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Thursday, 27 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 10:30pm
Story Enlightenment's EFL and Elive Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 9:40pm
Story The new replication features in MySQL 8 Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 9:34pm
Story ROSA Desktop Fresh R9 GNU/Linux Operating System Rebased on a Newer Platform Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 9:31pm
Story Devuan Jessie 1.0 RC Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 9:15pm
Story Node.js Foundation Interview and New Offer Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 8:33pm
Story DockerCon News Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 7:47pm
Story Release Date of Next Ubuntu: October 19, 2017 Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 7:35pm
Story A Look at DietPi: A Lightweight OS for Your Pi Board Rianne Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 4:44pm
Story Linux 4.10.12 Rianne Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 4:40pm

Software and today's howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Ubuntu, Raspbian, and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • [Video] Ubuntu convergence Phone Tablet Desktop
  • I built this computer for $50—and you can too

    With the kit, just plug everything in and choose "Raspbian" from the list of options the first time. Voila, a fully-functioning computer emerges!

  • The State Of Debian 9.0 Stretch

    Debian developers are preparing for the final phase of the development freeze on Debian 9.0 "Stretch" and it's looking like the official release might not be too far out.

  • Status on the stretch release
  • Underestimating Debian

    I had two issues in the last days that lead me a bit into panic until they got solved. In both cases the issue was external to Debian but I first thought that the problem was in Debian. I’m not sure why I had those thoughts, I should be more confident in myself, this awesome operating system, and the community around it! The good thing is that I’ll be more confident from now on, and I’ve learned that hurry is not a good friend, and I should face my computer “problems” (and everything in life, probably) with a bit more patience (and backups).

FOSS: Mastodon Social, Richard Stallman Interview, ODF Toolkit and More

Filed under
GNU
Interviews
OSS
  • What is GNU social and is Mastodon Social a “Twitter Clone”?

    Mastodon Social is the name of an instance on GNU social which uses the OStatus protocol to connect to a vast variety of servers in what’s known as a federation. Mastodon is also the name of the software being used on that server, which was developed by Eugen “Gargron” Rochko. It was built with Ruby on Rails, Redux, and React.js. I learned the latter from the Wikipedia page, which is about the extent of research given by any of the other articles published this week.

  • "Richard Stallman" - Lunduke Hour - Apr 14, 2017

    In today's episode of the Lunduke Hour, I get the chance to sit down and chat with the one and only Richard Stallman. Founder of the Free Software Foundation. We talk about everything from the W3C's stance on DRM to opinions on the movie "Galaxy Quest".

  • New version of ODF Toolkit released
  • Indian Engineer wins UN Challenge to create open-source tool providing greater visibility into Member State voting patterns

    Unite Ideas is a big data crowd-sourcing platform developed by the Office of Information and Communications Technology, which seeks to provide a platform for collaboration between academia, civil society, and the United Nations.The vast amount of information generated by the UN in at least 6 official languages, and formats e.g. documents, datasets, and multimedia is increasingly being made available to the public as “open data”. At Unite Ideas, the public can access not just these these datasets, but also the source code of the solutions to previously completed challenges and build on them. Solutions and expertise developed can be re-used by governments and civil society to support international peace and security, sustainable development, human rights, international law, and humanitarian aid.

  • Ubuntu ditches Unity, Maryland embraces open textbooks, and more open source news

Events: Linux Plumbers Conference, CloudNativeCon and KubeCon Europe 2017

Filed under
OSS
  • Registration for Linux Plumbers Conference is now open

    The 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference organizing committee is pleased to announce that the registration for this year’s conference is now open. Information on how to register can be found here [1]. Registration prices and cutoff dates are published in the ATTEND [2] page of the web site. A reminder that we are following a quota system to release registration slots. Therefore the early registration rate will remain in effect until early registration closes on June 18 2017, or the quota limit (150) is reached, whatever comes earlier. As usual, contact us [3] if you have questions.

  • CloudNativeCon and KubeCon Europe 2017: an overview

    CloudNativeCon and KubeCon Europe 2017 took place in Berlin on March 29th and 30th, and they were packed with clever things you can do in, around, and on top of, Kubernetes. It is possible that not every reader of LWN is familiar with Kubernetes, so I'd like to give a brief description of it before I describe any of the talks that I heard there. To do that, I'll have to at least mention tools, containerization, cloud-native computing and microservices, and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

    Containers are an elegant way to combine two Linux primitives, control groups and and namespaces, with loopback filesystems to provide isolated structures that in many ways resemble virtual machines (VMs), though they don't have their own kernels. It is important to remember, however, that they are not actually VMs; no less an authority than Jessie Frazelle, who maintained Docker and now hacks on containers for Google when not speaking at KubeCon 2017, says exactly that in her blog. If you treat your containers like VMs, you're using them wrong, and things may not end well if you do that in production.

Q4OS 1.8.3 Orion review - Bayeux distro

Filed under
Reviews

Q4OS is like an ancient tapestry. Beautiful, stylish, iconic, but then, also fraying at the seams. The initial impression is mighty. You can't argue that. I was amazed by the virtual machine setup, and loved the live session even on the LG laptop. But then, the more I used it, the more I started seeing problems.

Orion does some things exceptionally well - it's friendly, it's designed to assist newbs in getting underway, it has a calm presence, and it's very frugal. But the hardware side of things is mediocre. First, no boot on UEFI. Then, no smartphone or Bluetooth support. Wonky suspend & resume. Moreover, customization is weak, UI has some rather rusty spots, and the multimedia front can benefit from improvement. The worst part is, prehistoric bugs linger, souring the experience.

All in all, Q4OS 1.8.3 Orion is the kind of desktop that got worse the more I used it, rather than better. Eventually, I settled in and enjoyed most of the experience, but there's a lot missing that most people take for granted. Curiously, it does some things exceptionally well, especially where some other distros struggle. But the balance isn't worth it. At the end of the day, TDE isn't the promised desktop and Q4OS isn't the promised distro. Good, but a lot more effort is needed to nail that professional feel. If you have an old laptop, you should definitely give it a try, just remember that the Ghost of KDE3.5 may come to haunt you. 5.5-6/10.

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Welcome Ubuntu Budgie 17.04: A Short Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Budgie begins its debut as official Ubuntu family in 17.04 "Zesty Zapus" release. It's a new choice of flavors with new desktop environment (Budgie) as operating system for us. Ubuntu Budgie is crafted purely for desktop use, no tablet-like interface (like Unity or GNOME), thanks to Budgie DE. So I want to introduce Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 to beginners especially if they're new to GNU/Linux. I hope you'll enjoy Ubuntu Budgie starting from this review.

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Security and Microsoft Back/Bug Doors

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • careful with the chrome HSTS

    I mean, yes, I set the HSTS header, but that was with the same cert that chrome is now insisting can’t be trusted. Why in the world would you permanently store “must have trusted cert” on the basis of an untrusted cert?

  • Hacked NSA tools put Windows users at possible risk

    The hacking group known as Shadow Brokers claims to have released National Security Agency malware designed to break into Windows computers. The software could make millions of Microsoft users vulnerable to malicious parties.

    [...]

    The NSA didn't immediately respond to a request for comment. But this isn't the first US intelligence agency whose tools have been leaked to the public. Just last month, WikiLeaks released techniques it claimed the CIA used for breaking into phones, computers, cars and smart TVs.

  • Leaked NSA point-and-pwn hack tools menace Win2k to Windows 8

    The Shadow Brokers have leaked more hacking tools stolen from the NSA's Equation Group – this time four-year-old exploits that attempt to hijack venerable Windows systems, from Windows 2000 up to Server 2012 and Windows 7 and 8.

    The toolkit puts into anyone's hands – from moronic script kiddies to hardened crims – highly classified nation-state-level weaponry that can potentially compromise and commandeer systems around the world. This is the same powerful toolkit Uncle Sam used once upon a time to hack into and secretly snoop on foreign governments, telcos, banks, and other organizations.

  • Microsoft blocks Kaby Lake and Ryzen PCs from Windows 7, 8 updates

    That means all updates, including security updates, will be unavailable on PCs with brand new hardware running the two older operating systems.

  • Microsoft says U.S. foreign intelligence surveillance requests more than doubled

    Microsoft said it received between 1,000 and 1,499 FISA orders for user content between January and June of 2016, compared to between 0 and 499 during both January-June 2015 as well as the second half of 2015.> Microsoft Corp (MSFT.O) said on Thursday it had received at least a thousand surveillance requests from the U.S. government that sought user content for foreign intelligence purposes during the first half of 2016.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Tunes Up OpenShift For Legacy Code In Kubernetes

    When Red Hat began building out its OpenShift cloud application platform more than five years ago, the open source software vendor found itself in a similar situation as others in the growing platform-as-a-service (PaaS) space: they were all using technologies developed in-house because there were no real standards in the industry that could be used to guide them.

  • Manage OpenStack deployments with Red Hat's Platform Director

    An OpenStack deployment doesn't always come easy for an IT team. Learn how Red Hat's Platform Director can help with OpenStack implementation and lifecycle management.

  • NetApp Inc. (NTAP) and Red Hat Inc (RHT), Q117 Earnings Preview
  • Fedora Workstation: Get the features you want now

    Christian Schaller is a long time free software contributor and advocate. He’s also a manager of emerging platform development at Red Hat. The groups in this area include desktop engineering, where developers work on many GNOME features seen in Fedora. Recently Christian posted on his blog about desktop features and improvements users want. He also discussed how Fedora delivers them.

    Many such comments came in a recent Hacker News thread concerning Ubuntu. But listening to users doesn’t stop with just Linux users. Christian writes, “I often read such articles and threads about non-Linux systems too, to help understand what people are looking for and thus enable us to prioritize what we do with Fedora Workstation even better.”

  • The new Fedora Project mission statement

    When we started Fedora.next, we decided to work underneath the mission as it stood. This has worked out well enough, but we're coming up to what feels like the limit. This is clear in the "Budget.next" process — it's one thing to say that spending is to be determined in public based on clear objectives and measurable results, but for it to really work, those objectives need to be attached to a goal with a more clear scope.

Containers News

Filed under
Server
  • Rancher Launches Tiny Linux Distro

    Rancher Labs is announcing general availability today for RancherOS, the stripped-down version of Linux that the company uses with its own container management platform.

    The container management platform, called simply Rancher, is what the startup is best known for, and it doesn't even have to run on RancherOS. It can run on any variety of Linux.

  • Containers are Linux

    Containers are Linux. The operating system that revolutionized the data center over the past two decades is now aiming to revolutionize how we package, deploy and manage applications in the cloud. Of course, you'd expect a Red Hatter to say that, but the facts speak for themselves. Interest in containers technology continues to grow, as more organizations realize the benefits they can provide for how they manage applications and infrastructure. But it’s easy to get lost in all the hype and forget what containers are really about. Ultimately, containers are a feature of Linux. Containers have been a part of the Linux operating system for more than a decade, and go back even further in UNIX. That’s why, despite the very recent introduction of Windows containers, the majority of containers we see are in fact Linux containers. That also means that if you’re deploying containers, your Linux choices matter a lot.

  • Running system services in containers

    Our computers run many programs that talk to the Internet, and the Internet is an unsafe place as we all know—with states and assorted organizations collecting “zero-day exploits” to exploit them as they see fit. One of the big tasks of operating system distributions has been to keep track of known software vulnerabilities and patch their packages as soon as possible.

    When we look closer, many vulnerabilities out there can be exploited because of a combination of two major weaknesses of GNU/Linux and similar Unix-like operating systems: lack of memory-safety in the C language family, and ambient authority in the operating system itself. The former leads to a huge class of bugs that become security issues: buffer overflows, use-after-free, and so on. The latter makes them more exploitable because processes have access to many resources beyond those they really need.

  • Enterprise Container Spending Is Skyrocketing

    A new study from container data services company Portworx, released on the eve of Dockercon 2017, bodes well for container vendors.

    Docker and other application container platforms are rapidly gaining traction in enterprise IT environments and spending is following suit. In its survey of 491 IT professionals, Portworx discovered that nearly a third (32 percent) of organizations are poised to spend $500,000 or more on container license and usage fees in 2017. Last year, only five percent were spending as much.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • What To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

    If you're a new comer to Ubuntu in 17.04 Zesty Zapus release, then welcome, this article is for you. This introduces some options you can do once finished installing Ubuntu. There are 13 options listed you can choose, mainly about applications and some tweakings. You'll find some list about software replacements (if you come from Windows) and also educational apps. I hope this what-to-do article helps you to be a new Ubuntu user easier. Enjoy Ubuntu 17.04!

  • Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Available For Download
  • Ubuntu 17.04 "Zesty Zapus" All Flavors Download Links
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Has Been Released (Download Links)
  • Downloading Ubuntu 17.04 with Zsync, Saving Bandwidth Cost
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Released, Not Much Changed

    Canonical finally announced the release of Ubuntu 17.04. Codenamed “Zesty Zapus”. In general, there doesn’t exist any new features or important updates. Just newer packages with bugs fixed and problems addressed from previous releases.

  • Ubuntu Unity – Present, Past and Future Discussed
  • Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 Released and What’s Next

    The Ubuntu GNOME developers are proud to announce our latest non-LTS release 17.04. For the first time in Ubuntu GNOME’s history, this release includes the latest stable release of GNOME, 3.24.

    Although Ubuntu’s release schedule was originally centered around shipping the latest GNOME release, this had not been possible since Ubuntu GNOME’s first release four years ago.

  • "Jono Bacon" - Lunduke Hour - Apr 11, 2017

    In this episode of the Lunduke Hour, I talk with my buddy Jono Bacon. The former Community Manager for Canonical waxes poetic about the recent announcements and what they mean -- and offers some advice for the current team at Canonical. He also says the word "community" very few times. So proud of the little guy.

  • Return Home to GNOME

    A while back I wrote about the importance of those of us in the Ubuntu community coming together around Ubuntu's Unity 8 project. The post was called "Return Home and Unify". I wrote that in order to promote the idea to contributing to the desktop that would inevitably ship on Ubuntu so that the experience would be a good one for its users. I wanted convergence to be a real thing, so that there would be a more open alternative to iOS (closed-source) and Android (open source but heavily controlled by Google) in the phone and tablet space. But that Unity 8 isn't happening and, here's the kicker, I'm just fine with it.

  • 6 Things Gnome Shell needs to do Before Ubuntu 18.04

    Few days ago Canonical, company behind Ubuntu, announced that they will end development of their signature desktop environment, Unity. Starting with 18.04 release, Ubuntu will ship with Gnome Shell as the default environment. Although I have been using Ubuntu Gnome as my primary work environment for about two years now, this made me a bit sad since Unity 8 preview looked really amazing.

  • Snaps and snapcraft.io explained in 3 minutes
  • Ubuntu Mate 17.04 - The Refined Gold Standard

    In this video we take a look at some of the refinements of Ubuntu Mate 17.04 and I get into a little history of the OS from Martin himself. This is a great all around distro and it is worth your time to try it out. Thanks for watching and thanks to everyone involved on the project.

  • The theater of Linux distributions

    The two most extreme Theater distros are Linux Lite and LXLE. The only thing that gives them their character are the PPAs they're built with, and if even one of those PPAs isn't maintained by its creator, the whole thing falls apart. You can't do any updates but the ones they demand, and you have to do every one of those. If you add something or change something, it's all over, they just disintegrate. Can't afford to have actors ad-lib!

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Pandora Radio Client Pithos 1.3.0 Released, Available In PPA

    Pithos 1.3.0 was released recently and is now available in its official PPA, for Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10 and 16.04. The new version brings support for MPRIS playlist and tracklist interfaces, improved accessibility UI, and more.

  • Termbox – Access Preconfigured Linux Command-Line Workspaces via Web Browser

    Folks, today we are going to show you about the fantastic website called Termbox where users can test/work almost six Operating systems through browser. It’s similar to Ubuntu online tour website which you might tried earlier. The main difference here is that offers only command line interface not for GUI.

    Whoever wants to learn Linux without spending money & efforts (i mean no need to install Virtual Machine and Linux operating system on it) termbox is a right choice, only you should have a working internet connection that’s it. Also people who aren’t familiar with the command line to have a practice without damaging their own systems. This is the right place to kick start the Linux learning.

  • Ntfy – Get Desktop or Phone Alerts When Long Running Command Finishes

    Ntfy is a simple yet serviceable cross-platform Python utility that enables you to automatically get desktop notifications on demand or when long running commands complete. It can as well send push notifications to your phone once a particular command completes.

Leftovers: KDE and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • Qt World Summit 2017 Early Bird Tickets Now Available!
  • ArcGIS Runtime SDK 100.0 by Esri is here

    In 100.0, Qt developers have even more capabilities for adding mapping and geographic analysis to native apps than ever before. 3D geographic visualization, 2D vector tiled basemap support, enriched error handling in the API, and additional geoprocessing tools are just a few of the new highlights.

  • Progressive Web App and Planet KDE

    Since I started to programming more serious, was with Qt and with the goal to made Desktop applications. And I was running with all my strength from Web Development. My little experience with the web made me be pissed. It’s hard to debug and find solutions for a web problem, because exist too many solutions for the same problem in a lot of languages, see for example the Js frameworks that each day a new one appears.

  • Kubuntu 17.04 Released!
  • Qt 3D Animation Easter Teaser

    As an Easter treat here is a quick taster of some of the animation goodies coming to Qt 3D along with Qt 5.9. In this post we will briefly outline the steps needed to create a simple Qt 3D application and the assets it uses to produce this little animation:

  • WikiToLearn: now available in German!

    Thanks to the work of our volunteers, with a special mention to Matthias Heil and Karin Cienkowski, we’re happy to announce the official opening of the German portal of WikiToLearn. We hope it will be of great service to the German community and we’re sure it will help creating even more free textbooks for everyone to use.

  • KActionRunner

    Sometimes I create a small widget for my own usecase and never blog about it, but this one I think it should be pushed upstream. It’s a small KComboBox that uses a KActionCollection based model to display *all* of the actionCollection’s actions.

Desktop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Galago Pro Available for Preorder

    Today Denver-based System76 allowed for preorder of the new Galago Pro. The Galago Pro is a 13” aluminum-body laptop, weighing in at 2.87lbs (1.3kg). The new laptop is very thin, but despite its size sports up to 32GB of RAM, 6TB of storage, and a 7 th Gen Intel i5 or i7 CPU. On top of that, the Galago Pro has many ports missing from modern ultra-thin laptops, such as an ethernet port. The starting price is $899.

  • Old Vista Laptop Into A Linux ZFS File Server Part 2

    In the previous Linux ZFS File Server article I put forth a list of parts that allowed me to utilize an old Vista laptop as a Linux+ZFS fileserver. In this article, I will detail how to put all the pieces together, from installing the Linux OS to connecting all the hard drives.

    First, we need to connect all the hardware. The eSATA card needs to be plugged into the slot, the USB3 Ethernet adapter needs to go in an available USB2 slot and connected with a CAT5 or better (CAT5e, CAT6) Ethernet cord to your existing router.

  • Old Vista Laptop Into A Linux ZFS File Server Part 3

    In the previous article, I showed you how to install Lubuntu 14.04 64-bit and install the important bits of Samba and the ZFS filesystem. In this article, I will give you the interesting details on how to get your Probox-connected disks up and running as a ZFS RAID10, starting with (1) disk and growing to a full 4-disk RAID10 in real-time. Please note: Follow these steps at your own risk. I take no responsibility for data loss! You will need to be careful and make sure you are using the right disks when entering administration commands.

Development News: HHVM, Python, and Swift

Filed under
Development
  • HHVM 3.19

    HHVM 3.19 is released! This release has some exciting new experimental features. Packages have been published in the usual places; see the installation instructions for more information.

  • Ask Hackaday: How Do You Python?

    Python is the Arduino of software projects. It has a critical mass of libraries for anything from facial recognition and neural networks to robotics and remote sensing. And just like Arduino, I have yet to find the killer IDE for Python. Perhaps I just haven’t tried the right one yet, but it could be that I’m just doing Python wrong.

  • Learn Swift Programming with No-Charge Books

    Swift is a new language, first appearing in 2014. It is friendly to new programmers, feels familiar to Objective-C developers, and the language is optimized for development. It was launched under a proprietary license, but Apple made the language open source in December 2015 by releasing Swift 2.2 and later under the Apache License 2.0. By open-sourcing Swift, developers are able to use the language for their own purposes and go beyond OS X, iOS and watchOS apps.

Canonical Gets Serious About Doing Enterprise Right

Filed under
Ubuntu

With what we now know -- that Canonical is working overtime to attract investors -- it become apparent that the activity we've seen coming from the Isle of Man during the past week or so is a carefully orchestrated series of events designed to both reassure its enterprise customers and to get word to potential investors that Canonical is getting its priorities in order.

It all started last week with Mark Shuttleworth's announcement that the company is killing Unity, which has been Ubuntu's default desktop since 2011. Development of Unity 8 is ceasing immediately, he said, and Unity 7 will no longer be the default desktop, beginning with version 18.04 which will be released next April. With the death of Unity comes the death of Ubuntu's phone and convergence efforts, which never got traction, as well as the company's go-it-alone display server, Mir, which had been seen as a disruption by many Linux developers. Mir will still have a life, however, in the company's IoT offerings.

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[Stable] OpenELEC 8.0.1 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

OpenELEC 8.0.1 release has been published. Users running OpenELEC 8.0.0 or later with auto-update enabled will be prompted on-screen to reboot and apply the update once it has been downloaded and enabled in some hours. Users running older OpenELEC releases or with auto-update disabled will need to manually update. If you would like to update from an older OpenELEC release please read update instructions/advice on the Wiki before updating. Manual update files can be obtained from the downloads page.

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Capsule8 Building Container-Aware Security Platform for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security

Security startup Capsule8 emerged from its stealth mode in February with a plan to help provide a new model for application container security. In a video interview with eWEEK, Capsule8 CTO Dino Dai Zovi and CEO John Viega explain what's missing from container security today and what they are building to help fill the gap.

"Capsule8 is container-aware, real-time threat protection for Linux-based production environments," Dai Zovi said.

Dai Zovi explained that the company name Capsule8 is a pun on what it does—which is encapsulates security knowledge in software, providing a secure approach to application delivery and deployment.

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An Important Linux Kernel Security Patch Is Available for CentOS 7, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Security

CentOS maintainer Johnny Hughes has informed the community about the availability of yet another important kernel security update, this time for users of the CentOS Linux 7 operating system series.

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today's leftovers

  • Mesa's Shader Cache Will Now Occupy Less Disk Space
    Mesa previously had a hard-coded limit to not take up more than 10% of your HDD/SSD storage, but now that limit has been halved. In a change to Mesa 17.2-dev Git and primed for back-porting to Mesa 17.1, Timothy Arceri has lowered the cache size limit to 5% of the disk space. He noted in the commit, "Modern disks are extremely large and are only going to get bigger. Usage has shown frequent Mesa upgrades can result in the cache growing very fast i.e. wasting a lot of disk space unnecessarily. 5% seems like a more reasonable default."
  • Amazon EC2 Cloud Benchmarks vs. AMD Ryzen, Various AMD/Intel Systems
  • Epiphany 3.25.1 Released, Ported To Meson
    Epiphany 3.25.1 has been released as the latest update for GNOME's Web Browser in what will be part of GNOME 3.26 this September. Epiphany 3.25.1 has continued the trend by other GNOME components in porting to the Meson build system. With Epiphany 3.25.1, Meson is present and its Autotools build system has been removed.
  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages
    openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts. Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.
  • 3 cool features in Ubuntu 17.04
    April showers bring May flowers, and fresh versions of Ubuntu too. Canonical’s latest official Ubuntu release—17.04—arrived this month after news of the death of Unity 8 and the return to the GNOME desktop in 2018. For now, Ubuntu is still shipping with its Unity desktop. I wrote earlier that most users who need stability and support over new features will probably want to stick with Ubuntu 16.04, which was released last April, until Ubuntu 18.04 arrives a year from now. However, there are a few small things in Ubuntu 17.04 that will appeal to users who are keen to get all the newest updates.
  • Linux Security and Isolation APIs course in Munich (17-19 July 2017)
    I've scheduled the first public instance of my "Linux Security and Isolation APIs" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 17-19 July 2017. (I've already run the course a few times very successfully in non-public settings.) This three-day course provides a deep understanding of the low-level Linux features (set-UID/set-GID programs, capabilities, namespaces, cgroups, and seccomp) used to build container, virtualization, and sandboxing technologies. The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

more of today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors

  • Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft
    Microsoft has urged non-tech-savvy people – or anyone who just wants a stable computer – to not download and install this year's biggest revision to Windows by hand. And that's because it may well bork your machine. It's been two weeks since Microsoft made its Creators Update available, and we were previously warned it will be a trickle-out rather than a massive rollout. Now, Redmond has urged users to stop manually fetching and installing the code, and instead wait for it to be automatically offered to your computer when it's ready.
  • Microsoft Word flaw took so long to fix that hackers used it to send fraud software to millions of computers
    A flaw in Microsoft Word took the tech giant so long to fix that hackers were able to use it to send fraud software to millions of computers, it has been revealed. The security flaw, officially known as CVE-2017-0199, could allow a hacker to seize control of a personal computer with little trace, and was fixed on April 11 in Microsoft's regular monthly security update - nine months after it was discovered.