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Tuesday, 16 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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KDE and GNOME: Qt 6.0, Auditing Licenses in KDE Frameworks FreeBSD Packaging, Richer Shadows, Endless and GTK+

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • With Qt 6.0 Development To Heat Up, 2018 Should Be Exciting For Qt

    Qt 6.0 planning has begun and we should be hearing more about this next major tool-kit update as the year goes on. Here's some of what we can expect from Qt in the near future.

  • Auditing Licenses in KDE Frameworks FreeBSD Packaging

    FreeBSD is getting more serious about license metadata in the packages produced by the project — that is, the binary distribution of software produced from licensed source code. A lot of software in FreeBSD “proper” is (naturally) BSD-licensed, and a lot of Free Software packaged by FreeBSD is (also naturally) GPL licensed. But the different licenses carry different obligations, so it’s good to keep track of the exact licensing applied to each bit of software.

  • Richer Shadows

    We decided to make them larger and deeper by default, and center them horizontally so that there’s a shadow on the left edges of windows and menus as well. I was honored to produce the patch, and I’m happy to report that it’s been accepted and merged! Starting in Plasma 5.12, here’s how shadows will look...

  • Have a great 2018!

    Workwise, it’s been another very busy year at Endless. I am still in charge of the App Center (our GNOME Software fork) and doing what I can to tame this beast. Endless’ mission has always been a noble one, but with the current direction of the world it’s even more significant and needed; so I will continue to give my best and hope we can keep making a difference in less fortunate regions.

  • GTK+ Custom Widgets: General Definitions

    Writing a GTK+ custom widget with is Vala easy. First all create an XML definition with a top level container widget and a set of child ones. You can use Glade to do so. This is not a tutorial for Glade, so let start at with an already designed template UI file.

Red Hat News Leftovers and New Fedora Build

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat honors former chairman with donation to The Shelton Leadership Center

    As we kick off 2018, Red Hat is proud to announce that we are making a donation to the Shelton Leadership Center in honor of General H. Hugh Shelton’s (U.S. Army Retired) years of service to the company. General Shelton served on Red Hat’s board of directors for more than 14 years, seven of those as chairman. During his time at Red Hat, he provided leadership and direction that guided us through exciting milestones and helped us grow to a $2 billion, +11,000 associate organization.

  • Red Hat steps up with Multi-Architecture Solutions for HPC

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux provides the foundation for many HPC software stacks and is available across multiple hardware architectures. It is at the core of Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Openshift, both of which are part of many HPC environments. Large supercomputing sites like Oak Ridge National Laboratory use Red Hat OpenStack Platform to make their systems more accessible. Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and Red Hat Ansible Automation are also compelling for HPC as they can enable better application portability and system provisioning and automation.

  • Just the Facts on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat: Don't Panic Over Amazon's Move into Enterprise, Says Deutsche
  • F27-20171226 updated lives released.

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.8-300 kernel.  

FOSS Security Updates and Six Cyber Threats to Really Worry About in 2018

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Six Cyber Threats to Really Worry About in 2018

    The cyberattack on the Equifax credit reporting agency in 2017, which led to the theft of Social Security numbers, birth dates, and other data on almost half the U.S. population, was a stark reminder that hackers are thinking big when it comes to targets. Other companies that hold lots of sensitive information will be in their sights in 2018. Marc Goodman, a security expert and the author of Future Crimes, thinks data brokers who hold information about things such as people’s personal Web browsing habits will be especially popular targets. “These companies are unregulated, and when one leaks, all hell will break loose,” he says.

Debian Development and Ubuntu Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #140

    12 package reviews have been added, 23 have been updated and 45 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

  • Debian {Developers, Maintainers} in Kerala

    We have three Debian Developers and two Debian Maintainers here in Kerala.

  • My Debian Activities in December 2017

    This month I accepted 222 packages and rejected 39 uploads. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 348.

    According to the statistic I now passed the mark of 12000 accepted packages.

  • [Older] Debian and the GDPR

    GDPR is a new EU regulation for privacy. The name is short for "General Data Protection Regulation" and it covers all organisations that handle personal data of EU citizens and EU residents. It will become enforceable May 25, 2018 (Towel Day). This will affect Debian. I think it's time for Debian to start working on compliance, mainly because the GDPR requires sensible things.

  • Linspire Is Back From The Dead In 2018

    Remember Linspire? The Linux distribution formerly known as "Lindows" is back from the dead...

    Linspire/Lindows was the Debian/Ubuntu-based operating system targeting the home desktop that dated back to 2001 when founded by controversial figure Michael Robertson. Back in the day it tried to offer an easier time with Linux package management and graphical utilities along with shipping Wine in its much earlier form for Windows software compatibility... Linspire 6.0 is a decade old but now Linspire and Freespire are being lifted back up.

  • smdavis.us Is Now bluesabre.org!

    So, you’ve clicked on a link or came to check for a new release at smdavis.us, and now you’re here at bluesabre.org. Fear not! Everything is working just as it should.

    To kick off 2018, I’ve started tidying up my personal brand. Since my website has consistently been about FOSS updates, I’ve transitioned to a more fitting .org domain. The .org TLD is often associated with community and open source initiatives, and the content you’ll find here is always going to fit that bill. You can continue to expect a steady stream of Xfce and Xubuntu updates.

Jolla and Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
Linux

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • How I teach open source to true newcomers

    Those who are new to the idea of open organizations (and open source in general) may have a difficult time envisioning how the open organization principles are incorporated as part of an existing culture. Many of these folks may not be participating in—or even have had extensive exposure to—an open organization, and therefore may not have ready access to a live community from which to observe and from which to learn.

    This exercise allows participants to create their own communities and then evaluate them with respect to the Open Organization Maturity Model. It is intended to allow participants to gain an understanding of how open organization principles could be implemented within a culture. The process of creating a community allows the participants to clearly understand how the community works, providing a solid foundation for the process of evaluating the community with respect to the Open Organization Maturity Model. The application of the model provides participants the opportunity to test their understanding of open organization principles by evaluating their inclusion in a known environment.

  • Haiku monthly activity report - 12/2017

    Who doesn't like them? I updated the Haiku stats to keep track of the activity in our git repository. The overall number of commits is very similar to 2016 (which was our quietest year so far) with more than 1300 commits (far from the 5555 commits in 2009). Our author of the year is waddlesplash with 213 commitsi, followed by PulkoMandy, Korli, Humdinger, Kallisti5, and Skipp_OSX. 65 different commiters made changes to Haiku this year, a net increase from 48 in 2016, but not reaching as high as 2012 (83 different committers). In the week-by-week graph you can also clearly see the effect of the coding sprint, which is of course the week with most commits.

  • Haiku OS Ends 2017 On A High Note With Better USB 3.0 & UEFI Abilities

    While Haiku OS is incredibly close to delivering their long-awaited beta, it didn't end up materializing in 2017 but they still made much headway into this open-source BeOS-inspired operating system.

  •  

  • Open Source Is Not A Silver Bullet

    OSS is in our everyday lives today. The chances are that you are reading this article using a web browser based on OSS (Chrome, Firefox, and Safari). Much of the Internet is operating on OSS components including Linux OS, Apache web servers, MySQL databases and hundreds of browser components used by thousands of websites around the Internet. Even Apple, known for a very user- and design-centric products is based at its core on many OSS components.

  • Supporting Conservancy Makes a Difference

    Earlier this year, in February, I wrote a blog post encouraging people to donate to where I work, Software Freedom Conservancy. I've not otherwise blogged too much this year. It's been a rough year for many reasons, and while I personally and Conservancy in general have accomplished some very important work this year, I'm reminded as always that more resources do make things easier.

    I understand the urge, given how bad the larger political crises have gotten, to want to give to charities other than those related to software freedom. There are important causes out there that have become more urgent this year.

  • Standard Ebooks: Free and liberated ebooks, carefully produced for the true book lover.

    Standard Ebooks is a volunteer driven, not-for-profit project that produces lovingly formatted, open source, and free public domain ebooks.

  • Open Access Weathers a Governmental Sea Change: 2017 in Review

    In the first few weeks of 2017, just days after President Donald Trump took office, reports emerged that the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Agriculture were instructing scientists on staff not to talk to the public or the press. The reports raised serious questions among open access advocates: what does it mean to advocate for public access to publicly funded scientific research at a time when the future of public funding for science itself is in question?

    Put most simply, open access is the practice of making research and other materials freely available online, ideally under licenses that allow anyone to share and adapt them. Open access publishing has long been the center of a debate over the future of academic publishing: on one side of the debate sit citizen scientists, journalists, and other members of the public eager to access and use scientific research even though they can’t afford expensive journal subscriptions and don’t have institutional access to even-more-expensive online repositories. On the other, a handful of large publishers with a massive vested interest in preserving the status quo.

    In recent years, the U.S. government was a key player in the fight for open access. In 2013, the White House directed all agencies that fund scientific research to enact policies requiring that that research be made available to the public after a year, one of the biggest wins for open access in the past decade. More recently, the Executive Branch spearheaded strong sense policies on access to government-funded software and educational resources.

  • How Log Analysis Can Bring Front-End Engineers on Call

    At the time series-focused Influx Days in San Francisco, presenters offered many unique views of log data. From talks on better analyzing log streams to bitter warnings against identifying what’s “normal,” the one-day event featured a range of ways enterprises can apply new techniques. The goal: get their arms around the near-infinite supply of logging and monitoring data their systems generate.

    Emily Nakashima, a front-end engineer at Honeycomb.io, gave a talk specifically targeted at bringing JavaScript front-end developers into the problem mitigation workflow. To do that, she said, you’ll need to extend your logging analysis all the way to the front-end JavaScript.

LLVM: LLVMpipe and LLVM Clang 6.0 Benchmark

Filed under
Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD
  • Even With An Intel Core i9 7980XE, LLVMpipe Is Still Slow

    During the recent holidays when running light on benchmarks to run, I was toying around with LLVMpipe in not having run this LLVM-accelerated software rasterizer in some time. I also ran some fresh tests of Intel's OpenSWR OpenGL software rasterizer that has also been living within Mesa.

    In showing the potential best case, an Intel Core i9 7980XE was used with its 18 cores / 36 threads configuration with 2.6GHz base frequency and 4.2GHz turbo for this ~$2,000 USD CPU with a 165 Watt TDP.

  • LLVM Clang 6.0 Benchmarks On AMD's EPYC Yield Some Performance Benefits

    With LLVM 6.0 being branched this week and that marking the end of feature development on this next compiler update before its stable debut in February, here are some benchmarks of the very latest LLVM Clang 6.0 compiler on AMD's EPYC 7601 32-core / 64-thread processor as we see how well the AMD Zen "znver1" tuning is working out.

Mesa Grew By Nearly 250,000 Lines Of Code In 2017 Across 10k Commits

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering Mesa's rate of change last year while adding in many OpenGL 4.5~4.6 features, a lot of Vulkan driver activity, countless performance optimizations, and the plethora of other work that took place in 2017, here are some numbers.

Yesterday I ran GitStats on the Mesa code-base for being curious about how 2017 looks from the development numbers.

- Mesa saw 465,765 lines of code added and 216,715 lines of code removed.. or a net gain of 249,050 lines of code. That came across 10,334 commits. While there was a ton of work landing in 2017, this was actually lighter than in 2016 when seeing 10,910 commits with 559,114 lines added and 263,342 removed (+295k).

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Games: Seven: The Days Long Gone, Road Dogs, DUSK, BRAIN / OUT, Ruggnar

Filed under
Gaming

Black Lab Software Releases Freespire 3.0 & Linspire 7.0 Linux Operating Systems

Filed under
OS
Linux

After giving users free copies of Linspire 7.0 for Christmas, Black Lab Software's CEO Roberto J. Dohnert is now also releasing the freely distributed Freespire 3.0 operating system, a slimmed down version of the commercial Linspire 7.0, which can now be purchased from the developer's website.

"While both contain common kernel and common utilities, they are targeted towards two different user bases. Freespire is a FOSS distribution geared for the general Linux community," reads the announcement. "Linspire is a commercial release which builds on the elegant Freespire foundation."

Read more

Best Linux Music Players To Stream Online Music

Filed under
Linux

​For all the music lovers, what better way to enjoy music and relax than to stream your music online. Below are some of the best Linux music players out there you can use to stream music online and how you can get them running on your machine. It will be worth your while.

Read<br />
more

10 Reasons Why Linux Is Better Than Windows

Filed under
Linux

​It is often seen that people get confused over choosing Windows or Linux as host operating system in both server and desktop spaces. People will focus on aspects of cost, the functionality provided, hardware compatibility, support, reliability, security, pre-built software, cloud-readiness etc. before they finalize. In this regard, this article covers ten reasons of using Linux over Windows.

Read<br />
more

OpenShot's 2018 Plans

Filed under
Software
Movies
  • Happy New Year 2018!

    Happy New Year! Last year was an amazing year for OpenShot, with huge stability and performance improvements, a new interactive transform tool, improvements to animation & key-frames, a new website (translated in 10 languages), a new cloud API (for video automation), improved playback speed, and more than 1 million installs of OpenShot 2.x. Now that 2018 has arrived, I thought it would be fun to discuss the future of OpenShot, and where it's heading for the next year.

  • OpenShot Wants to Crash Less in 2018

    Open source video editor OpenShot has shared a list of 'favourite ideas for 2018' that include improving stability, improving the UI and adding more effects.

  • OpenShot Video Editor Planning For Many Improvements In 2018

    The OpenShot open-source non-linear video editor is planning for many improvements this year.

Multiple-guess quiz will make Brit fliers safer, hopes drone-maker DJI

Filed under
GNU
Security
Legal

Meanwhile, security researcher Jon Sawyer has published a root exploit for DJI drones called DUMLRacer. It would appear to allow the technically competent dronie to completely ignore DJI's height and location restrictions, which form a large part of its please-don't-regulate-us-out-of-existence offering to governments around the world.

In his tweet announcing the release, Sawyer said: "Dear DJI, next time I ask for some GPL source code, maybe don't tell me no."

At the heart of DJI's software is GNU General Public Licensed (open source) code. While the firm does publish some of its source code, as previously reported, the company is not exactly clear about what elements of its drones' firmware are based on GPL-licensed code. The GPL contains a provision stating that anyone can modify GPL-licensed code provided that the source of any publicly available modded version is also made public, as the GPL FAQ makes clear.

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KDE: Plasma Mobile/postmarketOS, Kubuntu 17.10, and 2017 With KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • postmarketOS Update: Now Runs Plasma Mobile/Lune UI/Xfce On Real Devices

    In the last week of December, I came across a post on Reddit/r/KDE that showed a postmarketOS device with Plasma Mobile. Just recently, the team had published the latest blog update on their website, listing out the recent developments and breakthroughs achieved during the last months.

    Before going ahead and reading the developments, I’ll advise you to read this introductory post on postmarketOS if you’re not aware of the project.

  • Kubuntu 17.10[fix]: Fonts Looks Too Big After Enabling Nvidia’s Proprietary Driver?

    These days my main operating system is Kubuntu 17.10 because I’ve switched to KDE as my desktop environment. However, since my Asus laptop comes with a hybrid GPU setup, I decided to enable the more capable Nvidia GPU by installing its proprietary driver. Once I enabled it on Kubuntu 17.10, then after rebooting, I noticed that the fonts looks slightly (unnecessarily) bigger on the desktop and on the application windows. Luckily I was able to fix it quite easily. So if you’re having the same issue, this post will help you out for fixing it.

    To be honest, I rarely use the Nvidia GPU. And the only reason why I installed and enabled the proprietary driver was to see if it would break the user auto-login feature. This was purely out of my curiosity because that’s what happened in GNOME, while I reviewed Ubuntu 17.10.

  • A roadtrip through 2017 with KDE

    Happy New Year to all! The year 2017 has been a rollercoaster, to be honest. Well, it was rich and prosperous year regarding in technical terms. It was a beautiful year of great learning, splendid travel and got to network with some fantastic folks all around the globe.

    The best reason for making this 2017 incredible for me is KDE. One of the exciting community I have ever seen! It all started at the end of 2016, I got intrigued by the Tagline of KDE, “Experience freedom”. I started contributing to various projects inside KDE. My initial start was with Konsole, system settings, KIO and various educational suite programs. Moving on, I came across a student program organized by KDE named KDE-SoK and I was selected for it, yay!!!

    The project was with KStars(KDE’s amateur astronomy software which provides real-time and an accurate graphical simulation of the night sky, from any location on Earth.) to collect a new set of images from NASA/ESO catalogs along with orientation and pixel scale (arcsecs/pixel) from the whole set of Messier Catalog (which is a collection of 110 astronomy objects in the night sky). Images were processed for overlay in KStars using OpenCV, so to have transparency and to modulate according to the software.

The January 2018 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the January 2018 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Teaching open source graphic design is a learning experience

Filed under
OSS

"Would you like to teach a class to high school sophomores?" the staff email asked.

Well, sure I would!

I work in St. Lawrence University's communications department, and I had always wanted to try teaching. Now I had an opportunity to teach whatever I wanted. Of course, I chose my two favorite subjects: graphic design and open source. I submitted a proposal to teach a class called Graphic Design Using Open Source Tools for the St. Lawrence University Scholars Enrichment Program (SLUSEP) over eight Saturday mornings.

My proposal was approved, and I was ready to begin. How to begin? The only teaching I had done was as a Boy Scout leader, and this class had nothing to do with knots (except those in my stomach). I had to create a curriculum; prepare the hardware, environment and software; and figure out how to fill 2.5 hours each week with exciting, informative projects.

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Manjaro Linux 17.1.0 Released With Latest Packages — Get This User-friendly Distro Here

Filed under
Linux

Following the September release of Manjaro Linux 17.0.3, the developers of this Arch Linux-based distro have shipped Manjaro Linux 17.1.0. Released on December 31st, 2017, it marks the last Manjaro offering of 2017. In other words, you can kickstart 2018 with this freshly baked desktop-oriented operating system.

“This marks the last update of Manjaro in 2017. We wish you all the best for next year. Have fun and celebrate with family and friends,” the announcement reads.

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More in Tux Machines

Plasma 5.12 LTS beta available in PPA for testing on Artful & Bionic

Adventurous users, testers and developers running Artful 17.10 or our development release Bionic 18.04 can now test the beta version of Plasma 5.12 LTS. Read more Also: Kubuntu 17.10 and 18.04 Users Can Now Try the KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS Desktop

Leftovers: Proprietary Software, HowTos, and GXml

Debian Developers: Google Summer of Code, Quick Recap of 2017

  • RHL'18 in Saint-Cergue, Switzerland
    In between eating fondue and skiing, I found time to resurrect some of my previous project ideas for Google Summer of Code. Most of them are not specific to Debian, several of them need co-mentors, please contact me if you are interested.
  • Quick recap of 2017
         After the Stretch release, it was time to attend DebConf’17 in Montreal, Canada. I’ve presented the latest news on the Debian Installer front there as well. This included a quick demo of my little framework which lets me run automatic installation tests. Many attendees mentioned openQA as the current state of the art technology for OS installation testing, and Philip Hands started looking into it. Right now, my little thing is still useful as it is, helping me reproduce regressions quickly, and testing bug fixes… so I haven’t been trying to port that to another tool yet. I also gave another presentation in two different contexts: once at a local FLOSS meeting in Nantes, France and once during the mini-DebConf in Toulouse, France. Nothing related to Debian Installer this time, as the topic was how I helped a company upgrade thousands of machines from Debian 6 to Debian 8 (and to Debian 9 since then). It was nice to have Evolix people around, since we shared our respective experience around automation tools like Ansible and Puppet.

Devices: Raspberry Pi and Android