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Saturday, 21 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OSS in the Back End Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:56pm
Story Puppy Linux Fork Quirky 8.1.6 "Xerus" Is Built From Ubuntu 16.04 Binary Packages Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:56pm
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:32pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:15pm
Story Terrible Ideas in Git Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 10:48pm
Story RADV Improved Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 10:46pm
Story From Windows to GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 10:34pm
Story Linux Mint 18.1 'Serena' KDE Edition Beta is available for download now Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 8:41pm
Story 64-bit Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 ships for $25 to $30 Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 8:38pm
Story Panasonic Toughpad Rugged Tablet Muscles into Android Space Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 8:34pm

Embedded Linux Conference in Portland

Filed under
Linux

Microsoft and Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

ISO File Verification - The Laziest Way Possible

Filed under
HowTos

Here's a (very) lazy way to verify ISO files without hunting down hashes.

How To Break Free From Your Computer Operating System -- If You Dare

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

Weary of the "awful" hour-long updates his Windows computer forced him to periodically endure, usually during prime work hours, Farhang recently abandoned his PC operating system. He switched to Linux, an open-source OS.

The result? Linux turned his laptop into a "very good Mac OS clone," he says. And the price was right. He paid nothing for the software.

If you've upgraded your computer during the holidays and also are thinking of upgrading your operating system, you might be tempted to follow Farhang. But it's not an easy path, and it's not for everyone. I know because I just tried to do it.

Read more

Also: Why do you use Linux?

Set Up Two Factor Auth (2FA) on Your Smartphone & Linux Desktop... now.

Filed under
HowTos

Here's a tutorial to get 2FA working on both your smartphone and Linux desktop using oathtool.

Security OS Kodachi Linux 3.7 Released with Anonymous Wallpapers, Improvements

Filed under
OS
Linux

After less than two weeks since their end of year announcement, Eagle Eye Digital Solutions have announced the release of a new update of their security-oriented Linux Kodachi operating system, versioned 3.7.

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GNU/Linux Workstations

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Dell’s new Precision mobile workstation PCs available with Ubuntu or Windows

    Dell is updating its Precision mobile workstation line of powerful laptop computers with new models sporting Intel Kaby Lake processors, optional NVIDIA graphics, and a choice of Windows or Ubuntu software.

  • Talos, For Those Needing Powerful Computing

    FSF (Free Software Foundation) is backing a crowd-funded project to develop a motherboard for a workstation that’s competitive in the “power” department with Intel’s Xeon. I don’t need anywhere near that kind of power in my home so I’ve opted for ARM for small/efficient computing, but if you need the power and don’t want Intel nor Intel’s backdoor it might be just your thing. The price is a show-stopper for me.

Synfig 1.2.0

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Synfig 1.2.0 released

    This release summarizes the results of our work for last 16 months, since the start of new development cycle in August 2015. Much thanks to everyone who supported our efforts by contributing to crowdfunding campaign, purchasing training course, donating via downloads and providing continuous support through our Patreon page! You really made this release happen.

  • Open-Source Animation Software Synfig 1.2 Released
  • Synfig Studio 1.2 Released With New Render Engine

    The Synfig 1.2 release has a complete rewritten render engine developed over the past year and is now better optimized, a new lipsync feature, UI changes, support for multiple threads when rendering via the command line, and other improvements.

User Asks Canonical to Backport Mesa 13.0.2 Stable for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS HWE

Filed under
Ubuntu

Remember when Feral Interactive, the UK-based game publisher, asked Canonical to update the old Mesa 3D Graphics Library packages in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating systems?

Read more

Reviewing the Librem 15

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

Following up on my previous post where I detailed the work I’ve been doing mostly on Purism’s website, today’s post post will cover some video work. Near the beginning of October, I received a Librem 15 v2 unit for testing and reviewing purposes. I have been using it as my main laptop since then, as I don’t believe in reviewing something without using it daily for a couple weeks at least. And so on nights and week-ends, I wrote down testing results, rough impressions and recommendations, then wrote a detailed plan and script to make the first in depth video review of this laptop. Here’s the result—not your typical 2-minutes superficial tour:

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Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Vulkan Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

LLVM News

Filed under
Development
BSD

  • LLVM Founder, Swift Creator Chris Lattner Is Leaving Apple

    Chris Lattner who is known most recently for starting the Swift programming language while most profoundly he is the original creator of LLVM/Clang, is leaving his job at Apple.

    Lattner had been the director of the Developer Tools department, including Xcode and similar compiler efforts around Swift/LLVM. Chris joined Apple in 2005 due to his work on LLVM/Clang. His wife is the president of the LLVM Foundation. Coming as a surprise today is that he's leaving Apple and no longer the Swift Project Lead, per this mailing list post.

  • LLVM/Clang Finally Lands Mainline Support For AMD's Zen/Ryzen Processors

    The latest LLVM and Clang compiler code as of this morning now has support for Zen (AMD Ryzen) processors.

    Back in 2015 there was the AMD Zen "znver1" patches for GCC along with Zen for Binutils while with the latest Git/SVN development code for LLVM/Clang today is similar "znver1" support.

The best Android phones that fit every budget

Filed under
Android

Today, it is nearly impossible for smartphone manufacturers to build a bad phone. Component makers and the supply chain that serve the manufacturers have amazing momentum. It is the same momentum that drove PCs to market share leadership in the 1990s.

This is good news for consumers because now there are few tradeoffs when choosing a new phone. Consumers with $600 or $700 to spend do not have to make any real tradeoffs when buying a top branded phone. If that’s out of your budget, don’t fear. Unlike PCs, most apps perform well on lower-cost and lower-performance Android phones. Games need raw hardware performance, but apps such as Facebook, Google Search and WhatsApp perform almost indistinguishably.

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Mesa in Ubuntu

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu
  • User Asks Canonical to Backport Mesa 13.0.2 Stable for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS HWE

    Remember when Feral Interactive, the UK-based game publisher, asked Canonical to update the old Mesa 3D Graphics Library packages in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating systems?

    Well, that didn't happen, yet, and users who want to play the latest Linux games have to either compile the latest Mesa 3D libraries from sources or rely on either the well-known Oibaf or Padoka PPAs (Personal Package Archives), which include only development, but highly optimized versions of Mesa and related libraries.

  • Radeon Ubuntu Linux Users Have A Lot To Gain By Upgrading Mesa

    For those curious about the performance difference if upgrading to third-party PPAs from Ubuntu 16.10 when using a modern AMD Radeon graphics card with the open-source driver stack, here are some fresh numbers.

Reviews: Elementary OS Loki and Solus-2017.01.01

Filed under
Reviews
  • It’s Time to Try Something New: Elementary OS Loki

    Elementary OS isn’t your typical Linux distribution. Some would say it isn’t a distro at all. Elementary’s developers pitch their creation as a free and open alternative to Windows and macOS.

    That description is apt, and with the latest release, version 0.4 Loki, Elementary has blossomed into something beautiful. I love it, and I highly recommend it for new and experienced Linux users alike.

  • Solus-2017.01.01 — a review

    Solus is congenial system. I rather like the Budgie desktop. But you may find that you need to install additional software to meet your needs.

Linux/FOSS Events

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • 10 Lessons from 10 Years of Amazon

    Amazon launched their Simple Storage Service (S3) service about 10 years ago followed shortly by Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). In the past 10 years, Amazon has learned a few things about running these services. In his keynote at LinuxCon Europe, Chris Schlaeger, Director Kernel and Operating Systems at the Amazon Development Center in Germany, shared 10 lessons from Amazon.

  • MoodleMoot UK & Ireland 2017

    MoodleMoot UK and Ireland 2017 will be held from 10 – 12 April at Park Plaza Riverbank London.

  • Linus Torvalds, Guy Hoffman, and Imad Sousou to Speak at Embedded Linux Conference Next Month

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds will speak at Embedded Linux Conference and OpenIoT Summit again this year, along with renowned robotics expert Guy Hoffman and Intel VP Imad Sousou, The Linux Foundation announced today. These headliners will join session speakers from embedded and IoT industry leaders, including AppDynamics, Free Electrons, IBM, Intel, Micosa, Midokura, The PTR Group, and many others. View the full schedule now.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 13 Container Management and Automation Tools to Know

    As many deployments of open cloud computing platforms are maturing, integrating and managing container technologies and platforms is a very high priority. Container management and automation tools represent a hot area for development as companies race to fill the growing need to manage highly distributed, cloud-native applications.

    Analysts at 451 Research have called containers the “future of virtualization,” predicting strong container growth across on-premises, hosted, and public clouds. Meanwhile, the OpenStack User Survey shows Kubernetes, an open source container cluster manager, taking the lead as the top Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) tool of all.

  • I am pleased to announce the availability of mdadm version 4.0

    I am pleased to announce the availability of mdadm version 4.0

  • Linux Soft RAID's MDADM 4.0 Utility Released

    Version 4.0 of mdadm is out, the tool for managing MD "Soft RAID" on Linux.

    While I got excited too seeing "mdadm 4.0" cross the wire, it's not a huge update but does have some useful improvements. It turns out the bumping of the major version number was done to reflect developer Jes Sorensen taking over maintainership of MDADM from Neil Brown.

  • Desktop Reddit Clients Walkthrough

    What piques my interest in Reddit desktop clients? For starters, there is a paucity of Reddit desktop clients available in Linux Mint’s package managers. The Synaptic Package Manager does offer a package for Unity Webapp for Reddit. This is in contrast to say Twitter clients where there are more clients available such as Corebird and bti. Is there a need for a Reddit desktop client? In my opinion, definitely yes. Their website is functional, but it does not organize the content in the most efficient and intuitive way, at least for my purposes. And the desktop clients offer advanced features such as infinite column scrolling, and delivery of text-only versions of articles.

  • Q&A session: To all those using Kate for hacking on C++ -- Why don't you try KDevelop?

    Let's start from the beginning: I got to know quite a few people in the past decade (phew, I'm such a dinosaur!) who use Kate as their editor of choice to hack on C++ code, on a daily basis. While I totally agree Kate is an excellent editor -- don't get me wrong on that, I use it literally every day, too -- it doesn't and can't possibly provide the best experience when working with C++ code, in my book. This is not about Kate vs. KDevelop -- not at all. This is about a text editor vs. an integrated development environment for C++.

  • digiKam 5.4.0 Introduces a Complete Re-Write of Video File Support, Improvements

    We've been waiting for it for so long, but the wait is now finally over, and the digiKam development team just announced a few moments ago the release and general availability of digiKam 5.4.0.

    A major release, digiKam 5.4.0 ships two months after the third point release in the digiKam 5 series, bringing a complete re-write of the video file support, as well as numerous other improvements across a multitude of components, and a nice collection of patches that should resolve many of those nasty issues you're reported lately.

  • 6 Of The Best Music Players for Ubuntu

    Most of us listen to music when using our computers, be it to pass the time, motivate us, or even help us concentrate (no, really) — but what is the best music app for Ubuntu?

    That’s a question that I see new (and not so new) users ask all the time. Answering it is not an easy, but not through a lack of choice!

    Finding a music player for Ubuntu is far from difficult. A veritable orchestra of options exist, some new, some old, some in tune with modern trends, others riffing to their own beat.

    There’s a good chance you’ve already spun through a chorus of players over the years, and so have we. In this post we present 6 music players for Ubuntu that we think all stand up on their own.

The case for open source software

Filed under
OSS

“Free software is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept you should think of ‘free’ as in ‘free speech,’ not as in ‘free beer,’” leading software freedom activist Richard M. Stallman explained via the Free Software Foundation.

Open source software is computer software published under a copyright license where the copyright holder provides the rights for the study, change, and distribution of the software’s source code for any purpose. This is important not just for the advancement of technology but for the freedom of expression as an innate human right.

Currently, developers can release software under a few main types of licenses. The General Public License (GPL) demands any modified software from the product—including source code—must be placed under the same type of license. In contrast to traditional copyright laws, this license—often referred to as ‘copyleft’—allows developers to use and modify other developers’ code.

“The GPL is built on copyright, but disables the restrictions of copyright to allow for modification, distribution, and access,” Dr. Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy at McGill, wrote in an essay published in Cultural Anthropology. “It is also self-perpetuating because it requires others to adopt the same license if they modify copylefted software.”

Read more

Also: What engineers and marketers can learn from each another

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

Red Hat Financial News

Wine 2.0 RC6 released