Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 28 Feb 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 1:40am
Story Azure Gtk Is a New Linux Theme That Respects Google's Material Design Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 1:32am
Story Critical 0-days in open source? The problem isn't code, it's CASH Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 1:27am
Story Dronecode: Taking the Internet of Things to the Skies Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 12:32am
Story Systemd Gets An Fsck Daemon/Service Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 12:11am
Story Raspberry Pi Sells Over 5 Million Units to Date Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 11:54pm
Story Korora Comes Bursting With Extras Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 10:12pm
Story Symple Introduces the $89 Planet Friendly Ubuntu Linux Web Workstation symplepc 18/02/2015 - 10:08pm
Story Sony taps Linux robot car tech for self-driving car project Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 10:07pm
Story New Ubuntu Phone Flash Sale on February 19, Starting 9 AM CET Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 9:56pm

Xiaomi’s MIUI overlay makes Android prettier, more clever

Filed under
Android

Obsessed with mobile growth? Join us February 23-24 when we reveal the best technologies and strategies to help your company grow on mobile. It all takes place at our 5th annual Mobile Summit at the scenic Cavallo Point Resort in Sausalito, CA. See if you qualify here.

Read more

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Screenshots

Filed under
Reviews

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

The Open-Source Question

Filed under
OSS
Security

You’d be forgiven for thinking that the tech world is a loathsome hotbed of rapacious venture capitalists, airheaded trend-riders, and publicity hounds. That’s the image presented by much of the tech press, which prizes stories about the Montgomery Burnses of the tech world over ones about its more idealistic denizens.

Read more

Reactions to “Has modern Linux lost its way?” and the value of simplicity

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The best software, whether it’s operating systems or anything else, is predictable. You read the documentation, or explore the interface, and you can make a logical prediction that “when I do action X, the result will be Y.” grep and cat are perfect examples of this.

Read more

Also: Issues with Server4You vServer running Debian Stable (Wheezy)

Graphics-rich EPIC SBC taps 5th Gen Core, expands flexibly

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Aaeon’s “EPIC-BDU7″ SBC uses Intel’s 5th Gen Core processors, and offers multiple graphics, GbE, USB, and SATA ports, plus mini-PCIe and PCI-104 expansion.

Aaeon’s EPIC-BDU7 single board computer uses the same old-school EPIC form factor adopted by its Atom-based EPC-CV1 board, but instead loads up with Intel’s brand new 5th Generation Core processors using the 14nm “Broadwell” architecture. Aaeon typically supports Linux on its SBCs, and although no OS support was listed, Linux should run on this board with no problem.

Read more

Perl creator Larry Wall: Rethought version 6 due this year

Filed under
Development

Despite criticisms such as it having a "cryptic syntax," the Perl language has remained prominent in language popularity assessments, even if popularity has declined and a planned upgrade has been slow to appear. Designed by Larry Wall, the scripting language is suited for tasks ranging from quick prototyping to Web programming and system management tasks, and it's part of the prominent LAMP (Linux Apache MySQL Perl/PHP/Python) open source stack. At the recent FOSDEM conference in Brussels, Wall revealed intentions to have the long-awaited Perl 6 release out in a beta version in September and generally available by December. Wall answered some questions from InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill via email about what's planned for the language and responded to criticisms.

Read more

Also: Learn to crunch big data with R

Leftovers: Kernel

Filed under
Linux

X.org Leftovers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Five ways open source middleware can impact unmanned systems

Filed under
OSS

Traditionally thought of as intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR), or kinetic action platforms, unmanned systems are now filling roles such as command and control communications, meteorological survey, and resupply, and explosive ordnance disposal platforms. Historically, these platforms have been developed and fielded as standalone systems built by different vendors with unique and often proprietary payloads, control mechanisms and data formats. But this process has created limitations on interoperability and increased costs, leading the DoD to look at other, more viable options, including commercially supported open source middleware.

Read more

Also: DISA Unveils Online, Open Source Collaboration Tool for DoD

Linux for Astronomers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
SciFi

I've looked at specialty distributions that were created for engineers and biologists in previous articles, but these aren't the only scientific disciplines that have their own distributions. So in this article, I introduce a distribution created specifically for astronomers, called Distro Astro. This distribution bundles together astronomy software to help users with tasks like running observatories or planetariums, doing professional research or outreach.

From the very first moment of booting up Distro Astro, you will notice that this distribution is aimed at astronomers. The look and feel of items, from the boot splash screen to wallpapers and screensavers, have all been given an astronomical theme. Even the default wallpaper is a slideshow of Hubble images.

Read more

Open Source Jahia Raises $22.5M to Grow Enterprise Clients

Filed under
OSS
Web

Jahia is getting a $22.5 million cash infusion from Invus, a New York City-based investment firm, the Geneva, Switzerland-based open source content management system (CMS) vendor announced today.

Read more

Also:

The privacy differential - why don't more non-US and open source firms use the NSA as marketing collateral?

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
OSS

The shockwaves generated by Edward Snowden's revelations of the close collaboration between US tech giants such as Microsoft and Apple and the NSA are still reverberating through the industry. Those disclosures, together with related ones such as the involvement of the NSA in industrial espionage, as well as the asymmetric nature of US law when it comes to gathering data from foreign individuals, present something of an open goal for non-US technology companies - or so one might have thought.

On the face of it, then, it is surprising that non-US technology firms and others that can distance themselves from the US law are not proclaiming this fact more loudly. After all, there must be a considerable number of organisations that would dearly love to locate their data as far away from the attentions of the NSA as possible.

Read more

New Input Drivers Coming To Linux 3.20

Filed under
Linux

There's new input drivers for Linux 3.20 and improvements to the existing input drivers with this next kernel version.

Read more

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of why I don’t always work in the open

Filed under
OSS

When you choose not to work in the open, what are your reasons? Are they Good, Bad or Ugly? What are your suggestions for how those of us who want to work more in the open can all do better?

Read more

Linux Kernel 3.18.7 Officially Released, Fixes Maximum Transfer Length for 4K Disks

Filed under
Linux

Linux Kernel 3.18 is still used in numerous distributions of GNU/Linux, despite that fact that Linus Torvalds announced the final release of Linux 3.19 kernel on February 8, 2015, so it is time to update it to version 3.18.7, which was announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman a few hours ago, on February 11.

Read more

Rugged signage player runs Android on quad-core i.MX6

Filed under
Android

AOpen’s rugged “MEP320″ media player and signage device runs Android 4.2.2 on a 1GHz Freescale i.MX Quad, and offers a thin profile and dual HDMI ports.

Taiwanese OEM vendor AOpen has long been making Linux-ready mini-PCs such as its circa-2010 Intel Core-based MP57. Now, it’s introducing a rugged AOpen Media Engine MEP320 Android media player for digital signage based on an ARM platform. Its other current signage players run Windows on Intel processors.

Read more

Syndicate content