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Monday, 29 Dec 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Notifications Without User Interaction on Ubuntu Are Annoying Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 12:02pm
Story Librem Linux Laptop Drops NVIDIA Graphics But Still Coming Up Short Of Goal Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 10:45am
Story Ruby 2.2.0 Released Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 10:41am
Story 2014 Catalyst Linux Graphics Benchmarks Year-In-Review Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 10:35am
Story From Red Hat's CEO: Reflecting on a 'great year,' looking to '15 Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 10:26am
Story Open Source's 2014: MS 'cancer' embrace, NASDAQ listings, and a quiet dog Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 10:21am
Story How About 2014? Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 10:16am
Story Macbuntu strikes again, and we likes it! Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 10:14am
Story ROSA Fresh R5, Year in Ubuntu, and Fedora to the Rescue Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 10:08am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 9:57am

Study: ‘European Parliament should use open source’

Filed under
OSS

The European Parliament should use free software and open standards for all of its ICT systems and data, concludes a study by the EP’s Greens/European Free Alliance: “That is the most appropriate way for the Parliament to meet its own standard of ‘utmost transparency’.”

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Fedora 21 review - Uh, not again

Filed under
Reviews

Why did Fedora 21 have to be so buggy? Why? I wanted it to succeed, I wanted it to be cool and fun, just like the last release. There was so much potential, and then, something went wrong. Quite a few somethings, apparently. Installer partition selections, bootloader, login, codecs, printing, desktop effects. Damn. Fedora, where art thou?

Anyhow, Fedora 21 KDE is just not as good as it should be. Not as good as its predecessor, not as good as its rival, and most importantly, not as good as Fedora. There must be a baseline to quality, and it must never be crossed, downwards. This time, I did not get what I wanted, and I'm sad, because I know that Fedora can do it. We've all seen it happen. So more time is needed in the special oven for naughty distros. Perhaps I rushed testing just days after the official release, but it is how it is. 6/10. Done.

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Also: Fedora 21 GNOME Review: If you can ignore the initial hiccups, fantastic operating system!

Linux Best & Worst, Live Patchin', and Devuan Good

Filed under
-s

It was a fairly slow news day today in Linuxville. Nevertheless, Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols explains why 2014 "was the best of years, it was the worst of years." Gary Newell asks if the Debian-fork Devuan is a good idea and Serdar Yegulalp looks at the competing live kernel patchers and Fedora 21 is reviewed again, twice.

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OMG! GNU/Linux @ Walmart.com, sort of…

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Remember the netbooks with GNU/Linux at Walmart, years ago?

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Confessions of an open source purist

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

I have also repeatedly evaluated GNU/Linux as a platform for my daily writing and administration. Each time, I’ve found it fairly easy to install (moreso every time I try) and easy to add applications. I’ve never had problems with malware, but at some point in the life of the system, a problem arises that at best causes an inconvenience (like the sleep mode failing) and at worst leaves the system impossible to boot.

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Healthcare one of the most impacted industries by open source

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OSS

Healthcare is one of the most urgent socioeconomic issues of our time. This year, Opensource.com saw a variety of news and feature stories about applying the open source way and open source software (including tools) to alleviating the many problems faced by the healthcare industry. Here are this year's best of the best from Opensource.com in open health.

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The Open Bay helps launch 372 ‘copies’ of The Pirate Bay in a week, becomes GitHub’s most popular project

Filed under
OSS

isoHunt, the group now best known for launching The Old Pirate Bay, has shared an update a week after debuting The Open Bay. The Pirate Bay, the most popular file sharing website on the planet, still isn’t back following police raids on its data center in Sweden, but its “cause” is very much alive.

The Open Bay, which lets anyone with “minimal knowledge of how the Internet and websites work” deploy their own version of The Pirate Bay online, is becoming an open source engine of The Pirate Bay website, the group told VentureBeat in an email. “The fate of Open Bay is now in the hands of worldwide community.”

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Red Hat CEO lauds open source’s progress

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

For years, Red Hat executives fielded questions about its open source software from prospective customers: “Is open source safe? Is it secure? Is it reliable?”

But such inquiries have faded as open source software has gained momentum, CEO Jim Whitehurst wrote in a recent blog posted on the website of the Raleigh-based company. Red Hat is the leading open source software company.

“Today, it is almost impossible to name a major player in IT that has not embraced open source,” Whitehurst wrote. “Only a few short years ago, many would have argued we would never see that day.”

[...]

More than 90 percent of the Fortune 500 companies are Red Hat customers today.

“Open source was initially adopted for low cost and lack of vendor lock-in, but customers have found that it also results in better innovation and more flexibility,” Whitehurst stated. “Now it is pervasive, and it is challenging proprietary incumbents across technology categories. It is not only mainstream, open source is truly leading innovation in areas like cloud, mobile, big data, the Internet of Things, and beyond.”

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The magic behind Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu, the latest LTS version 14.04 operating system (OS), is definitely worth trying. My statement is backed by the fact that Ubuntu won the operating system of the year award from W3tech not only once but three times consecutively, followed by admiration from major players in the market and an inclusion of major organisations such as Lenovo, Dell, HP, IBM, and Asus etcetera.

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Tizen TV no substitute for Samsung's long-awaited answer to Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Global smartphone leader Samsung Electronics Co Ltd is planning a new product launch next year based on its own Tizen operating system, the South Korean giant's strategic push to free itself from Android and blaze its own software path.

But after years of development and a handful of Tizen-powered smartwatches and cameras, the only product confirmed for a 2015 launch so far is a TV set.

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Nokia C1 Smartphone With Android 5.0 Lollipop in the Works: Report

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Android

After launching its first Android tablet in November, the Nokia N1, the Finnish firm is now rumoured to be working on an Android 5.0 Lollipop-based smartphone called Nokia C1. If the rumour is true and smartphone is released as the Nokia C1, the firm would be breaching the Microsoft acquisition agreement.

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More Android 5.0:

Apple- and Microsoft-backed patent group ends its war on Android

Filed under
OS
Android
Microsoft
Mac
Legal

And just like that, the Rockstar Consortium's lawsuit campaign against Android is over. The patent holding group (backed by Apple, BlackBerry, Ericsson, Microsoft and Sony) has sold all of its commonly held patents to clearinghouse RPX for $900 million, or a fraction of the $4.5 billion the total patent pool was worth a few years ago. Rockstar will accordingly drop the lawsuits that it still had left, including those leveled against HTC, LG and Samsung. Don't worry that RPX will promptly turn around and sue someone else, either. It already has a deal to license those patents for defensive purposes to a group of 30-plus companies, including Google and Cisco, while the Rockstar companies get to keep their licenses.

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Will A Gorgeous Android Tablet Make Dell A Player?

Filed under
Android

Dell is about to begin selling an eye-poppingly beautiful slab of hardware. Will anyone notice?

Pricing and availability will be announced for the Venue 8 7000 at CES in January, a Dell spokeswoman said in response to an email query. (The tablet had initially been expected for release at the end of November.)

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Campaign promotes open source in Finland’s towns

Filed under
OSS

Municipalities using open source are reaching out to other towns and cities, motivating them to switch to this type of software. The past four months, members of Finland’s Centre for Open Source Solutions (COSS) have been visiting towns around the country, talking about their use of free and open source.

The so-called ‘Open Knowledge Roadshow 2014’ involves six municipalities, Turku, Mikkeli, Pori, Oulu, Tampere and Rovaniemi. Apart from reaching out to their colleagues, the towns of Mikkeli, Oulu and Rovaniemi also organised a workshop, reports COSS on its website.

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Open source now part of Romania’s Digital Agenda

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OSS

All of Romania’s public administrations are to use open source and open standards software. The government is making this a (minute) part of the 2014-2020 Digital Agenda, made public in November. The approach will increase interoperability of ICT systems.

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GNU Binutils 2.25 Released With Port To Andes NDS32

Filed under
GNU

The Binutils 2.25 changes include support for the Andes NDS32 architecture and new --data, --include-all-whitespace, and --dump-section options. Among the changes for GNU ld in Binutils 2.25 is support for the Andes NDS32 architecture, support for the OpenRISC and OR32 has been replaced with the OR1K port. Gas for Binutils 2.25 has support for AVR Tiny micro-controllers, support for the NDS32, and enhanced ARM support. The NDS32 enablement within the GNU stack has been going on for a while with last year GCC seeing a port to this architecture, etc. The NDS32 from Andes Technology is a 32-bit CPU architecture designed for embedded environments using the AndeStar ISA and the SoC processors are marketed under the AndesCore brand.

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2014 Year-End NVIDIA Linux Benchmark Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For this article today, the major driver releases of the year for their mainline driver were benchmarked while ignoring some of the later drivers in each series that just shipped bug-fixes or new kernel / xorg-server support after a new driver series was already in beta or stable. The tested NVIDIA drivers for this article include the 331.38, 334.16, 337.12, 337.19, 340.17, 343.13, 343.22, 346.16, and 346.22 Linux x86_64 drivers. The 331 series was the last driver series from late 2013 for reference. The graphics card used for today's testing was a GeForce GTX 780 Ti (Kepler) graphics card as being a high performance GPU that's compatible with all of the driver releases tested throughout the year.

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Quadcopter drone packs first all-Linux APM autopilot

Filed under
Linux

Erle Robotics launched a ROS-enabled, open source “Erle-brain” autopilot that runs APM directly on Linux. The device also powers an “Erle-copter” drone.

Over the last year, Spanish firm Erle Robotics S.L. has been working with 3DRobotics to develop an open source BeaglePilot autopilot for drones that can run Linux on 3DR’s popular, Arduino-based APM (ArduPilot Mega) platform. The APM Linux port was developed by both companies, as well as several academic institutions. The BeagleBone-based “Erle-brain” autopilot is built into the $490-and-up Erle-copter quadcopter.

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Seven Tips To Get The Most From Your New Android Smartphone

Filed under
Android

With applications able to run in the background and sync as they see fit, Android can rapidly eat through your cellular data allowance if you are not careful. While it’s fine to let the data run free on wi-fi, you’ll want to restrict your data usage when out and about.

Short of switching off mobile data (which defeats the purpose of a smartphone), look under the options in the Data Usage part of the settings. Here you’ll find my wallet’s favourite Android setting of ‘restrict background data’. Now when using cellular data, apps will only pull down data when they are in the foreground and you can see them doing so. If a smartphone is all about being in control, this is the option that gives you confidence.

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today's leftovers

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HowTos
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