1.5 million broadcast on Twitch each month, with an estimated 100 million people tuning in. Big stats, but with so much activity, so many streams, and so many enviably awesome gamers showcasing their skill i it can be hard to keep track of who’s online and when.

Intel News

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel “Aero” drone board runs Yocto on Cherry Trail

    Intel has launched a Linux-on-Atom powered “Aero Compute Board” and quadcopter, promising improved obstacle navigation based on Intel RealSense.

    Even more than last year’s Intel Developer Forum, this week’s IDF is focusing relentlessly on Intel RealSense. The 3D depth sensing camera technology is everywhere at IDF, including the new Windows-focused Project Alloy VR helmet and several Linux-infused drone, robotics, and camera kits. In fact, even the new Kaby Lake and Apollo Lake processors expected to be announced today include built-in support for RealSense. Here, we take a look at the Intel Aero Platform drone products: the Atom-based Intel Aero Compute Board and an Aero Ready To Fly quadcopter based on it.

  • Intel unveils its Joule chip module for the Internet of Things

    Joule is the latest product in Intel’s family of all-in-one chip modules for the Internet of Things.

    Intel CEO Brian Krzanich showed off the new Joule module during a keynote speech at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco. The module is a follow-up to Edison, the prior IoT module introduced in 2014.

  • Intel Launches Project Alloy — An Open-source VR Headset That’s A Full PC [Ed: That’s a lie (even the headline). It’s not “Open Source”, it’s Microsoft rubbish.]

AMDGPU-PRO Radeon RX 460/470/480 vs. NVIDIA Linux GPU Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I published an 18-way GPU Linux comparison featuring the new Radeon RX 460 and RX 470 graphics cards along with other AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce GPUs. The Radeon tests were done using the very latest open-source Linux driver stack while in this article are similar benchmarks done but using the AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver stack.

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Linux Devices (Arduino, Euclid and routers)

Filed under
Linux
  • The Positives and Negatives of Arduino

    My introduction to the world of single board computers started with the Raspberry Pi and an attempt to spin up a media server. Once the media server was established, the GPIO pins began to peek my interest and other projects were born. As I learned more about GPIO and electronics, I discovered there existed boards other than the Raspberry Pi that I could program to take my projects to another level.

  • Intel's Project Euclid is a tiny Linux-powered PC for robot makers

    INTEL has unveiled Project Euclid, a pint-sized RealSense PC aimed at robotics makers and developers.

    Project Euclid (below) was announced during the firm’s Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, and makes it dead simple to create applications, such as self-driving go-karts and 3D printing robots, using Intel's depth-sensing RealSense cameras, the firm said.

    Intel has kicked its Atom chips to the curb in terms of mobile, but Project Euclid comes with an integrated Atom processor, suggesting that that the once-defunct chip still has a future in the world of robotics and the Internet of Things (IoT).

  • Review: 6 slick open source routers

    Hackers of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but the lousy stock firmware your routers shipped with.

    Apart from smartphones, routers and wireless base stations are undoubtedly the most widely hacked and user-modded consumer devices. In many cases the benefits are major and concrete: a broader palette of features, better routing functions, tighter security, and the ability to configure details not normally allowed by the stock firmware (such as antenna output power).

Linux kernel 4.6 reaches end of life

Filed under
Linux
Security

Those using a GNU/Linux operating system powered by a kernel from the Linux 4.6 branch have been urged to move to Linux kernel 4.7.

According to a report by Softpedia, users have been advised to install the new Linux kernel 4.7.1 build.

Read more

Also: The Linux Foundation Announces 2016 LiFT Scholarship Recipients

UBOS Beta 8: incremental improvements and bug fixes

Filed under
Linux

Beta 7 was a major feature release. This time around, the improvements are more incremental. Here are the highlights:

FOSS Scare

Filed under
OSS
  • The trouble with open source research on the web

    Every open source research project -- no matter how simple or complex -- starts with browsing the internet. But researchers should know that their identity can be obtained through a number of basic techniques, which could have consequences ranging from modified data to directed cyber attacks or worse.

    Even the simplest of website visits will expose significant details about your location and your device, and pretty much any site you visit will drop code on your computer to track what you’re doing as you traverse the internet. Most of the time, this exchange is benign, but there can be times when content will be modified or attacks launched based on the identity of the user.

    When Tim Berners-Lee released his building blocks for the modern internet, they were designed for the academic research community. Like other initiatives of the time, web protocols (and the browsers to support them) were built to easily share information, not for privacy or security. In order to minimize or even prevent counter-surveillance while conducting open source research, it is important to understand how the underlying protocols exchange information when you visit a web page.

  • Endurance Robots launches fully roboticized open-source platform [Ed: That's not FOSS. Using OpenCV to make a proprietary and Windows-only platform?]

    Finally, we used the standard Microsoft SAPI. This product with various language sets is distributed free of charge.

  • Intel claim open source driven by 'enthusiasts' is 'complete rubbish' says Weaveworks founder [Ed: Intel is badmouthing FOSS while putting secret/proprietary back doors in its chipsets]

    Weaveworks founder and CEO Alexis Richardson delivered a verbal drubbing to an Intel senior architect yesterday after he suggested open source software is still driven by "enthusiasts" who alone don't produce "enterprise-capable product" without distributors 'professionalising' parts of it themselves.

    Richardson, speaking at an open source panel debate hosted by Rackspace, described Markus Leberecht's claim as "complete rubbish", leaving the solutions architect floundering.

    When discussing the increasing relevance of open source software to the enterprise, senior data centre solutions architect Leberecht volunteered the notion that "open source has become a natural thing for enterprise to consume when distributors have professionalised certain parts of [it]".

    "So just to re-emphasise the role that some of the companies on the panel here [companies included MongoDB, Red Hat, and Rackspace, as well as Weaveworks] are taking in this particular way of getting open source to market: by itself open source is attention-driven, enthusiasts driving a certain topic, but that doesn't give us enterprise-capable product."

How open source helps startups get a big data boost

Filed under
OSS

Big data isn't new. We've actually had fairly sophisticated data infrastructure long before Hadoop, Spark, and such came into being. No, the big difference in big data is that all this fantastic data infrastructure is open source software running on commodity servers.

Over a decade ago, entrepreneur Joe Kraus' declared that "There's never been a better time to be an entrepreneur because it's never been cheaper to be one," and he was right, though he couldn't have foreseen how much so. Though Kraus extolled the virtues of Linux, Tomcat, Apache HTTP server, and MySQL, today's startups have access to a dazzling array of the best big data infrastructure that money doesn't need to buy.

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Basics Of Linux File Permissions

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Linux file permissions are very well documented in many places throughout the internet. In fact, it’s one of the first things one learns when first learning Linux. Linux permissions are the first layer of security when it comes to your personal files and folders, as they control who can access and/or change them (and in Linux, technically everything is a file, but that’s a discussion for another day).

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more

Mega 50GB Free Cloud Storage Plus Linux Client

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

​Hi Guys, Today I wanna talk about a storage service that I have been using for a couple of months and I am pretty satisfied so I thought of sharing my experience with you guys. It's a Mega cloud storage that provides 50GB data for free and an official Linux client. Here is all that I have to say after using Mega in my Ubuntu Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

5 Reasons to Switch to Ubuntu Phone

You’ve had Android phones, and you’ve had iPhones. Buying a smartphone for most people is a polarized, A/B choice. And for some, the experience of choosing a new phone is becoming… jaded. You might think that Android and iOS have the mobile market sewn up, but what if I was to tell you that you don’t need to look at Windows 10 Mobile or BlackBerry as alternatives? Various others are available, but perhaps the most impressive of them all is the Ubuntu Phone, which uses the Ubuntu Touch platform, and can be found on devices such as the Meizu Pro 5. Read more Also: Ubuntu Linux 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Beta 1 now available for download (don't talk back)

Bodhi Updates, KaOS & Antergos Reviews, Another 25?

Today in Linux news, Jeff Hoogland posted a short update on the progress of Bodhi Linux 4.0 and reported on the updates to the project's donations page. In other news, An Everyday Linux User reviewed Arch-based Antergos Linux saying it was "decent" and Ubuntu-fan Jack Wallen reviewed "beautiful" KDE-centric KaOS. makeuseof.com has five reasons to switch to the Ubuntu phone and Brian Fagioli asked if Linux can survive another 25 years. Read more

Rise of the Forks: Nextcloud and LibreOffice

  • ownCloud-Forked Nextcloud 10 Now Available
  • Secure, Monitor and Control your data with Nextcloud 10 – get it now!
    Nextcloud 10 is now available with many new features for system administrators to control and direct the flow of data between users on a Nextcloud server. Rule based file tagging and responding to these tags as well as other triggers like physical location, user group, file properties and request type enables administrators to specifically deny access to, convert, delete or retain data following business or legal requirements. Monitoring, security, performance and usability improvements complement this release, enabling larger and more efficient Nextcloud installations. You can get it on our install page or read on for details.
  • What makes a great Open Source project?
    Recently the Document Foundation has published its annual report for the year 2015. You can download it as a pdf by following this link, and you can now even purchase a paper copy of the report. This publication gives me the opportunity to talk a bit about what I think makes a great FOSS project and what I understand may be a great community. If it is possible to see this topic as something many people already went over and over again, think again: Free & Open Source Software is seen as having kept and even increased its momentum these past few years, with many innovative companies developing and distributing software licensed under a Free & Open Source license from the very beginning. This trend indicates two important points: FOSS is no longer something you can automagically use as a nice tag slapped on a commodity software; and FOSS projects cannot really be treated as afterthoughts or “nice-to-haves”. Gone are the days where many vendors could claim to be sympathetic and even supportive to FOSS but only insofar as their double-digits forecasted new software solution would not be affected by a cumbersome “community of developers”. Innovation relies on, starts with, runs thanks to FOSS technologies and practices. One question is to wonder what comes next. Another one is to wonder why Open Source is still seen as a complex maze of concepts and practices by so many in the IT industry. This post will try to address one major difficulty of FOSS: why do some projects fail while others succeed.

Red Hat News

  • Red Hat Virtualisation 4 woos VMware faithful
    It is easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn’t forgotten about you. Red Hat Virtualisation (RHV) 4.0 refreshes Red Hat’s open source virtualisation platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat’s product line. It is a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat’s virtualisation efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company’s intention to woo VMware customers.
  • Forbes Names Red Hat One of the World's Most Innovative Companies
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced it has been named to Forbes' “World’s Most Innovative Companies” list. Red Hat was ranked as the 25th most innovative company in the world, marking the company's fourth appearance on the list (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Red Hat was named to Forbes' "World's Most Innovative Growth Companies" list in 2011.
  • Is this Large Market Cap Stock target price reasonable for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?