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Friday, 17 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux File-System Benchmarks On The Intel Optane 900P SSD Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2017 - 6:10pm
Story Software taking over, but hardware still has a role: Linux expert Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2017 - 6:07pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2017 - 8:50am
Story 5 open source fonts ideal for programming Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2017 - 8:36am
Story Firefox Quantum Now Rolling Out to All Ubuntu Linux Users, Update Now Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2017 - 8:32am
Story GNU/Linux Laptops for Developers Roy Schestowitz 17/11/2017 - 5:43am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:23pm
Story Graphics: Intel, Mesa, Wayland and Bosch Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:21pm
Story Software: Nuclide, QEMU, Mailspring, GNOME Calendar and To Do, LibreOffice Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:20pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:18pm

GhostBSD 11.1 OS Arrives with Own Software Repository, Drops 32-Bit Support

Filed under
BSD

More than a year in development, GhostBSD 11.1 is based on FreeBSD 11.1 and comes with Xfce and MATE flavors both available for 64-bit (amd64) systems as 32-bit (i386) support is being dropped starting with this release. This is also the first release of the BSD-based OS to ship with its own software package repository.

"After a year of development, testing, debugging and working on our software package repository, we are pleased to announce the release of GhostBSD 11.1 is now available," reads today's announcement. "With 11.1 we drop 32-bit i386 supports, and we currently maintain our software packages repository for more stability."

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Also: GhostBSD 11.1 Released: FreeBSD With MATE & Xfce Desktop Experience

Slax Linux Distro Gets New Release After Two Years, Drops Slackware for Debian

Filed under
Slack
Debian

Slax 9.2.1 is now available for download as the latest stable release of the Linux distro, and it's the first to be based on Debian GNU/Linux. That's right, Slax no longer lives up to its name and drops Slackware for Debian. As its version number suggests, Slax 9.2.1 is based on Debian GNU/Linux 9.2.1 "Stretch."

"After several years of inactivity Slax project has been brought to life again in new version 9.2.1," said the developer in today's release announcement. "I've decided to go for Debian because it made my life much easier and I believe that it will make yours too."

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5 Coolest Linux Terminal Emulators

Filed under
Linux

Sure, we can get by with boring old GNOME terminal, Konsole, and funny, rickety, old xterm. When you're in the mood to try something new, however, take a look at these five cool and useful Linux terminals.

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Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS Will Bring Undecorated Maximized Windows for Mutiny Layout

Filed under
Ubuntu

First off, the development of Ubuntu MATE 18.04 starts based on the core components of its bigger brother, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, such as the Linux 4.13 kernel, X.Org Server 1.19 display server, Mesa 17.1 graphics stack, and many of the latest security patches from upstream, a.k.a. Debian Testing (Buster) repositories.

And now for the goodies coming to the final Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS release next year, as Martin Wimpress and his team promise to bring hardware acceleration to Marco, MATE desktop environment's default window manager, as well as undecorated windows for the Mutiny layout for ex-Unity users.

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ExLight Linux Distro Now Based on Ubuntu 17.10, Features Enlightenment Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

ExLight Build 171112 is the latest update to the Linux distro, which is based on the recently released Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, but also borrows some package from the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" repositories (a.k.a. Debian Testing).

The biggest change in this release is the replacement of the Linux 4.9 LTS kernel used in previous versions of the distribution with the more recent Linux 4.13 kernel series. ExLight Build 171112 runs a specially crafted kernel 4.13.0-16-exton based on upstream's Linux 4.13.4 kernel.

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MX 17 Linux: The Best of 2 Linux Worlds

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

MX-17 Beta 1 images are available for download here. If you are looking for a computing platform that is a bit different and very reliable, check out the latest MX 17 Beta releases. Try out the various installation options. See how they work on your slowest legacy hardware.

If you like what you see, keep using the Beta release on USB until the final release of MX 17 comes out shortly. Then you can install it to your computer's hard drive in frugal mode, keep your existing Linux distro where it is, and choose which one to run with each new boot-up.

The beauty of MX Linux is you do not have to deal with wiping or partitioning your hard drive or fussing with the unpredictability of maintaining a dual-boot setup.

MX Linux is a powerful, easy-to-use computing platform that goes beyond lightweight performance without filling your computer with software bloat.

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Raspberry Pi 3 clone offers Allwinner H2, H3, or H5 SoCs for $9 to $29

Filed under
Linux

Libre Computer’s open source “Tritium” SBCs run Ubuntu or Android on Allwinner H2+, H3, or 64-bit H5 SoCs, and have an RPi 3 like layout and 40-pin header.

Earlier this year, Shenzhen-based Libre Computer successfully funded its quad Cortex-A53 Amlogic S905X based Le Potato SBC on Kickstarter for $25 to $35. Now, the company has returned to Kickstarter to launch a second hacker SBC with a Raspberry 3-like form factor, layout, and 40-pin expansion interface. The Tritium is available in packages of $9, $19, or $29, depending on whether you want it configured with the Allwinner H2+, Allwinner H3, or Allwinner H5.

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Wandboard.org launches i.MX8M-based SBC with RPi expansion

Filed under
Android
Linux
Ubuntu

Technexion’s Wandboard.org unveiled open source “Wand-Pi-8M” SBCs that run Linux on a quad-A53 i.MX8M, and offer WiFi/BT, GbE, HDMI 2.0, and a 40-pin RPi link.

Technexion and its Wandboard.org community project opened pre-orders on three successors to its i.MX6 based Wandboard and almost identical Wandboard Reload SBCs that tap NXP’s long awaited, quad-core, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M SoC. Unlike the Wandboards, the smaller, Raspberry Pi like (85 x 56 x 19.3mm) Wand-Pi-8M-Lite ($89), Wand-Pi-8M-Pro ($99), and Wand-Pi-8M-Deluxe ($119), are standard SBCs rather than sandwich-style COM-and-carrier products. The boards ship in Spring 2018.

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GNU/Linux in HPC

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

10 easy steps from proprietary to open source

Filed under
OSS

First, we should accept that no software is perfect6. Not proprietary software, not open source software. Second, we should accept that good proprietary software exists, and third, there is also some bad open source software out there. Fourth, there are extremely intelligent, gifted, and dedicated architects, designers, and software engineers who create proprietary software.

But here's the rub: fifth, there is a limited pool of people who will work on or otherwise look at proprietary software. And you can never hire all the best people. Even in government and public sector organisations—who often have a larger talent pool available to them, particularly for cough security-related cough applications—the pool is limited.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How to Install OpenVPN on CentOS 7
  • How to turn your website into a desktop app
  • The Quantum of Firefox: Why is this one unlike any other Firefox?

    The Mozilla Foundation has officially launched a radical rewrite of its browser, a major cross-platform effort to regain relevance in a world that seems to have forgotten Firefox. The much-rewritten browser claims to be 30 per cent faster with half the memory load, although this comes at the cost of compatibility, as Scott Gilbertson found here.

    The proof’s in the pudding, and this pudding doesn’t feel like the old Firefox behemoth at all. It’s long overdue.

    "Firefox is 13 years old – and very few applications have been around for 13 years without accruing technical debt,” Nick Nguyen, Mozilla’s VP of technology told us.

GNU/Linux World Domination (in HPC)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • China moves ahead of US on Top 500 supercomputer list; Linux now found on every machine

    The bi-annual Top 500 supercomputer list has reached its fiftieth edition, bringing with it two important milestones: China has more machines on the list than the US, and every computer now runs Linux.

    Boasting 202 entries, China can now claim more supercomputers in the top 500 than ever before. At the same time, the US has its lowest number of places—144—since the list began 25 years ago. Back in June, China took 159 spots while the US led with 169.

  • It took 19 years, but Linux finally dominates an entire market

    LINUX MAY well still be viewed as the preserve of 'hobbyists', but there's one category of devices in which Linux rules the market: supercomputers. 

    According to ZDNet, it's the first time that Linux systems have taken all 500 spots in the TOP500 Supercomputer list - with the last two non-Linux supercomputers dropping off between the lists released in June and November of this year.

Attacks on GNU/Linux and Openwashing, E.E.E.

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Canonical Development News

Filed under
Ubuntu

Devices: Tizen, Android, QEMU Bridge

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • TV4 to bring Advertising Video on Demand Apps to Samsung Smart TVs

    As times change, the way we consume television content has been changing too. Cable TVs, Satellite broadcasts, Direct to Home and now internet streams thanks to the faster internet and Smart TVs have all made it easier to watch content that we like. One company that has been evolving with time to deliver better content is the popular Swedish commercial broadcaster TV4 which is a part of Bonnier Group.

  • Register here for Samsung’s webinar on how Tizen wearables can improve Enterprise productivity
  • An update on the Android problem

    Android has been a great boon to the kernel community, having brought a great deal of growth in both the user and the development communities. But Android has also been a problem in that devices running it ship with kernels containing large amounts (often millions of lines) of out-of-tree code. That fragments the development community and makes it impossible to run mainline kernels on this hardware. The problematic side of Android was discussed at the 2017 Maintainer Summit; the picture that resulted is surprisingly optimistic.

    Greg Kroah-Hartman started by saying that he has been working for some time with the system-on-chip (SoC) vendors to try to resolve this problem, which he blames primarily on Qualcomm for having decided not to work upstream. Qualcomm has since concluded that this decision was a mistake and is determined to fix it, but the process of doing so will take years. The other SoC vendors are also committed to closing the gap between the kernels they provide and the mainline but, again, getting there will take a while.

  •  

  • Hardware and Software Engineers Designing SoC FPGAs Stand to Profit from Aldec QEMU Bridge
  • QEMU 2.11-RC1 Released: Drops IA64, Adds OpenRISC SMP & More

    QEMU 2.11-RC1 is available for this important piece of the open-source Linux virtualization stack.

    - Dropped support for IA64 Itanium architecture. Also being dropped with QEMU 2.11 is AIX support.

LWN: Realtime Summit, Maintainers Summit and More (Paywall Expired)

Filed under
Linux
  • A report from the Realtime Summit

    The 2017 Realtime Summit (RT-Summit) was hosted by the Czech Technical University on Saturday, October 21 in Prague, just before the Embedded Linux Conference. It was attended by more than 50 individuals with backgrounds ranging from academic to industrial, and some local students daring enough to spend a day with that group. What follows is a summary of some of the presentations held at the event.

  • USBGuard: authorization for USB

    USBGuard is a security framework for the authorization of USB devices that can be plugged into a Linux system. For users who want to protect a system from malicious USB devices or unauthorized use of USB ports on a machine, this program gives a number of fine-grained policy options for specifying how USB devices can interact with a host system. It is a tool similar to usbauth, which also provides an interface to create access-control policies for the USB ports. Although kernel authorization for USB devices already exists, programs like USBGuard make it easy to craft policies using those mechanisms.

  • A kernel self-testing update

    Shuah Khan is the maintainer of the kernel's self-test subsystem. At the 2017 Kernel Summit, she presented an update on the recent developments in kernel testing and led a related discussion. Much work has happened around self-testing in the kernel, but there remains a lot to be done.

  • Kernel regression tracking, part 2

    The tracking of kernel regressions was discussed at the 2017 Kernel Summit; the topic made a second appearance at the first-ever Maintainers Summit two days later. This session was partly a repeat of what came before for the benefit of those (including Linus Torvalds) who weren't at the first discussion, but some new ground was covered as well.

    Thorsten Leemhuis started with a reprise of the Kernel Summit discussion, noting that he has been doing regression tracking for the last year and has found it to be rather harder than he had expected. The core of the problem, he said, is that nobody tells him anything about outstanding regressions or the progress that has been made in fixing them, forcing him to dig through the lists to discover that information on his own. He had, though, come to a few conclusions on how he wants to proceed.

  • Bash the kernel maintainers

    Laurent Pinchart ran a session at the 2017 Embedded Linux Conference Europe entitled "Bash the kernel maintainers"; the idea was to get feedback from developers on their experience working with the kernel community. A few days later, the Maintainers Summit held a free-flowing discussion on the issues that were brought up in that session. Some changes may result from this discussion, but it also showed how hard it can be to change how kernel subsystem maintainers work.

    The first complaint was that there is no consistency in how maintainers respond to patches. Some will acknowledge them right away, others take their time, and others will sometimes ignore patches altogether. James Bottomley defended the last group, saying that it is simply not possible to respond to all of the patches that show up on the mailing lists. The discussions can get nasty or, with some posters, a maintainer can end up stuck in a never-ending circle of questions and reposts. Arnd Bergmann suggested that maintainers could adopt a standard no-reply reply for such situations.

  • The state of Linus

    A traditional Kernel-Summit agenda item was a slot where Linus Torvalds had the opportunity to discuss the aspects of the development community that he was (or, more often, was not) happy with. In 2017, this discussion moved to the smaller Maintainers Summit. Torvalds is mostly content with the state of the community, it seems, but the group still found plenty of process-related things to talk about.

    The kernel development process is going well, with one big exception, Torvalds said: developers still seem unable to distinguish the merge window from the period after -rc1 is released and he doesn't understand why. An extreme example was the MIPS subsystem which, as a result, was not merged at all for two release cycles. Most of the issues are not so extreme, but the problem is ongoing.

  • Maintainers Summit: SPDX, cross-subsystem development, and conclusion

    The 2017 Maintainers Summit, the first event of its type, managed to cover a wide range of topics in a single half-day. This article picks up a few relatively short topics that were discussed toward the end of the session. These include a new initiative to add SPDX license tags to the kernel, the perils of cross-subsystem development, and an evaluation of the summit itself.

Security: Jobs, Linux 4.14, Bruce Schneier, Spyhunter

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Security Jobs Are Hot: Get Trained and Get Noticed

    The demand for security professionals is real. On Dice.com, 15 percent of the more than 75K jobs are security positions. “Every year in the U.S., 40,000 jobs for information security analysts go unfilled, and employers are struggling to fill 200,000 other cyber-security related roles, according to cyber security data tool CyberSeek” (Forbes). We know that there is a fast-increasing need for security specialists, but that the interest level is low.

  • security things in Linux v4.14
  • Schneier: It's Time to Regulate IoT to Improve Cyber-Security

    The time has come for the U.S. government and other governments around the world, to start regulating Internet of Things (IoT) security, according to Bruce Schneier, CTO of IBM's Resilient Systems.

    Schneier delivered his message during a keynote address at the SecTor security conference here. He noted that today everything is basically a computer, whether it's a car, a watch, a phone or a television. IoT today has several parts including sensors that collect data, computing power to figure out what to do with the collected data and then actuators that affect the real world.

  • Shady Anti-Spyware Developer Loses Lawsuit Against Competitor Who Flagged Its Software As Malicious

    Enigma Software makes Spyhunter, a malware-fighting program with a very questionable reputation. But the company isn't known so much for containing threats as it's known for issuing threats. It sued a review site for having the audacity to suggest its pay-to-clean anti-spyware software wasn't a good fit for most users… or really any users at all.

    Bleeping Computer found itself served with a defamation lawsuit for making fact-based claims (with links to supporting evidence) about Enigma's dubious product, dubious customer service tactics (like the always-popular "auto-renew"), and dubious lawsuits. Somehow, this dubious lawsuit managed to survive a motion to dismiss. Fortunately, Bleeping Computer was propped up by Malwarebytes' developers, who tossed $5,000 into Bleeping Computer's legal defense fund.

Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Events: Linux Developer Conference Brazil, LinuxTage 2017, PET-CON

Filed under
OSS
  • Linux Developer Conference Brazil

    Last weekend I attended the first Linux Developer Conference Brazil at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp). It was an event focused on the upstream development of low level components related to Linux, such as gcc, systemtap and the Linux kernel itself. The event was organized by a few contributors of some of these upstream projects, like the kernel, and was sponsored by companies that work directly with it (among them were openSUSE and Collabora).

  • Talking at Kieler LinuxTage 2017 in Kiel, Germany

    Compared to other events, it’s a tiny happening with something between fifty and hundred people or so. I was presenting on how I think GNOME pushes the envelope regarding making secure operating systems (slides, videos to follow). I was giving three examples of how GNOME achieves its goal of priding a secure OS without compromising on usability. In fact, I claimed that the most successful security solutions must not involve the user. That sounds a bit counter intuitive to people in the infosec world, because we’re trying to protect the user, surely they must be involved in the process. But we better not do that. This is not to say that we shouldn’t allow the user to change preferences regarding how the solutions behave, but rather that it should work without intervention. My talk was fairly good attended, I think, and we had a great discussion. I tend to like the discussion bit better than the actual presentation, because I see it as an indicator for how much the people care. I couldn’t attend many other presentations, because I would only attend the second day. That’s why I couldn’t meet with Jim Confused

  • Talking at PET-CON 2017.2 in Hamburg, Germany

    A few weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to talk at the 7th Privacy Enhancing Techniques Conference (PET-CON 2017.2) in Hamburg, Germany. It’s a teeny tiny academic event with a dozen or so experts in the field of privacy.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: New Release of HardenedBSD, Windows Leaks Details of Windows Back Doors

  • Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 11-STABLE v1100054
  • Kaspersky blames NSA hack on infected Microsoft software
    Embattled computer security firm Kaspersky Lab said Thursday that malware-infected Microsoft Office software and not its own was to blame for the hacking theft of top-secret US intelligence materials. Adding tantalizing new details to the cyber-espionage mystery that has rocked the US intelligence community, Kaspersky also said there was a China link to the hack.
  • Investigation Report for the September 2014 Equation malware detection incident in the US
    In early October, a story was published by the Wall Street Journal alleging Kaspersky Lab software was used to siphon classified data from an NSA employee’s home computer system. Given that Kaspersky Lab has been at the forefront of fighting cyberespionage and cybercriminal activities on the Internet for over 20 years now, these allegations were treated very seriously. To assist any independent investigators and all the people who have been asking us questions whether those allegations were true, we decided to conduct an internal investigation to attempt to answer a few questions we had related to the article and some others that followed it:
  • Kaspersky: Clumsy NSA leak snoop's PC was packed with malware
    Kaspersky Lab, the US government's least favorite computer security outfit, has published its full technical report into claims Russian intelligence used its antivirus tools to steal NSA secrets. Last month, anonymous sources alleged that in 2015, an NSA engineer took home a big bunch of the agency's cyber-weapons to work on them on his home Windows PC, which was running the Russian biz's antimalware software – kind of a compliment when you think about it. The classified exploit code and associated documents on the personal system were then slurped by Kremlin spies via his copy of Kaspersky antivirus, it was claimed.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source Networking Days: Think Globally, Collaborate Locally
    Something that we’ve learned at The Linux Foundation over the years is that there is just no substitute for periodic, in-person, face-to-face collaboration around the open source technologies that are rapidly changing our world. It’s no different for the open networking projects I work with as end users and their ecosystem partners grapple with the challenges and opportunities of unifying various open source components and finding solutions to accelerate network transformation. This fall, we decided to take The Linux Foundation networking projects (OpenDaylight, ONAP, OPNFV, and others) on the road to Europe and Japan by working with local site hosts and network operators to host Open Source Networking Days in Paris, Milan, Stockholm, London, Tel Aviv, and Yokohama.
  • The Open-Source Driving Simulator That Trains Autonomous Vehicles
    Self-driving cars are set to revolutionize transport systems the world over. If the hype is to be believed, entirely autonomous vehicles are about to hit the open road. The truth is more complex. The most advanced self-driving technologies work only in an extremely limited set of environments and weather conditions. And while most new cars will have some form of driver assistance in the coming years, autonomous cars that drive in all conditions without human oversight are still many years away. One of the main problems is that it is hard to train vehicles to cope in all situations. And the most challenging situations are often the rarest. There is a huge variety of tricky circumstances that drivers rarely come across: a child running into the road, a vehicle driving on the wrong side of the street, an accident immediately ahead, and so on.
  • Fun with Le Potato
    At Linux Plumbers, I ended up with a Le Potato SBC. I hadn't really had time to actually boot it up until now. They support a couple of distributions which seem to work fine if you flash them on. I mostly like SBCs for having actual hardware to test on so my interest tends to be how easily can I get my own kernel running. Most of the support is not upstream right now but it's headed there. The good folks at BayLibre have been working on getting the kernel support upstream and have a tree available for use until then.
  • PyConf Hyderabad 2017
    In the beginning of October, I attended a new PyCon in India, PyConf Hyderabad (no worries, they are working on the name for the next year). I was super excited about this conference, the main reason is being able to meet more Python developers from India. We are a large country, and we certainly need more local conferences :)
  • First Basilisk version released!
    This is the first public version of the Basilisk web browser, building on the new platform in development: UXP (code-named Möbius).
  • Pale Moon Project Rolls Out The Basilisk Browser Project
    The developers behind the Pale Moon web-browser that's been a long standing fork of Firefox have rolled out their first public beta release of their new "Basilisk" browser technology. Basilisk is their new development platform based on their (Gecko-forked) Goanna layout engine and the Unified UXL Platform (UXP) that is a fork of the Mozilla code-base pre-Servo/Rust... Basically for those not liking the direction of Firefox with v57 rolling out the Quantum changes, etc.
  • Best word processor for Mac [iophk: "whole article fails to mention OpenDocument Format"]
  • WordPress 4.9: This one's for you, developers!
    WordPress 4.9 has debuted, and this time the world's most popular content management system has given developers plenty to like. Some of the changes are arguably overdue: syntax highlighting and error checking for CSS editing and cutting custom HTML are neither scarce nor innovative. They'll be welcomed arrival will likely be welcomed anyway, as will newly-granular roles and permissions for developers. The new release has also added version 4.2.6 of MediaElement.js, an upgrade that WordPress.org's release notes stated has removed dependency on jQuery, improves accessibility, modernizes the UI, and fixes many bugs.”
  • New projects on Hosted Weblate
  • Cilk Plus Is Being Dropped From GCC
    Intel deprecated Cilk Plus multi-threading support with GCC 7 and now for GCC 8 they are looking to abandon this support entirely. Cilk Plus only had full support introduced in GCC 5 while now for the GCC 8 release early next year it's looking like it will be dropped entirely.
  • Software Freedom Law Center vs. Software Freedom Conservancy

    On November 3rd, the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) wrote a blog post to let people know that the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) had begun legal action against them (the SFC) over the trademark for their name.

  • What Is Teletype For Atom? How To Code With Fellow Developers In Real Time?
    In a short period of three years, GitHub’s open source code editor has become one of the most popular options around. In our list of top text editors for Linux, Atom was featured at #2. From time to time, GitHub keeps adding new features to this tool to make it even better. Just recently, with the help of Facebook, GitHub turned Atom into a full-fledged IDE. As GitHub is known to host some of the world’s biggest open source collaborative projects, it makes perfect sense to add the collaborative coding ability to Atom. To make this possible, “Teletype for Atom” has just been announced.
  • Microsoft Is Trying To Make Windows Subsystem For Linux Faster (WSL)
  • Microsoft and GitHub team up to take Git virtual file system to macOS, Linux

Ubuntu: New Users, Unity Remix, 18.04 LTS News

  • How to Get Started With the Ubuntu Linux Distro
    The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we’ll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.)
  • An ‘Ubuntu Unity Remix’ Might Be on the Way…
    A new Ubuntu flavor that uses the Unity 7 desktop by default is under discussion. The plans have already won backing from a former Unity developer.
  • Ubuntu News: Get Firefox Quantum Update Now; Ubuntu 18.04 New Icon Theme Confirmed
    Earlier this week, Mozilla earned big praises in the tech world for launching its next-generation Firefox Quantum 57.0 web browser. The browser claims to be faster and better than market leader Google Chrome. Now, Firefox Quantum is available for all supported Ubuntu versions from the official repositories. The Firefox Quantum Update is also now available.
  • New Icon Theme Confirmed for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
    ‘Suru’ is (apparently) going to be the default icon theme in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. That’s Suru, the rebooted community icon theme and not Suru, the Canonical-created icon theme that shipped on the Ubuntu Phone (and was created by Matthieu James, who recently left Canonical).

OnePlus 5T Launched

  • OnePlus 5T Keeps the Headphone Jack, Introduces Face Unlock and Parallel Apps
    Five months after it launched its OnePlus 5 flagship Android smartphone, OnePlus unveiled today its successor, the OnePlus 5T, running the latest Android 8.0 (Oreo) mobile OS. OnePlus held a live event today in New York City to tell us all about the new features it implemented in the OnePlus 5T, and they don't disappoint as the smartphone features a gorgeous and bright 6.0-inches Optic AMOLED capacitive touchscreen with multitouch, a 1080x2160 pixels resolution, 18:9 ratio, and approximately 402 PPI density. The design has been changed a bit as well for OnePlus 5T, which is made of anodized aluminum.
  • OnePlus 5T Launched: Comes With Bigger Screen, Better Dual Camera, And Face Unlock
    Whenever costly phones like iPhone X or Google Pixel 2 are bashed (here and here) and their alternatives are discussed, OnePlus is always mentioned. In the past few years, the company has amassed a fan base that has found the concept of “Never Settle” impressive.
  •