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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 11:13am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 11:11am
Story Debian Isn't Difficult, Fedora Elections Winners, Fav Distro Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 10:12am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 10:08am
Story Epiphany Browser to Add New "Copy Image" Context Menu Item, Support IDN URLs Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 3:03am
Story Oracle Continues to Improve Linux 4.10 Kernel Support in New VirtualBox Releases Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 3:01am
Story Meet the new Week view Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 2:59am
Story Mycroft AI Intelligent Personal Assistant Now Available as a Raspberry Pi Image Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 2:57am
Story You Can Now Have All the Essential Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS Flavors on a Single ISO Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 2:55am
Story Benchmarking Radeon Open Compute ROCm 1.4 OpenCL Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 2:52am

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Swiss Data protection commissioner concludes Windows 10 investigation

    The FDPIC investigations revealed that data processing in connection with Windows 10 did not conform in every respect with the data protection legislation. The page layout and content on the ‘Quick access' und ‘Customize settings' pages failed to meet the transparency requirements in full. There was a lack of information on how long the transmitted data would be stored, on the content of browser data and on the content of feedback and diagnostic data. In addition, the users found it difficult during individual data processing operations to look up further information, e.g. from the relevant passages of the data privacy statement.

    In response, Microsoft made proposals to the FDPIC for rectifying these and other shortcomings, which the FDPIC assessed and amended. The modifications that have now been agreed will ensure that more precise information is provided on data processing. In addition, the new settings page will make it clear to users during the installation process that they must decide on and give their consent to the processing and transmission of data.

  • Linux Consolidates Support For Beast IV
  • Kaby Lake On Linux Plays Much Better With CPUFreq Than P-State

    After ordering a Core i5 7600K Kaby Lake CPU last week, I've been spending the past few days trying it out under Ubuntu Linux. If you happened to pick up an early Kaby Lake CPU and seeing low performance, I wanted to pass along a little PSA while I am still working on additional tests.

  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) is Initiated by Wells Fargo to Outperform
  • FreeOrion Turn-Based 4X Space Empire Conquest Game Is Coming to Fedora Linux

    In October last year, Fedora contributor Charles Profitt wrote a tutorial on how to compile and install the FreeOrion open-source turn-based 4X space empire and galactic conquest video game on the latest release of Fedora Linux.

    Since then, a lot of Linux gamers using the Fedora operating system showed interest in having an easy-to-install package that would allow them to enjoy the game instead of spending a lot of time compiling it.

  • Why a MacOS user switched to Ubuntu Linux

    Apple’s MacOS has long been the de facto alternative to Windows. But what happens when a MacOS user tires of doing things Apple’s way? He switches to Ubuntu Linux and doesn’t look back. Goodbye Apple, hello Linux!

  • It’s About To Get Easier to Enable Low Graphics Mode on Ubuntu

    We’ve shown you how to enable low-graphics mode in Unity 7 on both Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 — but there’s no denying that this method is far from user-friendly.

  • Panther MPC, Inc.'s Panther Alpha

    Panther Alpha combines full desktop functionality with an ultra-customizable Linux OS that fits in the palm of your hand. Panther says its new device could be possible only now thanks to a culmination of years of industry innovation and development, namely the power of today's ARM chips and an improved emphasis of Linux on ARM.

Leftovers: Software and Games

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Software
Gaming

Android Leftovers

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Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • January 2017 PyLadies Pune meetup

    Like many of the previous PyLadies Pune meetups, I took a session in this month’s meetup too. System programming basics was the topic for my session. We did the session for around an hour, but as this month’s session also had a guest session over hangout, we could not go longer. We will do a full day workshop on the same topic in future.

  • Missing from the Trump Cabinet Nominee Hearings: Cybersecurity for Everyday Internet Users

    Protecting users’ privacy and security online is a crucial issue for all of us. Security protects elections, economies and our private online and offline lives. And many recent events (cyber attacks, hacks and threats by foreign governments) show that a secure Internet is currently under threat.

    I recently wrote about how cybersecurity is a shared responsibility. Governments, technology companies and users need to work together to strengthen cybersecurity. Mozilla knows that even one weak link — be it technical or legislative — can break the chain of security and put Internet users at risk. The chain only remains strong if technology companies, governments and users work together to keep the Internet as secure as it can be.

    You can help Mozilla stand up for a more secure Internet. We’re asking readers to pen a Letter to the Editor to their local newspaper in response to this week’s Senate hearings, and support personal security and privacy online. Get started here.

  • Open Web Development and Content Creation Tools Proliferate

    If you're involved with DevOps and web development, you're probably very aware of many of the tools from the open standards and open source arenas that can make your work easier. Still, these are always spreading out at a fast clip and there are some applications and tools that are rarely discussed. Here at OStatic, we try to regularly update our collections focused on them. In this post, you'll find numerous and updated free resources for web development that range from complete online courses available for free to unsung applications.

  • Single-cable motor interface goes open-source
  • Quantum Computing Is Real, and D-Wave Just Open-Sourced It
  • D-Wave Initiates Open Quantum Software Environment
  • The Linux and Windows Ecosystems are Converging. Here's Why It Matters [Ed: Microsoft “embrace, extend, extinguish” tactics mean one should avoid Windows; it's a trap that complicates and increases exit barriers]
  • EasyStack raises $50M Series C Round, Setting New Single Round Record in China Open Source
  • China's Cash Capital Leads $50M Series C Round In EasyStack
  • China: Investment firm Cash Capital leads $50m Series C round in EasyStack
  • DragonFlyBSD Working On NUMA-Awareness, Memory Changes

    Matthew Dillon's latest work on the DragonFlyBSD kernel includes steps towards supporting NUMA-awareness, locking, and other memory allocation related changes.

  • FSFE Annual Report 2016

    It has been a busy year for the FSFE. Upholding the principles of Free Software and protecting citizens' from being exploited are ongoing challenges we tackled from a variety of angles. We (and by "we", we mean the staff and volunteers at the FSFE) pored over hundreds of pages of policies and legislations, looking for loopholes through which Free Software could be attacked.

    We travelled to events all over Europe, often carrying with us dozens of heavy boxes of merchandising, to explain what Free Software is all about as speakers and attendees. We have organised our own events too including our first international summit.

'Opening' Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open source reaches processor core

    Whether for budgetary, philosophical, or other reasons, an increasing number of embedded systems are being designed using open source elements. For the most part, these elements are software based, although there are some open source board designs in use as well. Now, the microcontroller that empowers a PCB design is available as an open source design.

    A little over a month ago, startup SiFive announced a milestone product in the development of the RISC-V (pronounced risk-five) open source microprocessor instruction set architecture (ISA). Originally developed for research and education, the architecture began moving toward industry implementation with the creation of the RISC-V Foundation in 2015. SiFive advanced that movement by developing a microcontroller design implementing the RISC-V ISA. The company has now proven that design in silicon and donated the RTL code for the design to the open source community.

  • A $12,000 open-source hardware platform to develop electric vehicles

    The automotive industry has always been capital-intensive and therefore, it has often been difficult for startups to carve themselves a space in it. But the electric vehicle revolution is disrupting the industry enough that it is opening up opportunities for startups to accelerate the pace of innovation.

    OSVehicle, a company based in Italia, is trying to help them to just that with their new platform.

    They released the second generation of the TABBY EVO, an open-source hardware platform to develop electric vehicles and electric vehicle parts. The platform enables companies or individuals wishing to develop parts for electric vehicles, or even full EVs, to leapfrog some of the development and test the parts in an open platform.

  • Renault will release its Twizy EV hardware system as an opensource platform

    The Renault POM represents the first foray by a big automaker into truly open-sourcing its vehicle platform.

  • Renault announces partners for open-source electric-vehicle platform

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

X.Org Server 1.19.1 Out, Mesa 17.0.0 Coming

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • X.Org Server 1.19.1 Released

    X.Org Server 1.19.1 was released today with a couple regression fixes.

    X.Org Server 1.19 was released last November as the first xorg-server major release in one year. Arriving today is the first point release, but it's on the lighter side even with two months having passed.

  • [ANNOUNCE] xorg-server 1.19.1

    First stable 1.19 release, including a few regression fixes. Thanks to all who contributed!

  • Mesa 13.1.0 Branch Is No More, Mesa 17.0.0 to Land in the First Week of February

    Collabora's Emil Velikov is officially announcing today, January 11, 2017, that the upcoming Mesa 13.1.0 branch of the widely-used 3D graphics stack will change its versioning scheme to Mesa 17.0.0.

    Those of you bleeding-edgers who are using the Mesa 3D Graphics Library from Git, a.k.a. the development (unstable) branch of the graphics stack used in numerous GNU/Linux distributions to provide various open-source drivers for Intel, AMD, and Nvidia graphics cards, should have already noticed the major change.

    Mesa 13.1.0 is now known as Mesa 17.0.0 if you pull the latest code from Git, which the Padoka and Oibaf PPA do for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) platforms. It appears that the Mesa people decided to change the versioning scheme at the beginning of a new year, so now being 2017, here comes Mesa 17.0.0.

Why Open Source is Rising Up the Networking Stack in 2017

Filed under
OSS

With 2016 behind us, we can reflect on a landmark year where open source migrated up the stack. As a result a new breed of open service orchestration projects were announced, including ECOMP, OSM, OpenBaton, and The Linux Foundation project OPEN-O, among them. While the scope varies between orchestrating Virtualized Network Functions (VNFs) in a Cloud Data Center, and more comprehensive end-to-end service delivery platforms, the new open service orchestration initiatives enable carriers and cable operators to automate end-to-end service delivery, ultimately minimizing the software development required for new services.

Read more

Linux ready COM taps FPGA/ARM Arria 10 SoC

Filed under
Linux

Enclustra’s “Mercury+ AA1” COM runs Linux on an Altera Arria 10 FPGA/ARM hybrid with up to 8GB DDR4, up to 8GB eMMC, PCIe Gen 3, and -40 to 85°C support.

Swiss FPGA specialists Enclustra announced a Mercury+ AA1 computer-on-module built around Intel/Altera’s dual-core, Cortex-A9 Arria 10 FPGA/ARM hybrid SoC. The 74 × 54mm module is open for pre-orders, and is said to be “already in use,” suggesting it has entered the sampling stage.

Read more

How To Lift Vector Art From PDF's Using Inkscape on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

If you've ever needed some artwork in vector format, read on to learn how to extract high quality artwork and logos from PDFs found online using Inkscape on Linux
Read more

Explore climate data with open source tools

Filed under
OSS

You can't look anywhere these days without seeing evidence of the changing weather patterns on the earth. Monthly, we are confronted with facts and figures that point to a warming planet.

Climate scientists warn us that inaction could be fatal to our futures here. Military strategists at the Pentagon have recently cautioned President-Elect Trump that inaction on climate change could spell disaster for our national security as shrinking water supplies and meager rainfall cause crop failures will force large numbers of people to migrate to other parts of the world that can sustain them.

Read more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • It's Getting Close Whether The OpenGL On-Disk Shader Cache Will Happen For Mesa 17.0

    While a lot of OpenGL improvements, Vulkan driver advancements, and performance optimizations can be found in Mesa Git for the forthcoming release as Mesa 17.0, one big feature that's still missing as of today is the OpenGL on-disk shader cache.

  • Intel vs. Modesetting X.Org DDX Performance Impact

    With word of Fedora switching away from using the Intel X.Org driver in favor of the generic xf86-video-modesetting driver, following in the steps laid by Debian/Ubuntu, there is fresh discussions over features and any performance impact of xf86-video-modesetting vs. xf86-video-intel DDX drivers. As such, here are some fresh 2D and 3D benchmarks.

SUSE Formalizes Container Strategy with a New Linux Distro, MicroOS

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

Arguably, CoreOS Linux could be called the first Linux-based operating system designed for cluster computing, containers/microservices. Even if CoreOS Linux (since renamed “Container Linux“) had its roots in the traditional Linux OS, it offered a new approach towards operating systems: One of the most significant features of Container Linux is transitional upgrades that keep the system up-to-date without user intervention.

Read more

Huawei Mate 9 Pro Review: Probably The Best Android Phone Of 2016

Filed under
Reviews

It is a testament (or perhaps indictment?) to the Wild Wild West nature of the mobile industry that, on December 14, thinking it was close enough to the end of the year, I wrote a piece ranking my favorite smartphones of 2016 -- only for the list to be thrown out of wack a week later when I got my hands on the Huawei Mate 9 Pro.

The Mate 9 Pro is now my favorite go-to phone to use, and since it was technically released in 2016, that means it is indeed my new favorite phone of 2016.

Read more

C Compiler News

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • Fedora 26 Likely To Receive GCC 7, Other Changes Still Being Devised

    Fedora 26 will likely be using GCC 7 as its default compiler.

    This shouldn't come as a big surprise since Fedora usually always ships with the latest stable GNU Compiler Collection release. GCC 7.1, the first stable GCC 7 version, should be out in late March or early April while it's just about in the final state of development and could allow GCC 7 being added to F26/Rawhide very soon.

  • A Look At The New Features Coming To GNU C Library 2.25

    Three weeks from today should mark a new release of the GNU C Library, glibc 2.25, and it's coming with many feature additions.

FOSS in Networking

Filed under
OSS
  • Kubernetes Helps Comcast Re-Engineer Cable TV

    Comcast cable is undergoing a major technical shift. The company is moving away from an always-on transmission of every single channel to every single customer, with the signal converted on either end by a piece of proprietary hardware, which is how cable has worked for decades. The new system is IP-based, on-demand streaming model where channel signal is sent only when requested by the user, explained Erik St. Martin, a systems architect at Comcast, at CloudNativeCon in November.

  • Keynote: Kubernetes: As Seen On TV by Erik St. Martin, Systems Architect, Comcast
  • IHS Markit: 70% of Carriers Will Deploy CORD in the Central Office

    The Central Office Re-Architected as a Data Center (CORD) combines network functions virtualization (NFV) and software-defined networking (SDN) to bring data center economics and cloud agility to the telco central office. CORD garnered so much attention in 2016 that its originator — On.Lab‘s Open Network Operating System (ONOS) — established CORD as a separate open source entity. And non-telcos have joined the open source group, including Google and Comcast.

Containers Rising

Filed under
Server
SUSE
  • SUSE Formalizes Container Strategy with a New Linux Distro, MicroOS

    Arguably, CoreOS Linux could be called the first Linux-based operating system designed for cluster computing, containers/microservices. Even if CoreOS Linux (since renamed “Container Linux“) had its roots in the traditional Linux OS, it offered a new approach towards operating systems: One of the most significant features of Container Linux is transitional upgrades that keep the system up-to-date without user intervention.

  • Container Revenue Growing to $2.7B by 2020

    The market for application containers, largely led by the open-source Docker container engine, has been a hot area in recent years, at least in terms of mindshare - but how much money is there in the container market? A new forecast from 451 Research aims to answer that question.

    According to 451 Research, the market for application container technologies in 2016 generated $762 million in revenue. Looking forward to 2020, 451 Research is forecasting that 2020 revenue will reach $2.7 billion for a 40 percent compound annual growth rate.

    The upward revenue growth trajectory for application containers is not a surprise given some of the current adoption trends. 451 Research conducted a study in April and May 2016 that found 14 percent of surveyed organizations were using Docker containers in production. Additionally nearly 31 percent of surveyed organizations indicated they were piloting or evaluating Docker containers.

Free/Libre Games

Filed under
Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Phoronix Graphics News and Benchmarks

Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Expands With Linkerd Project

  • Linkerd Project Joins Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    The Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is expanding its roster of hosted projects today with the inclusion of the open-source Linkerd service mesh project.
  • Linkerd Project Joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Today, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s (CNCF) Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) voted to accept Linkerd as the fifth hosted project alongside Kubernetes, Prometheus, OpenTracing and Fluentd. You can find more information on the project on their GitHub page. As with every project accepted by the CNCF -- and by extension, The Linux Foundation -- Linkerd is another great example of how open source technologies, both new and more established, are driving and participating in the transformation of enterprise IT.

Don’t let Microsoft exploit Bangladesh’s IT talent

Open-source software is effectively a public good and owned by everyone who uses it. So there is no conflict of interest in the Bangladesh government paying programmers to fix bugs and security holes in open-source software, because the Bangladesh government would be as much an owner of the software as anyone else, and benefit from the increased use-value of the improved software as much as any other user. Read more