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Friday, 22 Aug 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LinuxCon: What's Going On With Fedora.Next Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:49pm
Story Intel Sandy Bridge Gains On Linux 3.17 Extend Beyond Graphics Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:47pm
Story Acer Offers New Desktop Chromebox Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:36pm
Story Android in-dash IVI device revs up in India Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:17pm
Story Orca 3.14 Beta 1 Features Major Changes and Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:10pm
Story Leaked images of Elephone P1000 – The OnePlus Killer loaded with CyanogenMod Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 6:55pm
Story Exclusive: Elephone P1000, Snapdragon 801, 2K and CyanogenMod! Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 5:37pm
Story Ken Starks to Keynote At Ohio LinuxFest Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 5:23pm
Story Mesa 10.3 release candidate 1 Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 5:09pm
Story Canonical Joined The Khronos Group To Help Mir/Wayland Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 5:03pm

NHS open-source Spine 2 platform to go live next week

Filed under
OSS

Last year, the NHS said open source would be a key feature of the new approach to healthcare IT. It hopes embracing open source will both cut the upfront costs of implementing new IT systems and take advantage of using the best brains from different areas of healthcare to develop collaborative solutions.

Meyer said the Spine switchover team has “picked up the gauntlet around open-source software”.

The HSCIC and BJSS have collaborated to build the core services of Spine 2, such as electronic prescriptions and care records, “in a series of iterative developments”.

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What the Linux Foundation Does for Linux

Filed under
Linux

Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, talks about Linux a lot. During his keynote at the LinuxCon USA event here, Zemlin noted that it's often difficult for him to come up with new material for talking about the state of Linux at this point.

Every year at LinuxCon, Zemlin delivers his State of Linux address, but this time he took a different approach. Zemlin detailed what he actually does and how the Linux Foundation works to advance the state of Linux.

Fundamentally it's all about enabling the open source collaboration model for software development.

"We are seeing a shift now where the majority of code in any product or service is going to be open source," Zemlin said.

Zemlin added that open source is the new Pareto Principle for software development, where 80 percent of software code is open source. The nature of collaborative development itself has changed in recent years. For years the software collaboration was achieved mostly through standards organizations.

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Arch-based Linux distro KaOS 2014.08 is here with KDE 4.14.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linux desktop community has reached a sad state. Ubuntu 14.04 was a disappointing release and Fedora is taking way too long between releases. Hell, OpenSUSE is an overall disaster. It is hard to recommend any Linux-based operating system beyond Mint. Even the popular KDE plasma environment and its associated programs are in a transition phase, moving from 4.x to 5.x. As exciting as KDE 5 may be, it is still not ready for prime-time; it is recommended to stay with 4 for now.

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diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Filed under
Linux

One problem with Linux has been its implementation of system calls. As Andy Lutomirski pointed out recently, it's very messy. Even identifying which system calls were implemented for which architectures, he said, was very difficult, as was identifying the mapping between a call's name and its number, and mapping between call argument registers and system call arguments.

Some user programs like strace and glibc needed to know this sort of information, but their way of gathering it together—although well accomplished—was very messy too.

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GNU hackers discover HACIENDA government surveillance and give us a way to fight back

Filed under
GNU
Security

GNU community members and collaborators have discovered threatening details about a five-country government surveillance program codenamed HACIENDA. The good news? Those same hackers have already worked out a free software countermeasure to thwart the program.

According to Heise newspaper, the intelligence agencies of the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand, have used HACIENDA to map every server in twenty-seven countries, employing a technique known as port scanning. The agencies have shared this map and use it to plan intrusions into the servers. Disturbingly, the HACIENDA system actually hijacks civilian computers to do some of its dirty work, allowing it to leach computing resources and cover its tracks.

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Play Hexen, Quake I, and Quake II with 4MLinux Game Edition 9.1 Beta

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux Game Edition, a special Linux distribution based on Busybox, Dropbear, OpenSSH, and PuTTY, which also happens to feature a large number of games, is now at version 9.1 Beta.

The 4MLinux distributions are among the smallest ones in the world, but that doesn't mean the developers can't add a ton of interesting games into the mix.

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Firefox gets preliminary support for casting to Chromecast

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla is in the process of adding the ability to “cast” videos from Firefox to Chromecast devices, and you can try it now if you have the right hardware.

As announced in a post on Google+ post by Mozilla developer Lucas Rocha, “Chromecast support is now enabled in Firefox for Android’s Nightly build.”

To check this out, I downloaded the latest Firefox Nightly, installed it on my Nexus 10, and tested it with my Chromecast. It worked… although, it has some rough edges right now.

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SparkyLinux GameOver Is a Winning Work-Play Combo

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

This SparkyLinux game edition builds in access to a large collection of popular games compiled for the Linux platform. It brings the latest game fare via the Steam and Desura platforms. It provides handy access from a quick launch bar to a dozen plus emulators to let you run top-line games from leading gaming boxes and platforms.

GameOver does not wimp out on providing all of the needed everyday computing tools found in other Linux distros, either. It provides nearly all of the standard Linux applications out-of-the-box, so you do not have to install them on your own.

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WebKitGTK+ 2.5.2 Drops GTK+2 Dependency

Filed under
Software
GNOME

WebKitGTK+, a version of the WebKit open source web engine that uses GTK+ as its user-facing frontend, has reached version 2.5.2.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming
HowTos

Proposed: A Tainted Performance State For The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

Similar to the kernel states of having a tainted kernel for using binary blob kernel modules or unsigned modules, a new tainting method has been proposed for warning the user about potentially adverse kernel performance.

Dave Hansen of Intel has proposed a new "TAINT_PERFORMANCE" for the kernel that would proactively print a warning message about not using the kernel for any performance measurements. Dave explained in his RFC announcement, "I have more than once myself been the victim of an accidentally-enabled kernel configuration option being mistaken for a true performance problem. I'm sure I've also taken profiles or performance measurements and assumed they were real-world when really I was measuring the performance with an option that nobody turns on in production. A warning like this late in boot will help remind folks when these kinds of things are enabled."

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Scientific Linux 7.0 x86_64 BETA 3

Filed under
Linux

Fermilab's intention is to continue the development and support of
Scientific Linux and refine its focus as an operating system for
scientific computing. Today we are announcing a beta release of
Scientific Linux 7. We continue to develop a stable process for
generating and distributing Scientific Linux, with the intent that
Scientific Linux remains the same high quality operating system the
community has come to expect.

Please do not install Pre-Release software in your production
environment.

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Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Now Features Linux Kernel 3.16.1

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

"The Utopic kernel has been rebased to the first v3.16.1 upstream stable kernel and uploaded to the archive, ie. linux-3.16.0-9.14. Please test and let us know your results," says Canonical's Joseph Salisbury, after the latest Ubuntu Kernel Team meeting.

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GitHub, Seagate, Western Digital & Others Join The Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

With LinuxCon starting today in Chicago, the Linux Foundation has announced their latest sponsorship recruits for some major organizations that are now backing the foundation.

Adapteva, GitHub, SanDisk, Seagate, and Western Digital are the latest organizations joining the Linux Foundation. Nearly all Phoronix readers should now GitHub along with storage companies Seagate and Western Digital. Adapteva is the start-up Parallella super-computing board.

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Open-Source Radeon Graphics Have Some Improvements On Linux 3.17

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Early benchmarking of the Linux 3.17 kernel have indicated faster performance for AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver thanks to Radeon DRM improvements.

There's plenty of Radeon changes for Linux 3.17 among which is properly-working AMD Radeon R9 290 (Hawaii) graphics support after these high-end GPUs were busted on the open-source Linux driver for countless months. Linux 3.17 also expands where Radeon Dynamic Power Management (DPM) is enabled, supports uncached and write-combined GTT buffers, Userptr support, and there's GPU VM improvements among other fixes and improvements.

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The Top Open Source Cloud Projects of 2014

Filed under
OSS

OpenStack is the most popular open source cloud project, followed by Docker and KVM, according to a survey of more than 550 respondents conducted by Linux.com and The New Stack and announced today at CloudOpen in Chicago.

The results reflect the rising popularity of a new generation of open source projects that for the most part are less than five years old and aimed at meeting the growing enterprise demand for cloud computing infrastructure. In turn, these young projects are showing favor but the strength of the more solid technologies have a certain degree of longevity that is also reflected in the results.

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GNOME 3.14 Beta Makes GLSL Optional, Supports Wayland Gesture/Touch Events

Filed under
GNOME

For the upcoming GNOME 3.13.90 release are updates to GNOME Shell and Mutter that bring a few notable last-minute changes.

The GNOME 3.13.90 Beta release is scheduled to happen today and as such the Mutter and GNOME Shell updates were checked in this week. With the Mutter 3.13.90 comes an enforcement that XSync() is only ever called once per-frame, the GLSL support is optional, gesture and touch events are now handled on Wayland, and there's a variety of other fixes/changes. The Mutter 3.13.90 changes can be found via its release announcement.

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Five things Android smartphones have that are unlikely to come to the iPhone 6

Filed under
Android

It is likely I will buy an iPhone 6, but there are many things I like about Android that I doubt we will see come to an Apple flagship smartphone any time soon.

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Microsoft Lobby Denies the State of Chile Access to Free Software

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Fresh on the heels of the entire Munich and Linux debacle, another story involving Microsoft and free software has popped up across the world, in Chile. A prolific magazine from the South American country says that the powerful Microsoft lobby managed to turn around a law that would allow the authorities to use free software.

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LaKademy 2014 - KDE Latin America Summit

Filed under
KDE

Two years have passed since the reality of the first Latin American meeting of KDE contributors in 2012 in Porto Alegre, capital of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Now we are proud to announce that the second LaKademy will be held August 27th to 30th in São Paulo, Brazil, at one of the most important and prestigious universities in the world—the University of São Paulo.

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