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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 25 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Mint 18.2 to Come with a Revamped Bluetooth Panel, Updated Xplayer and Xed Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 1:12am
Story Debian-Based GParted Live 0.28.1-1 Released with Linux 4.9.6 and GParted 0.28.1 Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 1:08am
Story Linux 4.10 Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2017 - 11:22pm
Story Desktop GNU/Linux/Chromebook Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2017 - 11:05pm
Story Kernel Space/Linux Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2017 - 11:05pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2017 - 11:03pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2017 - 11:03pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2017 - 11:03pm
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2017 - 11:02pm
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2017 - 11:00pm

Best Linux Email Clients

Filed under
Linux

Finding the best Linux email client is largely a matter of taste. That said, there are specific email clients for Linux that are better than others. In this article, I'll share some of the best Linux email clients available.

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Linux Lite 3.4 to Revamp Lite Welcome to Help Windows Users Accommodate Faster

Filed under
Linux

Jerry Bezencon, the creator of the Ubuntu-based Linux Lite distro, announced today that a new version of the Lite Welcome tool is coming soon for all users with exciting new features.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" Gets First Point Release to Improve Skylake Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Just days after its official release, the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" operating system received its first point release, which brings new, up-to-date components and fixes critical issues.

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Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Gaming Performance With NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060/1080

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

It's been a while since last testing Windows 10 vs. Linux on different, newer Linux game ports with a variety of GPUs, but that changed this week. As mentioned this weekend, I've been working on a large, fresh Windows vs. Linux gaming performance comparison. The results available today are for NVIDIA with testing a GeForce GTX 1060 and GTX 1080 on Windows 10 Pro x64 and Ubuntu 16.10 x86_64 with the latest drivers and using a variety of newer Direct3D 11/12 / OpenGL / Vulkan games.

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What is Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

Open source software is everywhere. It underpins virtually the entire technology sector, with every single element of IT relying on at least one open source component.

For those who aren't aware, free and open source software (commonly abbreviated to FOSS) is software and tools that are made freely available online. Not only are they free to download, install and use, the creators also publish the source code for these programs - their 'DNA'. This means anyone can recreate, tweak, improve or modify them as they see fit.

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Review: KDE neon 5.9.1

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

It has been a while since I've done a review of a Linux distribution. Lately, I've seen a few reviews of KDE neon (the second word being intentionally written in lowercase), and some of them have praised it as being much better than Kubuntu (the traditionally KDE spin of Ubuntu). That got my attention, so I figured I should check it out.

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Growing Your Open Source Community With Twitter

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Engagement in an open source community leads to collaboration, says Jason Hibbets, community evangelist at Red Hat. And social media is one good tool that projects can use to help increase engagement in their communities, he adds, “because you can reach a broad audience at pretty much no-to-low costs.”

Hibbets will discuss how Red Hat has increased engagement with one such social media tool, Twitter chats, in his talk at Open Source Leadership Summit in Lake Tahoe on Feb. 16, 2017. Here, he shares with us some of his reasoning behind why engagement is important, some best practices for increasing engagement, and a few lessons learned from Red Hat’s Twitter chats.

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Open source human body simulator trains future doctors

Filed under
OSS

SOFA an open source human body simulator used for training medical students and for preparing medical interventions, is being used by an increasing number of research centres and companies, says Hugo Talbot, coordinator of the SOFA consortium. He demonstrated SOFA (Simulation Open Framework Architecture) last week at Fosdem, Europe’s largest free software conference, in Brussels (Belgium).

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Industrial controller builds on Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
Linux

Janz Tec has released an industrial controller built around the Raspberry Pi 3, with WiFi, Bluetooth, CANbus, and CODESYS compatibility.

Saelig launched North American distribution for the latest in Janz Tec’s emPC-A/RPI line of Raspberry Pi based industrial controllers. The Raspberry Pi 3 derived emPC-A/RPI3 follows the almost identical, RPi 2 based emPC-A/RPI2, which was called the emPC-A/RPI when we covered it back in Aug. 2015.

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Open Access

Filed under
OSS
  • A $100,000 grant would help the University System of Maryland promote open-source textbooks

    Some students spend hundreds of dollars on textbooks every semester, but the Textbook Cost Savings Act of 2017, sponsored by Maryland state Sen. Jim Rosapepe, could help students save a lot of that money.

    The bill would provide a $100,000 grant to the University System of Maryland's William E. Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation to promote the use of open source materials in place of traditional textbooks. The money would be used to foster the use of open education resources, or OERs, among the system's 12 institutions, said MJ Bishop, director of the Kirwan Center.

  • The Met Goes Public Domain With CC0, But It Shouldn't Have To

    The ongoing digitization of the vast wealth of material sitting in museums and archives around the world is one of the greatest projects of the digital age — a full realization of the internet's ability to spread knowledge and culture to all. Or it would be, if it weren't for copyfraud: for every museum genuinely embracing open content and the public domain, there's another claiming copyright on public domain images and being backed up by terrible court rulings.

    And so it's fantastic to see The Metropolitan Museum of Art joining the former camp with a new Open Access policy that is putting images of 375,000 works online with a CC0 public domain declaration. The Met actually partnered with Creative Commons, Wikimedia, Pinterest and others to help make this happen, and has even announced its first Wikimedian-in-residence who will head up the project to get these images into Wikimedia Commons and onto Wikipedia.

    This is all great, but here's the annoying thing: it should be totally unnecessary. These are digitizations of public domain works, and there's no reasonable basis for granting them any copyright protection that would need to be divested with a CC0 mark in the first place. They are not creative transformative works, and in fact they are the opposite: attempts to capture the original as faithfully and accurately as possible, with no detectable changes in the transfer from one medium to another. It might take a lot of work, but sweat of the brow does not establish copyright, and allowing such images to be re-copyrighted (in some cases hundreds or even thousands of years after their original creation) would be pointless and disastrous.

  • The Met Makes 375,000 Public Domain Images Available

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced Tuesday that more than 375,000 of the Museum's "public-domain artworks" are now available for unrestricted use.

    "We have been working toward the goal of sharing our images with the public for a number of years," said Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the Met, in a statement. "Our comprehensive and diverse museum collection spans 5,000 years of world culture and our core mission is to be open and accessible for all who wish to study and enjoy the works of art in our care."

    The image collection covers photographs, paintings, and sculptures, among other works. Images now available for both scholarly and commercial purposes include Emanuel Leutze's famous painting Washington Crossing the Delaware; photographs by Walker Evans, Alfred Steiglitz, and Dorothea Lange; and even some Vincent van Gogh paintings.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • Clangd: LLVM's Clang Gets A Server
  • GhostBSD 11.0 to Ship with Whisker Menu as Default Application Menu for Xfce

    The GhostBSD developers have announced this past weekend the availability of the first Alpha development release of the upcoming GhostBSD 11.0 open-source, BSD-based operating system.

    GhostBSD 11.0 development is ongoing, and a first Alpha build is now ready for public testing, for early adopters and anyone else who wants to help the GhostBSD developers polish the final release of the operating system by fixing the remaining bugs. This Alpha adds the missing Xfce .xinitrc configuration file and theme engine.

Linux FAQs(Frequently Asked Questions) From A Newbie Perspective

Filed under
Linux

Linux distros are wonderful operating systems. But when you are new to it, you’re probably gonna have some questions in your mind. It’s normal, I too had many questions at first. So, here I’m gonna list out 10 frequently asked questions about Linux.

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Linux and Graphics (WireGuard, Mesa 17.0.0, and RadeonHD)

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • WireGuard Is Still Looking Good As A Linux VPN Tunnel

    We've been talking about WireGuard for months and it's hoping to go mainline in the Linux kernel this calendar year. Earlier this month at FOSDEM was a status update on the project.

    WireGuard lead developer Jason Donenfeld presented on this project that he's been developing over the past year. For those that haven't been following WireGuard up to now, this VPN tunnel is implemented in less than four thousand lines of kernel code, is designed to be very secure, keeps track of minimal state, has a minimal attack surface, provides a solid crypto base, is designed to be very performant, and has other benefits.

  • Mesa 17.0.0 Officially Released

    Mesa 17.0 ships with many big changes and improvements -- see that article for an overview. In the past week I've also published Intel benchmark results with ANV Vulkan having noticeably better performance, RADV/RadeonSI being much faster, and Nouveau Maxwell improvements.

  • [Mesa-dev] [ANNOUNCE] mesa 17.0.0
  • The beginning of the end of the RadeonHD driver.

    Soon it will be a decade since we started the RadeonHD driver, where we pushed ATI to a point of no return, got a proper C coded graphics driver and freely accessible documentation out. We all know just what happened to this in the end, and i will make a rather complete write-up spanning multiple blog entries over the following months. But while i was digging out backed up home directories for information, i came across this...

Openwashing and Microsoft Attacks on GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • What is Open Source?

    Open source software is everywhere. It underpins virtually the entire technology sector, with every single element of IT relying on at least one open source component.

    For those who aren't aware, free and open source software (commonly abbreviated to FOSS) is software and tools that are made freely available online. Not only are they free to download, install and use, the creators also publish the source code for these programs - their 'DNA'. This means anyone can recreate, tweak, improve or modify them as they see fit.

  • ToaruOS 1.0 Released, Hobby OS/Kernel Written From Scratch Over 6+ Years

    In the past on Phoronix we have mentioned ToaruOS a few times. It's a "hobby" kernel and operating system written mostly from scratch yet supports Mesa, GCC, Python, and more. It's been in development since 2011 while now the operating system's 1.0 release finally took place.

    The ToaruOS developer wrote in about the Toaru 1.0 release that took place at the end of January. He wrote, "After six years of development, I am very happy to finally announce the 1.0 release of ToaruOS. While I would not consider this "complete" - there is still much work to be done - it is time to refocus my development, and with that comes the time to declare a stable release. ToaruOS 1.0 has been the result of over half a decade of effort, with contributions from a dozen people besides myself."

  • Opening the Software Heritage archive

    We posted this while I was keynoting with Roberto at FOSDEM 2017, to discuss the role Software Heritage plays in preserving the Free Software commons. To accompany the talk we released our first public API, which allows to navigate the entire content of the Software Heritage archive as a graph of connected development objects (e.g., blobs, directories, commits, releases, etc.).

    Over the past months we have been busy working on getting source code (with full development history) into the archive, to minimize the risk that important bits of Free/Open Sources Software that are publicly available today disappear forever from the net, due to whatever reason --- crashes, black hat hacking, business decisions, you name it. As a result, our archive is already one of the largest collections of source code in existence, spanning a GitHub mirror, injections of important Free Software collections such as Debian and GNU, and an ongoing import of all Google Code and Gitorious repositories.

  • 13 best free and open source inventory management systems 2017: How to save money and improve service for your customers

    Inventory management is the process of specifying and quantifying the shape and percentage of goods you hold in stock. By knowing what you have, and where, you can save money and improve your service to customers.

    There are myriad free inventory management software systems to choose from, many of which are free to use. We have highlighted 13 that are worth considering for your business.

  • Raptor Engineering Hopes To Bring OpenBMC To An ASUS Motherboard

    While Raptor Engineering was unsuccessful with their Talos Secure Workstation effort to build a high-end, libre POWER8 workstation, they are now backing a more realistic effort: opening the Baseboard Management Controller of an ASUS server motherboard still on the market.

    They are hoping to replace the proprietary baseboard management controller firmware with an open-source solution using OpenBMC. They are hoping to do this not only for the sake of having a fully-free server/workstation motherboard but also for addressing security holes in the proprietary firmware and add missing features while also allowing Coreboot to interact with this BMC.

  • The Call for Papers for LIBER’s 2017 Annual Conference in Greece — from 5 to 7 July — is now open.

    Implicit in the concept of access to knowledge is the idea of sustainability. As the idea that we should move towards a more open approach to conducting and disseminating research takes hold it is incumbent on libraries to ensure that in this shifting environment that the accessibility, usability, and long term availability of research outcomes are taken care of. This is a proactive role requiring leadership, vision, innovation and a flexible approach to partnering with researchers and infrastructure.

  • Mozilla Had A Crazy Week Landing Servo, WebRender & More Into Firefox Repo

    This was one of the busiest weeks in Firefox's history with having more than ~10,000 change-sets affecting ~97,000 file changes.

    Landing into the mainline codebase of Firefox Nightly's mozilla-central repository was vendoring the Servo project, WebRender, the ECMAScript ECMA-262 conformance test suite, and various Rust dependencies.

  • How We Talk About Free Software Legal Tools

    Companies are using more free software than ever, but often with little or no understanding of the licenses or the community norms that are part of the package. When it comes to talking about free software legal tools, we need to control the message. This talk will offer ideas on how we should craft and deliver our message around the adoption of free software legal tools.

    Companies are using more free software than ever, but often with little or no understanding of the licenses or the community norms that are part of the package. When it comes to talking about free software legal tools, we need to control the message. If we let other entities fill in the gaps in our outreach strategy, a lot of context and nuance will be lost. A poor or incomplete message hinders our ability to gain more widespread acceptance of free software tools and practices.

  • Baofeng Handy Talkie Meets GNU Radio

    There was a time when just about every ham had a pricey VHF or UHF transceiver in their vehicle or on their belt. It was great to talk to friends while driving. You could even make phone calls from anywhere thanks to automatic phone patches. In 1980 cell phones were uncommon, so making a call from your car was sure to get attention.

  • Understanding The Complexity of Copyleft Defense

    After 25 years of copyleft enforcement and compliance work, is copyleft succeeding as a strategy to defend software freedom? This talk explores the history of enforcement of the GPL and other copyleft licenses, and considers this question carefully. Attendees who have hitherto not followed the current and past debates about copyleft licenses and their enforcement can attend this talk and learn the background, and can expect to learn enough to provide salient and informed feedback of their own opinions about the processes behind upholding copyleft.

LibreOffice 5.3

Filed under
LibO
  • Experimenting with LibreOffice 5.3

    I finally installed LibreOffice 5.3 to try it out. (This is actually version 5.3.0.3.) This version comes with a new interface called MUFFIN, which I wrote about as LibreOffice updating its user interface.

  • LibreOffice 5.3: A week in stats

    We announced LibreOffice 5.3 one week ago, and a lot has happened in the meantime! Here’s a summary of downloads, web page views, social media activity and other statistics. We’ve also compared these to the LibreOffice 5.2 first week stats to see how the project and community is progressing…

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Opening Cyber Salvo in the French Elections

    On Feb 1st, 2017, Wikileaks began tweeting about the candidates in the French election coming up in a few months. This election (along with Germany’s later this year) is a very highly anticipated overt cyber conflict, one that many people in the intelligence, infosec and natsec communities are all paying attention to. We all saw what happened in the US and expect the Russians to meddle in both of these elections too. The outcomes are particularly important because France and Germany (“Old Europe”) are the strong core of the EU, and Putin’s strategic goal is a weak EU. He’s been dealt a weak hand and his geopolitical strategy is to weaken his opponents, pretty straight forward.

  • Kaspersky says businesses hit by fileless Windows malware

    Fileless Windows malware is infecting enterprise systems in 40 or more countries, with more than 140 institutions having been hit, according to the anti-virus company Kaspersky.

    The malware has not been given a name yet, but Kaspersky says it is similar to Duqu 2.0 that attacked its own network and stayed undetected for more than six months.

    It said an unnamed bank found the malware in late 2016 after it detected Meterpreter code in the physical memory of one of its Windows domain controllers. Meterpreter is an advanced, dynamically extensible payload that uses in-memory DLL injection stagers and is extended over the network at runtime.

  • Hack my car? Most believe it can happen

    Most Americans have some concerns that self-driving cars can be hacked to cause crashes, disable the vehicle in some way or even be used as weapons by terrorists, according to researchers at the University of Michigan.

    And large percentages of people are at least slightly concerned that these kinds of vehicles can be hacked to gain access to personal data.

    However, more than half have these same cybersecurity concerns about conventional vehicles, say Michael Sivak and Brandon Schoettle of the U-M Transportation Research Institute.

    Using an online survey of more than 500 Americans, the researchers asked respondents how concerned they are about hackers gaining access to personally owned self-driving (both with control over the gas pedal, brake and steering, and without) and conventional vehicles.

  • ‘Top 10 Spammer’ Indicted for Wire Fraud

    Michael A. Persaud, a California man profiled in a Nov. 2014 KrebsOnSecurity story about a junk email purveyor tagged as one of the World’s Top 10 Worst Spammers, was indicted this week on federal wire fraud charges tied to an alleged spamming operation.

  • Chap scripts remote Linux takeover for sysadmins

    Linux sysadmins with a sense of adventure: Tokyo-based developer Hector Martin has put together a set of scripts to replace an in-use Linux system over SSH.

    Over at GitHub, Martin's Takeover.sh is the kind of no-safety-net we imagine El Reg's readers will love.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Video: State of Linux Containers

    In this video from the 2017 HPC Advisory Council Stanford Conference, Christian Kniep from Gaikai presents: Best Practices: State of Linux Containers.

  • Telegram on Mobile and openSUSE

    Small Messaging Service, or SMS, is a very common and popular way to communicate today. It is a convenient way to transmit a short message. It has seemingly evolved into a way to carry on conversations throughout the day… but it is so 2007...

    [...]

    Privacy: The people behind Telegram are not making money off of your data and take privacy quite seriously. They have received a “generous donation” by an individual and have quite enough money for the time being. Maybe eventually they will have a paid service but not now.

  • NixNote An Unofficial Evernote Client For Linux/Ubuntu/Fedora

    Evernote is arguably the most popular and powerful note-taking tool available. You can save notes in different forms like text, pictures, videos, voice memos and web pages. There are clients available for the web, desktop operating systems (Windows and Mac) as well as mobile devices (Android and iOS) but none for the Linux desktop. There are a few third-party options available including GeekNote, Everpad and NixNote.

  • After a Year in Development, Parole Media Player 0.9 Arrives with New Mini Mode
  • Ardour 5.6 Open-Source DAW Improves Unloading of Large Sessions, Adds Many Fixes

    A new important update of the Ardour open-source and cross-platform DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) software has been released this past weekend for Linux-based operating systems, as well as macOS and Microsoft Windows platforms.

    Ardour 5.6 comes two months after the release of the previous version, and it looks like it's yet another big update implementing numerous improvements and fixing some of those nasty bugs reported by users lately. For example, the transport bar has been greatly revamped to use space more effectively and efficiently, and there's a new design that allows for session navigation while the Mixer tab is in use.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.31 Adds Qt 5.8 Support for C++ Highlighting, over 70 Bug Fixes

    KDE announced this weekend the general availability of the monthly maintenance update to their open-source KDE Frameworks project, a collection of over 70 add-on libraries for Qt 5 providing common functionality for many KDE apps.

    KDE Frameworks 5.31.0 is here with a total of 72 changes across most of its components, including Attica, which now supports display_name in categories, the Breeze icons, the framework integration, as well as KArchive archive manager and KAuth.

  • Kdenlive 16.12.2 Open-Source Video Editor Released with GPU Improvements, More

    Now that the second maintenance update to the KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for KDE Plasma desktops arrived, it's time for the Kdenlive developers to tell us all about the new features implemented in Kdenlive 16.12.2.

    >From the release notes, it looks like Kdenlive 16.12.2 is a small bugfix release adding a total of 20 changes, as the development team is currently concentrating all of their efforts on the refactoring of the timeline with its highly anticipated professional-grade feature and an extra layer of stability.

  • Canonical Now Offers Mesa 13.0.4 for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 in a PPA

    As we reported earlier this week, the soon-to-be-released Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system won't ship with the latest Mesa 13.0.x 3D Graphics Library, but with Mesa 12.0.6.

    If you're reading our previous report, we've provided users with detailed instructions on how to upgrade their Mesa graphics stack from version 12.0.6 to 13.0.4, but it now looks like Canonical's Timo Aaltonen has prepared a PPA (Personal Package Archive) for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 with Mesa 13.0.4.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Diving into Drupal: Princeton’s Multi-site Migration Success with Open-source
    Princeton University’s web team had a complex and overwhelming digital ecosystem comprised of many different websites, created from pre-built templates and hosted exclusively on internal servers. Fast forward six years: Princeton continues to manage a their multisite and flagship endeavors on the open-source Drupal platform, and have seen some great results since their migration back in 2011. However, this success did not come overnight. Organizational buy-in, multi-site migration and authentication were a few of the many challenges Princeton ran into when making the decision to move to the cloud.
  • GitHub Invites Developers to Contribute to the Open Source Guides
    GitHub has recently launched its Open Source Guides, a collection of resources addressing the most common scenarios and best practices for both contributors and maintainers of open source projects. The guides themselves are open source and GitHub is actively inviting developers to participate and share their stories.
  • Top open source projects
    TechRadar recently posted an article about "The best open source software 2017" where they list a few of their favorite open source software projects. It's really hard for an open source software project to become popular if it has poor usability—so I thought I'd add a few quick comments of my own about each.
  • Dropbox releases open-source Slack bot
    Dropbox is looking to tackle unauthorized access and other security incidents in the workplace with a chatbot. Called Securitybot, it that can automatically grab alerts from security monitoring tools and verify incidents with other employers. The company says that through the use of the chatbot, which is open source, it will no longer be necessary to manually reach out to employees to verify access, every time someone enters a sensitive part of the system. The bot is built primarily for Slack, but it is designed to be transferable to other platforms as well.
  • Dropbox’s tool shows how chatbots could be future of cybersecurity
    Disillusion with chatbots has set in across the tech industry and yet Dropbox’s deep thinkers believe they have spotted the technology’s hidden talent: cybersecurity.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • Entroware have unleashed the 'Aether' laptop for Linux enthusiasts featuring Intel's 7th generation CPUs
  • New Entroware Aether Laptop Pairs Intel Kaby Lake with Ubuntu
    The new Entroware Aether is the latest Linux powered laptop from British company Entroware, and is powered by the latest Intel Kaby Lake processors.
  • Freedom From Microsoft v1.01
    But we can be Free from Microsoft! As we saw above, there is a powerful – and now popular movement afoot to make alternative software available. The Free Software Foundation, and the GNU Project, both founded by Richard Stallman, provide Free software to users with licenses that guarantee users rights: the rights to view, modify, and distribute the software source code. With GNU-licensed software, such as Linux, the user is in complete control over the software they employ. And as people contribute to modify Free Software source code, and are required to share those modifications again, the aggregate creative acts give rise to the availability of many more, much more useful results. Value is created beyond what anyone thought possible, and our freedom multiplies.
  • Review of the week 2017/08
    This week we had to cancel a couple snapshots, as a regression in grub was detected, that caused issues on chain-loading bootloaders. But thanks to our genius maintainers, the issue could be found, fixed and integrated into Tumbleweed (and this despite being busy with hackweek! A great THANK YOU!). Despite those canceled snapshots, this review will still span 4 revisions: 0216, 0218, 0219 and 0224. And believe me, there have been quite some things coming your way.

Security Leftovers

  • [Older] The Secure Linux OS - Tails
    Some people worry a lot about security issues. Anyone can worry about their personal information, such as credit card numbers, on the Internet. They can also be concerned with someone monitoring their activity on the Internet, such as the websites they visit. To help ease these frustrations about the Internet anyone can use the Internet without having to “look over their shoulder”.
  • Password management made easy as news of CloudFlare leak surfaces
    In the last 24 hours, news broke that a serious Cloudflare bug has been causing sensitive data leaks since September, exposing 5.5 million users across thousands of websites. In addition to login data cached by Google and other search engines, it is possible that some iOS applications have been affected as well. With the scale of this leak, the best course of action is to update every password for every site you have an account for. If there was ever a good time to modernize your password practices, this is it. As consumers and denizens of the Internet, we have a responsibility to be aware of the risks we face and make an attempt to mitigate that risk by taking best-effort precautions. Poor password and authentication hygiene leaves a user open to risks such as credit card fraud and identity theft, just like forgetting to brush your teeth regularly can lead to cavities and gum disease. This leaves us with the question of what good password and authentication hygiene looks like. If we stick with the (admittedly poorly chosen) dentistry analogy, then there are five easily identifiable aspects of good hygiene.
  • Security: You might want to change passwords on sites that use Cloudflare
  • Smoothwall Express
    The award-winning Smoothwall Express open-source firewall—designed specifically to be installed and administered by non-experts—continues its forward development march with a new 3.1 release.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Derivatives

  • 'Big Bang Theory's' Stuart wears Ubuntu T-shirt
    Am I the only person to notice that comic book shop-owning Stuart (Kevin Sussman) on the "The Big Bang Theory" is wearing an Ubuntu T-shirt on the episode airing Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017? (It's Season 10, Episode 17, if that information helps you.) The T-shirt appearance isn't as overt as Sheldon's mention of the Ubuntu Linux operating system way back in Season 3 (Episode 22, according to one YouTube video title), but it's an unusual return for Ubuntu to the world of "Big Bang."
  • Unity Explained: A Look at Ubuntu’s Default Desktop Environment
    Ubuntu is the most well-known version of Linux around. It’s how millions of people have discovered Linux for the first time, and continues to draw new users into the world of open source operating systems. So the interface Ubuntu uses is one many people are going to see. In this area, Ubuntu is unique. Even as a new user, rarely will you confuse the default Ubuntu desktop for something else. That’s because Ubuntu has its own interface that you can — but probably won’t — find anywhere else. It’s called Unity.
  • A Look at Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS for Raspberry Pi
    Installing Ubuntu MATE onto my Raspberry Pi 3 was straight forward. You can easily use Etcher to write the image to a microSD card, the partition is automatically resized to fill your microSD card when the pi is powered up for the first time, and then you are sent through a typical guided installer. Installation takes several minutes and finally the system reboots and you arrive at the desktop. A Welcome app provides some good information on Ubuntu MATE, including a section specific for the Raspberry Pi. The Welcome app explains that the while the system is based on Ubuntu MATE and uses Ubuntu armhf base, it is in fact using the same kernel as Raspian. It also turns out that a whole set of Raspian software has been ported over such as raspi-config, rpi.gpio, sonic-pi, python-sent-hat, omxplayer, etc. I got in a very simple couple of tests that showed that GPIO control worked.
  • Zorin OS 12 Business Has Arrived [Ed: Zorin 12.1 has also just been released]
    This new release of Zorin OS Business takes advantage of the new features and enhancements in Zorin OS 12, our biggest release ever. These include an all new desktop environment, a new way to install software, entirely new desktop apps and much more. You can find more information about what’s new in Zorin OS 12 here.