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Monday, 16 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 11/01/2017 - 1:02am
Story ISO File Verification - The Laziest Way Possible relativ7 11/01/2017 - 12:44am
Story How To Break Free From Your Computer Operating System -- If You Dare Roy Schestowitz 11/01/2017 - 12:32am
Story Set Up Two Factor Auth (2FA) on Your Smartphone & Linux Desktop... now. relativ7 11/01/2017 - 12:29am
Story Security OS Kodachi Linux 3.7 Released with Anonymous Wallpapers, Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 11:47pm
Story GNU/Linux Workstations Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 11:36pm
Story Synfig 1.2.0 Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 11:32pm
Story User Asks Canonical to Backport Mesa 13.0.2 Stable for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS HWE Rianne Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 11:23pm
Story Reviewing the Librem 15 Rianne Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 11:10pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 11:00pm

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

AGL, Linux Foundation and Linux

Filed under
Linux

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Steam And Linux On PS4- Traces of AMD’s Bonaire GPU found

    In another attempt by hackers to run steam and Linux on PS4, it hit a dead end: they could not get the PS4’s GPU to display any sort of output or even process any kind of graphics. Much like any dead end, if you need a workaround you research the internet. So, the hackers did the same and found a chink in the armor of GPU script.

  • Steam’s Linux and OpenGL Efforts Forced Microsoft to Take PC Gaming Seriously: Former Valve Employee

    Ex-Valve employee Rich Geldreich — who worked on games such as Portal 2 and Linux versions of Valve’s games based on the original Source Engine — took to his blog to share the impact Valve’s efforts with Linux and OpenGL had on the industry. Particularly in getting Microsoft to support PC gaming better.

    One post on Valve’s Linux blog, entitled ‘Faster Zombies’ is of interest as it showed off what performance Valve was able to get out of its games running Linux and OpenGL, which was faster than using Windows with Direct3D on the same systems. Written by Gabe Newell himself, it resulted in Microsoft paying the company a visit.

  • Valve's Linux support 'lit a fire' under Microsoft execs, says ex-Valve engineer

    In the summer of 2013, Valve made a show of throwing support behind Linux by moving to port its game engine and Steam platform to run on the cult favorite operating system, generating a bit of cautious optimism among game devs.

    PC game makers may recall that Valve even launched its own Linux-focused blog, and shortly after launch it published a post outlining how the company had tweaked Left 4 Dead 2 to the point that it actually ran better on Linux using OpenGL than on Windows 7 using Direct3D. Now, years later, devs may be curious to hear that one of the primary engineers on that project believes it helped encourage Microsoft to bolster its support for Direct3D tech.

    Longtime game engineer Rich Geldreich (who currently works at Unity and occasionally blogs on Gamasutra) was working at Valve on the Steam Linux project in 2013, and this week he published a post to his personal blog reminiscing about what it was like to be there in the room with company chief Gabe Newell helping to write that Left 4 Dead 2 Linux performance post -- and how Valve's big push for Linux influenced the industry in some surprising ways.

  • Beamdog (Baldur's Gate: Enhanced Edition) are working on another game, testers needed

    It seems Beamdog may be doing a revamp of another title, or possibly even an original title. They have sent word that they need game testers, including Linux gamers.

KDE Plasma 5.8.5 LTS Lands for Kubuntu 16.04 LTS and 16.10, Here's How to Update

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

The Kubuntu team proudly announced today, January 5, 2017, the general availability of KDE's Plasma 5.8.5 desktop on the backports repositories of the Kubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) and Kubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating systems.

This exciting announcement comes almost one month after users were invited to test drive the latest KDE Plasma 5.8.5 LTS desktop environment on their Kubuntu or Ubuntu installations by using the Backports Landing testing repository, as reported right here on Softpedia.

Read more

Also: Plasma 5.8.5 bugfix release in Xenial and Yakkety Backports now

Pinebook and Endless Updates

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • $89 Pinebook Linux Laptop To Go On Sale Next Month

    New details about the $89 Linux ARM laptop have emerged, including a tentative shipping date and warranty details.

  • Endless is bringing its cheap, user-friendly Linux PCs to the US

    The dream of a Linux computer for normal humans is relatively dead. Sure, Google put Linux in billions of hands and homes with Android and Chrome OS, but neither OS is very much like the desktop Linux flavors well-meaning open-source developers have been crafting for decades.

  • Endless introduces Linux mini desktop PCs for American market

    For the past few years Endless Computers has been making inexpensive Linux-based computers designed for use in emerging markets. Last summer the company also started working with PC makers to load its Endless OS software on some computers.

    Now Endless is launching its first products designed specifically for the United States.

  • Endless Unveils Mission Mini and Mission One Computers as the Endless Experience Comes to America
  • Endless expands into the U.S. with $129 Mission Mini and $249 Mission One computers

    Computers have become an important part of our world, especially in the classrooms and at home, but while many can afford these devices — often costing hundreds, if not thousands of dollars — there are still those left behind. Endless Mobile was founded five years ago with the mission to make computing universally accessible, creating an operating system initially targeted toward emerging markets.

  • Closer look at the Mission line of mini PCs from Endless Computers

    The Endless Mission One and Mission Mini desktop computers will be available for pre-order in the US starting January 16th.

    They’re both small, fanless desktop computers that ship with Endless OS, a Linux-based operating system that’s designed to be easy to use, and which comes with tools to help kids (or adults) learn to write code.

  • Endless has a mission: Bring its charmingly cheap Mission One computers to the US

    You and I have a nearly limitless array of computer choices, from massive desktops to slim laptops to entire computers build into something the same size as a USB stick. But in emerging markets, the options are much more limited, both in the hardware available and even in the availability of internet access.

    That's why I liked the Endless Mini desktop PC we reviewed last year. It was a $79 (approximately £54 or AU$110) desktop in a charming spherical red plastic case, running a custom Linux-based OS. More importantly, it included a ton of educational content pre-loaded, making it a useful tool for students, even without reliable or fast internet access.

Snappy vs. Flatpak: Unified Linux Packaging Systems

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Getting Linux applications to run on servers is not always as easy as it should be, thanks to the myriad software packaging formats that various Linux distributions use. Over the course of 2016, two efforts really ramped up to help solve that challenge in the form of Snappy and Flatpak.

The promise of both Snappy and Flatpak is to deliver an approach that enables software developers to build software once and then have it bundled in a package that can run on multiple distributions. Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu Linux, is a big advocate of Snappy.

Read more

Solus Devs to Focus on Linux Driver Management and Budgie 11 Desktop for Q1 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Now that they've launched the long anticipated first ISO snapshot of the Linux-based Solus operating system, which brought many enhancements and updated technologies, the Solus devs announce the roadmap for 2017.

After reviewing everything they've accomplished in 2016, which appears to have been a great year for them, the development team announces that their efforts will be invested in the development of the Linux Driver Management tool with a focus on Nvidia hybrid laptops, as well as the upcoming Budgie 11 desktop environment.

Read more

Security News

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Security

CentOS 7.3 (1611) Linux Distro Officially Released for ARM64/AArch64 Machines

Filed under
Red Hat

CentOS developer Jim Perrin reports on January 4, 2017, the release and general availability of the CentOS Linux 7.3 (1611) operating system for AArch64/ARM64 machines.

CentOS Linux 7.3 (1611) is based on the freely distributed sources of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3. Coming three weeks after Karanbir Singh's announcement of CentOS Linux 7.3 (1611) on x86_64 (64-bit) hardware, as well as Fabian Arrotin's release for the CentOS userland 7.3 (1611) on ARMhf platforms, the latest version of the server-oriented operating system can now be used on AArch64 (ARM64) machines, too.

Read more

BusyBox 1.26.1 Swiss Army Knife of Linux Hits the Streets as New Stable Series

Filed under
OS

When the BusyBox 1.26.0 unstable release launched last month, just before the Christmas holidays, we told you that it would hit the stable channel as soon as the first point release is announced.

And it happened! BusyBox 1.26.1 was unveiled on January 2, 2017, and it's now the newest stable series of the Swiss army knife for embedded systems and GNU/Linux distributions. But don't get too excited because this release is just a formality to inform OS vendors that they can finally update the BusyBox packages, and it looks like it only adds various tweaks to defconfig and addresses issues with single-applet builds.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • We have 99 keys of IMPOSSIBALL to give away to Linux gamers willing to test it out

    The developer of IMPOSSIBALL [Steam, Official Site] is working to bring the game to Linux, so they have sent us tons of keys to throw at you so you can test it.

    The developer isn't too familiar with Linux just yet, so they are bringing you all in to help polish it up.

    The beta is open to anyone who already owns it, otherwise you can claim your key below!

  • Eco - Global Survival Game, an incredibly interesting looking game that's already on Linux

    I was pointed towards 'Eco - Global Survival Game' [Steam, Official Site] thanks to a GOL follower and after looking it up, I decided to check it out a little more closely.

    The game was funded thanks to Kickstarter, where it bagged $202,760 towards helping development.

    The good news is that it's already on Linux. I read reports that early Alpha versions are already up to date for Linux, so I picked up a copy to test it out. I am pleased to personally confirm that it does have a Linux version already.

    I jumped right in on the only server that appeared to be compatible and I was genuinely surprised. The people on it welcomed me and pointed me to the starter guide right away. It's so damn refreshing to be greeted by friendly people in an online game!

    The game is really quite good-looking in a simple way. They've gone for a more cartoon-like visual style than realism, which is done really well. People have compared it to Minecraft, but it's not "blocky" at all. The gameplay is also vastly different, since you have skills, a social system and so on.

  • Retro-Pixel Castles updated again and will get a new name
  • Rich Geldreich, a former Valve developer, has an interesting blog post about Valve supporting Linux and OpenGL

    I fondly remember reading the Valve blog post about getting Left 4 Dead 2 running faster on Linux than it did on Windows. I remember feeling so happy about everything that was happening. Rich Geldreich was the one feeding the information to Gabe Newell himself (the owner of Valve) who wrote the blog post.

  • The "Faster Zombies!" blog post

    Gabe Newell himself wrote a lot of this post in front of me. From what I could tell, he seemed flabbergasted and annoyed that the team didn't immediately blog this info once we were solidly running faster in OpenGL vs. D3D. (Of course we should have blogged it ourselves! One of our missions as a team inside of Valve was to build a supportive community around our efforts.) From his perspective, it was big news that we were running faster on Linux vs. Windows. I personally suspect his social network didn't believe it was possible, and/or there was some deeper strategic business reason for blogging this info ASAP.

  • Steam's Linux Efforts Were Influential To Microsoft, Other Companies

SystemRescueCd 4.9.1 Rescue & Recovery Live CD Lands in 2017 with Linux 4.8.15

Filed under
GNU
Linux

SystemRescueCd creator François Dupoux is also kicking off the new year with a brand-new release of his popular live system developed for system recovery and rescue operations.

SystemRescueCd 4.9.1 is the first point release to the 4.9 series, which was initially announced at the end of October 2016, and it ships with new kernels. While the standard one was updated to the long-term supported Linux 4.4.39 kernel for both rescue32 and rescue64 editions, the alternative kernel is now Linux 4.8.15.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

MAME 0.181 Open-Source Arcade Machine Emulator to Support Sega's Altered Beast

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

A new maintenance update of the open-source and multiplatform MAME (Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator) computer emulator tool landed to kick off 2017, with even more improvements and support for lots of arcade games.

Read more

Arch Linux Gets First ISO Respin for 2017, Still Powered by Linux Kernel 4.8.13

Filed under
Linux

Dear all, it's time for you to get your hands on the first ISO snapshot of the popular Arch Linux operating system for 2017. Yes, you're reading it right, the Arch Linux 2017.01.01 dual-arch image is now available for download.

Read more

Overcoming Ubuntu Wi-Fi Not Working

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

One of the biggest issues I still see cropping up for Ubuntu (and other distributions) are challenges connecting to Wi-Fi networks. This article will provide actionable solutions to overcome common Ubuntu Wi-Fi issues.

Read more

Open spec router SBC offers 5x GbE, wireless, and SATA

Filed under
Android
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

Sinovoip’s “Banana Pi BPI-R2” router SBC gives you 5x GbE, WiFi, BT, 2GB RAM, 8GB eMMC, SATA, and mini-PCIe, plus a quad-core -A7 MediaTek MT7623N.

The Banana Pi BPI-R2 updates Sinovoip’s earlier BPi-R1 router board, later called the Banana Pi BPI-R1. No pricing or availability information was provided, but full specs and schematics are posted. Like the R1 and other Banana Pi SBCs such as the recent Banana Pi M2 Ultra, this is an open spec board supported by the Banana Pi community. The Banana Pi BPI-R2 runs Android 5.1, OpenWrt, Debian, Ubuntu Linux, including MATE, and Raspbian

Read more

Linksys router offers Tri-Band mesh networking with Alexa

Filed under
Linux

Linksys has launched a Linux-based “Velop” mesh networking router with Tri-Band WiFi-ac Wave2, up to 2K sq. ft coverage per router, and Alexa voice support.

At CES, Belkin’s Linksys subsidiary has jumped into the hot market for mesh networking routers, which aim to improve WiFi coverage, especially in larger homes. The Linksys Velop Whole Home Wi-Fi system joins others in the category including the Eero, Netgear’s Orbi, and Google WiFi.

Read more

Red Hat needs to get real about the cloud

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

Serving enterprise datacenters won't sustain Red Hat. OpenShift and what it represents may be crucial to the company's long-term survival

Read more

Toyota and Ford Create Automaker Group to Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces

Filed under
OSS

Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg on Wednesday.

Read more

Also: Strange Appfellows: Ford and Toyota Form Open-Source Software Consortium

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More in Tux Machines

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Project launches updated Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 with bug fixes
    An updated version of Debian, a popular Linux distribution is now available for users to download and install. According to the post on the Debian website by Debian Project, the new version is 8.7. This is the seventh update to the Debian eight distribution, and the update primarily focuses on fixing bugs and security problems. This update also includes some adjustments to fix serious problems present in the previous version.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2016
    The number of sponsored hours did not increase but a new silver sponsor is in the process of joining. We are only missing another silver sponsor (or two to four bronze sponsors) to reach our objective of funding the equivalent of a full time position.
  • APK, images and other stuff.
    Also, I was pleased to see F-droid Verification Server as a sign of F-droid progress on reproducible builds effort - I hope these changes to diffoscope will help them!
  • Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Gets a Beta Release, Ships with KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS
    After landing on the official download channels a few days ago, the Beta version of the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Edition operating system got today, January 16, 2017, an official announcement. The KDE Edition is the last in the new Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" stable series to be published, and it was delayed a little bit because Clement Lefebvre and his team wanted it to ship with latest KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment from the Kubuntu Backports PPA repository.
  • Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 — Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu In One ISO
    Linux AIO is a multiboot ISO carrying different flavors of a single Linux distribution and eases you from the pain of keeping different bootable USBs. The latest Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 is now available for download in both 64-bit and 32-bit versions. It features various Ubuntu flavors including Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu.

Top Ubuntu Editing Apps: Image, Audio, Video

It's been my experience that most people aren't aware of the scope of creative software available for Ubuntu. The reason for this is complicated, but I suspect it mostly comes down to the functional availability provided by each application title for the Linux desktop. In this article, I'm going to give you an introduction to some of the best creative software applications for Ubuntu (and other Linux distros). Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google's open-source Draco promises to squeeze richer 3D worlds into the web, gaming, and VR
    Google has published a set of open source libraries that should improve the storage and transmission of 3D graphics, which could help deliver more detailed 3D apps.
  • Why every business should consider an open source point of sale system
    Point of sale (POS) systems have come a long way from the days of simple cash registers that rang up purchases. Today, POS systems can be all-in-one solutions that include payment processing, inventory management, marketing tools, and more. Retailers can receive daily reports on their cash flow and labor costs, often from a mobile device. The POS is the lifeblood of a business, and that means you need to choose one carefully. There are a ton of options out there, but if you want to save money, adapt to changing business needs, and keep up with technological advances, you would be wise to consider an open source system. An open source POS, where the source code is exposed for your use, offers significant advantages over a proprietary system that keeps its code rigidly under wraps.
  • Can academic faculty members teach with Wikipedia?
    Since 2010, 29,000 students have completed the Wiki Ed program. They have added 25 million words to Wikipedia, or the equivalent of 85,000 printed pages of content. This is 66% of the total words in the last print edition of Encyclopedia Britannica. When Wiki Ed students are most active, they are contributing 10% of all the content being added to underdeveloped, academic content areas on Wikipedia.
  • AMD HSA IL / BRIG Front-End Still Hoping To Get Into GCC 7
    For many months now there's been work on an AMD HSA IL front-end for GCC with supporting the BRIG binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). It's getting late into GCC 7 development and onwards to its final development stage while this new front-end has yet to be merged. Developer Pekka Jääskeläinen has been trying to get in the finishing reviews and changes for getting approval to land this BRIG front-end into the GNU Compiler Collection. It's a big addition and with GCC 7 soon just focusing on wrong-code fixes, bug fixes, and documentation fixes starting on 19 January, there would be just a few days left to land this new front-end for GCC 7 to avoid having to wait until next year for it to debut in stable with GCC 8.
  • Rcpp 0.12.9: Next round
    Yesterday afternoon, the nineth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp made it to the CRAN network for GNU R. Windows binaries have by now been generated; and the package was updated in Debian too. This 0.12.9 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, and the 0.12.8 release in November --- making it the thirteenth release at the steady bi-montly release frequency. Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing GNU R with C or C++ code. As of today, 906 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further. That is up by sixthythree packages over the two months since the last release -- or about a package a day!