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Tuesday, 19 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linus Torvalds Lifestyle and Preview of Linux 4.15 Kernel With 'Open' Hardware Support Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2017 - 10:17am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2017 - 9:16am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2017 - 8:28am
Story Essential open source software for running your small business Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2017 - 8:18am
Story IBM’s 'New Gen' LinuxONE Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2017 - 4:11am
Story “Forget Windows Use Linux” 2.0 Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2017 - 4:10am
Story Software and howtos: Torrench, Gradio, Watermarking Images and More Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2017 - 4:08am
Story Preview of Next Month's Ubuntu and This Week's GNOME Release Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2017 - 4:06am
Story Open Networking Foundation (ONF) Announcements Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2017 - 4:04am
Story OSS: Sharing, Hadoop, AI, Symphony Software Foundation and Shakthi Kannan Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2017 - 4:03am

Security: NSA Data Dumps Again

Filed under
Security

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

AMD Secure Processor Support and Sound in Linux 4.14

Filed under
Linux
  • AMD Secure Processor Support In Linux 4.14

    The crypto subsystem updates have been pulled in for the Linux 4.14 kernel and it includes more complete AMD Secure Processor support, among other changes.

  • Sound Updates Ready To Be Heard On Linux 4.14

    Takashi Iwai of SUSE has mailed in his sound driver updates for the Linux 4.14 kernel. This time around there isn't too many speaker-shattering changes, but a wide range of fixes and a few notable changes.

Ditching Apple and Microsoft for GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac
  • Switching to xmonad + Gnome – and ditching a Mac

    I have been using XFCE with xmonad for years now. I’m not sure exactly how many, but at least 6 years, if not closer to 10. Today I threw in the towel and switched to Gnome.

    More recently, at a new job, I was given a Macbook Pro. I wasn’t entirely sure what to think of this, but I thought I’d give it a try. I found MacOS to be extremely frustrating and confining. It had no real support for a tiling window manager, and although projects like amethyst tried to approximate what xmonad can do on Linux, they were just too limited by the platform and were clunky. Moreover, the entire UI was surprisingly sluggish; maybe that was an induced effect from animations, but I don’t think that explains it. A Debisn stretch install, even on inferior hardware, was snappy in a way that MacOS never was. So I have requested to swap for a laptop that will run Debian. The strange use of Command instead of Control for things, combined with the overall lack of configurability of keybindings, meant that I was going to always be fighting muscle memory moving from one platform to another. Not only that, but being back in the world of a Free Software OS means a lot.

  • Google is trying to poach Microsoft Azure partners by sending them free Chromebooks
  • Google’s Cloud Team Is Sending Chromebooks To Microsoft Partners

     

    Microsoft has its Azure platform, Amazon has AWS, Google is entering the arena with Google Cloud and each company is throwing serious money to grab a slice of this market as it continues to expand.

  • Windows loses the market share growth battle against Linux [Ed: Almost no site (that I've stumbled upon) mentions that the firm behind these numbers is Microsoft-connected. Microsoft sites like this one say Windows "market share collapsed from 90.45% to 88.77%." But no, it's more like 50%. ChromeOS, Android etc. are conveniently unaccounted for.]

    In August, Windows dropped to a 90.70% market share from 91.45% from July, despite Microsoft’s effort. This drop of 0.75% is the biggest one that the operating system had recorded since April 2016. Back then, the OS’s market share collapsed from 90.45% to 88.77%.

3 Cool Linux Service Monitors

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Linux

The Linux world abounds in monitoring apps of all kinds. We're going to look at my three favorite service monitors: Apachetop, Monit, and Supervisor. They're all small and fairly simple to use. apachetop is a simple real-time Apache monitor. Monit monitors and manages any service, and Supervisor is a nice tool for managing persistent scripts and commands without having to write init scripts for them.

Read more

Android Oreo Adds Linux Kernel Requirements and New Hardening Features

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Android
Linux

The Linux kernel continues to add security protections so developers don’t have to build them on their own. As a result, one of the first steps security experts recommend for protecting against embedded Linux malware threats is to work with the latest possible kernel release and then regularly update field devices. Now that Android is getting long in the tooth -- it was nine years ago this month that Sergey Brin and Larry Page rollerbladed onto the stage to announce the debut of the flagship HTC G1 phone -- more and more Android devices are being attacked due to out-of-date Linux kernels. To address the problem before it adds to Android’s substantial challenge with malware generated from rogue or unprotected apps, Google has announced new requirements in Android 8.0 (“Oreo”) to build on Linux kernels no older than kernel 4.4.

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Servers: Mesosphere, ​NGINX, and Systemd on Ubuntu 16.04

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Server

Software: Flathub, gPodder, PulseAudio, MConnect

Filed under
Software
  • The Flathub Website Now Lists Apps, Lets You Install Them

    Read this site regularly enough and you’ll learn that I love Flathub. Flathub, for those of you who haven’t heard of it, is the quasi-official app store for apps packaged and distributed using Flatpak. But it hasn’t been easy to find out which apps are available on it. Until now.

  • A look at gPodder – Podcast player for GNU/Linux

    Podcasts have been around for years now, but I’ve noticed an increase among my social circles in people using them, and so using that as a general assumption that others are also starting to enjoy them I thought I should show off my favourite application for downloading and listening to them on my GNU/Linux systems; gPodder.

    gPodder is a GTK+ client that is written using Python, designed to be a podcast client and media aggregator. The interface is very minimalistic, so if you're looking for something with a bunch of bells and whistles, you might want to look elsewhere.

  • PulseAudio 11 Debuts with Support for Newer AirPlay Hardware, Bluetooth Goodies

    The open-source and cross-platform PulseAudio sound system has been updated recently to version 11, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements to the audio to make it sound better on your favorite GNU/Linux distribution.

  • MConnect, the Android GNOME Shell Extension, Has Been Updated

    An updated version of mConnect, the GNOME extension that helps you integrate your Android device with the Linux desktop, is now available. Rolling out on the GNOME Extensions site now, the update adds minor improvements to the Android-ingratiating add-on, including support for keyboard shortcuts, and tooltips to provide helpful pointers about its various features.

Security: Dragonfly, Zhejiang University, ‘Internet of Things’, ShadowBrokers and Protego

Filed under
Security
  • Hackers {sic} attacking US and European energy firms could sabotage power grids [iophk: "symantec == windoze; windoze == fraud"

    Cybersecurity firm Symantec says ‘Dragonfly’ group has been investigating and penetrating energy facilities in US, Turkey and Switzerland

  • A Simple Design Flaw Makes It Astoundingly Easy To Hack {sic} Siri And Alexa

    [...] a team from Zhejiang University translated typical vocal commands into ultrasonic frequencies that are too high for the human ear to hear, but perfectly decipherable by the microphones and software powering our always-on voice assistants. This relatively simple translation process lets them take control of gadgets with just a few words uttered in frequencies none of us can hear.

  • The ‘internet of things’ is sending us back to the Middle Ages

    By gazing into this fish tank, we can see the problem with “internet of things” devices: We don’t really control them. And it’s not always clear who does – though often software designers and advertisers are involved.

  • ShadowBrokers release UNITEDRAKE NSA malware

    The ShadowBrokers group of hackers has released a remote access and control tool used by the US NSA to capture information from Windows-based machines.

    The existence of the UNITEDRAKE RAT first came to light in 2014 as part of a series of classified documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

  • Shadow Brokers appear again with new exploit

    And a second, known as ETERNALROMANCE, was used to craft ransomware that was given various names — Petya (nomenclature given to ransomware that already existed), NotPetya, ExPetr, Nyetya and GoldenEye — which attacked Windows machines in Europe in June and spread to other countries.

  • Protego

    Today, September 7th 2017, WikiLeaks publishes four secret documents from the Protego project of the CIA, along with 37 related documents (proprietary hardware/software manuals from Microchip Technology Inc.). The project was maintained between 2014 and 2015.

Debian 10 "Buster" Switches GNOME Session To Wayland By Default

Filed under
Debian
  • Debian 10 "Buster" Switches GNOME Session To Wayland By Default

    For those not riding the in-development Debian "Buster" packages or the "Sid" bleeding-edge packages, the default desktop GNOME session is using Wayland by default.

    Changed back in July for Debian Sid and then during the middle of August for the Buster packaging, the gnome-session for Debian testing/Buster is defaulting to Wayland as outlined via the change-log (thanks to reader Fran for pointing it out).

  • Debian 10 development builds switch to Wayland

    Work on Debian 10 is under way already even though we won’t see it ready for mainstream consumption until 2019. One of the latest changes discovered in Debian 10 is that it drops X11 for Wayland. Debian is considered quite conservative in terms of how quickly it adopts new technologies in order to provide a stable experience and therefore will still continue to offer X11 as an alternative.

Latest Parted Magic Release Adds Support for GParted 0.29.0, Linux Kernel 4.12.9

Filed under
Linux

Patrick Verner, the creator of the Parted Magic live system designed for disk partitioning, closing and erasing, as well as data recovery and rescue, and system benchmarking tasks, announced the release of Parted Magic 2017_09_05.

Read more

GNU Linux-Libre 4.13 Kernel Launches Officially for Those Who Seek 100% Freedom

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Alexandre Oliva, the maintainer of the GNU Linux-libre project, an Open Source initiative to provide a 100% free version of the Linux kernel to those who seek 100% freedom, announced the release of the GNU Linux-libre 4.13 kernel.

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Bodhi Linux With Moksha Is Truly Enlightening

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Bodhi Linux is a very functional alternative to the run-of-the-mill distro offerings. It will extend users' comfort zones as they get familiar with its different computing procedures. Newcomers to Linux, not knowing how Linux "is supposed to work," actually may have an easier time gaining proficiency in using this Enlightened approach to computing.

The Midori browser by default loads a help file with wiki-like links to some startup information. That file is part of the installation content, so new users can access the quick start guide and FAQ topics even if they are not able to access a wireless Internet connection.

Minimum hardware specs include a 500-Mhz processor with 256 MB of RAM and 4 GB of drive space.

Recommended specs are a 1.0-Ghz processor with 512 MB of RAM and 10 GB of drive space.

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Jetson TX2 camera add-on features 6x HD cameras

Filed under
Linux

E-con has launched a Linux-driven camera system for the Jetson TX1 and TX2 dev kits with six 3.4MP, HD cameras that stream in uncompressed YUV422.

Embedded vendor E-con Systems has long been known for its Linux-driven embedded camera modules and boards such as its i.MX6 based e-CAM50IMX6. Now, the company has launched an ambitious, six-camera “e-CAM30_HEXCUTX2” solution designed to work with Nvidia developer kits for the Nvidia Jetson TX1 and Jetson TX2 computer-on-modules.

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today's leftovers

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Misc
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AMD Threadripper 1950X on Linux

KDE: Plasma Mobile in Randa, Calligra Suite Rant, Kubuntu Updates

  • Plasma Mobile in Randa(aaaaaaaa)
    Last week I had a chance to attend the Randa meetings 2017, my plan was to work on the Plasma Mobile during the sprint, improve the state of current images.
  • Progress On KDE Plasma Mobile From Randa 2017
    KDE contributor Bhushan Shah has shared some highlights of Plasma Mobile progress made from this year's Randa Meetings in Switzerland. At this annual KDE developer event in the Swiss mountains, some of the Plasma Mobile advancements worked on or reviewed included: - Plasma Mobile images are now being assembled by the KDE Neon build system rather than the Plasma Mobile CI.
  • Calligra Suite does not suit me
    It pains me to say so, but the split from KOffice to Calligra has given this program only a temporary infusion of hope, and looking back at my 2013 trial, it's not made any progress since. On the contrary. Calligra Suite is slow, difficult to use, and it comes with less than ideal file format support. My conclusion here is much the same regarding different Linux software, be it distros or desktop environments. 90% of it just shouldn't exist, and the effort must be focused on just one or two select programs with the highest quality and chance of making it big. The infinite forking doesn't do anyone any good. Calligra Suite has the potential, but it's far, far from realizing it, and the world of Plasma has left it behind. The interface split is bad, too much equity is taken by a confusing maze of options, the performance is dreadful, the stability flaky, and the rest does not scale or compare against LibreOffice, let alone Microsoft Office. I wish my findings were different, but it cannot be. Ah well. Like so many other flowers of the open-source world, this one must wilt. I'll keep an eye, but I doubt there is ever going to be enough focus or love to make Calligra into a serious competitor. Dedoimedo's sad prose out.
  • Plasma 5.11 beta available in unofficial PPA for testing on Artful
    Adventurous users and developers running the Artful development release can now also test the beta version of Plasma 5.11. This is experimental and can possibly kill kittens!
  • Kubuntu: Writing Japanese (Kanji, Hiragana, Katakana) Easily
    On Kubuntu system, we can write Japanese easily using Fcitx-Mozc tool! This awesome tool eases you with word-suggestions popup on-the-fly, with ability to switch between Kanji-Hiragana-Katakana-ASCII as simple as one click. It's very well integrated to the whole screens inside KDE Plasma desktop, enables you to write Japanese in Firefox browser, LibreOffice, Kate text editor, and even Konsole terminal.

Red Hat and Fedora: AnsibleFest SF 2017, So-called 'Open Organisation', and Pipewire

  • AnsibleFest SF 2017
    AnsibleFest was amazing, it always is. This has been my Third one and it's always one that I look forward to attending. The Ansible Events Team does an absolutely stellar job of putting things together and I'm extremely happy I was not only able to attend but that I was accepted as a speaker.
  • The eye-opening power of cultural difference
    Inclusivity is the quality of an open organization that allows and encourages people to join the organization and feel a connection to it. Practices aimed at enhancing inclusivity are typically those that welcome new participants to the organization and create an environment that makes them want to stay. When we talk about inclusivity, we should clarify something: Being "inclusive" is not the same as being "diverse." Diversity is a product of inclusivity; you need to create an inclusive community in order to become a diverse one, not the other way around. The degree to which your open organization is inclusive determines how it adapts to, responds to, and embraces diversity in order to improve itself. Interestingly enough, the best way to know which organizational changes will make your group more inclusive is to interact with the people you want to join your community.
  • Red Hat (RHT) PT Raised to $120 at Barclays Into Q2 Print
  • Barclays Holds To Rating And Raises Price Target On Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Volatility in Focus
  • Share Activity Lifted for Red Hat Inc (RHT) in Session
  • Red Hat Formally Rolls Out Pipewire For Being The "Video Equivalent of PulseAudio"
    Red Hat has quietly been working on PipeWire for years that is like the "video equivalent of PulseAudio" while now it's ready to make its initial debut in Fedora 27 and the project now has an official website. Pipewire has been talked about a few times in recent months while Red Hat's Christian Schaller wrote a blog post today about Launching Pipewire!

Ubuntu: Applications Survey, Mir support for Wayland, Canonical OpenStack Pike and Bright Computing

  • Results of the Ubuntu Desktop Applications Survey
    I had the distinct honor to deliver the closing keynote of the UbuCon Europe conference in Paris a few weeks ago. First off -- what a beautiful conference and venue! Kudos to the organizers who really put together a truly remarkable event. And many thanks to the gentleman (Elias?) who brought me a bottle of his family's favorite champagne, as a gift on Day 2 :-) I should give more talks in France!
  • Mir support for Wayland
    I’ve seen some confusion about how Mir is supporting Wayland clients on the Phoronix forums . What we are doing is teaching the Mir server library to talk Wayland in addition to its original client-server protocol. That’s analogous to me learning to speak another language (such as Dutch). This is not anything like XMir or XWayland. Those are both implementations of an X11 server as a client of a Mir or Wayland. (Xmir is a client of a Mir server or and XWayland is a client of a Wayland server.) They both introduce a third process that acts as a “translator” between the client and server.
  • Mir 1.0 Still Planned For Ubuntu 17.10, Wayland Support Focus
    Following our reporting of Mir picking up initial support for Wayland clients, Mir developer Alan Griffiths at Canonical has further clarified the Wayland client support. It also appears they are still planning to get Mir 1.0 released in time for Ubuntu 17.10.
  • Webinar: OpenStack Pike is here, what’s new?
    Sign up for our new webinar about the Canonical OpenStack Pike release. Join us to learn about the new features and how to upgrade from Ocata to Pike using OpenStack Charms.
  • Bright Computing Announces Support for Ubuntu
    right Computing, a global leader in cluster and cloud infrastructure automation software, today announced the general availability of Bright Cluster Manager 8.0 with Ubuntu. With this integration, organizations can run Bright Cluster Manager Version 8.0 on top of Ubuntu, to easily build, provision, monitor and manage Ubuntu high performance clusters from a single point of control, in both on-premises and cloud-based environments.