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Thursday, 23 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 2:27pm
Story Development News/Languages Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 9:26am
Story Zorin OS 12.1 Education Is Here Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 9:19am
Story Games and Wine Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 9:11am
Story Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 8:29am
Story GNOME News: GNOME 3.24, Recipes 1.0 Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 8:28am
Story Mesa 13.0.6 Graphics Stack Promises Better Vulkan Drivers, over 100 Improvements Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 8:17am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 2:26am
Story Linux and FOSS Events Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 2:23am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 2:22am

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Desktops and Devices With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Neutralizing the Intel Management Engine on Librem Laptops

    In my last blog post, I have spoken of the completion of the Purism coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 and mentioned that I had some good news about the Intel Management Engine disablement efforts (to go further than our existing quarantine) and to “stay tuned” for more information. Since then I got a little side-tracked with some more work on coreboot (more below), but now it’s time to share with you the good news!

  • Windows vs Linux: what's the best operating system? [Ed: Vista 10 ad disguised as a comparison to GNU/Linux? Very shallow, repeats old stigma.]

    Windows, however, remains the winner in terms of pure convenience. It’s simple, familiar, and guaranteed to be compatible with virtually all software; for busy companies, that could well be more valuable in the long run.

  • Endless Mission One – A $250 Linux Computer Makes Us Feel It’s Time To Switch

    With all the major breeds of computers, whether laptops, desktops, and mini PCs, being Windows-centric, it’s hard to find good hardware that has an eternal love for Linux distributions. But we have seen some good machines like the Mint Box Pro.

    The minds behind the Linux-based Endless OS have also created a bunch of box computers, that come pre-installed with Endless OS. And I am sure, even if you don’t buy these machines, they’ll change your view about Linux machines regarding visual appearance. One of them, the Endless Mission One, has a wooden-finished body that makes it soothing AF in the first look itself.

  • P2V: Debian Testing PXE server and Vmware Workstation 11

    Thankfully, the SATA drive and CMOS battery have survived with apparently no ill effects, since the box has been moved around through a couple of house changes with no special storage arrangements – it’s basically been “unpowered” sitting in a corner.

  • Asus Tinker Board Review: First Impressions

    OS TinkerOS (Debian)

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • PiCluster 1.6 – Move your Containers to Different Hosts

    I am pleased to announce v1.6 of PiCluster. In this release there are a few usability bugs fixed and a new feature that allows you to change the host of a running container. Having the ability to easily change where a container is running is a standard and crucial feature to expect from a container management platform. I am glad that it is finally here and let’s explore how it works!

  • Tizonia: A Command-line Music Streaming Client for Linux

    We recently introduced you to a command line music app, MOC media player for Linux, that comes with an equalizer and a mixer.

    Today we bring you another command line app called Tizonia, which can play locally stored music files and also allow you to listen to your favorite music streaming platforms.

    Tizonia is an Open Source command-line application for streaming music on your Linux desktop.

  • Screenlets Lets You Spice Up Your Ubuntu/Linux Mint Desktop

    Screenlets is basically a widgets engine which run small applications on the desktop called widgets, it is written in Python and licensed under GPL. It was designed to run on Unix-like operating systems by 'Rico Pfaus', 'Helder Fraga' and 'Natan Yellin', targeting specifically to run on X11-based compositing windows manager like compiz.

  • Simple Weather Indicator Lets You Keep An Eye On Weather Conditions

    Simple Weather Indicator is simple and elegant indicator designed to get weather information right on the panel. It is developed using Python languages and uses an in-house open source weather API called Eris to get the current weather condition of the user's location.

  • Take Care Of Your Eyes Using SafeEyes Application in Linux

    SafeEyes is a useful application designed to give your eyes a little break from your computer screen (this is the way how not to get eye strain, 'asthenopia'), while also asking you to do some eyes exercise which can be useful. It is free and open source developed by Gobinath, it is an alternative to EyeLeo which is only available for Windows.

  • Lightweight Paint Software mtPaint 3.50 Dev Available In PPA For Ubuntu or Linux Mint

    While the last stable mtPaint version was released back in 2011, there have been quite a few development releases since then, with the last one dating to June, 2016. I couldn't find a PPA with the latest mtPaint 3.50 development releases, so I created one to make it easy to install in Ubuntu and Linux Mint.

  • Import Your Geotagged Photos In Google Earth With Mapollage (KML File Generator)

    Mapollage is a Java tool that can be used to put your geotagged photos on the map by creating an KML file that can be used with Google Earth.

  • Heard Of Chrome OS But Never Tried? Here Is The Chrome OS Theme For Your Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    There isn't much theme development going on now a days for latest Ubuntu version like it used to in past, we had so many themes to choose from for our beloved desktop but it is quite unfortunate. Hopefully creators will jump in eyecandy pool once again and give us those great themes taste we used to have for our Linux desktops. But there are still some people who are giving their free time to Linux eyecandy and we must appreciate them.

  • Davinci Resolve now available on Linux

    Inevitably it didn't get as much attention as the new camera and panels did when they were announced last week, but in Blackmagic's live stream unveiling Grant Petty also talked briefly about Resolve for Linux.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Sharing your app with friends

    It’s a rainy afternoon in Portland so I’m cozy with an espresso watching the rain. After a short hacking session you can now export your application as a Flatpak bundle quickly and easily. Just select the workbench menu in the top right corner of the workbench, followed by Flatpak, and then Export as Bundle.

  • Numix-Based GTK Theme Generator Tool Oomox 1.2.0 Released With Improved Unity Support, More

    Oomox is a tool that allows generating color variations of the popular Numix GTK2 / GTK3 theme, as well as icons to match them.

    The application comes with a large number of built-in presets that can be further customized, and it supports GNOME, Unity, Xfce4 and Openbox.

    The minimum GTK3 version required to use it is 3.18 (so it supports Ubuntu 16.04 and newer). The themes might work with older GTK3 versions, but you may encounter issues.

  • Simplifying newcomer setup

    One thing we are striving for in 3.24 is to make it as simple as possible for newcomers to get their development environment setup. Hopefully in time so that our next round of Outreachy and GSoC interns have an easier time getting started.

    A common installation issue we’ve seen is that people have flatpak, but not flatpak-builder. Without it, Builder can’t do builds inside of the target mount namespace with all your proper dependencies. So now Builder will detect this and install it for you if you like.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Okular table selection mode is amazing

    Okular has a amazing table select mode where you select an area and Okular will auto detect rows and columns on it (you can fine-tune it afterwards) and then you can directly copy&paste to a spreadsheet Smile

  • Meteo Qt Is A Nice Qt5 Weather Tray Application

    The application is based on Python 3 and Qt 5, and while it is aimed at Qt-based desktops (like KDE Plasma or LXQt), it works pretty well on GTK-based desktops as well (either as a tray or as an AppIndicator).

  • Season of KDE, 2017

    Finally I am writing about my experience in Season of KDE, 2017 which came to an end a few days ago. A winter learning new things, learning what really matters is not just writing code but writing good code. I would like to thank GCompris and KDE for giving me such an opportunity to be a part of the community and to try to bring happiness to people and kids using it around the world.

  • Vault - for the privacy of your data

    While the recent revelations are not all that surprising, they did stir the pot a bit and made people at least a tad more aware of the problems of personal privacy in the modern age.

  • Virtual Keyboard on Lock Screen

    As part of our efforts to improve out of box experience for touch screens I’m pleased to announce that Plasma 5.10 will provide integration for virtual keyboard.

  • Wiki, what’s going on? (Part 22-Throw back time)
  • Provisioning OpenStreetMap providers in QtLocation

    This post is to provide some clarification on a behavioral change we had to introduce with Qt 5.6.2 to the QtLocation‘s OpenStreetMap plug-in. The related change seems to have generated some confusion, so here’s the full story.

  • Kdenlive 16.12.3 Out, Promises to Crash Less Often

    A new bug fix release of the open-source, non-linear video editor Kdenlive is now available to download. Kdenlive 16.12.3 is the last release in the 16.12.x series. It brings a handful of important improvements to the table. Numerous causes of crashes have been fixed, as has the ‘overnight render bug‘ that affected rendering jobs that eked past midnight.

  • Does Anyone Else Remember the KDE Bouncy Ball?

    That little red ball was a KDE widget that could be added to the desktop. A quick flick of the moue is all it took to send the ball ricochetting off the bounds of your desktop workspace, boinging and banging, from top to bottom, side to side, over and over, until it slowly expended all its energy and jogged to a slow halt.

    [...]

    At the time this widget was around desktop widgets were the “in thing”.

    Every one seemed to be offering them: Google Desktop; Yahoo Widgets, Windows Gadgets, Apple’s Dashboard and gDesk lets, aDesklets, Screenlets and KDE Plasma widgets on Linux.

  • Fear not, OMG! Ubuntu! You will bounce again!

    Intrepid journalist Joey Sneddon over at OMG! Ubuntu! recently pointed out to us that Plasma 5 is currently not doing so well when it comes to serving an important user demographic - bored cats!

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • CloudLinux 7 and 6 Users Receive Security Kernel Update to Patch CVE-2017-2636

    CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is announcing today the immediate availability of new stable kernel security updates for the CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 operating system series.

    The newly updated CloudLinux 7, CloudLinux 6 and Hybrid kernel is here to fix the recently discovered and patched CVE-2017-2636 vulnerability that was affecting the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, and Red Hat Enterprise MRG (Messaging, Realtime and Grid) 2 operating systems.

  • The Red Hat Inc (RHT) CEO James M. Whitehurst Sells 5,099 Shares
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) By The Numbers: Valuation in Focus
  • More Fedora 24/25 family pimpage

    Fedora, Fedora, Fedora, Soltanto Fedora, Fedora tra noi, here's a song for you. But the reason we are here is not to tickle the nostalgia glands. Instead, we want to spend a little more time making Fedora extra useful, beautiful and functional, also known in the professional circles as pimping.

    We've done this before time and time again, including the recent stint with Fedora 24, and the installation & review of Fedora 25, and now we will do some of this magic. I would like to show you a few more tips and tricks that can enhance your Fedora experience. This article should also work nicely with my recently published Gnome accessibility guide. Fedora me.

  • Fedora 27 Will Indeed Eliminate Alpha Releases

    Last month we reported on Fedora 27 looking to drop alpha releases and now that change has been approved.

    Fedora 27 will be the distribution's first release not doing any alpha milestones. Instead, the distribution is trying to focus on better daily quality of Fedora Rawhide / F27, similar to Ubuntu not doing alpha/beta releases and openSUSE Leap also deciding to go a similar route.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

BSD and GPL

Filed under
GNU
BSD
Legal
  • Booting FreeBSD 11 with NVMe and ZFS on AMD Ryzen

    We recently took one of our test systems and tried an experiment: could we boot FreeBSD 11 from a NVMe SSD using ZFS root file system using AMD Ryzen. At STH we have many FreeBSD users and developers so when there is a new hardware class out, we tend to try it in FreeBSD and sometimes popular FreeBSD appliance OSes such as pfSense and FreeNAS. You can see an example with our Knights Landing Xeon Phi x200 system booting FreeBSD OSes. In our recent testing with AMD Ryzen we found major installers with the latest CentOS 7.3 and also had issues with Ubuntu crashing using current LTS image kernels. We wanted to see how FreeBSD would fare given it normally lags in terms of hardware support.

  • VMware becomes gold member of Linux Foundation: And what about the GPL?

    As we can read in recent news, VMware has become a gold member of the Linux foundation. That causes - to say the least - very mixed feelings to me.

    One thing to keep in mind: The Linux Foundation is an industry association, it exists to act in the joint interest of it's paying members. It is not a charity, and it does not act for the public good. I know and respect that, while some people sometimes appear to be confused about its function.

    However, allowing an entity like VMware to join, despite their many years long disrespect for the most basic principles of the FOSS Community (such as: Following the GPL and its copyleft principle), really is hard to understand and accept.

    I wouldn't have any issue if VMware would (prior to joining LF) have said: Ok, we had some bad policies in the past, but now we fully comply with the license of the Linux kernel, and we release all derivative/collective works in source code. This would be a positive spin: Acknowledge past issues, resolve the issues, become clean and then publicly underlining your support of Linux by (among other things) joining the Linux Foundation. I'm not one to hold grudges against people who accept their past mistakes, fix the presence and then move on. But no, they haven't fixed any issues.

    They are having one of the worst track records in terms of intentional GPL compliance issues for many years, showing outright disrespect for Linux, the GPL and ultimately the rights of the Linux developers, not resolving those issues and at the same time joining the Linux Foundation? What kind of message sends that?

Microsoft and Openwashing, 'Success' Stories

Filed under
Microsoft
  • OCP Launches Marketplace for Open Source Data Center Hardware
  • Microsoft embraces open source innovation for data centres at OCP 2017 [Ed: This has nothing to do with "open source"; pure openwashing from Microsoft]
  • Microsoft: Users Locked Out of Accounts Tuesday

    Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) was hit with an outage early Tuesday morning that prevented users from accessing a host of applications and services including Xbox, Skype and Outlook. Many Microsoft customers in Western Europe and the Eastern U.S. were greeted with a message that their account wasn’t active when they tried to log on.

    Users complaining at website DownDector.com about Outlook.com reached in the thousands, reported Reuters. Meanwhile the hashtag #hotmail was trending on Twitter in the U.K. Microsoft confirmed the problem, saying in an Xbox Live message it was working to resolve the issues as quickly as possible. Microsoft Account Services, which also includes Office 365, the Windows Store and a host of other apps came back up around 9:30 a.m. EST Tuesday at which time Microsoft alerted users.

  • Microsoft is putting OneDrive ads in Windows 10’s File Explorer

    Microsoft has made a bad habit of introducing ads here and there throughout Windows, and now people are starting to notice them showing up in another spot: inside File Explorer.

    People have reported seeing notifications to sign up for OneDrive — Microsoft’s cloud storage service — at the top of the Quick Access screen that comes up when you open a new File Explorer window.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Your freedoms are eroding as technology becomes more closed

    We’re not doing a good job of keeping the Internet and related technologies as open and egalitarian as they used to be, allowing a dangerous oligopoly to reemerge. How can we reverse the trend? And by we, I actually mean you.

  • Senlin for VMware Integrated OpenStack brings open source up to speed

    The Senlin clustering service delivers a one-two punch, enabling developer productivity while proving VMware's commitment to improving open source technology.

  • Open Source Couchbase Mobile Now Scales on Demand

    The open source Couchbase Mobile platform comprises: the Couchbase Lite NoSQL embedded database for mobile and Internet of Things (IoT) devices; the Couchbase Server that stores and manages data in the cloud; and the Couchbase Sync Gateway that synchronizes data between the two.

  • Inertia Slows Evolution For Open Scientists

    It is still a long way to a new generation of “open scientists”, German open data researcher Christian Heise found out in his just-published PhD thesis. Heise not only investigated drivers and barriers for what he expects to be an evolution from open access to open science by theory and a survey of over 1100 scientists. He tried the concept open science the hard way, opening up the writing of his thesis paper on the net.

  • Open Source textbooks could save students a bundle

    As the cost of college has skyrocketed, students and parents could soon get relief on expensive textbooks under the Textbook Cost Savings Act of 2017 that would provide funding to develop free open source learning materials.

    “The state is moving rapidly towards free textbooks online,” said the bill’s sponsor Sen. Jim Rosapepe, D-Prince George’s, in an interview. “If the bill passes it will be state policy that we want to move in that direction as much as possible.”

  • Mathematics for Computer Science: a free, CC-licensed MIT textbook

    This is indeed an up-to-the-minute text [PDF], dated Mar 7, 2017. It's written by Googler/MIT prof Eric Lehman, MIT/Akamai scientist F Thomson Leighton and MIT AI researcher Albert R Meyer, as a companion to their Mathematics for Computer Science open course.

  • The Open Source Toolkit – meet the Channel Editors

    The Open Source Toolkit features articles and online projects describing hardware and software that can be used in a research and/or science education setting across different fields, from basic to applied research. The Channel Editors aim to showcase how Open Source tools can lead to innovation, democratisation and increased reproducibility.

  • Vulkan 1.0.43 Adds Two New Extensions

    The Khronos Group has done a Friday evening update to the Vulkan 1.0 API specification.

    Vulkan 1.0.43 includes a number of GitHub and internal-Khronos issues around document clarifications and other minor behavior differences.

Linux and FOSS Events: LibrePlanet 2017, foss-north 2017, Strata+Hadoop World 2017, UCLA Linux User Group

Filed under
OSS

Mozilla News: More on Firefox 52 and WebAssembly

Filed under
Moz/FF

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Payments Giant Verifone Investigating Breach

    Verifone circled back post-publication with the following update to their statement: “According to the forensic information to-date, the cyber attempt was limited to controllers at approximately two dozen gas stations, and occurred over a short time frame. We believe that no other merchants were targeted and the integrity of our networks and merchants’ payment terminals remain secure and fully operational.”

  • Terabytes of Government Data Copied [iophk: "they need to publish via bittorrent more often to take out the single point of failure; they need to learn to use torrents from day one of their research"]
  • Millions of websites still using vulnerable SHA-1 certificate

    At least 21 percent of all public websites are using insecure SHA-1 certificates – past the migration deadline and after Google researchers demonstrated a real-world collision attack. And this is without taking into account private or closed networks that also might be using the hash.

  • Widespread Bug Bounty Program Could Help Harden Open Source Security

    One company is adding to its bug bounty program efforts by offering its professional services to the open source community for free. HackerOne’s platform, known as HackerOne Community Edition, will help open source software teams create a comprehensive approach to vulnerability management, including a bug bounty program.

  • Consumer Reports Proposes Open Source Security Standard To Keep The Internet Of Things From Sucking

    Thanks to a laundry list of lazy companies, everything from your Barbie doll to your tea kettle is now hackable. Worse, these devices are now being quickly incorporated into some of the largest botnets ever built, resulting in some of the most devastating DDoS attacks the internet has ever seen. In short: thanks to "internet of things" companies that prioritized profits over consumer privacy and the safety of the internet, we're now facing a security and privacy dumpster fire that many experts believe will, sooner or later, result in mass human fatalities.

    Hoping to, you know, help prevent that, the folks at Consumer Reports this week unveiled a new open source digital consumer-protection standard that safeguards consumers’ security and privacy in the internet-of-broken things era. According to the non-profit's explanation of the new standard, it's working with privacy software firm Disconnect, non-profit privacy research firm Ranking Digital Rights (RDR), and nonprofit software security-testing organization Cyber Independent Testing Lab (CITL) on the new effort, which it acknowledges is early and requires public and expert assistance.

  • Researchers warn augmented mobile and open source = malware opportunity [Ed: Well, and proprietary is never a malware ramp (sarcasm)]

    ESET researchers warn that augments mobile applications plus open source platforms like Google's open could be a recipe for clever malware to come, in a recent security post.

    Currently, Google only requires developers to make a onetime payment of $25 and within 24 hours they can have an application in the Google Play Store compared to Apple which requires a yearly license which costs more than $100 and a vetting period of up to two weeks.

  • Operation Rosehub patches Java vulnerabilities in open source projects

    Google employees recently completed Operation Rosehub, a grass roots effort that patches a set of serious Java vulnerabilities in thousands of open source projects.

  • [Video] CPU Backdoors Could Allow Government Spying
  • Moving Git past SHA-1 [Ed: no longer behind LWN paywall]

    The SHA-1 hash algorithm has been known for at least a decade to be weak; while no generated hash collisions had been reported, it was assumed that this would happen before too long. On February 23, Google announced that it had succeeded at this task. While the technique used is computationally expensive, this event has clarified what most developers have known for some time: it is time to move away from SHA-1. While the migration has essentially been completed in some areas (SSL certificates, for example), there are still important places where it is heavily used, including at the core of the Git source-code management system. Unsurprisingly, the long-simmering discussion in the Git community on moving away from SHA-1 is now at a full boil.

  • Linux kernel: CVE-2017-2636: local privilege escalation flaw in n_hdlc
  • Spammergate: The Fall of an Empire

11 Awesome Open-Source Linux Games You Should Not Miss

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Despite PC gaming being big business, Linux users have often been left to rot in gaming obscurity. With Triple A publishers favoring operating systems with bigger market shares, gaming on a Linux machine has been underwhelming to say the least. However, this doesn’t mean that gaming is non-existent. In the spirit of open-source software, talented developers have been toiling to create entertaining and engaging games on Linux. Without further ado, here are some of our favorite open-source games you can enjoy on Linux.

Read more

A Short Review for Trisquel 8 GNU/Linux Alpha Version

Filed under
Reviews

This is a short overview to Trisquel 8 Alpha Version operating system. Trisquel is a user-friendly desktop GNU/Linux distro derived from Ubuntu as 100% free software. Trisquel is certified officially by FSF along with gNewSense and Parabola. This 8th version comes with MATE as its user interface, with complete audio/video support in VLC, and a full suite of LibreOffice. Despite being alpha, it has 50000+ packages already in its repository worth to wait for the final. I hope this article can encourage anyone to use 100% free distro and spread it. Enjoy!

Read more

Also: How To Install Trisquel 8 GNU/Linux Flidas

Steam News

Filed under
Gaming
  • Streets of Rogue released on Steam with a free weekend

    This is one developer deserving of support! They constantly released free development builds, now it's free with the release on Steam for a few days and the game is really fun and works really well on Linux too.

  • New Steam Client Update Adds Steam Controller Configuration Links, Many Changes

    Valve pushed a new stable update of the Steam Client for Linux, Mac, and Windows users, as well as on its Debian-based SteamOS gaming operating system, adding, as expected, numerous improvements and some new exciting features.

    The March 9 Steam Client Update is awaiting you next time you fire up your Steam desktop client, no matter the operating system you're currently using, and it will add a new option in the setting that lets you disable group announcement and event notifications, and removes the sing-on notifications for in-game/online friends.

  • Steam's redesign, a new open VR/AR standard, and more gaming news

    The Valve team behind Steam confirmed it's working on a new look for the gaming platform in a video interview published Feb. 20. The news first broke when SteamDB shared screenshots on Twitter.

  • SteamVR For Linux Gets Improved Radeon Performance

    Valve has released an updated SteamVR beta for Linux VR gamers ahead of the weekend.

    Fixes in this SteamVR build include an issue that could cause a system hang and an issue where the image would appear to shift around.

It Looks Like Ubuntu 17.04 Might Ship with Mesa 17.0.1 and X.Org Server 1.19.2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu
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More in Tux Machines

Boards With Linux

  • Latest Linux Maker Boards Gamble on Diversity
    As usual, last week’s Embedded World show in Nuremberg, Germany was primarily focused on commercial embedded single board computers (SBCs), computer-on-modules, and rugged industrial systems for the OEM market. Yet, we also saw a growing number of community-backed maker boards, which, like most of the commercial boards, run Linux. The new crop shows the growing diversity of hacker SBCs, which range from completely open source models to proprietary prototyping boards that nevertheless offer low prices and community services such as forums and open source Linux distributions.
  • Rugged, expandable 3.5-inch Skylake SBC supports Linux
    Diamond’s 3.5-inch “Venus” SBC offers an Intel 6th Gen CPU, -40 to 85°C support, up to 20GB of ruggedized RAM, and mini-PCIe and PCIe/104 OneBank.
  • How enthusiasts designed a powerful desktop PC with an ARM processor

    The purpose of the gathering was to get the ball rolling for the development of a real desktop based on ARM. The PC will likely be developed by 96boards, which provides specifications to build open-source development boards.

Has Interest in Ubuntu Peaked?

This graph represents Google search volume for Ubuntu (the OS) from 2004 until now, 2017. Looking at the image it us hard to not conclude one thing: that interest in Ubuntu has peaked. Read more Also: Ubuntu splats TITSUP bug spread in update

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Windows flaw lets attackers take over A-V software

    A 15-year-old flaw in every version of Windows right from XP to Windows 10 allows a malicious attacker to take control of a system through the anti-virus software running on the system.

  • Google Continues to Make Strides in Improving Android Security
  • Google cites progress in Android security, but patching issues linger
  • Dark Matter
    Today, March 23rd 2017, WikiLeaks releases Vault 7 "Dark Matter", which contains documentation for several CIA projects that infect Apple Mac Computer firmware (meaning the infection persists even if the operating system is re-installed) developed by the CIA's Embedded Development Branch (EDB). These documents explain the techniques used by CIA to gain 'persistence' on Apple Mac devices, including Macs and iPhones and demonstrate their use of EFI/UEFI and firmware malware. Among others, these documents reveal the "Sonic Screwdriver" project which, as explained by the CIA, is a "mechanism for executing code on peripheral devices while a Mac laptop or desktop is booting" allowing an attacker to boot its attack software for example from a USB stick "even when a firmware password is enabled". The CIA's "Sonic Screwdriver" infector is stored on the modified firmware of an Apple Thunderbolt-to-Ethernet adapter.