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Sunday, 19 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security: PeopleSoft, DJI, IoT, Amazon, Microsoft, ​Google, Ad Blocking and Codewarz Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2017 - 5:44pm
Story KVM & Xen Don't Change Much With Linux 4.15 Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2017 - 5:20pm
Story Software: Wpm, Wanna, Atelier, Narabu Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2017 - 5:14pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2017 - 5:10pm
Story Linux 4.15, Linux 4.16, and Linux Foundation's CNCF and CII Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2017 - 1:01pm
Story Linux World Domination and Microsoft Corruption in Munich Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2017 - 12:54pm
Story Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2017 - 12:51pm
Story Graphics: AMDGPU, Radeon, Intel DRM Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2017 - 12:34pm
Story Raspberry Digital Signage 10 Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2017 - 12:32pm
Story Red Hat Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2017 - 12:20pm

KDE: KDE Applications 17.12, Akademy 2018, KDE Binary Factory

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Applications 17.12 Sees Some New KF5 Ports, Other Apps Dropped

    The beta of KDE Applications 17.12 is now available ahead of next month's official debut for this quarterly update to the collection of official KDE programs.

    As previously covered, 17.12 is the point where only Qt5 / KDE Frameworks 5 apps will be included and any programs depending upon the older Qt4/KDE4 components will be dropped.

  • Applications 17.12 Pre-Beta available for testing with KDE neon Developer Stable branch edition

    Please join us in testing 17.12 pre-beta of KDE applications!

  • Akademy 2018 - Vienna, Austria - 11-17 August

    Vienna Calling! This is not only a song by the famous austrian singer Falco, but could also the motto for next years Akademy.

    In 2018 Akademy will be held at the University of Technology (TU Wien) in Vienna, Austria, from Saturday 11th to Friday 17th August.

    The conference is expected to draw hundreds of attendees from the global KDE Community to discuss and plan the future of the Community and its technology. Many participants from the broad free and open source software community, local organizations and software companies will also attend.

    Akademy 2018 is being organized together with Fachschaft Informatik (FSINF). Apart from representing and counseling computer science students, they engage in diverse political topics e.g. FOSS, Privacy and social justice.

  • CI for Windows installer and macOS bundle generation: KDE Binary Factory

    For some time now the KDE community has had a separate Continuous Integration system running which repeatedly generates Windows installers and macOS app bundles (DMG) for a specific subset of KDE projects.

  • /

Security: Google, Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), Quad9 and More

Filed under
Security
  • Google investigators find hackers swipe nearly 250,000 passwords a week

    Hackers are constantly trying to break into Google accounts, so Google researchers spent a year tracing how hackers steal passwords and expose them on the internet's black market.

    To gather hard evidence about the tools hackers use to swipe passwords, Google collaborated with University of California Berkeley cybersecurity experts to track activity on some of these markets. On Thursday, they published their results.

  • Time Will Tell if the New Vulnerabilities Equities Process Is a Step Forward for Transparency

    The White House has released a new and apparently improved Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), showing signs that there will be more transparency into the government’s knowledge and use of zero day vulnerabilities. In recent years, the U.S. intelligence community has faced questions about whether it “stockpiles” vulnerabilities rather than disclosing them to affected companies or organizations, and this scrutiny has only ramped up after groups like the Shadow Brokers have leaked powerful government exploits. According to White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Rob Joyce, the form of yesterday’s release and the revised policy itself are intended to highlight the government’s commitment to transparency because it’s “the right thing to do.”

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Quad9 Secure DNS Service Embeds IBM Security Intelligence
  • New “Quad9” DNS service blocks malicious domains for everyone

    The Global Cyber Alliance (GCA)—an organization founded by law enforcement and research organizations to help reduce cyber-crime—has partnered with IBM and Packet Clearing House to launch a free public Domain Name Service system. That system is intended to block domains associated with botnets, phishing attacks, and other malicious Internet hosts—primarily targeted at organizations that don't run their own DNS blacklisting and whitelisting services. Called Quad9 (after the 9.9.9.9 Internet Protocol address the service has obtained), the service works like any other public DNS server (such as Google's), except that it won't return name resolutions for sites that are identified via threat feeds the service aggregates daily.

  • The Internet of Shit is so manifestly insecure that people are staying away from it in droves
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • [Ubuntu] Security Team Weekly Summary: November 16, 2017
  • Hacking Blockchain with Smart Contracts to Control a Botnet

    Blockchain has been hailed by some in the technology industry as a potential method to help improve cyber security. However, security researcher Majid Malaika warns that Blockchain can potentially be abused to enable a new form of botnet that would be very difficult to take down.

    Malaika detailed his Blockchain-powered botnet in a session at the SecTor security conference on Nov. 15. The overall attack method has been dubbed "Botract" by Malaika, as it abuses inherent functionality in the smart contracts that help to enable Blockchain.

  • What Can The Philosophy of Unix Teach Us About Security?

Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • R600 Gallium3D Shader Image Support Lands, Other R600g Patches Pending

    As a follow-up to OpenGL 4.2 Support Could Soon Land For AMD Cayman GPUs On R600g, the patches have landed in Mesa 17.4-dev Git! Plus other R600g patches are on the mailing list for review.

    These shader image support patches for R600g expose OpenGL's ARB_shader_image_size and ARB_shader_image_load_store for Radeon HD 5000/6000 series. In the process, this ends up taking Radeon HD 6900 "Cayman" GPUs to having OpenGL 4.2 compliance from 4.1 with the shader image support having been the last blocker. Other GPUs on R600g remain at OpenGL 3.3 due to lacking FP64 support, as outlined more extensively in that previous article.

  • GeForce GTX 900 Series Re-Clocking Patches Updated By Karol Herbst

    Frequent Nouveau open-source NVIDIA driver contributor Karol Herbst has posted his latest patch series in working towards GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell 2" graphics processor re-clocking.

  • 25 More AMDGPU DC Patches, Mostly Focused On Raven DCN

    DCN in this context is for current the DCN 1.0 Raven Ridge family of display engines. The just-launched Vega+Zen APUs feature a new display engine and that's what this DCN code is for, which is also under a separate Kconfig tunable from the rest of AMDGPU DC.

Development of Linux 4.15

Filed under
Development
Linux
  • Broadcom Hurricane 2 & Allwinner R40 Supported By Linux 4.15

    More ARM platform upstreaming has taken place for the Linux 4.15 kernel development cycle among other ARM hardware improvements.

  • Intel Coffee Lake & Cannonlake Thermal Support In Linux 4.15

    While Intel Coffee Lake hardware is shipping already, a few bits of tardy kernel code for these "8th Gen Core" CPUs is only hitting the Linux 4.15 kernel. The Intel DRM driver is most notably enabling Coffee Lake graphics by default in 4.15, but there's also some thermal code now landing among other changes now happening.

    Zhang Rui sent in the thermal updates for Linux 4.15 on Thursday and they include late additions for Coffee Lake but at the same time the relevant additions for Cannonlake that will be shipping in 2018 as the next-gen Intel CPUs.

  • AMDGPU DC Pull Request Submitted For Linux 4.15 Kernel - 132,395 Lines Of Code

    One day after submitting the main DRM feature pull request for Linux 4.15, David Airlie of Red Hat has submitted the secondary pull request that would feature the long-awaited introduction of AMDGPU DC into the mainline kernel.

Red Hat: OpenShift Container Platform, CTICC, Quote-to-Cash

Filed under
Red Hat

Kubuntu 17.10 review - Hello darkness my old friend

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

This must be one of the worst Kubuntu releases I've tried in a long time. Part of the fault lies with the parent distro, and the heartless switch to Gnome, which just shows that the passion to making Ubuntu an important desktop player is gone. This is just inertia and apathy. Still, there's so much wrong with Kubuntu on its own that I feel like a total fool for investing my time in this effort. And it also proves that there is only one good release for every three, showing that distro teams are overstretched roughly by 300%. The whole fast-release bullshit is just the modern-era agile-crap nonsense. It helps no one. Shitty products serve no purpose. Being fast for the sake of it is like running head first into an industrial blender to have your outstretched arms finely chopped by spinning blades.

Kubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark makes me sad. Makes me angry. Zesty was one of the finest distros ever created. This is one of the worst. That makes no sense. How can it be? Where's the modicum of care and diligence to ensure this kind of stuff does not happen? Application crashes, kernel crashes, media bugs, weird artifacts. Horrible.

My suggestion is not to upgrade for now. And even then, the foundation of your sanity is shaken. Come the upgrade, you do not know what will happen. You're hostage to arbitrary code decisions. There's no peace and stability in the Linux desktop. You will always have to dread the update process, not knowing what will break next. That is the essence of amateurism. And I'm right there, advocating Plasma and Kubuntu like the biggest of fools in this universe. Anyway, for the sake of public sacrifice, I'll also check 17.10 in-vivo upgrades on other machines, but my expectations are low. Aardvark gets 4/10. Don't bother for now, give it six months for the bugs to be fixed before a new release erases the slate and the cycle of depression starts again.

Read more

Also: First Look At Linux Mint 18.3 Sylvia Beta

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

HTC U11 Life (Android One) review: Keep it simple

Filed under
Reviews

Android One has arrived in Europe, and HTC is one of the first manufacturers to ship an affordable, Google-branded phone. The Android One badge made its debut in India and parts of Asia, as Google emphasized quality software on super-cheap hardware. But with its latest round of "One" handsets, the prices are higher, the products more premium, and the hand on the software rudder a little firmer.

The Android One U11 Life — unlike the T-Mobile U.S. version we reviewed separately, running HTC Sense — runs Android 8.0 Oreo out of the box, and comes with the promise of timely updates to future versions. It takes the fundamentals of HTC's flagship phone and downscales it into a smaller size, while trimming the specs back to the essentials.

There's a Snapdragon 630 processor — Qualcomm's latest mid-ranger, and the successor to the very capable 625/626 — along with 3GB or 4GB of RAM, and 32 or 64GB of storage, plus microSD. I've been using the 3/32GB model for the past couple of weeks, however the UK will be getting the more capacious 4/64GB model when it goes on sale.

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The power of open source: Why GitLab's move to a Developer Certificate of Origin benefits the developer community

Filed under
OSS

Over the past few years, open source software has transformed the way enterprises operate and ship code. In an era where companies are striving to deliver the next best application, enterprises are turning to the sea of open source contributors to create projects faster and more effectively than ever before. For instance, 65 percent of companies surveyed in The Black Duck Future of Open Source Survey reveal they are contributing to open source projects – with 59 percent doing so to gain a competitive edge. As open source continues to have a positive influence on software development, it’s important for developers to continue to participate in and contribute to open source projects.

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Linux File-System Benchmarks On The Intel Optane 900P SSD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this week I presented out initial Linux benchmarks of the Intel Optane 900P SSD with this 3D XPoint memory U.2 solid-state drive delivering incredible performance figures. Those tests were done with EXT4 while in this article are more tests with other mainline Linux file-systems and also testing some of the different mount options.

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Software taking over, but hardware still has a role: Linux expert

Filed under
Linux

Matthias Eckermann (below, right), director of product management for SUSE Linux Enterprise at the the Nuremberg-based company, said in response to queries from iTWire that software-defined infrastructure would bring about a change in existing business processes, and allow new business processes to be implemented.

But he said this did not necessarily mean that hardware businesses were staring down the barrel at extinction.

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5 open source fonts ideal for programming

Filed under
OSS

What is the best programming font? First, you need to consider that not all fonts are created equally. When choosing a font for casual reading, the reader expects the letters to smoothly flow into one another, giving an easy and enjoyable experience. A single character for a standard font is akin to puzzle piece designed to carefully mesh with every other part of the overall typeface.

When writing code, however, your font requirements are typically more functional in nature. This is why most programmers prefer to use monospaced fonts with fixed-width letters, when given the option. Selecting a font that has distinguishable numbers and punctuation, is aesthetically pleasing, and has a copyright license that meets your needs is also important.

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Firefox Quantum Now Rolling Out to All Ubuntu Linux Users, Update Now

Filed under
Moz/FF

It didn't take long, and just two days after its official launch, the Mozilla Firefox Quantum web browser (version 57.0) landed today in the stable software repositories of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr).

Firefox 57.0 a.k.a. Firefox Quantum is Mozilla's latest and greatest web browser, offering speeds twice as fast as of previous releases, thanks to the implementation of an all-new Photon browsing engine that's capable of leveraging the full potential of your personal computer, as well as a brand-new interface.

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GNU/Linux Laptops for Developers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 5 New & Powerful Dell Linux Machines You Can Buy Right Now

    The land of powerful PCs and workstations isn’t barren anymore when we talk about Linux-powered machines; even all of the world’s top 500 supercomputers now run Linux.

    Dell has joined hands with Canonical Inc. to give Linux-powered machines a push in the market. They have launched five new Canonical-certified workstations running Ubuntu Linux out-of-the-box as a part of the Dell Precision series. An advantage of buying these canonical-certified machines is that the users won’t have to worry about incompatibility with Linux.

  • How to set up a Pixelbook for programming

    The beauty of Chrome OS is that most of the "state" of your system is in the cloud, attached to your Google Account, but if you have any local documents those will be gone. This is because Developer Mode basically destroys the physically secure design of Chrome OS. Now you're in Linux land, and local security is your job, not Google's.

    Every time you boot up now, you'll have the option to press Space bar and wipe the system again and return to the safety of vanilla Chrome OS. Press Ctrl-D to continue into the unknown.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Graphics: Intel, Mesa, Wayland and Bosch

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel's Mesa GLSL Shader Cache Is Speeding Up Game Load Times

    At the start of the month the Intel i965 Mesa driver finally landed its on-disk shader cache, months after the GLSL on-disk shader cache originally landed in core Mesa and wired up for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. While you can't play too many shader-heavy games with current Intel integrated graphics, this GLSL shader cache within Mesa 17.4-dev Git is working well for speeding up load times and does provide some frame-rate benefits in games dynamically loading shaders.

  • Bosch Has Been Developing A 3D Window Manager Using Wayland

    In what appears to be research for potential use within in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems, Bosch in conjunction with other organizations has been developing a 3D window manager that's built atop Wayland/Weston.

    Wayland is already used within automobiles for IVI purposes, etc, but this is the first we're seeing at least publicly of creating a 3D window manager around it. Harsha Manjula Mallikarjun of Bosch has talked about their work in developing a middleware framework for a 3D window manager that is making use of Wayland's Weston library, libweston. The window manager maps client buffers to 3D shapes like cubes and cylinders.

  • MESA_program_binary_formats Added To The OpenGL Registry

    Intel developers have seen their MESA_program_binary_formats extension added to the official OpenGL registry.

    The extension is really quite simple and just documents the unique format designator to be used by Mesa for ARB_get_program_binary/OES_get_program_binary extensions. Overnight it was merged into the OpenGL Registry.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers