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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 20 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 12:00am
Story Red Hat Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/03/2018 - 11:59pm
Story Mozilla Leftovers: New Release of Firefox and Lots More Roy Schestowitz 13/03/2018 - 11:56pm
Story Openwashing: Plus Codes, 'Open Innovation,' and Vatican Roy Schestowitz 13/03/2018 - 11:52pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/03/2018 - 11:49pm
Story Linux Foundation: ACRN, CNCF, AGL With Listening Device Support Roy Schestowitz 13/03/2018 - 10:13pm
Story Google FOSS Releases Roy Schestowitz 13/03/2018 - 10:07pm
Story The Top 10 GNU/Linux Distros for Privacy & Security Roy Schestowitz 13/03/2018 - 8:23pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 13/03/2018 - 6:29pm
Story Tails 3.6 Linux Distribution Released Rianne Schestowitz 13/03/2018 - 6:22pm

Chrome 65

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

Debian in Jail, Debian-based TeX Live 2018 is Coming

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  • Debian, Kali Linux distributions now available in the Microsoft Store

    Microsoft promised months ago that Windows 10 users would be able to install and run multiple Linux distributions side-by-side on the Windows Subsystem for Linux.

  • Debian GNU/Linux for WSL now available in the Windows Store

    We’re excited to announce that you can now download & install Debian GNU/Linux via the Windows Store!

    After we announced that you’d be able to install and run multiple distro’s side-by-side on WSL , we are happy to introduce another one of your favorite Linux distros to the Windows Store. As promised, we are expanding your ability to run multiple distros on WSL!

  • Debian GNU/Linux Operating System Is Now Available from the Windows 10 Store

    Microsoft announced on Tuesday that it brought the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system to the Windows Store for those who want to install it on top of the WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux) feature for Windows 10.

    The exciting announcement comes just one day after Microsoft introduced the Debian-based Kali Linux ethical hacking and penetration testing GNU/Linux distribution on the Windows Store for those who want to download and install it on their Windows 10 machines that support WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux), and now you can do the same with Debian GNU/Linux.

  • TeX Live 2018 pretest started

    Preparations for the release of TeX Live 2018 have started a few days ago with the freeze of updates in TeX Live 2017 and the announcement of the official start of the pretest period. That means that we invite people to test the new release and help fixing bugs.

​Kubernetes graduates to full-pledged, open-source program

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At the Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS), the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which sustains and integrates open-source, cloud native technologies such as Prometheus and containerd, and Chen Goldberg, Google Cloud's director of engineering, announced that Kubernetes is the first project to graduate from the CNCF.

That may sounds a little odd since Kubernetes is already the dominant cloud container orchestration program. But, for the CNCF, graduation has a particular meaning. To graduate, a project must must show it has been adopted by multiple organizations, have a documented, structured governance process, and show a strong commitment to community success and inclusivity.

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Also: Microservices 101

A Year Away From Mac OS

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This is the fifth post in my series on finding an alternative to Mac OS X.

A bit over a year ago I wrote about my search for an alternative to Mac OS and switch to Linux. In this post I reflect on how that year went and detail some further adventures into Mac OS alternatives.

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Graphics:, xf86-video-ati, DRM, and Open-Source Mali GPU Driver

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  • xf86-video-ati 18.0 X.Org Driver Released

    Days after the release of xf86-video-amdgpu 18.0 is now an updated xf86-video-ati / Radeon DDX release for namely the pre-GCN graphics processors.

    The xf86-video-ati 18.0 release is available today that like the AMDGPU DDX driver has also switched over to a year-based versioning scheme. With most attention these days being on GCN Radeon GPUs, there isn't too much to this Radeon DDX driver that ends out its support with the Radeon HD 6000 series, depending upon if GCN 1.0/1.1 support for your kernel is set to AMDGPU yet or not.

  • Aspect Ratio Support Within The Linux Kernel's DRM Code Revised

    Intel open-source developer Ankit Nautiyal has restarted work on adding picture aspect ratio support to the Linux kernel's Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) layer.

    Previous work on adding aspect ratio handling to the DRM subsystem's mode-setting paths and exposing that to user-space had failed and been reverted since it didn't properly deal with user-space applications not supporting the aspect ratio information attached to modes. With these new patches, the new aspect ratio support is hidden behind a capability flag as to not cause problems for existing software.

  • Libdrm 2.4.91 Released With AMDGPU, Android & Freedreno Updates

    Version 2.4.91 of the Mesa DRM library (libdrm) is now available for this component that notably sits between the Linux kernel and various user-space clients like Mesa and the X.Org Server.

  • Work Is Underway On Assembler, Shader Support For Chai Open-Source Mali GPU Driver

    Last month we reported on work resuming with the Mali T700 series open-source GPU driver called Chai. It's continued with the lead developer now working on an Assembler and soon beginning work on shaders.

    Alyssa Rosenzweig who has been working on this open-source Mali T700 driver from where the Lima project left off several years ago continues making progress.

Games: Railway Empire, 'Where The Water Tastes Like Wine' and More

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Security: Updates, 4G LTE, and Chip Bugs Handling by Oracle and OpenIndiana

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  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Researchers detail new 4G LTE vulnerabilities allowing spoofing, tracking, and spamming

    4G LTE isn’t nearly as secure or private as you think it is. Mobile privacy and security are both at risk. Researchers from Purdue University and the University of Iowa have released a new research paper detailing ten attacks on 4G LTE networks. Some attacks allow fake emergency alerts to be sent to a phone, others allow for the spoofing or tracking of the target’s location. The attacks could be carried out with less than $4,000 of equipment and open source 4G LTE software.

  • Oracle Brings KPTI Meltdown Mitigation To Linux 4.1

    If for some reason you are still riding the Linux 4.1 kernel series, you really should think about upgrading to at least a newer LTS series in the near future. But if you still plan on riding it for a while longer, at least it's getting page table isolation support for Meltdown mitigation.

    An Oracle kernel developer has posted patches bringing kernel page table isolation (KPTI, formerly known as KAISER) to the Linux 4.1 stable kernel series.

  • OpenIndiana Now Has KPTI Support Up For Testing To Mitigate Meltdown

    The Solaris-derived OpenIndiana operating system now has KPTI (Kernel Page Table Isolation) support for testing to mitigate the Intel Meltdown CPU vulnerability.

    Thanks in large part to the work done by Joyent on KPTI support for SmartOS/OmniOSce, the Illumos kernel used by OpenIndiana now has a KPTI implementation for testing. They have spun up some live install images for testing as well as an IPS repository containing a KPTI-enabled kernel build. With this KPTI work is also PCID (Process Context Identifier) support too.

  • A long two months

    I had a quiet New Year's Eve and Day for the beginning of 2018. We had originally planned a trip away with my parents and some friends from southern California, but they all fell through -- my father was diagnosed with cancer late in 2017 and their trip to visit us in the U.S. was cancelled, and our friends work in medicine and wound up being on call. One of Lou's other friends came to visit us, instead: she was on a mission to experience midnight twice on January 1st by flying from Hong Kong to San Francisco. That might sound like an excuse to party hard, but instead we sat around an Ikea table playing board games, drinking wine and eating gingerbread. It was very pleasant.


    To mitigate Meltdown (and partially one of the Spectre variants), you have to make sure that speculative execution cannot reach any sensitive data from a user context.

Checking Out Ubuntu 18.04's Minimal Desktop Install Option

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Besides the Ubuntu 18.04 minimal spin that is around to 30MB compressed, the Ubuntu 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" installer recently added an option for a "minimal installation" from the desktop Live DVD/USB environment. Here's a look at what that means for desktop users.

The minimal installation option from the Ubuntu 18.04 Ubiquity installer isn't to be confused with the lightweight Ubuntu minimal spin for containers and building your Ubuntu stack from scratch. Rather, the desktop minimal installation is advertised as only installing "a minimal desktop environment with a browser and utilities."

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Divisive Politics are destroying Open Source

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Divisive Politics are destroying Open Source. Many Open and Free Software projects have been ripped apart, just in the last year, by politics that seem to serve no purpose other than to divide us as people. I take a look at three recent, and noteworthy, examples: FreeBSD, Node.js (part of the Linux Foundation), and Mozilla. Three organizations that have a massive impact on our lives (even if we don’t know it) — that have had divisive politics cause significant turmoil and damage to not only themselves… but the entire Open Source and technology world.

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Exploring free and open web fonts

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There is no question that the face of the web has been transformed in recent years by open source fonts. Prior to 2010, the only typefaces you were likely to see in a web browser were the generic "web safe" core fonts from Microsoft. But that year saw the start of several revolutions: the introduction of the Web Open Font Format (WOFF), which offered an open standard for efficiently delivering font files over HTTP, and the launch of web-font services like Google Fonts and the Open Font Library—both of which offered web publishers access to a large collection of fonts, for free, available under open licenses.

It is hard to overstate the positive impact of these events on web typography. But it can be all too easy to equate the successes of open web fonts with open source typography as a whole and conclude that the challenges are behind us, the puzzles solved. That is not the case, so if you care about type, the good news is there are a lot of opportunities to get involved in improvement.

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Trying Out The New Intel Open-Source OpenCL NEO Compute Driver

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Last month Intel open-sourced a new "NEO" OpenCL driver including an LLVM graphics compiler and its compute runtime supporting OpenCL 2.1. I finally found some time to give this new open-source Intel OpenCL Linux driver a try.

This new Intel OpenCL open-source driver dubbed "NEO" that replaces the Beignet previous open-source OpenCL Linux driver as well as Intel's previous closed-source OpenCL SDK driver is in much better standing. While Beignet hit OpenCL 2.0 support a few months ago, NEO already exposes OpenCL 2.1 and they are on the way with OpenCL 2.2 support. This NEO driver is also cross-platform, introduces a new "GMMLIB" graphics memory management library, and makes use of a new LLVM-based graphics compiler stack. This new Intel stack focuses on Broadwell "Gen 8" graphics hardware support and newer.

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You Can Now Run Linux on Sony's PlayStation 4 (4.55) Gaming Console, Here's How

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Developer Valentin Breiz recently updated his PS4 Linux Loader, a simple payload tool designed with a single goal in mind, to let you run Linux on your Sony PlayStation 4 gaming console, to support some PlayStation 4 models running firmware 4.55.

This is possible thanks to IDC's kernel exploit for firmware 4.05, which has now been updated for firmware 4.55 too. However, for now it looks like running Linux on PlayStation 4 only works with some PS4 models having a FAT filesystem.

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today's leftovers

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  • Data Destroyer, Testdisk, Boot-repair and Windows7

    Nevertheless, the laptop became unusable. I could not boot it from HDD. I had to save it. I managed to create a Live USB with Kubuntu 16.04 image using another laptop I had. But even then, HDD partition table was destroyed. Linux operating system could not read anything from the disk.

    Here comes Testdisk. This is a small CLI utility to help in these situations. I installed it in the Live Kubuntu 16.04 and let it run. It took some time for Testdisk to scan my 1TB drive. I must admit that the interface of Testdisk is far from perfect, and you can easily null the scan results by pressing just one button. That made my work iterative before I finally managed to rescue my drive.

    Testdisk found partitions on my HDD, and even helped me to copy files from the data partition to an external HDD. At least, I saved my data.

    The next step was to recreate partition table. There were certain partitions for Linux, Linux Swap, OS restore and data. But the main Windows partition was lost, and instead I saw couple dozen broken bit-size partitions. Using Testdisk, I managed to recreate the partition table. Live Kubuntu could mount these partitions normally, which was already a big achievement. Few more files were copied from the Linux partition to the external drive, just in case.


  • The Engine Of HPC And Machine Learning

    The GPU motor has come a long way since the “G80” GPU was launched by Nvidia back in 2006, laying the groundwork for what has evolved into the Volta GPU, arguably them most complex and rich computing engine yet put into the field for parallel processing. This GPU had eight shader cores, each with sixteen processing elements, introducing a much more parallel architecture than prior chips from Nvidia.

  • DRI3 v1.2 Lands In X.Org Server 1.20

    We knew it was coming still for X.Org Server 1.20, but now the DRI3 v1.2 support has landed in the server.

    Along with the X.Org Server bits are support within the modesetting DDX driver and GLAMOR acceleration for the new DRI3 v1.2 capabilities. This includes support for multiple planes and buffer modifier requests. The modesetting DDX work includes atomic mode-setting support and supporting buffer formats/modifiers. The multi-plane support should be particularly useful for ARM/embedded Linux devices.

  • Kali Linux For Windows 10 Arrives In Microsoft Store
  • Kali Linux for Windows 10 now available in Microsoft Store
  • Kali Linux now available for download from Microsoft Store
  • Kali Linux hits the Microsoft Store (for Windows Subsystem on Linux)

    It still feels weird writing that a Linux distribution is something you can download and install from the Microsoft Store. But it’s been true for a while now. Windows 10 has an optional feature called the Windows Subsystem for Linux that lets you load a command-line Linux operating system that runs inside of Windows, allowing you to use Linux tools without rebooting or opening a virtual machine.

  • Redcore Linux Hardened 1803 Jupiter Alpha

    We are very happy to announce that Redcore Linux Hardened 1803 (Jupiter) reached Alpha status. This development cycle we are leaving new features on a second plan, and we are focusing mostly on the security aspect of the distribution.

Systemd 238 Released, Adds New Temporary File-System Option

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While systemd 237 was released just over one month ago, systemd 238 was released today as the next installment of this init system.

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Wine and Games

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
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Mozilla News/Views

  • What we learned about gender identity in Open Source
    To learn more, we launched a Diversity & Inclusion in Open Source survey earlier this year, which sought to better understand how people identify, including gender-identity. Our gender spectrum question, was purposely long — to experiment with the value people found in seeing their identity represented in a question. People from over 200 open projects participated. Amazingly, of 17 choices, each was uniquely selected, by a survey participant at least once.
  • Why we participate in support
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  • A good question, from Twitter
    Why do I pay attention to Internet advertising? Why not just block it and forget about it? By now, web ad revenue per user is so small that it only makes sense if you're running a platform with billions of users, so sites are busy figuring out other ways to get paid anyway.
  • This Week In Servo 108
    We have been working on adding automated performance tests for the Alexa top pages, and thanks to contributions from the Servo community we are now regularly tracking the performance of the top 10 websites.

Blockchain: DigitalBits, Aventus, Cryptocurrency

  • DigitalBits launches open-source blockchain-based marketplace for loyalty points
    Their value — or at least their versatility — could get a boost if The DigitalBits Project is successful. This community endeavor, soon to become a nonprofit foundation based out of the tiny European country of Lichtenstein, is today launching an open-source blockchain-based infrastructure that supports trading loyalty points or rewards or transferring them to other individuals.
  • Aventus Announces Development of Open-Source Protocol Foundation
    Aventus, the blockchain ticketing startup that raised 60,000 Ether via a crowdsale in 2017, has announced the next stage of development for its non-profit foundation. The Aventus Protocol Foundation will serve as an entity tasked with supporting open-source projects built using the Aventus protocol. This encourages the growth of the Aventus ticketing ecosystem while protecting the rights of holders of AVT, the native Aventus token.
  • An Overview of Cryptocurrency Consensus Algorithms
    One of the most important aspects of a decentralized cryptocurrency project is the consensus algorithm it employs. A consensus algorithm is crucial to the implementation of a digital currency because it prevents the double spending problem, a challenge that has historically limited the development of digital currencies until the recent development and adoption of the blockchain ledger method. Because cryptocurrencies are implemented as public, decentralized ledgers that are append-only, they must employ a consensus algorithm to verify that there “is one version of the truth” and that the network cannot be overwhelmed by bad actors.

today's howtos

Fedora: Release Party, Fedora Diversity, Critical Firefox Fix