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Thursday, 05 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu 16.04 Brings More Privacy and Big Changes to the Desktop

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The release of Ubuntu 16.04 last week is good news for computer users who are upset over the recent development of Microsoft turning Windows into an operating system that is essentially spyware. As an open-source Linux distribution, Ubuntu is a great operating system for users concerned about privacy.

This marks the 24th release of the Ubuntu operating system, which has become perhaps the most popular Linux distribution in the world. Ubuntu 16.04 — codenamed Xenial Xerus — is also the sixth Long Term Support (LTS) release, meaning it will receive free security updates and support for five years. Canonical — the UK software company which sponsors Ubuntu — has continued to show its commitment to providing a solid, smooth, reliable, open-source operating system for the desktop even while working toward convergence of the desktop, phone, and tablet into one seamless operating system.

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Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) to Be Released on October 20, 2016

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Ubuntu

While most of the Ubuntu fans are enjoying their brand-new Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, it looks like the Ubuntu developers are hard at work again.

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Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Daily Build ISOs Now Available for Download

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Ubuntu

It looks like the Ubuntu developers are not wasting any time, and they've already started working on the next release of the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.

Yes, we're talking about Ubuntu 16.10, which has been dubbed "Yakkety Yak" by Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth on day the company launched their sixth LTS (Long Term Support) release, Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus).

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Inside The Mind Of Linus Torvalds — Open Source, Linux, And Power Of Code

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Linux

Linus could be very easily regarded as one of the most influential peoples of last century who created a software that serves as the foundation of the 21st-century computing. Notably, he changes the technology twice — first with the Linux kernel, and again with Git, the source code management system being used all over the world by developers to maintain their code.

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Also: Kernel 4.4.8 Has Been Released

Packaging a Fedora kernel on a GNOME tablet

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Red Hat
GNOME
HowTos

As Pa Bailey might have put it, it’s deep in the race to want to run GNOME on your tablet. At last year’s Libre Graphics Meeting in Toronto, pippin displayed GNOME on his Lenovo MIIX 3 Bay Trail device. A few months later I was able to pick up an ASUS T100TA with similar specs (if not as elegant) for a good discount. Adam Williamson’s latest Fedlet release was days old at the time, and I installed it.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Derivatives

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Ubuntu

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Reordering a Qt Quick ListView via drag'n'drop

    It is common in user interfaces to provide the user with a list of elements which can be reordered by dragging them around. Displaying a list of elements with Qt Quick is easy, thanks to the ListView component. Giving the user the ability to reorder them is less straightforward. This 3 article series presents one approach to implementing this.

  • A note to those who test kde apps building them from sources
  • Google Summer of Code,2016

    So, finally, the wait is over. The result of GSoC selections is out and Voila! my proposal has been accepted and is now a GSoC project. I would like to thank KDE community, my mentor, and co-mentors for their support and giving me an opportunity to be a part of this programme. I will be working on the project LabPlot (KDEdu) which is a KDE-application for interactive graphing and analysis of scientific data. LabPlot provides an easy way to create, manage and edit plots.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • It's Been Four Years Since Revealing Many Early Steam Linux Details

    I just realized this morning it's been four years since I was out at Valve HQ learning the early, exclusive details about their Steam Linux plans (and what would become SteamOS and Steam Machines) from Gabe Newell and their Linux cabal.

    If you weren't a Phoronix reader back then, there's our exclusive (from the time) Valve's Gabe Newell Talks Linux Steam Client, Source Engine article. It's some fun weekend reading or to reminisce!

  • Vector 36 physics racer available for Linux and SteamOS

    A really impressive new indie game is now available for Linux, Steam, Mac and Windows PC. Vector 36, a futuristic physics-based racing game, now been made available for Linux and SteamOS.

  • The Other 99, a single-player action and survival game coming soon to Linux

    The Other 99 looks like a pretty good entry to the single-player action & survival section, and it's releasing into Early Access with Linux support soon.

    I generally much prefer the single-player survival games (apart from Don't Starve), as they are able to focus on a much nicer user experience.

    With a lot of survival games now available on Linux, it will have to be pretty good to stand out from the crowd. The teaser trailer certainly has me intrigued.

  • Solar Division, a blend of RTS and Tower Defence in space out now for Linux

    I am a bit of a sucker for space strategy games and Solar Division certainly looks unique enough to give it a mention. It's also not in Early Access, it's a full game, so that's nice.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 34 Best Free Linux Backup Software

    You may have read the story about a man deleting his entire company with one mistaken piece of code: accidentally misusing rm -rf in Ansible. It was a fairly obvious hoax designed to be a viral marketing effort. It achieved that goal as scores of media sources carried the story. But at least it will have alerted readers to the importance of making sure their data is safe. But remember, human error is not the only source of data loss. Other ways of losing data include mechanical damage to RAID or disks, file system corruption, theft, fire, as well as viruses and malware.

  • MuPDF 1.9 Brings Changes

    As you may know, MuPDF is a free, open-source, lightweight PDF viewer written in C, with all the basic features of any other PDF viewer and vim-like keybinds.

  • Kodi 16.1 – Jarvis – Mark XVI

    Once a ‘final’ version is released some new bugs and/or problems usually appear out of nowhere, and this release is no exception. Even though tens of thousands of users were already testing the 16.0 version before release and we as team trying very hard to prevent any problems, as soon as millions start using the released version some problems we either did not think of or which we did not notice before pop up. To counter some of these new issues, we’re bringing you this maintenance release called 16.1 which has some additional fixes on top of the 16.0

  • Wireshark 2.0.3 Release Notes

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • This is why we can't have safe cancellation points
  • Gentoo on my Tesla
  • Lessons learned: Five years of colocation

    Back in 2011, I decided to try out a new method for hosting my websites and other applications: colocation. Before that, I used shared hosting, VPS providers (“cloud” wasn’t a popular thing back then), and dedicated servers. Each had their drawbacks in different areas. Some didn’t perform well, some couldn’t recover from failure well, and some were terribly time consuming to maintain.

    This post will explain why I decided to try colocation and will hopefully help you avoid some of my mistakes.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Google Summer of Code 2016

Filed under
Google
OSS
GNOME
  • Google Summer of Code 2016 Projects Announced

    Google announced this week the participating student projects for this year's Summer of Code.

  • GSoC 2016 at coala

    coala participates in this GSoC under the PSF umbrella. This year we got a stunning number of 8 GSoC projects just working with us.

  • GSoC 2016 is Starting at GNOME

    Dear GSoC Students, dear GNOME community – and especially dear rejected students,

    Google Summer of Code 2016 is starting. GNOME has accepted 21 students – we are thrilled to work with you people!

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Screenshots/Screencasts

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Reviews

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Refactoring the open-source photography community

    Generally speaking, most free-software communities tend to form around specific projects: a distribution, an application, a tightly linked suite of applications, and so on. Those are the functional units in which developers work, so it is a natural extension from there to focused mailing lists, web sites, IRC channels, and other forms of interaction with each other and users. But there are alternatives. At Libre Graphics Meeting 2016 in London, Pat David spoke about his recent experience bringing together a new online community centered around photographers who use open-source software. That community crosses over between several applications and libraries, and it has been successful enough that multiple photography-related projects have shut down their independent user forums and migrated to the new site, PIXLS.US.

  • Is Firefox Search Worth $375M/Year to a Yahoo Buyer?

    That’s because Mozilla is highly dependent on a five-year contract with Yahoo, signed in December 2014, where it receives about $375m per year to make Yahoo the default search provider in the Firefox browser on the desktop. From 2004 to 2014, that contract was exclusively with Google; now it’s Yahoo in the US, Google in Europe, Yandex in Russia and Baidu in China.

  • How to build a Linux router, Internet of Things devices, and more news
  • Aravena's Small Step, Open Source's Big Leap

    Aravena’s recent initiative to open-source four of his built projects goes a long way to promoting the public and social benefits of collaboration and information-sharing.

  • CERN Makes 300TB of Large Hadron Collider Data Public

    CERN has recently released the data from the famous 2011 experiment probing the fundamental structure of the Universe to the public. These raw and processed data can be analyzed and verified using CERN Linux virtual environment on a virtual machine.

  • Lawsuit accuses PACER of milking the public for cash in exchange for access

    The federally run online court document access system known as PACER now finds itself listed on a federal docket. Its overseer, the US government, is a defendant in a proposed class-action lawsuit accusing the service of overcharging the public.

    The suit, brought by three nonprofits on Thursday, claims millions of dollars generated from a recent 25-percent increase in page fees are being illegally spent by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO). The cost for access is 10 cents per page and up to $3 a document. Judicial opinions are free. This isn't likely to break the bank for some, but to others it adds up and can preclude access to public records. The National Consumer Law Center, the Alliance for Justice, and the National Veterans Legal Services Program also claim in the lawsuit that these fees are illegal because the government is charging more than necessary to keep the PACER system afloat (as is required by Congress).

  • Lawsuit Filed Over PACER Fees

    For many years we've pointed out that the fees charged by PACER were clearly outside what the law allows. If you don't know, PACER is the electronic filing system for the federal court system. It is great that all filings in federal cases are available online, but the interface looks like it was designed in 1998, the search is ridiculous, and (worst of all) the system charges you 10 cents per page of download -- excluding judicial opinions, but including HTML pages including search results and docket reports. There is a cap of $3 per document, but that means that every time I call up PACER on a big case -- say the Apple/DOJ encryption battle, there are so many filings that just to look at the docket is basically $3. That adds up.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Timezones for programmers

    Timezones are typically based on geographical locations. For example, we have the IANA timezone America/Chicago which can represent Central Time for the United States.

  • When to Rewrite from Scratch - Autopsy of a Failed Software

    It was winter of 2012. I was working as a software developer in a small team at a start-up. We had just released the first version of our software to a real corporate customer. The development finished right on schedule. When we launched, I was over the the moon and very proud. It was extremely satisfying to watch the system process couple of million of unique users a day and send out tens of millions of SMS messages. By summer, the company had real revenue. I got promoted to software manager. We hired new guys. The company was poised for growth. Life was great. And then we made a huge blunder and decided to rewrite the software. From scratch.

  • Doing things that scale

    In the software world, and with internet, we can do a lot of things that scale.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Why I gave your paper a Strong Reject

    Writing a bunch of wordy bullshit that doesn't mean anything. Trust me, you're not going to wow and amaze the program committee by talking about dynamic, scalable, context-aware, Pareto-optimal middleware for cloud hosting of sensing-intensive distributed vehicular applications. If your writing sounds like the automatically-generated, fake Rooter paper ("A theoretical grand challenge in theory is the important unification of virtual machines and real-time theory. To what extent can web browsers be constructed to achieve this purpose?"), you might want to rethink your approach. Be concise and concrete. Explain what you're doing in clear terms. Bad ideas won't get accepted just because they sound fancy.

  • Computer System Security Policy Debate (Follow-up)

    The challenge is that political people see everything as a political/policy issue, but this isn’t that kind of issue. I get particularly frustrated when I read ignorant ramblings like this that dismiss the overwhelming consensus of the people that actually understand what needs to be done as emotional, hysterical obstructionism. Contrary to what seems to be that author’s point, constructive dialogue and understanding values does nothing to change the technical risks of mandating exceptional access. Of course the opponents of Feinstein-Burr decry it as technologically illiterate, it is technologically illiterate.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Teach an old PC new tricks

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you're looking for a modern OS to replace XP that will run smoothly on your old PC, then Linux is the answer. We'd recommend that you choose Ubuntu as your Linux distribution of choice, and download the latest LTS version, currently 12.04, which will be supported until 2017. It's relatively straightforward to install.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat pilots new leadgen program in Canada targeting the mid-to-high market

Fedora: The Latest

  • Fedora’s Love For Python Continues
    In this digital age, there is still some use for having messaging that is easy to distribute and consume. While it may seem quaint and old-fashioned, hard-copy content is a useful way to deliver information at events like conferences and meetups.
  • Fedora account system and FreeIPA
    Over the years, a number of times, people have asked us about migrating from our own custom Fedora Account System (FAS) to FreeIPA.
  • Testing FreeIPA in openQA
    openQA has some integration with Open vSwitch and it’s what the SUSE folks use, so I went with that. You basically have to create a tap device for each worker instance and use something like OVS to connect those devices together with a virtual bridge or whatever so the test VMs can communicate. The VMs also need to access the per-job web server that os-autoinst runs for the worker to upload logs to and download scripts to run from (in some cases), so in the reference set up you have that bind to the bridge interface and ensure the firewalling is set up so the VMs can reach it. And if you need the VMs to have access to the external network, as we do for FreeIPA testing (dnf and rolekit just do not want to work without access to the repositories), you have to basically set up NAT routing for the traffic from the VMs. It’s lots of network configuration fun!

Leftovers: Debian

  • The Pyra - handheld computer with Debian preinstalled
    The machine is a complete ARM-based PC with micro HDMI, SATA, USB plugs and many others connectors, and include a full keyboard and a 5" LCD touch screen. The 6000mAh battery is claimed to provide a whole day of battery life time, but I have not seen any independent tests confirming this. The vendor is still collecting preorders, and the last I heard last night was that 22 more orders were needed before production started.
  • New sources for contributors.debian.org
    Many people might not be aware of it, but since a couple of years ago, we have an excellent tool for tracking and recognising contributors to the Debian Project: Debian Contributors Debian is a big project, and there are many people working that do not have great visibility, specially if they are not DDs or DMs. We are all volunteers, so it is very important that everybody gets credited for their work. No matter how small or unimportant they might think their work is, we need to recognise it!
  • What's new since Jessie?
    Jessie was released one year ago now and the Java Team has been busy preparing the next release.

Leftovers: OSS

  • The New Kingmakers and the Next Step for Open Source
  • Puppet Rebrands, Launches Numerous New Projects
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Fast-forward to today, and Puppet Labs is changing its name to mark a new era, and is out with several new product initiatives. The organization, now known as just Puppet, has also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who comes to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president.
  • Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    After taking a break in 2015, Tracing is back at Plumbers this year! Tracing is heavily used throughout the Linux ecosystem, and provides an essential method for extracting information about the underlying code that is running on the system. Although tracing is simple in concept, effective usage and implementation can be quite involved.
  • Jeremy Sands: Southern Fried College Football and Down-Home Linux
    This is a “Meet the Man Behind the Curtain” interview. It’s more about Sands than about either csnbbs.com or the LinuxFest he spends so much of his time organizing. But at the end of the interview, he talks about how the LinuxFest can always use more volunteers, even if all you can do is woman or man the registration desk for an hour. And sponsors? It’s a pretty healthy operation financially, but more sponsors are always welcome — especially ones from the Southeast, because this conference is proudly regional, not something identical to what you might find in, say, Los Angeles or Washington State.
  • A daughter of Silicon Valley shares her 'nerd' story
    In the end, I had to leave my job at ISC. Luckily, my work and my values brought me to Mozilla, where I've been both perseverant and lucky enough to have several meaningful roles. Today, I'm the senior program manager of diversity and inclusion. I work full-time on building a more diverse and inclusive Mozilla, standing on the shoulders of giants who did the same before me and in partnership with many of the smartest and kindest people I know. I've followed my passion for empowering people to find meaningful ways to contribute to the Internet I believe the world needs: an expansion of the one that excited me so long ago. And I get to see a lot of the world while I do it!
  • Waiting for Plugins: The Nylas N1 Email Client
    I wish the Nylas N1 team the best. I love that they took the time to build a Linux client. I love the idea of a hackable email client. But Nylas N1, as it stands now, is very limited. If you happen to like the defaults, you’re in for a treat. But if you’re looking for an email client that bends to your will and that you can easily customize as a non-developer, you’re probably better off with Thunderbird (especially now that people are thinking about its future). Thunderbird isn’t pretty—certainly not as pretty as Nylas N1—but it lets you build it into whatever email client you want it to be.
  • RightScale, Focused on the Cloud, Delivers Docker Container Management
  • Drupal developer on how to make your website more accessible
    For open source developer Mike Gifford, founder and president of OpenConcept Consulting Inc., any mention of Drupal accessibility after his name is redundant. He has spent the better part of 10 years improving and cementing accessibility in Drupal, enough to earn the role of official core accessibility maintainer for the project. Accessibility awareness has grown considerably in the Drupal community, but the Internet changes rapidly and the software needs to keep up to remain relevant. Recent press on the trend of decoupling Drupal—including the milestone post by project founder Dries Buytaert himself—tends to skirt the issue that so-called headless configurations can blot out accessibility functions designed for the theme layer.
  • DuckDuckGo Gives $225,000 to Open Source Projects
    It appears as if people have been using DuckDuckGo’s privacy centered search enough to make the company successful. Certainly not we-control-the-world successful like Google, but successful enough to give it some cash-on-hand breathing room. Also successful enough for the company to give back to the community by handing out $225,000 to some free and open source projects.
  • DuckDuckGo's 2016 open source donations
  • H2020 submission is rather 'anti-open'
    So what's the EC's current stand with forcing citizens to use Adobe's proprietary, closed technology and only Windows or Mac for submission of H2020 projects? With Adobe retiring Linux versions of Acrobat a couple of years ago (yes you can still download an obsolete version for Linux from Adobe's FTP but it won't work with ECAS "A forms"), this is a very "anti-open" situation.
  • It's Time to Open Source Moving Vehicles
    Open source software has made its mark on desktop computing, mobile phones, and the internet of things. But one area yet to be cracked wide open with freely distributed software is mobility: from autonomous cars, software-assisted driving, to connecting vehicles to other devices. On Wednesday, Arthur Taylor, chief technology officer at Advanced Telematic Systems, presented an open-source platform that he hopes will be the start of more innovation in software development for mobility technologies. But he also argued for the merits of open source software in a space pretty much dominated by the closed-off products of large corporates, such as Google and Uber.
  • Next Phase of Development Begins for The Hovalin, An Open Source 3D Printed Violin
    The Hovalin, developed by Matt and Kaitlyn Hova, is a open source 3D printed violin that has received much attention since the first version was released. Now the next phase of development has begun for the Hovalin 3.0, and Matt Hova has posted a blog entry and started a Reddit thread about the project that always keeps improving in a collaborative effort by many Hovalin fans. In the Hovalin website blog post, Hova explains what the most recent plans are for the latest version. First, version 3.0 will “move away from the current carbon fiber rectangle to an 8 mm rod.” Also, a lock will be created that will be used to keep the top and bottom pieces together. Custom brims to prevent warping will be added, as well as possible chin and shoulder rests. Finally, Hova wants to “work out a new system for distributing multiple options for the .stls including files with brim, files without brim, pre-sliced files with supports for the middle piece.” There are many changes in the works here, as you can see from just this list alone.