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Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Renesas spins 3rd Gen automotive starter kits, adds new M3 SoC Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 11:06pm
Story Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 6:48pm
Story Radeon vs. Nouveau Open-Source Drivers On Mesa Git + Linux 4.9 Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 6:47pm
Story Ubuntu MATE, Not Just a Whim Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 6:34pm
Story EU-Fossa project submits results of code audits Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 6:27pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 3:44pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 3:39pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 3:38pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 3:34pm
Story And More Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 3:32pm

How Building Strong Open Source Teams Is Like Raising Chickens

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Dr. Margaret Heffernan, in her LinuxCon North America keynote, tells an open source story that isn't about software. It's a story about chickens.

If your organization is struggling to build teams that work well together, and it feels more like The Hunger Games than a smoothly functioning team, let the tale of the two chicken flocks show you the open source way. Dr. Heffernan tells how a reseacher used two flocks of laying hens to study how to breed more productive egg-layers. One was an average, nothing special flock, just ordinary hens. The other flock was composed of super-chickens, hens who were highly productive egg layers. The researcher bred only the most productive of the super-chickens, and did no selective breeding in the first flock.

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Also: Keynote: Beyond Measure: The True Power and Skill of Collaboration by Dr. Margaret Heffernan

Linux Foundation whacks open JavaScript projects umbrella

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A project fostering JavaScript’s panoply of projects has been established by the Linux Foundation.

The JS Foundation will cultivate JavaScript application and server-side projects. The thinking is to create a centre that drives broad adoption and development of JavaScript technologies and that fosters collaboration. It should help devs and tools builders make sense of the rapid pace of change.

The focus on standardization and mentoring, JS Foundation executive director Kris Borchers told the Open Source Business Conference in London on Monday. The Linux Foundation and Node.JS will, in particular, work to advance the JavaScript language through bodies such as ECMA TC39 and the W3C.

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Open source ResinOS adds Docker to ARM/Linux boards

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OSS has spun off the Yocto-based OS behind its IoT framework as a ResinOS 2.0 distro for running Docker containers on Linux IoT devices., the company behind the Linux/Javascript-based IoT framework for deploying applications as Docker containers, began spinning off the Linux OS behind the framework as an open source project over a year ago. The open source ResinOS is now publicly available on its own in a stable 2.0.0-beta.1 version, letting other developers create their own Docker-based IoT networks. ResinOS can run on 20 different mostly ARM-based embedded Linux platforms including the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone, and Odroid-C1, enabling secure rollouts of updated applications over a heterogeneous network.

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Happy 15th Birthday Red Hat Product Security

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Red Hat

This summer marked 15 years since we founded a dedicated Product Security team for Red Hat. While we often publish information in this blog about security technologies and vulnerabilities, we rarely give an introspection into the team itself. So I’d like, if I may, to take you on a little journey through those 15 years and call out some events that mean the most to me; particularly what’s changed and what’s stayed the same. In the coming weeks some other past and present members of the team will be giving their anecdotes and opinions too. If you have a memory of working with our team we’d love to hear about it, you can add a comment here or tweet me.

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Entroware Is Now Shipping PCs with Ubuntu 16.10 and Ubuntu MATE 16.10

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Entroware, a UK-based hardware manufacturer known for offering desktops, laptops, and servers with the popular Ubuntu operating system pre-installed, announced that they are now shipping with the latest Ubuntu release.

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Linux Kernel News

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  • Linux Kernel 4.8.2 Is Out with x86 and ARM Improvements, Updated Drivers

    Today, October 16, 2016, renowned kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman was proud to announce the general availability of the second point release to the Linux 4.8 kernel series.

    That's right, Linux kernel 4.8.2 is here, and it arrives a little over a week from the first maintenance update. According to the appended shortlog and the diff from Linux kernel 4.8.1, the new version changes a total of 52 files, with 487 insertions and 213 deletions. Overall, the Linux 4.8.2 kernel looks pretty small in changes with the exception of some ARM and x86 improvements, and the updated drivers.

  • Linux Kernel 4.7.8 Released with x86, ARM, and PowerPC Fixes, Updated Drivers

    Immediately after announcing the second point release of the Linux 4.8 kernel series, Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the immediate availability of Linux kernel 4.7.8.

  • Linus Torvalds Announces the First Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.9

    The first Release Candidate (RC) snapshot of the Linux 4.9 kernel was announced by Linus Torvalds on October 15, 2016, which means that the merge window is now close and development was begun.

    According to Linus Torvalds, the Linux kernel 4.9 merge window was pretty big and that's why we're seeing the first Release Candidate build a day earlier than expected. Another reason for shipping the RC1 earlier is to not encourage kernel developers to send in last-minute pull requests.

Leftovers: Software

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  • Calamares 2.4.2 Universal Linux Installer Supports Disabling of LUKS UI Elements

    The development team behind the Calamares universal installer framework for GNU/Linux distributions announced the second update to the Calamares 2.4 stable series.

    Calamares 2.4.2 is now the latest version of the installer, and, according to release notes, it implements support for disabling LUKS (Linux Unified Key Setup) related UI (User Interface) elements, adds support for Debian-style /etc/default/keyboard configuration as an option, improves the checking of system requirements configuration, and removes the dependency of chfn in the users module.

  • 10 Top Tools for Novelists

    Writing is one of the essential skills in modern society. Being able to communicate effectively is paramount both at work and at home. It makes your thinking visible to others, and is the main way in which work, learning, and intellect is judged by others.

    At first glance, the trusty word processor might seem a good tool for a novelist. After all, in days gone by, budding authors would tap away using a typewritter, and a word processor is the modern day equivalent. Linux has some excellent word processing software such as LibreOffice. However, word processors are actually not the ideal tool for some forms of writing, particularly novel-writing. In fact, it could be said that using a word processor for novel-writing is a recipe for disaster, and actually a retrograde step from a typewritter. Word processors are a general application software that are perfect for constructing business documents, letters, batch mailings using templates, etc. However, many word processors are too obtrusive and distracting for writers. What is needed is software that helps concentrate on the content of the novel, sketch out the chapters and scenes, work out the best structure, import research, add locations, characters and objects, and so on.

  • Lighttpd 1.4.42 Brings New Modules, Rewritten Authentication Framework

    Lighttpd 1.4.42 was released this Sunday morning as the newest version of this open-source, lightweight HTTP web-server.

    Lighttpd 1.4.42 introduces some new modules including mod_deflate, mod_geoip, and mod_uploadprogress. This release also has a rewritten auth framework that affects mod_authn_ldap, mod_authn_gssapi, and mod_authn_mysql.

  • Nautilus 3.22.1 File Manager Improves the Batch Renaming Feature, Adds Fixes

    The popular Nautilus (Files) file manager saw its first point release for the latest 3.22 series, distributed as part of the recently announced GNOME 3.22.1 desktop environment.

    Yes, that's right, we're talking here about Nautilus 3.22.1, the latest, and most advanced, stable version of the file manager used in numerous GNU/Linux distributions, including the very popular Ubuntu, Fedora Workstation, openSUSE Leap and Tumbleweed, Solus, and many others.

ExLight Live DVD Is Now Based on Ubuntu 16.10, Ships with Enlightenment 0.20

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Today, October 16, 2016, GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton informs Softpedia about the release and immediate availability of a new, updated version of his lightweight ExLight Live DVD distribution.

Based on the recently released Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) and Debian GNU/Linux 8.6 "Jessie" operating systems, ExLight Live DVD Build 161016 uses Arne Exton's special kernel 4.8.0-21-exton, which is based on Linux kernel 4.8 (also used in Ubuntu 16.10), replacing the 4.6.0-10-exlight kernel used in previous releases of ExLight.

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4MParted 20 Disk Partitioning Live CD Enters Beta Stage, Based on GParted 0.26.1

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Today, October 16, 2016, 4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia about the release and immediate availability of the Beta pre-release version of the upcoming 4MParted 20.0 Live CD.

Based on the 4MLinux 20.0 operating system, which is also in the Beta stages of development, the 4MParted 20.0 disk partitioning Live CD is built around the popular and open-source GParted 0.26.1 graphical partition editor utility, which right now is the best tool for formatting, resizing, splitting, and joining disk partitions of any type.

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Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Review

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Overall, I want to congratulate the Ubuntu MATE development team on really working hard to nail the user experience. This is one of the better distributions out there and a great example for others with regards to the Welcome app and the initial introduction to the system. If you are looking for a solid desktop environment to explore, be sure to give Ubuntu MATE a try, it's an excellent distribution.

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Ubuntu Budgie Remix 16.10 Officially Released, Available for Download Now

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Softpedia was informed today, October 16, 2016, by budgie-remix project leader David Mohammed about the official and final release of the Ubuntu Budgie Remix 16.10 computer operating system.

Based on the recently released Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) distro, Ubuntu Budgie Remix (budgie-remix) 16.10 ships with a kernel from the Linux 4.8 series and it's built around the Budgie 10.2.7 desktop environment developed by the Solus Project. There are a lot of great new features implemented in this major version, such as full disk encryption support, Home folder encryption, and support for more languages during installation.

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Also: Ubuntu 17.04 — What Do You Think The Codename Will Be?

Linux 4.8.2

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I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.2 kernel.

All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at:
git:// linux-4.8.y
and can be browsed at the normal git web browser:

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Also: Linux 4.7.8

Linux 4.4.25

Dota 2 Radeon OpenGL vs. Vulkan Performance With Mesa Git, Linux 4.9-rc1

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Now that the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver has landed in Mesa Git and Linux 4.9-rc1 is out, I figured it was time for some fresh benchmarks of the Radeon Vulkan driver against the RadeonSI Gallium3D OpenGL driver. Here is the first of that new data.

For some Sunday benchmarking fun was testing RADV Vulkan vs. RadeonSI OpenGL for Dota 2, the best Vulkan benchmark on Linux to date. In addition to looking at the latest performance results, the Phoronix Test Suite was looking at the CPU utilization in both scenarios too (by setting the MONITOR=cpu.usage environment variable). The OpenGL vs. Vulkan tests were done at a variety of resolutions.

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Also: Mesa Benchmarks Post-ReZ RadeonSI Change, Another Game Jumps Up By ~20%

10 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 16.10 'Yakkety Yak'

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Ubuntu 16.10 was recently released with some improvements. According to the poll 53% conducted on LinuxAndUbuntu, 53% users will upgrade to Ubuntu 16.10. But what to do next after you've upgraded to Yakkety Yak. In this article, I'll walk you through the 10 Things to do after installing Ubuntu 16.10.

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Top 5 Penetration Testing Linux Distributions

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There are a seemingly endless amount of Linux distros for just about every area of use. This includes pen testing, sometimes called hacking, distros. Some of you are undoubtedly familiar with, at least if you have spent any time looking around at all the distributions out there. ​

Read<br />

today's leftovers

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.