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Tuesday, 21 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux-on-i.MX6 Pico-ITX SBC has 40-pin GPIO header Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 6:31pm
Story Desktop: Microsoft E.E.E., Dell, and Linux Mint 18.3 Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:27pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:25pm
Story Servers: HPC, Red Hat, Fedora Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:23pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 4:15pm
Story Red Hat: OpenStack, Container, SAP, Fedora 27 Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 2:27pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 2:19pm
Story 3 open source alternatives to ArcGIS Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 2:13pm
Story KaOS Linux's November 2017 Release Adds KDE Plasma 5.11.3, Linux Kernel 4.13.12 Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 2:08pm
Story Anonymous Live OS Tails Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.13, Latest Tor Software Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 2:07pm

Graphics: RADV, VC5 Gallium3D, Radeon

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Canonical's Mir Patches Are Breaking RADV With Stock Mesa On Ubuntu

    If you have been trying to use the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver that's packaged for Ubuntu but find it not working, chances are it's caused by Canonical's patches for Mir support.

    RADV developer David Airlie of Red Hat today sent out a notice that Canonical's Mir patches in their Mesa packages are breaking the RADV driver. Ubuntu isn't shipping Vulkan drivers by default yet but ANV and RADV can be easily obtained on Ubuntu Linux systems via sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers for the RADV/ANV drivers built against their stock version of Mesa.

  • VC5 Gallium3D OpenGL Driver Is Starting To Get Fit

    Broadcom's Eric Anholt has remained busy in bringing up the VC5 Gallium3D driver.

    Anholt has added occlusion query support to this driver for next-gen Broadcom graphics hardware as well as improving the debugging output, fixing some crashes, and fixing other OpenGL functionality with this driver. It's been a busy time for him in bringing up this new driver stack as well as continuing to maintain the VC4 driver that continues to be most notably used by the current range of Raspberry Pi ARM boards.

  • More RADV Radeon Vulkan Optimizations Are In The Works

    We are just one week into November and already there are a number of patches volleyed onto the mailing list for continuing to optimize the RADV open-source Radeon Vulkan driver.

  • Radeon VCN Encode Support For RadeonSI Gallium3D

    Earlier this year patches were posted and merged for VCN video decode support with RadeonSI/Gallium3D while now patches are coming from AMD for wiring up VCN video encoding support.

    VCN is a new media block with the upcoming Raven Ridge (Zen+Vega) APUs for both video encode and decode. In the past there was UVD for video decoding and VCE for video encoding while now VCN offers both multimedia encode/decode unified functionality via this new implementation. As mentioned, the VCN video decode bits are already in Mesa while the video encode pieces are now under review.

Free Software/Games, Proprietary and Sales

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Five Desktop Environments, Updated KDE Plasma 5, and GNOME News

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Linux Desktop Roundup | A Look at Five Desktop Environments

    Here are my thoughts on KDE Plasma, GNOME, Cinnamon, MATE and XFCE.

    Please be sure to give EzeeLinux a ‘Like’ on Facebook! Thanks! Also check out http://www.ezeelinux.com for more about Linux.

  • Plasma 5.11.3

    Tuesday, 7 November 2017. Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.11.3. Plasma 5.11 was released in October with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

  • GtkSourceView fundraising – September/October report

    I’ve launched two months ago a fundraising for the GtkSourceView library. I intend to write a report every two months, so that you can follow what’s going on in that project, and at the same occasion I can explain in more details some facets of the fundraising.

  • Closures with Async Operations

    Way back in 2011 people were discussing usage of modern GCC features like __attribute__((cleanup())). A few years later it found it’s way into our API’s in GLib with one small caveat, only GCC/Clang support (so no MSVC/Xlc/SunProC). Since I couldn’t care less about MSVC I’ve been using it for years (and really Microsoft, you could contribute more to the mental health of open source programmers by modernizing MSVC).

Orange and Red Hat, Bodhi 3 in Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Orange and Red Hat Join Forces to Spearhead Network Virtualization Innovation

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced it is collaborating with Orange, a major multinational telecom operator, to build a modern infrastructure for an agile, responsive network aimed at bringing innovations to customers more quickly and scaling out services dynamically. They are collaborating in open source community projects to accelerate technology innovation in network virtualization, while Orange is using Red Hat OpenStack Platform for its network functions virtualization infrastructure (NFVi) deployments.

  • Stock Under Review: Looking at the Levels for Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Bodhi 3

    Bodhi 3.0.0 was released and deployed to production a few weeks ago, but I wanted to give it the dignity of a blog post since it is a pretty significant milestone in the project's history. Bodhi 3.0.0 is the first Bodhi release that fully supports a non-RPM content type with the addition of the ability to mash modules.

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Uber Made Its Homegrown AI Language Open Source, but Not Entirely out of Altruism

    Uber’s artificial-intelligence lab is less than a year old, but researchers there have already built their own programming language for AI applications—and now they’re releasing it for anyone to use. Quite a generous move for a company known more for its hard-nosed business tactics than for handing out in-house innovations to potential competitors.

  • Kubernetes by the numbers: 10 compelling stats

    How quickly has Kubernetes’ popularity soared? By most accounts, very quickly. Earlier this year, Cloud Native Computing Foundation executive director Dan Kohn penned a blog post that dug into that claim. People regularly tout Kubernetes as one of the highest velocity projects ever in open source history: Does the data back it up?

    As Kohn found, there may not be a single definitive metric, but they all point in the same conclusion: “You can pick your preferred statistic, such as that Kubernetes is in the top 0.00006% of the projects on GitHub,” Kohn wrote. “I prefer to just think of it as one of the fastest moving projects in the history of open source.”

  • HyperLedger – The Linux Foundation’s Blockchain Framework for Business

    Blockchain development is a novelty in the tech world, but has been around long enough to see platforms such as Ethereum give birth to a myriad of decentralized applications. These dApps aim to solve some of the world’s problems, challenges, or to create new marketplaces.

    Hyperledger is a blockchain project started by the Linux Foundation in January of 2016 as an enterprise-level development framework. This open-source collaboration has attracted the support of many leaders across various industries that want to utilize blockchain technology to facilitate interconnectivity between businesses.

  • The Open-Source Model And Wall Street
  • Open Source Machine Learning: Open Source Dominates Preferred ML and AI Tools and Frameworks

    Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies are being developed and adopted at a rapid pace. This area has become a hot topic in 2017. Interestingly, many of the more prominent tools are Open Source. The technologies are being used with a wide variety of applications, like search, data mining, spam detection, character recognition, autonomous vehicles, online recommendations

    Many of those Open Source tools offer a Python interface to allow developers to jump in quickly. For example, there are core libraries like NumPy, SciPy and SciKit. Keras is a Deep Learning library and TensorFlow is Google’s Open Source Machine Learning tool.

  • Global Application Modernization Services Market 2017-2022 - Open-Source Technology Paving the Way for Untapped Possibilities
  • Service providers use NFV open source to innovate the network

    With NFV open source, service providers can push network innovation and reduce network costs. But service providers will need to adjust to a new open source culture.

  • Open Source Initiative Announces DigitalOcean Corporate Sponsorship

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), dedicated to increasing the awareness and adoption of open source software, is delighted to welcome DigitalOcean as a Premium Sponsor. DigitalOcean, a cloud services platform designed for developers, will provide both financial support and hosting for several OSI community-driven services.

    A Forbes' Cloud 100 company, DigitalOcean's active engagement and investment in open source software highlights how today's most innovative and successful companies have recognized the value of, and opportunities within, open communities of collaboration. The company regularly sponsors open source related MeetUps and Hackathons—including their popular "Hacktoberfest", develops tutorials on open source technologies and techniques, maintains and contributes to a number of open source projects, and of course offers hosting to open source projects and foundations.

  • Highlights from the fifth annual SeaGL conference

    The fifth annual Seattle GNU/Linux Conference (better known as SeaGL), held Oct. 6–7 at Seattle Central College, was again a great event. Seattle even rolled out the welcome committee for us with penguins on the train and geek-oriented tagging posted around town.

  • R / Finance 2018 Call for Papers

    The tenth (!!) annual annual R/Finance conference will take in Chicago on the UIC campus on June 1 and 2, 2018. Please see the call for papers below (or at the website) and consider submitting a paper.

    We are once again very excited about our conference, thrilled about who we hope may agree to be our anniversary keynotes, and hope that many R / Finance users will not only join us in Chicago in June -- and also submit an exciting proposal.

    So read on below, and see you in Chicago in June!

  • Juniper Integrates AppFormix into Contrail Cloud for OpenStack

    At the OpenStack Summit in Sydney, Australia, Juniper announced multiple enhancements to its Contrail Cloud Software Defined Networking (SDN) platform. Among the enhancements are integrated AppFormix visibility capabilities and integrated support for Red Hat's Ceph Storage platform.

  • From imaging neurons to understanding space - what's happening in science with OpenStack?

     

    Scientists are increasingly turning to the open source infrastructure to support the enormous data their experiments yield

  • Stressed about serverless lock-in? Don't be [Ed: Mac Asay continues to promote dangerous buzzwords like "serverless" and denies the fact it's all just lock-in]
  • How to Monetize an Open Source Project [Ed: Engaging Steven Grandchamp from Microsoft as though he's a FOSS expert?!]

Copyleft and Licensing

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • FSFE makes copyrights computer readable

    The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is proud to release its next version of our REUSE practices designed to make computers understand software copyrights and licenses.

    The REUSE practices help software developers make simple additions to license headers which make it easier for a computer to determine what license applies to the various parts of a programs source code. By following the REUSE practices, software developers can ensure their intent to license software under a particular license is understood and more readily adhered to.

    Together with the updated practices, which mostly clarify and make explicit some points, the FSFE is also releasing a set of developer tools and examples which show the REUSE practices in action. Three example repositories, together with an example walkthrough of the process used to make the cURL project REUSE compliant, are complemented with a simple tool to validate whether a program is REUSE compliant.

  • Apple Will No Longer Be Developing CUPS Under The GPL

    One decade after Apple bought out CUPS as the de facto printing system for Unix-like operating systems, they are changing the code license.

    The CUPS Common UNIX Printing System up to now had been developed under the GPLv2 license while now Apple will be switching it to the Apache 2.0 software license.

  • Software Freedom Law Center and Conservancy

    There’s been quite a bit of interest recently about the petition by Software Freedom Law Center to cancel the Software Freedom Conservancy’s trademark. A number of people have asked my views on it, so I thought I’d write up a quick blog on my experience with SFLC and Conservancy both during my time as Debian Project Leader, and since.

    It’s clear to me that for some time, there’s been quite a bit of animosity between SFLC and Conservancy, which for me started to become apparent around the time of the large debate over ZFS on Linux. I talked about this in my DebConf 16 talk, which fortunately was recorded (ZFS bit from 8:05 to 17:30).

Security: USB. WPA2, Updates, Magento

Filed under
Security

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Programming and Hardware: Atom 1.22, BSD, GCC, RISC-V, ROCm

Filed under
Development
  • Atom 1.22

    Users who work with large projects will be happy to see we resolved a long-standing performance issue related to spawning Git processes to fetch Git status. This manifested in periodic pauses of Atom’s UI and we’ve seen a noticeably smoother experience.

    The autocomplete-plus default provider now computes suggestions natively and on a separate thread. This means no memory overhead and no threat to Atom’s responsiveness. Read more in our in-depth blog post on Atom’s new concurrency-friendly buffer implementation.

  • Atom 1.22 Hackable Text Editor Introduces Performance and Usability Improvements

    GitHub updated their open-source and cross-platform Atom hackable text editor to version 1.22, a monthly bugfix release that promises to add an extra layer of performance and usability improvements.

    Atom 1.22 is here to address a long-standing performance issue for those who work with large projects. The issue was related to the spawning of Git processes that fetch the Git status, and it would apparently occur at times.

  • The first AF3e preorders

    This morning, Google alerted me to a reputable site mentioning “Absolute FreeBSD, 3rd Edition.”

  • Paul Irofti (pirofti@) on hotplugd(8), math ports, xhci(4) and  other kernel advancements
  • Cannonlake Onboarding Posted For GCC Compiler

    An Intel developer is looking to merge the -march=cannonlake support for the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC).

  • Codasip and Avery Partner to Improve Regression Test Methodology of RISC-V Processors

    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded CPU cores, today announced its partnership with Avery Design Systems, the provider of cutting-edge verification intellectual property (VIP) solutions for SoC and IP companies.

  • Exploring AMD’s Ambitious ROCm Initiative

    The ROCm developers wanted a platform that supports a number of different programming languages and is flexible enough to interface with different GPU-based hardware environments (Figure 1). As you will learn later in this article, ROCm provides direct support for OpenCL, Python, and several common C++ variants. One of the most innovative features of the platform is the Heterogeneous-Compute Interface for Portability (HIP) tool, which offers a vendor-neutral dialect of C++ that is ready to compile for either the AMD or CUDA/NVIDIA GPU environment.

  • RQuantLib 0.4.4: Several smaller updates

Microsoft and Intel Back Doors

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

GNU Pioneer Stallman to Speak to CWDS Lunch

Filed under
GNU

Richard Stallman founded the free software movement 34 years ago and announced the GNU Project, the thrust of which wasn’t software’s cost but its ability to be shared, changed and shared again. One offshoot of the project was GNU/Linux, software created and inspired by the movement’s open-source principles.

CWDS is hosting Stallman because it, too, is trying to foster innovation in state IT while freely sharing the products of its best efforts with the city, county and other state agencies it supports through tech.

Read more

Linux Boards with Intel (Back Doors)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Arduino Create Expands to Support Linux on Intel Chips

    When we talk about open source hardware, we often think about the Raspberry Pi and other community-backed single board computers running Linux. Yet all these communities were modeled on the success of the 14-year-old Arduino project, in which Linux has been only tangentially involved, and only over the past four years. The two platforms should grow closer, however, now that Arduino has extended its Arduino Create development environment to support Linux on x86 platforms.

    With the new Linux support, “users are now able to program their Linux devices as if they were regular Arduinos,” says Arduino. Arduino Create works in concert with embedded Linux distributions – initially Ubuntu or Intel’s Wind River Pulsar Linux – to let developers load Arduino sketches to control lower level interfaces to sensors and other Internet of Things peripherals.

  • 3.5-inch SBC comes in 6th and 7th Gen Intel flavors

    Commell’s 3.5-inch “LS-37K” SBC supports 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series and Xeon-E3-1200 v5 CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, triple displays, 2x SATA, and mSATA.

    Commell announced a 3.5-inch SBC with Intel’s 6th (“Skylake”) or 7th (“Kaby Lake”) Gen Core S-series and Xeon-E3-1200 v5 CPUs. The LS-37K’s layout and feature set are similar to that of its Skylake based LE-37I and LE-37G 3.5-inch boards. As usual, no OS support is listed, but Linux should run with no problem.

  • Apollo Lake DIN-rail computer packs a lot in a little

    Axiomtek’s Linux-friendly “ICO120-83D” IoT gateway runs on a dual-core Apollo Lake Celeron, and offers mini-PCIe expansion and extended temp support.

    Axiomtek has launched an ICO120-83D Internet of Things gateway that runs on Intel’s dual-core, 1.1GHz Celeron N3350 SoC with 6W TDP. The system has the same Apollo Lake processor and fanless DIN-rail design as the recent ICO300-83B gateway, but with a more compact 125 x 100 x 31mm. 0.3 k footprint and a reduced feature set.

Carrier board extends Linux-driven Jetson modules

Filed under
Linux

Aetina’s “ACE-N261” Nano-ITX carrier for the Jetson TX1/TX2 COMs offers GbE, HDMI, 2x USB 3.0, 2x CAN, 2x mini-PCIe, and optional -20 to 70°C support.

In April, Aetina announced a Nano-ITX ACE-N620 carrier board for Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 COM, as well as its earlier, pin-compatible Jetson TX1. The company has now announced a more feature-rich ACE-N261 Nano-ITX (120 x 120mm) carrier aimed at machine vision.

Read more

GCC 8 & LLVM Clang 6.0 Compiler Performance On AMD EPYC - November 2017

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the continuously evolving state of open-source code compilers, especially for the newer AMD Zen "znver1" architecture, here is the latest installment of our compiler benchmarks. Tested for this article from and AMD EPYC 7601 processor were GCC 7.2, GCC 8.0.0, LLVM Clang 5.0, and LLVM Clang 6.0 SVN.

Read more

Linux 4.13.12

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.13.12 kernel.

All users of the 4.13 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.13.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.13.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.9.61

Linux 4.4.97

Linux 3.18.80

Arch Linux Officially Kills 32-Bit Support, Migrate to "Arch Linux 32" Fork Now

Filed under
Linux

The Arch Linux devs announced today that they are officially terminating support for 32-bit architectures, removing all i686 packages from the repositories by the end of the month.

At the beginning of the year, on January 25, Arch Linux's Bartłomiej Piotrowski announced that they are phasing out 32-bit (i686) support for the operating system beginning March 1, 2017, no longer building monthly ISO snapshots that support 32-bit installation.

Arch Linux 2017.02.01 was the last monthly ISO snapshot released with 32-bit support, as all ISO snapshots that followed included only 64-bit packages, but existing 32-bit installations were still supported for a 9-month period during which users were had to move to 64-bit.

Read more

Also: Arch Linux Ends i686 Package Support Today

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Daily Builds Now Available to Download

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth dubbed the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system as the "Bionic Beaver," but he didn't reveal any of the plans for the next long-term supported release of one of the most popular free operating systems in the world, which Canonical will maintain for the next five years.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is in early development stages, which means that the daily build ISO image is currently based on the stable branch, Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark). As such, it's running the Linux 4.13 kernel and uses the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

Read more

Also: Daily ISOs Begin For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver"

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More in Tux Machines

Tizen News

OSS Leftovers

  • How Open Source Tech Helps Feds Solve Workforce Turnover Issues
    Just as a mainframe from decades ago might be ready for retirement, the IT staff who originally procured and installed that system might also be preparing for a new phase in their lives. It’s up to the current and next generation of government IT employees to prepare for that eventuality, but there are indications they may not be ready, despite evidence that older IT professionals are retiring or will soon be leaving their positions. Unfortunately, a skills gap exists even among younger generation IT workers. Agencies are scrambling to find personnel with expertise in cloud service management, cybersecurity, technical architecture and legacy technologies, such as common business-oriented language (COBOL) and mainframes, among other areas. At the same time that many workers are getting ready to retire, leaving behind a wealth of knowledge, many younger IT professionals are struggling to gain the knowledge they will need to take their agencies into the future.
  • Introducing Fn: “Serverless must be open, community-driven, and cloud-neutral”
    Fn, a new serverless open source project was announced at this year’s JavaOne. There’s no risk of cloud lock-in and you can write functions in your favorite programming language. “You can make anything, including existing libraries, into a function by packaging it in a Docker container.” We invited Bob Quillin, VP for the Oracle Container Group to talk about Fn, its best features, next milestones and more.
  • Debian seminar in Yokohama, 2017/11/18
    I had attended to Tokyo area debian seminar #157. The day’s special guest is Chris Lamb, the Debian Project Leader in 2017. He had attended to Open Compliance Summit, so we invited him as our guest.
  • Overclock Labs bets on Kubernetes to help companies automate their cloud infrastructure
    Overclock Labs wants to make it easier for developers to deploy and manage their applications across clouds. To do so, the company is building tools to automate distributed cloud infrastructure and, unsurprisingly, it is betting on containers — and specifically the Kubernetes container orchestration tools — to do this. Today, Overclock Labs, which was founded two years ago, is coming out of stealth and announcing that it raised a $1.3 million seed round from a number of Silicon Valley angel investors and CrunchFund — the fund that shares a bit of its name and history with TechCrunch but is otherwise completely unaffiliated with the blog you are currently reading.
  • MariaDB Energizes the Data Warehouse with Open Source Analytics Solution
    MariaDB® Corporation, the company behind the fastest growing open source database, today announced new product enhancements to MariaDB AX, delivering a modern approach to data warehousing that enables customers to easily perform fast and scalable analytics with better price performance over proprietary solutions. MariaDB AX expands the highly successful MariaDB Server, creating a solution that enables high performance analytics with distributed storage and parallel processing, and that scales with existing commodity hardware on premises or across any cloud platform. With MariaDB AX, data across every facet of the business is transformed into meaningful and actionable results.
  • AT&T Wants White Box Routers with an Open Operating System [Ed: AT&T wants to openwash its surveillance equipment]
    AT&T says it’s not enough to deploy white box hardware and to orchestrate its networks with the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) software. “Each individual machine also needs its own operating system,” writes Chris Rice, senior vice president of AT&T Labs, Domain 2.0 Architecture, in a blog post. To that end, AT&T announced its newest effort — the Open Architecture for a Disaggregated Network Operating System (dNOS).
  • Intel Lands Support For Vector Neural Network Instructions In LLVM
  • p2k17 Hackathon report: Antoine Jacoutot on ports+packages progress
  • GCC 8 Feature Development Is Over
    Feature development on the GCC 8 compiler is over with it now entering stage three of its development process. SUSE's Richard Biener announced minutes ago that GCC 8 entered stage three development, meaning only general bug fixing and documentation updates are permitted.
  • 2018 Is The Year For Open Source Software For The Pentagon
  • Open-source defenders turn on each other in 'bizarre' trademark fight sparked by GPL fall out
    Two organizations founded to help and support developers of free and open-source software have locked horns in public, betraying a long-running quarrel rumbling mostly behind the scenes. On one side, the Software Freedom Law Center, which today seeks to resolve licensing disputes amicably. On the other, the Software Freedom Conservancy, which takes a relatively harder line against the noncompliance of licensing terms. The battleground: the, er, US Patent and Trademark Office. The law center has demanded the cancellation of a trademark held by the conservancy.
  • Open Source Underwater Glider: An Interview with Alex Williams, Grand Prize Winner
    Alex Williams pulled off an incredible engineering project. He developed an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) which uses a buoyancy engine rather than propellers as its propulsion mechanism and made the entire project Open Source and Open Hardware.

Programming Leftovers

Security: Linux, Free Software Principles, Microsoft and Intel

  • Some 'security people are f*cking morons' says Linus Torvalds
    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has offered some very choice words about different approaches security, during a discussion about whitelisting features proposed for version 4.15 of the Linux kernel. Torvalds' ire was directed at open software aficionado and member of Google's Pixel security team Kees Cook, who he has previously accused of idiocy. Cook earned this round of shoutiness after he posted a request to “Please pull these hardened usercopy changes for v4.15-rc1.”
  • Free Software Principles
    Ten thousand dollars is more than $3,000, so the motives don't add up for me. Hutchins may or may not have written some code, and that code may or may not have been used to commit a crime. Tech-literate people, such as the readers of Linux Magazine, understand the difference between creating a work and using it to commit a crime, but most of the media coverage – in the UK, at least – has been desperate to follow the paradigm of building a man up only to gleefully knock him down. Even his achievement of stopping WannaCry is decried as "accidental," a word full of self-deprecating charm when used by Hutchins, but which simply sounds malicious in the hands of the Daily Mail and The Telegraph.
  • New warning over back door in Linux
    Researchers working at Russian cyber security firm Dr Web claim to have found a new vulnerability that enables remote attackers to crack Linux installations virtually unnoticed. According to the anti-malware company, cyber criminals are getting into the popular open-source operating system via a new backdoor. This, they say, is "indirect evidence" that cyber criminals are showing an increasing interest in targeting Linux and the applications it powers. The trojan, which it's calling Linux.BackDoor.Hook.1, targets the library libz primarily. It offers compression and extraction capabilities for a plethora of Linux-based programmes.
  • IN CHATLOGS, CELEBRATED HACKER AND ACTIVIST CONFESSES COUNTLESS SEXUAL ASSAULTS
  • Bipartisan Harvard panel recommends hacking [sic] safeguards for elections
     

    The guidelines are intended to reduce risks in low-budget local races as well as the high-stakes Congressional midterm contests next year. Though most of the suggestions cost little or nothing to implement and will strike security professionals as common sense, notorious attacks including the leak of the emails of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chair, John Podesta, have succeeded because basic security practices were not followed.  

  • Intel Chip Flaws Leave Millions of Devices Exposed
     

    On Monday, the chipmaker released a security advisory that lists new vulnerabilities in ME, as well as bugs in the remote server management tool Server Platform Services, and Intel’s hardware authentication tool Trusted Execution Engine. Intel found the vulnerabilities after conducting a security audit spurred by recent research. It has also published a Detection Tool so Windows and Linux administrators can check their systems to see if they're exposed.