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Quick Roundup

Ubuntu: Crazy Justice, Mir, and Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The developer of Crazy Justice has shown off a quick teaser of it on Ubuntu

    Black Riddles Studio has finally shown Crazy Justice [Official Site] on Ubuntu, although it's only a small teaser of their third-person shooter it has me excited.

    Crazy Justice is the third-person shooter developed by two brothers, which was crowdfunded on Fig where they managed to get $51K in funding. Since the campaign finished, they've hit just shy of $70K thanks to people pre-ordering it.

    They later announced a Battle Royale mode, which has me excited because Linux doesn't really have one currently. You could argue we have stuff with last man standing modes, sure, but they're quite different. Given how popular the BR genre is, it will be sweet to have it on Linux. As a reminder, the Early Access release should hopefully be available before the end of June. Looks like I might be getting an early birthday present this year…

  • Logind Support For Mir Is Getting Closer To Working

    Mir developers have been working on support for systemd's Logind and there is a "mess of a branch" that is nearly functionally complete and could soon be merged.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E10 – Ten Little Ladybugs - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we’ve been smashing up a bathroom like rock stars. We discuss the Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) LTS release, serve up some command line love and go over your feedback.

Ubuntu: Crazy Justice, Mir

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The developer of Crazy Justice has shown off a quick teaser of it on Ubuntu

    Black Riddles Studio has finally shown Crazy Justice [Official Site] on Ubuntu, although it's only a small teaser of their third-person shooter it has me excited.

    Crazy Justice is the third-person shooter developed by two brothers, which was crowdfunded on Fig where they managed to get $51K in funding. Since the campaign finished, they've hit just shy of $70K thanks to people pre-ordering it.

    They later announced a Battle Royale mode, which has me excited because Linux doesn't really have one currently. You could argue we have stuff with last man standing modes, sure, but they're quite different. Given how popular the BR genre is, it will be sweet to have it on Linux. As a reminder, the Early Access release should hopefully be available before the end of June. Looks like I might be getting an early birthday present this year…

  • Logind Support For Mir Is Getting Closer To Working

    Mir developers have been working on support for systemd's Logind and there is a "mess of a branch" that is nearly functionally complete and could soon be merged.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E10 – Ten Little Ladybugs - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we’ve been smashing up a bathroom like rock stars. We discuss the Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) LTS release, serve up some command line love and go over your feedback.

Security: Updates, NSA Back Doors in Windows/Microsoft, Vista 10 Bricking and Intel Back Doors

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Windows Under Attack as NSA Exploit Usage Skyrockets

    EternalBlue, the stolen NSA exploit that was used to create the infamous WannaCry ransomware, is back in business, only that this time usage appears to skyrocket, according to security vendor ESET.

    Researcher Ondrej Kubovič notes that while WannaCry attacks have dropped, EternalBlue is still around, and the first months of 2018 brought a worrying increase in the number of attacks based on this exploit.

    EternalBlue is an exploit stolen from the NSA by hacking group Shadow Brokers in April 2016. It takes advantage of a vulnerability in the Windows Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, and Microsoft shipped patches even before the flaw went public.

    But this doesn’t mean that attackers have stopped searching for targets. The researcher says cybercriminals are scanning the Internet for exposed SMB ports and are trying to compromise the host with an exploit that eventually allows for payloads deployed on the target machine and leading to different outcomes.

    “Interestingly, according to ESET’s telemetry, EternalBlue had a calmer period immediately after the 2017 WannaCryptor campaign: over the following months, attempts to use the EternalBlue exploit dropped to “only” hundreds of detections daily,” the researcher notes.

    “Since September last year, however, the use of the exploit has slowly started to gain pace again, continually growing and reaching new heights in mid-April 2018.”

  • Microsoft Says It Won’t Fix a Bug Causing BSODs on Windows 10

    A bug causing Windows machines to crash when a USB drive is inserted won’t get a patch from Microsoft, despite the issue said to be affecting all versions of the operating system, including the newly-launched April 2018 Update.

    Security researcher Marius Tivadar says in a post on GitHub that he first reported the problem to Microsoft in July 2017 after discovering that a USB drive running a handcrafted NTFS image can cause any system to crash even if locked.

    “Microsoft was very responsive regarding my disclosure 1 year ago, but they didn’t issue a security patch,” Tivadar explains.

  • Purism's FSP Reverse Engineering Effort Might Be Stalled

    Purism has been working on reverse-engineering the Intel Firmware Support Package (FSP) module but it looks like that work may have taken a turn.

    A Phoronix reader tipped us off this morning that the Intel FSP reverse-engineering information made public by Purism has now been retracted. The past several months Purism has been working on reverse-engineering the Intel FSP to free the system further to run on only open-source code rather than still having the Intel binary-only module paired with Coreboot. Their big focus this year has been on figuring out the actual silicon initialization code inside the FSP. Purism's Youness Alaoui was very close to finding out this information at the start of April and he wrote a lengthy blog post outlining his reverse-engineering work.

AMD Graphics and Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Radeon EQAA Anti-Aliasing Support Merged To Mesa 18.2

    In addition to the potentially performance-doubling AMD Kaveri fix landing yesterday in Mesa 18.2 Git, also hitting this next version of Mesa is Enhanced Quality Anti-Aliasing (EQAA) support for Radeon GCN graphics processors.

    RadeonSI Gallium3D has wired up its Enhanced Quality Anti-Aliasing support. EQAA aims to deliver better quality over multi-sample anti-aliasing (MSAA) by providing more coverage samples per pixel. EQAA should have only slightly higher performance requirements than MSAA but with significant visual quality benefits.

  • AMD Kaveri Gets A Big Performance Boost With Mesa 18.2 & AMDGPU DRM

    When using the latest Git/development code of Mesa 18.2 on Kaveri APUs you may find up to a 2x increase in performance if you are using the AMDGPU DRM driver rather than the default Radeon DRM driver.

    It turns out the number of render back-ends reported by the kernel driver was wrong for Kaveri: there's two, not one. Both render back-ends for Kaveri should now be enabled when using Mesa 18.2 Git since yesterday, but you need to be using the AMDGPU kernel driver as otherwise with the Radeon DRM kernel driver one of the back-ends will still be disabled.

  • Radeon ROCm 1.8 Compute Stack Released

    Following the slew of recent AMD/Radeon Linux driver updates, the ROCm 1.8.0 release was issued today for the Radeon Open Compute stack.

    ROCm 1.8 can be obtained via the GitHub instructions. Binary packages are provided for Ubuntu 16.04 and CentOS/RHEL 7.4.

End of Red Hat Summit 2018: Coverage

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Summit 2018 Wraps Up With Containers/Virtualization Still Being Hot

    Red Hat Summit 2018 in San Francisco has now wrapped up, marking Red Hat's 25th year hosting the event of customers and partners. Virtualization and containers continued being among the most discussed topics at the tech event.

    While there's been signs of an approaching Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Alpha, sadly there was seemingly no RHEL8 mentions at this year's summit, at least when it came to public announcements pertaining to this next-generation enterprise Linux platform. So we'll have to wait and see on the RHEL8 front, but based upon their past release cycles and the alpha references we've been seeing, I suspect we'll hear more later in the year.

  • Red Hat, Boston Children’s Collaborate on Open Source Image Sharing

    Red Hat announced its collaboration with Boston Children’s Hospital to provide a distributed user open source image sharing interface so clinicians and radiologists can share images in real-time anywhere around the world.

    The ChRIS Research Integration Service is a web-based medical image platform deployed on the Massachusetts Open Cloud (MOC). The MOC is a multi-provider cloud that was created by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and several research universities.

    The collaboration was put into motion by the need for faster and more convenient access to medical images. Waiting for images to be scanned, shared, and analyzed causes delays in patient care, which can cause further medical problems.

  • Photos: Red Hat Gets Hot & Sweaty

    Tech conference protip: When attending conferences, my rule is I wear jeans to events with the name "open" in the title, and otherwise wear a suit. Red Hat is a unique edge case -- the word "open" isn't in the title, but the company is founded on open source. On the other hand, it's enterprise focused, suggesting a suit as appropriate business attire. I went with a suit on day one, and jeans on day two.

    When I was not running around working on articles, and feeling the pain of sugar/carb withdrawal, I found some interesting oddities in corners of the conference. Click on the slideshow below for some of what I saw.

  • Red Hat shows the way for open-source licensing. Will the industry follow?

    The licensing of open-source software is complicated and runs counter to human intuition. Developers put their blood, sweat and tears into creating an elegant piece of software and then sign away the copyrights so that others can use and improve on it free and clear. Say what?

    The tech community has been grappling with this issue basically since Richard Stallman developed a free UNIX-style operating system in the early 1980s. As the open-source community has grown, the products have become more diverse and the stakes are higher.

    [...]

    At the heart of open-source licensing is the General Public License, or GPL, the compliance instrument that governs much of Red Hat’s software, including its Enterprise Linux. The GPL is known as a “copyleft” license, meaning that a developer can create open-source software and distribute it to someone else with all of the necessary copyrights. The recipient can copy it, distribute it, or improve on it in any way they see fit.

'Proper' GNU/Linux Software on Chrome OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • A closer look at Chrome OS using LXD to run Linux GUI apps (Project Crostini)

    Project Crostini is the Chrome OS project to add support to run Linux GUI apps on Chrome OS.

    The components that facilitate Project Crostini can be found at https://github.com/lstoll/cros-crostini That page has instructions for those that wanted to enable the running of Linux GUI apps on Chrome OS, when Project Crostini was still under development. Lincoln Stoll dissected the source of Chrome OS and created a helpful list of the involved repositories.

    The basic component is The Chrome OS Virtual Machine Monitor (crossvm), which runs untrusted operating systems through Linux’s KVM interface. The Linux distribution would run in a VM. The test repositories make reference to the X server, XWayland and Wayland. There is a repository called sommelier, which is a nested Wayland compositor with X11 forwarding support. It needs more searching to figure out where the source code ended into the Chrome OS repository and what is actually being used.

    Update #1: Here are the vm_tools in Chrome OS. They include garcon, a service that gets added in the container and communicates with another service outside of the container (vm_concierge).

    What is important, is that LXD runs in this VM and is configured to launch a machine container with a Linux distribution. We are going in depth into this.

  • Linux On Chromebooks Now Official

    Among other news from Google I/O 2018, Google is making it possible to code on Chromebooks. Whether it’s building an app or writing a quick script, Chromebooks will be available for coding projects.

  • Android apps on Chromebooks can finally access SD card storage

    It’s been nearly two years since Google started rolling out a feature that lets you run Android apps on Chromebooks. And while Android support has come a long way, there’s one thing Android apps couldn’t do on Chromebooks… until now: access an SD card.

    But starting with the latest Chrome OS beta, it looks like Android apps on Chromebooks can access the SD card… although it seems like the feature is still very much a work in progress.

OSS: National Guard, Testing Frameworks, Taking Open Source for Granted

Filed under
OSS
  • National Guard team builds open-source cyber toolkit

    When the Missouri National Guard Cyber Team was called in to respond to security incidents, it used to take two days to collect information from compromised servers.

    To get better insight into attempted breaches and overall network health faster, the team built the Response Operation Collect Kit for Network Service Monitoring, a scalable and secure open source sensor platform that makes network monitoring more automated and easier to navigate.

    RockNSM combines several open source tools in a single platform. The combination of tools allows the Missouri National Guard Cyber Team to set up their data collection for security monitoring and incident response in 20 minutes.

    Part of the appeal of RockNSM is the ability to collect information on networks without needing administrative access to sensitive networks.

  • Maximizing Value from Open Source Testing Frameworks

    Even well-known companies like Google that have built home-grown systems to run UI and API testing against all their applications are now releasing their own open source systems into the market. Recently, Google and Netflix announced Kayenta, an open source automated canary analysis service to enable continuous delivery for software teams. However, if you are not a company with the resources of a Google and Netflix, building your own open source tool or complementing an open source framework with a home-grown system is not always a viable open. In fact, it’s a common misconception that software teams have or should choose between purchasing a commercial tool or leverage free open source framework. Growing companies should maximize their value from open source assets along with commercial tools.

  • Taking Open Source for Granted

    But just as many in the United States have had a wakeup call about taking the stability of our civic institutions for granted, those with an interest in seeing open source remain a vital and robust model moving forward should remember that the price of freedom is high. It always has been.

Brazilian federal government leads in open source adoption

Filed under
OSS

Open source is more common at federal level, seen in 93 percent of organizations, while 78 percent of state-level bodies use it, according to the findings of the E-Government ICT edition carried out by the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br).

The study has also found that in 2017, new open source development has taken place in 85 percent of federal government organizations to cater for their specific requirements, while 57 percent of state organizations also developed new open systems.

Of the federal organizations that have carried out open source development in Brazil, some 52 percent have also shared these platforms with other public sector bodies.

For the study, some 1686 federal and state-level organizations were surveyed by the CGI.br between July and October 2017.

Read more

Wine 3.8

Filed under
Software

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Purism's Librem 15 v2 Laptop Now Supported By Mainline Coreboot

    While Purism had already been shipping Coreboot on their Librem 15 v2 laptop two years ago and has already succeeded by their third revision that does have mainline Coreboot support, the support was merged today to Coreboot proper for the Librem 15 v2.

    Mainline Coreboot has already supported the earlier iteration of the original Librem 15, the newer and current Librem 15 v3, as well as the Librem 13. As of today the second version of the Librem 15 is now officially supported in its Git code-base. The Librem 15 v2 was their updated Broadwell-based like the Librem 15 v1 while the current-generation Librem 15 v3 is utilizing an Intel Skylake processor.

  • Opera 53 Web Browser Hits Stable with Revamped Appearance of Tabs, Address Bar

    Opera released today a new stable version of its Chromium-based web browser for computers, Opera 53, which is a minor update revamping the look of the tabs and the address bar.
    Based on the latest Chromium 66.0.3359.139 open-source web browser, Opera 53 is now rolling out to Linux, Mac, and Windows users worldwide with optimizations to how tabs are displayed on the tab bar when you have numerous tabs opened, especially for Mac users, making it easier to find a certain tab in the multitude of opened tabs.

    "Today, we’re transitioning Opera 53 from the beta line to stable. This build revamps the appearance of tabs and the address bar," said Krystian Kolondra, EVP Desktop at Opera. "Mac users find it difficult to locate and manage a particular tab when many of them are open. We figured out a way to optimize this and made your plentiful tabs’ favicons more visible."

  • Adaptive GNOME Web

    I started working on making GNOME Web work well on the Librem 5; to be sure it fits a phone's screen I want the windows to fit in a 360 points width, which is definitely small. To do so I started with the advices from Tobias Bernard to make Web have two modes that I named normal and narrow. The normal mode is Web as you know it, while the narrow mode moves all buttons from the header bar but the hamburger menu to a new action bar at the bottom, letting the windows reach yet unreachable widths.

  • GNOME Terminal: separate menu items for opening tabs and windows

    Astute users might have noticed that the GNOME Terminal binary distributed by Fedora has separate menu items for opening new tabs and windows, while the vanilla version available from GNOME doesn’t.

  • The Grand Update – brace yourselves!

    In the remaining hours before the hdlists are regenerated, and we can all update our Mageia 6 systems with more than 400 packages, here’s some info – very important info – about the update process.

    It’s vitally important that the update completes without interruption! Here’s what you need to do:

  • CentOS 7 1804 Linux Distro Available For Download: Here’s How To Update

    While making a list of free operating systems that can be used both as a daily use system as well as a server, CentOS gets an early mention. Based on RHEL base, CentOS is known for being a stable and manageable platform. Just recently, the developers have shipped the sixth CentOS-7 release.

  • Red Hat Summit: An introduction to OpenShift.io

    Red Hat OpenShift.io is an innovative online service for development teams. Installing and configuring IDEs, libraries, and various tools is a major time sink. OpenShift.io is a cloud-native set of zero-install tools for editing and debugging code, agile planning, and managing CI/CD pipelines. It also features package analytics (an unbelievably cool feature we’ll discuss more in a minute), and has various quick starts for common frameworks. Because everyone on the team uses the exact same tools, “It works on my machine” becomes a thing of the past.

    [...]

    One more thing: package analytics is an amazing feature. In Todd’s example, he added a package (the name of which we shall not mention) and the tools flagged it as having a security vulnerability. This is done in an elegant, friendly UI as opposed to a text message you might not notice in a console. In addition, the product uses machine learning to analyze your project. If you’re using an unusual combination of packages, the tools let you know. That might not be a problem, but it’s a sign that you might want to re-examine your choices. To quote Todd, package analytics is “freaky, freaky cool.”

  •  

  • [Slackware] Moving to OpenSSL 1.1.0 and Firefox 60
  • [Slackware] May ’18 security update for Adobe Flashplayer

    Here’s the latest security update for Adobe’s Flash Player plugins.

    The version 29.0.0.171 of the flashplayer-plugin (NPAPI plugin for Mozilla based browsers) and the chromium-pepperflash-plugin (PPAPI plugin for Chromium based browsers) was released yesterday and you can find Slackware packages for it in my repository.

  • [DNG] Devuan "ASCII" 2.0 Release Candidate
  • Systemd-free Devuan Linux looses version 2.0 release candidate

    Devuan Linux, the Debian fork that offers "init freedom" has announced the first release candidate for its second version.

    Dubbed "ASCII", Devuan 2.0 uses Debian Stretch as its base, doesn't use Systemd, and reached beta in February 2018.

    This week, the developers behind the distro announced ASCII's first release candidate, along with news that the installer "now offers a wider variety of Desktop Environments including XFCE, KDE, MATE, Cinnamon, LXQT (with others available post-install)."

    "In addition, there are options for 'Console productivity' with hundreds of CLI and TUI utils, as well asa minimal base system ideal for servers," the team stated.

  • Yet Another Message Bug Crashes iPhones, iOS 11.3 and iOS 11.4 Affected

    The message bug crashing WhatsApp on Android is now hitting iPhones as well, only that in Apple’s ecosystem it breaks down Messages to a point where it’s fairly difficult to bring it back.
    Specifically, a specially crafted message that includes invisible Unicode characters causes the Messages app on an iPhone to crash completely. The app no longer launches, despite the typical workarounds like forced closes or phone reboots.

    At this point, the message bug appears to spread online with the following string of emoji, though it’s worth noting that the body can be easily modified by anyone, as long as the invisible Unicode characters are still there:

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Why it's important to get kids into public speaking

    Although she's only 16 years old, Keila Banks is already a veteran presenter at technology conferences. Her courage to get on stage in front of adults, beginning at the very young age of 11, to talk about open source technology has opened a world of opportunities for her.

    In her Lightning Talk at the 16th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE), Keila shares some of her amazing experiences, from the television studio to the White House, resulting from her conference presentations about open source, coding, and involving youth in technology.

    Watch Keila's Lightning Talk to learn more about how to leverage conference presentations to advance your career.

  • Firefox 60 and JAWS 2018 back in good browsing conditions together

    When Firefox Quantum was first released in November of 2017, it temporarily regressed users of the JAWS screen reader. I’m happy to report that both Firefox and JAWS once again deliver a first class browsing experience together!

  • These Weeks in Dev-Tools, issue 4

    Welcome to the 4th issue of these weeks in dev-tools! We've re-organised the
    teams a little bit and have been working hard towards the 2018 edition release.

    These Weeks in Dev-Tools will keep you up to date with all the exciting dev
    tools news. We plan to have a new issue every few weeks. If you have any news
    you'd like us to report, please comment on the tracking issue.

    If you're interested in Rust's developer tools and want to contribute or ask
    questions, come chat to us on Gitter.

  • How citizens become scientists with open hardware

    "Every person's piece of individual information put together gives you a cloud of real knowledge."

    Eymund Diegel, a research coordinator for Gowanus Canal Conservancy, shares this tidbit during the first clip of the new Open Source Stories documentary, "The Science of Collective Discovery." He's setting out in a canoe on an inner-city canal that is polluted and struggling to get the help it needs.

    That's the theme of citizen science it seems: people and places in need who are not getting the help and resources they deserve taking matters into their own hands. Why are they not getting the help they need in the first place? The reason is shockingly simple yet a typical problem: Where's the evidence?

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

MidnightBSD Could Be Your Gateway to FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

The Xfce desktop interface will make you feel right at home on MidnightBSD; learn how to set it up in this tutorial from Jack Wallen.
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs

FreeBSD is an open source operating system that descended from the famous Berkeley Software Distribution. The first version of FreeBSD was released in 1993 and is still going strong. Around 2007, Lucas Holt wanted to create a fork of FreeBSD that made use of the GnuStep implementation of the OpenStep (now Cocoa) Objective-C frameworks, widget toolkit, and application development tools. To that end, he began development of the MidnightBSD desktop distribution.

MidnightBSD (named after Lucas’s cat, Midnight) is still in active (albeit slow) development. The latest stable release (0.8.6) has been available since August, 2017. Although the BSD distributions aren’t what you might call user-friendly, getting up to speed on their installation is a great way to familiarize yourself with how to deal with an ncurses installation and with finalizing an install via the command line.

In the end, you’ll wind up with desktop distribution of a very reliable fork of FreeBSD. It’ll take a bit of work, but if you’re a Linux user looking to stretch your skills… this is a good place to start.

I want to walk you through the process of installing MidnightBSD, how to add a graphical desktop environment, and then how to install applications.

Read more

Open source SDN project could let network admins duplicate production environments

Filed under
OSS

Software Defined Networking (SDN) is an increasingly attractive option for organizations looking to automate more of their data center operations. However, SDN deployments typically accompany vendor lock-in, as hardware manufacturers such as Cisco provide proprietary software solutions to go with bundles of network hardware. Similarly, turn-key software defined data center (SDDC) solutions often rely on top-down vendor integration, or have similar limitations for using products from qualified vendors.

One team is working to change that. Japanese software firm axsh is developing an open-\ source software stack—code named LiquidMetal—that combines their existing OpenVNet SDN software, with OpenVDC VM orchestration software.

With the two, the developers have made it possible to take an off-the-shelf dedicated switch, and configure it for any desired network topology, in effect making it possible to create complete identical copies of a given production network, including copying the IP and MAC addresses of each connected device. The LiquidMetal project also incorporates Terraform, Expect, and Ansible in their software stack.

Read more

Education tech and battling stubborn Open Source myths

Filed under
OSS

When open source first hit the market, for many it was indistinguishable from The Free Software Movement. The key appeal was, indeed, that open source software was free – primarily because of the unchecked redistribution rights, where licences didn’t restrict any party from selling or giving away the software.

Read more

A look at open source image recognition technology

Filed under
OSS

At the Supercomputing Conference in Denver last year, I discovered an interesting project as I walked the expo floor. A PhD student from Louisiana State University, Shayan Shams, had set up a large monitor displaying a webcam image. Overlaid on the image were colored boxes with labels. As I looked closer, I realized the labels identified objects on a table.

Of course, I had to play with it. As I moved each object on the table, its label followed. I moved some objects that were off-camera into the field of view, and the system identified them too.

Read more

Is It Linux or GNU/Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After putting this question to the experts, the conclusion is that no matter what you call it, it's still Linux at its core.

Should the Linux operating system be called "Linux" or "GNU/Linux"? These days, asking that question might get as many blank stares returned as asking, "Is it live or is it Memorex?"

Some may remember that the Linux naming convention was a controversy that raged from the late 1990s until about the end of the first decade of the 21st century. Back then, if you called it "Linux", the GNU/Linux crowd was sure to start a flame war with accusations that the GNU Project wasn't being given due credit for its contribution to the OS. And if you called it "GNU/Linux", accusations were made about political correctness, although operating systems are pretty much apolitical by nature as far as I can tell.

Read more

Kdenlive 18.04.1 released

While our team is working on the awaited refactoring, we still managed to add 2 small usability improvements in the 18.04.1. version. First the safe zone overlay was improved so you can now easily spot the center of your frame.

Then we improved the default background color for the titler so that white text can easily be read without having to make further adjustments.

Read more

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Android Leftovers

Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

  • XWayland Gets Patches For Better EGLStreams Handling
    While the recently released X.Org Server 1.20 has initial support for XWayland with EGLStreams so X11 applications/games on Wayland can still benefit from hardware acceleration, in its current state it doesn't integrate too well with Wayland desktop compositors wishing to support it. That's changing with a new patch series.
  • Intel Mesa Driver Finally Supports Threaded OpenGL
    Based off the Gallium3D "mesa_glthread" work for threaded OpenGL that can provide a measurable win in some scenarios, the Intel i965 Mesa driver has implemented this support now too. Following the work squared away last year led in the RadeonSI driver, the Intel i965 OpenGL driver supports threaded OpenGL when the mesa_glthread=true environment variable is set.
  • Geometry & Tessellation Shaders For Mesa's OpenGL Compatibility Context
    With the recent Mesa 18.1 release there is OpenGL 3.1 support with the ARB_compatibility context for the key Gallium3D drivers, but Marek Olšák at AMD continues working on extending that functionality under the OpenGL compatibility context mode.
  • Mesa Begins Its Transition To Gitlab
    Following the news from earlier this month that FreeDesktop.org would move its infrastructure to Gitlab, the Mesa3D project has begun the process of adopting this Git-centered software.

Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Comment Ubuntu 18.04, launched last month, included a new Welcome application that runs the first time you boot into your new install. The Welcome app does several things, including offering to opt you out of Canonical's new data collection tool. The tool also provides a quick overview of the new GNOME interface, and offers to set up Livepatch (for kernel patching without a reboot). In my review I called the opt-out a ham-fisted decision, but did note that if Canonical wanted to actually gather data, opt-out was probably the best choice. Read more

How CERN Is Using Linux and Open Source

CERN really needs no introduction. Among other things, the European Organization for Nuclear Research created the World Wide Web and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest particle accelerator, which was used in discovery of the Higgs boson. Tim Bell, who is responsible for the organization’s IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group, says the goal of his team is “to provide the compute facility for 13,000 physicists around the world to analyze those collisions, understand what the universe is made of and how it works.” Read more