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Friday, 23 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2019 - 7:30pm
Story GPD Micro PC: Can a 6-inch Ubuntu Laptop Really Be Usable? Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2019 - 7:17pm
Story 'No Man's Sky Beyond' Just Got Patched For Linux, Even Though It's A Windows-Only PC Game Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2019 - 6:58pm
Story Introducing the XPS 13 developer edition, 9th generation Rianne Schestowitz 9 22/08/2019 - 6:48pm
Story Fedora Switching To The BFQ I/O Scheduler For Better Responsiveness & Throughput Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2019 - 6:45pm
Story Gammy: Adaptive Screen Brightness Tool For Linux Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2019 - 6:42pm
Story Top 3 Video Players for Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2019 - 6:30pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2019 - 5:23pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2019 - 5:15pm
Story Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS 6 Receive Important Kernel Security Update Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2019 - 5:14pm

IBM/Red Hat and Intel Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Hardware
  • Troubleshooting Red Hat OpenShift applications with throwaway containers

    Imagine this scenario: Your cool microservice works fine from your local machine but fails when deployed into your Red Hat OpenShift cluster. You cannot see anything wrong with the code or anything wrong in your services, configuration maps, secrets, and other resources. But, you know something is not right. How do you look at things from the same perspective as your containerized application? How do you compare the runtime environment from your local application with the one from your container?

    If you performed your due diligence, you wrote unit tests. There are no hard-coded configurations or hidden assumptions about the runtime environment. The cause should be related to the configuration your application receives inside OpenShift. Is it time to run your app under a step-by-step debugger or add tons of logging statements to your code?

    We’ll show how two features of the OpenShift command-line client can help: the oc run and oc debug commands.

  • What piece of advice had the greatest impact on your career?

    I love learning the what, why, and how of new open source projects, especially when they gain popularity in the DevOps space. Classification as a "DevOps technology" tends to mean scalable, collaborative systems that go across a broad range of challenges—from message bus to monitoring and back again. There is always something new to explore, install, spin up, and explore.

  • How DevOps is like auto racing

    When I talk about desired outcomes or answer a question about where to get started with any part of a DevOps initiative, I like to mention NASCAR or Formula 1 racing. Crew chiefs for these race teams have a goal: finish in the best place possible with the resources available while overcoming the adversity thrown at you. If the team feels capable, the goal gets moved up a series of levels to holding a trophy at the end of the race.

    To achieve their goals, race teams don’t think from start to finish; they flip the table to look at the race from the end goal to the beginning. They set a goal, a stretch goal, and then work backward from that goal to determine how to get there. Work is delegated to team members to push toward the objectives that will get the team to the desired outcome.

    [...]

    Race teams practice pit stops all week before the race. They do weight training and cardio programs to stay physically ready for the grueling conditions of race day. They are continually collaborating to address any issue that comes up. Software teams should also practice software releases often. If safety systems are in place and practice runs have been going well, they can release to production more frequently. Speed makes things safer in this mindset. It’s not about doing the “right” thing; it’s about addressing as many blockers to the desired outcome (goal) as possible and then collaborating and adjusting based on the real-time feedback that’s observed. Expecting anomalies and working to improve quality and minimize the impact of those anomalies is the expectation of everyone in a DevOps world.

  • Deep Learning Reference Stack v4.0 Now Available

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) continues to represent one of the biggest transformations underway, promising to impact everything from the devices we use to cloud technologies, and reshape infrastructure, even entire industries. Intel is committed to advancing the Deep Learning (DL) workloads that power AI by accelerating enterprise and ecosystem development.

    From our extensive work developing AI solutions, Intel understands how complex it is to create and deploy applications for deep learning workloads. That?s why we developed an integrated Deep Learning Reference Stack, optimized for Intel Xeon Scalable processor and released the companion Data Analytics Reference Stack.

    Today, we?re proud to announce the next Deep Learning Reference Stack release, incorporating customer feedback and delivering an enhanced user experience with support for expanded use cases.

  • Clear Linux Releases Deep Learning Reference Stack 4.0 For Better AI Performance

    Intel's Clear Linux team on Wednesday announced their Deep Learning Reference Stack 4.0 during the Linux Foundation's Open-Source Summit North America event taking place in San Diego.

    Clear Linux's Deep Learning Reference Stack continues to be engineered for showing off the most features and maximum performance for those interested in AI / deep learning and running on Intel Xeon Scalable CPUs. This optimized stack allows developers to more easily get going with a tuned deep learning stack that should already be offering near optimal performance.

11 Best Linux Distro for hacking and programming

Filed under
Development
Linux
Security

When it comes to choosing a Linux distribution for hacking or programming, there are a number of points that you should keep in mind. The operating system should run smoothly on your system, and if you are installing one on your primary computer, you should always go for the one that you know how to use properly.

But using an operating system for more specific purposes like cybersecurity, which I have discussed here, isn’t that straightforward.

Kali Linux is one of the best cybersecurity operating systems, but there are many which offer more streamlined functionalities. I recommend you to try out at least a few of the most intriguing Kali Linux alternatives I have discussed here before you finally make your decision.
So that was my list of top 10 Kali Linux alternatives, that is worth your time. Do you have anything to add? Feel free to comment on the same down below.

Read more

Linux Foundation Initiatives for or With Involvement of IBM and Intel

  • IBM OpenPOWER to Join Open Source Linux Foundation

    IBM has announced it was contributing the instruction set (ISA) for its Power microprocessor and the designs for the Open Coherent Accelerator Processor.

  • IBM joins Linux Foundation AI to promote open source trusted AI workflows

    "AI, as it matures, needs to mature in a way that is something that the general public can put their confidence and trust in," Todd Moore, IBM's VP of Open Technology, told ZDNet. "Too often, what we hear is the AI is a black box, they don't understand how it got to its results, there's bias in the models, there needs to be more fairness... We've heard that loud and clear, and we felt it was time to help the industry move forward."

  • Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat Open Source Tools for 'Confidential Computing'

    Members of the Linux Foundation, including Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent, will start promoting the use of Trusted Execution Environments (TEEs), also called secure enclaves, for both cloud computing and PC applications.

    The participants in the newly formed group, called the Confidential Computing Consortium, plan to make open source multiple projects related to securing data in use. Intel will open source the SDK for its Software Guard Extension (SGX) chip feature.
    The SGX solution protects sensitive code and data of an application from being stolen or modified by malicious actors that may have taken over the operating system or virtual machine. Applications such as the end-to-end encrypted messenger Signal use SGX for private contact discovery without the need for the server to store users’ contacts in plaintext and unprotected.
    Microsoft also contributed the Open Enclave SDK, a framework for building app enclaves that work across various Trusted Execution Environment (TEE) architectures to the CCC. Each application that uses the Open Enclave SDK can be split into two components, an untrusted one that runs on the untrusted operating systems and a trusted one that’s protected from operating system malware.

Akaunting: a web-based accounting system

Filed under
Software
Reviews

One of these years, LWN will have a new accounting system based on free software. That transition has not yet happened, though, despite the expending of a fair amount of energy into researching alternatives. Your editor recently became aware of a system called Akaunting, so a look seemed worthwhile. This tool may have the features that some users want, but it seems clear that your editor's quest is not done yet.

As an aside, additional motivation for this effort came in the form of an essentially forced upgrade to QuickBooks 2019 — something that QuickBooks users have learned to expect and dread. There appear to be no new features of interest in this release, but it does offer a newly crippled data import mechanism and routine corruption of its database. If your editor didn't know better, he might just conclude that proprietary software is buggy, unreliable, and unfixable.

[...]

The system is written in PHP and JavaScript; the code is licensed under GPLv3. Akaunting is able to use MySQL, PostgreSQL, or SQLite to store the actual data. It is, as one might expect given the implementation languages, designed to run as a web application; one can install it on a handy machine, but Akaunting (the company) also offers to host accounts free of charge on its own servers. The company promises "we cover it, for free, forever" — a pretty big promise for a free-software startup with a minimal track record.

Read more

GNOME 3.33.91 released

Filed under
GNOME

Hi developers,

GNOME 3.33.91 is now available. This is the second beta version towards 3.34.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.33.3, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot:

https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.33.91/gnome-3.33.91.tar.xz

The list of updated modules and changes is available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.91/NEWS

The source packages are available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.91/sources/

WARNING!
--------
This release is a snapshot of development code. Although it is
buildable and usable, it is primarily intended for testing and hacking
purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development
status.

For more information about 3.33, and the full schedule, please see our
3.33 wiki page:

https://www.gnome.org/start/unstable

Cheers,

Abderrahim Kitouni
GNOME Release Team

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.34 Beta 2 Brings Last Minute Improvements To GNOME Shell, Mutter & Friends

How To Share Files Anonymously And Securely: Linux Alternatives to Google Drive

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

The ability to share files regardless of the physical distance and almost instantaneously is one of the greatest characteristics of the Internet. With 4.3 billion Internet users at the beginning of 2019, the amount of data transferred over the Web is almost unimaginable.

But not all file-sharing services are created equal. In the era where personal data is the most valuable currency we can spend, it is important to ensure we send files over the Internet in a secure and anonymous way.

Read to find out why mainstream file-sharing services are not your best bet and how to pick an alternative solution.

Read more

The Release of Raspberry Pi 4: What Does It Mean to You

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The release of Raspberry Pi 4 has been met with much enthusiasm from developers and tech enthusiasts. Since it is a major upgrade from Raspberry Pi 3B+, some are already pronouncing the long-anticipated model as the greatest single-board computer (SBC) ever.

However, a lot of it has to do with hype, as the dazzling features of Raspberry Pi 4 have been available with other SBC boards for quite some time. Whether it is video HDMI, a powerful processor or USB 3.0 ports, it is clear that Raspberry Pi arrived pretty late on the scene.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: mintCast, TLLTS, BSD Now, Choose Linux and Matt Layman

Filed under
Interviews
  • mintCast 315.5 – On OggCamp with Les and Dan

    In the second half, we interview Dan and Les about OggCamp and get more than we bargained for.

    Then, in our security update, we talk about how Chrome’s Incognito mode can be detected.

    Finally, we share feedback and point out a few things we found interesting this fortnight.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 822
  • Why Package Managers | BSD Now 312

    Valuable research is often hindered or outright prevented by the inability to install software. This need not be the case.

  • PCLinuxOS + Hugo | Choose Linux 16

    We check out a great tool for learning web development basics, and Distrohoppers brings us mixed experiences.

    Plus which of the 10 commandments for Linux users we agree with.

  • Celery In A Shiv App - Building SaaS #31

    In this episode, we baked the Celery worker and beat scheduler tool into the Shiv app. This is one more step on the path to simplifying the set of tools on the production server.

    I started the stream by reviewing the refactoring that I did to conductor/main.py. The main file is used to dispatch to different tools with the Shiv bundle.

How the Linux desktop has grown

Filed under
Linux

I first installed Linux in 1993. At that time, you really didn't have many options for installing the operating system. In those early days, many people simply copied a running image from someone else. Then someone had the neat idea to create a "distribution" of Linux that let you customize what software you wanted to install. That was the Softlanding Linux System (SLS) and my first introduction to Linux.

My '386 PC didn't have much memory, but it was enough. SLS 1.03 required 2MB of memory to run, or 4MB if you wanted to compile programs. If you wanted to run the X Window System, you needed a whopping 8MB of memory. And my PC had just enough memory to run X.

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Intel's New OpenGL Driver Is Looking Really Great With The Upcoming Mesa 19.2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel's new open-source OpenGL Linux driver "Iris" Gallium3D that has been in development for the past two years or so is getting ready to enter the limelight. Months ago they talked of plans to have it ready to become their default OpenGL driver by the end of the calendar year and with the state of Mesa 19.2 it's looking like that goal can be realized in time. With our new tests of this driver, in most games and other graphics applications the performance of this Gallium3D driver is now beyond that of their "classic" i965 Mesa driver.

Over the past year we've been looking a lot at the Intel Gallium3D performance and it's been a remarkable journey from the performance starting out well below their decade old OpenGL driver to now mostly exceeding that classic Mesa driver and often times by wide margins. The Intel Gallium3D driver is also largely now to feature parity in terms of OpenGL extensions and other capabilities. With all of their bases covered, this summer for the upcoming Mesa 19.2 release we've been seeing a lot of performance optimizations land. Back in April is when they indicated they hope to have it become the default by end of year 2019 and viable by Mesa 19.2.

Read more

OSS: OpenSMTPD, Connexta, Square and Google

Filed under
OSS
  • FLOSS Weekly 543: OpenSMTPD

    OpenSMTPD is a FREE implementation of the server-side SMTP protocol as defined by RFC 5321, with some additional standard extensions. It allows ordinary machines to exchange emails with other systems speaking the SMTP protocol.

  • Octo Acquires Connexta to Enhance Open Source Software Development Capabilities

    Octo, a premier provider of next-generation services for the Federal market, today announced its acquisition of Connexta, a Phoenix, Arizona-based global leader in open source software development and secure discovery solutions for government and commercial customers

  • Square Crypto’s Open Source Endeavor, Fostering Bitcoin Development will Witness Matt Corallo On Board

    Square, Inc. is a mobile payment company based in San Francisco, California. The company markets software and hardware payments products and has expanded into business services. Square Crypto the division of parent company Square, Inc. is a payments solutions provider and focuses on open source Bitcoin development.

    Jack Dorsey, CEO of the Square, Inc. foresees a bullish vehement regarding the acceptance of Bitcoins and the urge to conceptualize Bitcoin as a utopia invigorates the formation of this new team which will be headed by Steve Lee, a former director at Google and Matt Corallo as the first development engineer.

  • Google open-sources gesture tracking AI for mobile devices

    Real-time hand shape and motion trackers are an invaluable part of sign language recognition and gesture control systems, not to mention a number of augmented reality experiences. But they’re often hobbled by occlusion and a lack of contrast patterns, preventing them from performing reliably or robustly.

    Those challenges and others motivated scientists at Google to investigate a new computer vision approach to hand perception — one bolstered by machine learning. They say that in experiments, it managed to infer up to 21 3D points of a hand (or multiple hands) on a mobile phone from just a single frame.

Open Source platforms to now help students

Filed under
OSS

The technical institutes in the State are now asked to use free and open-source software developed by a team, headed by the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD). The MHRD has also promoted their FOSSEE (Free and Open Source Software for Education) projects which uses tools so that students can easily use them.

Recently, the MHRD made a decision that FOSSEE should be promoted amongst the student community so they can aim at reducing dependency on proprietary software in educational institutions. The MHRD Minister Ramesh Pokhriyal Nishank too took to twitter urging students to use FLOSS tools in various languages to meet academic and research requirements.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • A guided tour of Linux file system types

    While it may not be obvious to the casual user, Linux file systems have evolved significantly over the last decade or so to make them more resistant to corruption and performance problems.

    Most Linux systems today use a file system type called ext4. The “ext” part stands for “extended” and the 4 indicates that this is the 4th generation of this file system type. Features added over time include the ability to provide increasingly larger file systems (currently as large as 1,000,000 TiB) and much larger files (up to 16 TiB), more resistance to system crashes and less fragmentation (scattering single files as chunks in multiple locations) which improves performance.

  • Testing the Linux Malware Detect.
  • Kushal Das: Remember to mark drive as removable for tails vm install

    If you are installing Tails into a VM for testing or anything else, always remember to mark the drive as a removable USB drive. Otherwise, the installation step will finish properly, but, you will get errors like the following screenshot while booting from the drive.

  • How to Set DNS Nameservers on Ubuntu 18.04

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • NSA Researchers Talk Development, Release of Ghidra SRE Tool

    The National Security Agency released its classified Ghidra software reverse-engineering (SRE) tool as open source to the cybersecurity community on April 4. NSA researchers Brian Knighton and Chris Delikat shared how Ghidra was built and the process of releasing it at Black Hat 2019. Ghidra is a framework developed by the NSA’s Research Directorate for the agency’s cybersecurity mission. It’s designed to analyze malicious code to give security pros a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities in their networks and systems.

  • Linux Is Being Hit with Zero-Day Exploits/ Zero-Day Attacks [Ed: This is not news. If you have a system that is unpatched for months, despite many warnings, it is a risk, no matter the OS/kernel.]

    It was once the popular opinion that Linux was immune to zero-day exploits. However, even before the Equifax exploit, vulnerabilities were found in Linux distributions like Fedora and Ubuntu. In particular, back in 2016, a security researcher discovered that you could exploit a Linux system by playing a specific music file. Then, in 2017, a group of attackers used Struckshock vulnerability to carry on the attack on Equifax. These zero-day attacks are Advanced Persistent Attacks that exploit recently discovered vulnerabilities. Read on to learn more about what are zero-day exploits and how they can affect a Linux system.

  • Intel, Google, Microsoft, and Others Launch Confidential Computing Consortium for Data Security

    Major tech companies including Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Google Cloud, Microsoft, and Red Hat today announced intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium to improve security for data in use.

  • Intel, Google, Microsoft, and others launch Confidential Computing Consortium for data security

    Major tech companies including Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Google Cloud, Microsoft, and Red Hat today announced intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium to improve security for data in use. Established by the Linux Foundation, the organization plans to bring together hardware vendors, developers, open source experts, and others to promote the use of confidential computing, advance common open source standards, and better protect data.

    “Confidential computing focuses on securing data in use. Current approaches to securing data often address data at rest (storage) and in transit (network), but encrypting data in use is possibly the most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data,” the Linux Foundation said today in a joint statement. “Confidential computing will enable encrypted data to be processed in memory without exposing it to the rest of the system and reduce exposure for sensitive data and provide greater control and transparency for users.”

Linux-driven modules to showcase new MediaTek AIoT SoCs

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

Innocomm is prepping an “SB30 SoM” with the new quad -A35 MediaTek i300 followed by an “SB50 SoM” with an AI-equipped, octa-core -A73 and -A53 MediaTek i500. Both modules ship with Linux/Android evaluation kits.

Innocomm, which has produced NXP-based compute modules such as the i.MX8M Mini driven WB15 and i.MX8M powered WB10, will soon try on some MediaTek SoCs for size. First up is an SB30 SoM due to launch in October that will run Linux or Android on MediaTek’s 1.5GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A35 based MediaTek i300 (MT8362) SoC. In November, the company plans to introduce an SB50 SoM based on the MediaTek i500 (MT8385).

Read more

Devices: Raspberry Pi and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
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More in Tux Machines

The lifecycle of Linux kernel testing

In Continuous integration testing for the Linux kernel, I wrote about the Continuous Kernel Integration (CKI) project and its mission to change how kernel developers and maintainers work. This article is a deep dive into some of the more technical aspects of the project and how all the pieces fit together. Every exciting feature, improvement, and bug in the kernel starts with a change proposed by a developer. These changes appear on myriad mailing lists for different kernel repositories. Some repositories focus on certain subsystems in the kernel, such as storage or networking, while others focus on broad aspects of the kernel. The CKI project springs into action when developers propose a change, or patchset, to the kernel or when a maintainer makes changes in the repository itself. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's howtos and leftovers

  • Making Sink(ed) contacts accessible to Plasma-Phonebook App
  • How to Delete MySQL Users Accounts
  • How to sync Google Contacts with Thunderbird
  • How to set the GNOME idle delay from the command line
  • Four Apollo Lake Pico-ITX SBCs start at $245 in single units

    Logic Supply has launched four Ubuntu-ready “EPM16x” Pico-ITX SBCs with Apollo Lake SoCs starting at $245. The $426 and up EPM163 has a Pentium N4200, 4GB LPDDR4, 64GB eMMC, mSATA, mini-PCIe, and 2x each of GbE, DP, and USB 3.0. We’ve reported on over a dozen Linux-friendly Pico-ITX boards with Intel Apollo Lake processors over the last few years, including most recently, Axiomtek’s PICO319 and IEI’s Hyper-AL. Yet, as some of our readers have complained, they are rarely announced with ship dates or prices, and if they are, they usually list only volume pricing.

  • Huawei Covers Android Gap with IoT OS

    If you’ve been watching the smartphone world, you may know of Huawei’s problems with the United States. Huawei has had a spotty history of spying on American technology, to the point where Huawei products have been banned from being sold in the US. Huawei responded by saying they would very much like to continue relations with Android and have been hoping they get a second chance with the technology giant. They have stated, however, that if they are officially cut off from Android, they would make their own OS.

  • Gaurav Agrawal: Google Summer of Code 2019 FINAL REPORT

    My Google Summer of Code (GSOC) project was focused on “Implementing split view” in gnome-gitg. This blog posts serves as my final submission to my Google Summer of Code project.

  • Command Line Heroes season 3, episode 5: The Infrastructure Effect: COBOL and Go

    Languages used for IT infrastructure don't have expiration dates. COBOL's been around for 60 years - and isn't going anywhere anytime soon. We maintain billions of lines of classic code for mainframes. But we're also building new infrastructures for the cloud in languages like Go.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E20 – Outrun

    This week we’ve been experimenting with lean podcasting and playing Roguelikes. We discuss what goes on at a Canonical Roadmap Sprint, bring you some command line love and go over all your feedback. It’s Season 12 Episode 20 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Stuart Langridge are connected and speaking to your brain.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open-Source Project Unveils Detailed Road Map for New Mainnet

    An open-source project that aims to create a smart economy based on blockchain technology has unveiled a new program designed to fuel its ecosystem’s growth — while setting out a detailed road map for its new mainnet. Neo says its EcoBoost scheme has been designed to support developers and projects that are already in its ecosystem, as well as those that wish to join. A total of $100 million has been allocated to the initiative — and in the first phase, the firm is seeking to establish long-term partnerships that will fuel the organic growth of its network. Media outlets, exchanges, decentralized application (DApp) distribution platforms and other blockchain infrastructures are being encouraged to express an interest in becoming an EcoBoost Partner, and Neo says it has already received numerous applications from “leading institutions and projects in the industry.”

  • Square Crypto Hires Blockstream Co-Founder, Open Source Bitcoin Dev

    Square Crypto announced on Twitter that they have hired Matt Corallo, Bitcoin software developer and co-founder of Blockstream.

  • 5 Arenas Where Open Source is the Undisputed Champion

    Open source software has come of age. It has now reached a level of maturity and capability where it simply cannot be ignored. Recent research[1] suggests that 82 percent of large organizations are more receptive to open source than they were five years ago and that C-level IT executives are now most likely to prefer an open source solution over proprietary alternatives. Over the years, everyone’s confidence and trust in open source software has been steadily growing. We’ve now reached the point where open source is the dominant player in many of the key technology trends shaping our world. [...] It’s widely acknowledged that Linux is the power behind the vast majority of public internet servers and that Unix-like operating systems are being used by about 70 percent of all web servers, with Linux taking the lion’s share. Why is that important?  Because even though we pay them little thought or attention, web and internet servers are responsible for stitching together the digital fabric that most of us rely on for communications and services every day. [...] There’s no denying that open source is here to stay.  I’ve been working with open source for almost a decade now and over that time I’ve seen how quickly open source solutions have taken off, gained acceptance and become the front runner is so many areas.

  • U-Boot Has Been Seeing Better x86 Support, EFI Improvements

    Google's Simon Glass who is part of the Chromium / Chrome OS team presented at this week's Embedded Linux Conference in San Diego on U-Boot.  U-Boot continues making good progress particularly on the embedded front for where this bootloader is most well known, but it's also been seeing increasing x86 support. Currently U-Boot supports around 10 different Intel SoCs and can handle booting from Coreboot on most boards. Intel Apollolake support is forthcoming to U-Boot. Additionally, FSP2 support for the newer version of Intel's firmware support package is being worked on for U-Boot. Also new on U-Boot's x86 front is slimbootloader support. 

  • Dustin J. Mitchell: Outreachy Round 20

    Outreachy is a program that provides paid internships working on FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) to applicants from around the world. Internships are three months long and involve deep, technical work on a mentor-selected project, guided by mentors and other developers working on the FOSS application. At Mozilla, projects include work on Firefox itself, development of associated services and sites like Taskcluster and Treeherder, and analysis of Firefox telemetry data from a data-science perspective. The program has an explicit focus on diversity: “Anyone who faces under-representation, systemic bias, or discrimination in the technology industry of their country is invited to apply.” It’s a small but very effective step in achieving better representation in this field. One of the interesting side-effects is that the program sees a number of career-changing participants. These people bring a wealth of interesting and valuable perspectives, but face challenges in a field where many have been programming since they were young.

  • AI open source leader H2O.ai secures funding worth $72.5 million

    Over the past couple of years, the Silicone-based company has raised a total of $147 million. Since its founding, H2O.ai has gone through a series of funding including its seed round in 2013. In 2017, it saw one of its biggest growth after a Series C funding that raised $75 million. Wells Fargo and NVIDIA led the funding with their $40 million investment. Other participants included Crane Venture Partners, New York Life, Transamerica Ventures, and Nexus Venture Partners.