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Friday, 20 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Openwashing Cars Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2018 - 4:23pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2018 - 8:57am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2018 - 8:47am
Story Debian Milestones and Diversity Update Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2018 - 8:45am
Story Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Beta 2, Replacement for gksu Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2018 - 8:43am
Story Devices: Aaeon, Tizen and Android Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2018 - 8:42am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2018 - 8:40am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 20/04/2018 - 8:38am
Story 3-D Printing and Open Hardware Roy Schestowitz 20/04/2018 - 8:35am
Story Mozilla's large repository of voice data will shape the future of machine learning Rianne Schestowitz 20/04/2018 - 8:32am

Nix This Innovative OS for Its Uninviting Complexity

Filed under
OS
Reviews

I had to keep reminding myself that I was not dealing with an extreme case of Arch Linux instead of GNU/Linux. NixOS is more demanding and definitely not a distro for users with anything less than advanced skills.

To say NixOS comes with a steep learning curve and lots of hands-on overhead is putting it mildly. If you are a typical Linux user who lacks sysadmin training, avoid NixOS like a malware attack hiding in plain sight.

Read more

Riot: A Distributed Way of Having IRC and VOIP Client and Home Server

Filed under
Software

Riot is a free and open source decentralized instant messaging application that can be considered an alternative to Slack. Take a look at features of Riot, installation procedure and usage.
Read more

KDE’s New Elisa Music Player: So Close, Yet So Far Away

Filed under
Reviews

KDE is a working on a new music player called Elisa. Can Elisa become the new default music player in most Linux distributions? Find out in this review of Elisa music player.
Read more

Collabora Online 3.2 released

Filed under
LibO

Collabora Productivity, the driving force behind putting LibreOffice in the Cloud, is excited to announce a new release of its flagship enterprise-ready cloud document suite – Collabora Online 3.2, with new features and multiple improvements.

Read more

Calamares Pinebook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

But there is an under-appreciated bit regarding images for an ARM laptop — or pre-installed Linux distro’s in general. And that’s the first-run experience. The Netrunner Pinebook image is delivered so that it boots to the Plasma 5 desktop, no passwords asked, etc. The user is called “live”, the password is “live”, and nothing is personalized. It’s possible, though not particularly secure, to use the laptop this way in a truly disposable fashion. A first-run application helps finalize the configuration of the device by creating a named user, among other things.

One of the under-documented features of Calamares is that it can operate as a first-run application as well as a system installer. This is called “OEM Mode“, because it’s of greatest interest to OEMs .. but also to distro’s that ship an image for users to flash onto (micro)SD card for use in a device.

Read more

MySQL 8.0 Released With Many Improvements, Faster Performance

Filed under
Server

It's a busy day in the software and hardware space today as well as a busy week for Oracle with several big releases this week. The latest is the general availability of the long-awaited MySQL 8.0 update.

MySQL 8.0 is a very significant update over the MySQL 5.7 series. MySQL 8.0 features a transactional data dictionary, a new document store with NoSQL support, and up to twice as fast MySQL database performance compared to version 5.7.

Read more

Direct: MySQL 8.0: Up to 2x Faster

Stable kernels 4.16.3, 4.15.18 and 4.14.35

Filed under
Linux

ExTiX 18.4 – “The Ultimate Linux System” – with LXQt 0.12.0, Refracta Tools, Calamares Installer and kernel 4.16.2-exton – Build 180419

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I have made a new version of ExTiX – The Ultimate Linux System. I call it ExTiX 18.4 LXQt Live DVD. (The previous version was 17.8 from 171012).

Read more

Migrating to Linux: Network and System Settings

Filed under
HowTos

Linux gives you a lot of control over network and system settings. On your desktop, Linux lets you tweak just about anything on the system. Most of these settings are exposed in plain text files under the /etc directory. Here I describe some of the most common settings you’ll use on your desktop Linux system.

A lot of settings can be found in the Settings program, and the available options will vary by Linux distribution. Usually, you can change the background, tweak sound volume, connect to printers, set up displays, and more. While I won't talk about all of the settings here, you can certainly explore what's in there.

Read more

Meet Bo, an Ubuntu-Powered Social Robot with AI Capabilities

Filed under
Ubuntu

Meet Bo, a social robot with AI (Artificial Intelligence) capabilities, powered by Canonical's Ubuntu Linux operating system and optimized to welcome customers, as well as to help them navigate to find products and areas in your organization.

Bo was already used by several well-known brands like Etisalat and BT in a bunch of scenarios, including hospitality and retail scenarios, and it's being tested in large shopping centers in the United Kingdom, such as Lakeside.

Read more

KDE Applications Open Source Software Suite Gets First Major Release in 2018

Filed under
KDE

More than four months in the making, the final KDE Applications 18.04 release is finally here, and it already started appearing in the stable software repositories of popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as Arch Linux. It's KDE Applications' first major release in 2018 and comes with numerous enhancements and new features.

Prominent new features in KDE Applications 18.04 include various improvements to the panels, menus, and folder view of the Dolphin file manager, along with the ability to sort and organize images by date, drag-and-drop optimizations, a new keyboard shortcut to open the Filter Bar, and better HiDPI support.

Read more

AMD Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The embargo on the Ryzen 5 2600X and Ryzen 7 2700X processors has expired now that these Ryzen+ CPUs are beginning to ship today. We can now talk about the Linux support and the initial performance figures for these upgraded Zen desktop CPUs.

Read more

Rise of the Tomb Raider Release and Performance

Filed under
Gaming
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider is now officially available on Linux, here’s a look at it with benchmarks

    Feral Interactive have teamed up with Crystal Dynamics and Square Enix once again to bring a top title to Linux, this time we have Rise of the Tomb Raider.

  • Rise of the Tomb Raider tested on AMD RX 580

    To go along with Liam’s benchmarks of the game on his Nvidia GPU, I decided to also run some tests on my RX 580 to give you a picture of the AMD performance of the Rise of the Tomb Raider port. So, let’s go!

  • Rise of the Tomb Raider Linux Performance On AMD Radeon GPUs

    Yesterday Feral announced that the long-awaited Linux release of Rise of the Tomb Raider would be coming tomorrow and now they have honored that release. Rise of the Tomb Raider is now natively available for Linux and this port is exclusively relying upon the Vulkan graphics API for rendering. Here are our initial benchmarks of Rise of the Tomb Raider on Linux with Radeon GPUs while making use of the Mesa RADV driver.

  • Rise of the Tomb Raider: 20 Year Celebration Is Out Now on Linux

    Feral Interactive, the UK-based video games publisher, announced today the availability of the Rise of the Tomb Raider: 20 Year Celebration video game on the Linux platform.

    After being released on Apple's macOS platform last week, the Rise of the Tomb Raider: 20 Year Celebration video game comes today to Linux gamers, and this special edition has all the DLCs released since its official launch more than two years ago, including Baba Yaga: The Temple of the Witch, Blood Ties, and Cold Darkness Awakened.

  • Linux Gaming Performance With AMD Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X

    Today the Ryzen+ "Pinnacle Ridge" processors begin shipping and we can now share with you the initial performance results for the Ryzen 5 2600X and Ryzen 7 2700X processors. One of the most common questions I've received about these improved Zen processors since showing them off last week was inquiries/hopes about the Linux gaming performance, so those numbers are first up today followed by other Linux benchmark results forthcoming.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • simple

    Every now and then, for one reason or another, I am sat in front of a Linux-powered computer with the graphical user interface disabled, instead using an old-school text-only mode.

  • A month with Dell XPS 13 (9370)

    After years of using Thinkpads, I went for a Dell XPS 13 with Ubuntu. Although I had bought devices with Linux pre-installed and laptops for friends as well, this  was going to be my first own laptop coming with Ubuntu straight from the factory.

  • Thin Clients, The Walking Dead Of Computing

     

    Most of us are doing a lot on the web anyway. There’s not much difference between a web-application running on a server somewhere or a desktop application running on a server in the building. Thin clients just won’t die as much as haters wish.

  • logstash 5.6.9 released with logstash-filter-grok 4.0.3
  • Calamares GeoIP

    Calamares is a distribution-independent (Linux) system installer. Outside of the “big five” distro’s, many smaller “boutique” distro’s need an installer, and Calamares is a highly configurable one that they can use. There’s a few dozen distro’s that I know of that use it (although I’ve only actually installed maybe six of them).

  • Cockpit 166

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 166.

  •  

  • KDE’s New Elisa Music Player: So Close, Yet So Far Away

    With the rise of streaming services bringing easy access to media, owning your own music and movies is at a seemingly all-time low. In my case, it wasn’t until recently that I started recollecting local music files again once I started caring more about the quality of music that I was listening to.

  • Atom-based embedded PC supports up to four removable SATA drives

    IEI’s Linux-ready “IBX-660” is a rugged, storage-oriented embedded computer with a Bay Trail Atom, 4x removable SATA bays, 2x GbE ports, 4x USB, HDMI, mini-PCIe, and -40 to 50°C support.

  • Eclipse and Linux Launch Projects to Help IoT Developers

    The Eclipse and Linux foundations are offering new projects for developers working on Internet of Things (IoT) projects.

    Eclipse is introducing Mita, a language for embedded IoT. Linux has announced an open source reference hypervisor project designed for IoT device development.

  • 7 tips from multi-cloud masters
  • Google Kaniko Tool Wrenches on Container Privilege Concern

    Google unveiled an open source tool that targets container security issues tied to the granting of privileged access to a Docker-based container. Docker containers are by default not granted privileged access to root content, though that does limit their agility.

    Analysts have noted that the privileged and root access issues remain a sticking point for securing container deployments.

  •  

  • An Update on Linux Journal

    First, keep the great ideas coming—we all want to continue making Linux Journal 2.0 something special, and we need this community to do it.

Elections for openSUSE Board and Schedule

Filed under
SUSE

Slackware Mass Rebuild

Filed under
Slack
  • Mass Rebuild to Remove .la files
  • Slackware-current ChangeLog 20180419

    Hi folks, and welcome to the third ever Slackware Mass Rebuild (and the longest ChangeLog entry in project history). There were two primary motivations for rebuilding everything in the main tree. The first was to switch to the new C++ ABI. The second was to get rid of all the .la files in the LD_LIBRARY_PATH. Really, having .la files installed has been mostly obsolete since things began to use pkg-config instead, …

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Debian, Elive, and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Re-elected as Debian Project Leader

    I have been extremely proud to have served as the Debian Project Leader since my election in early 2017. During this time I've learned a great deal about the inner workings of the Project as well as about myself. I have grown as a person thanks to all manner of new interactions and fresh experiences.

    I believe is a privilege simply to be a Debian Developer, let alone to be selected as their representative. It was therefore an even greater honour to learn that I have been re-elected by the community for another year. I profoundly and wholeheartedly thank everyone for placing their trust in me for another term.

  • Elive 3.0 is ALMOST here!

    Elive's latest beta, 2.9.90, was released a couple of weeks ago.
    According to the description, this is the last beta before the official release of version 3.0.

    I have been waiting for Elive for quite a long time.
    My first contact with it was through a live CD of version 2.0 Topaz in 2010, when I had recently migrated to Linux. I was truly impressed by the beauty and polish of the distro. I never installed it, though. I was put off by the fact that it was the only distro that could not be installed unless one paid for an installing module. Back then, I assumed that free software had to be "gratis".

  • NGINX Updates: Ubuntu Bionic, and Mainline and Stable PPAs

    Ubuntu Bionic 18.04 now has 1.14.0 in the repositories, and very likely will have 1.14.0 for the lifecycle of 18.04 from April of 2018 through April of 2023, as soon as it is released.

  • gksu removed from Ubuntu

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Prospects for free software in cars

    Car manufacturers, like most companies, navigate a narrow lane between the benefits of using free and open-source software and the perceived or real importance of hiding their trade secrets. Many are using free software in some of the myriad software components that make up a modern car, and even work in consortia to develop free software. At the recent LibrePlanet conference, free-software advocate Jeremiah Foster covered progress in the automotive sector and made an impassioned case for more free software in their embedded systems. Foster has worked in automotive free software for many years and has played a leading role in the GENIVI Alliance, which is dedicated to incorporating free software into in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems. He is currently the community manager for the GENIVI Alliance.

    First, Foster talked about the importance of software in modern vehicles. He pointed out that software increasingly becomes the differentiator used to market cars. Horsepower no longer sells these vehicles, Foster says—features do. He claims that some companies even sell the car at cost (the old "razor/blades" or "printer/ink" business model) and make their money on aftermarket apps and features. Companies are finding it effective to get hardware from other manufacturers while improving the user experience through their software. Some of these features contribute to safety (such as alerts that help you drive within the lane or parallel park), and some may be critical, such dashboard icons that warn the driver of electrical system problems or low brake fluid.

  • Productising open source integration

    We asked Lumina Networks’ CEO Andrew Coward, how companies can make best use of open source. “Open source is not a spectator sport,” says Andrew. “Sitting around and waiting for somebody to show up and deliver the equivalent of your existing vendor’s offering is not the right approach. So we work best when our customers are very engaged. And really, it’s all about how you automate things.”

  • Riot: A Distributed Way of Having IRC and VOIP Client and Home Server

    Riot is a free and open source decentralized instant messaging application that can be considered an alternative to Slack. We take a look at features of Riot, installation procedure and usage.

    It’s surprising that many Linux users and open source projects use a proprietary messaging service like Slack. Even we at It’s FOSS use Slack for our internal communication which I don’t like. This is why I came up with the proposal of using an open source alternative to Slack, called Riot.

  • Announcing the 2018 Fractal Hackfest

    For the past few months, I’ve been contributing to a new group messaging app called Fractal. Its aim is to be so good that we can maybe, eventually, finally replace IRC as the primary communication channel for GNOME development.

  • The ticking time bomb: Fake ad blockers in Chrome Web Store

    People searching for a Google Chrome ad blocking extension have to choose from dozens of similarly named extensions. Only few of these are legitimate, most are forks of open source ad blockers trying to attract users with misleading extension names and descriptions. What are these up to? Thanks to Andrey Meshkov we now know what many people already suspected: these extensions are malicious. He found obfuscated code hidden carefully within a manipulated jQuery library that accepted commands from a remote server.

  • Google Chrome now blocks autoplaying video with sound

    Video that plays without audio, or that a user has tapped or clicked on, will still play. On mobile, autoplaying videos will be allowed on sites that have been added as a bookmark to the home screen, while desktop sites that a user frequently actively watches video on will be allowed to autoplay videos with sound as ranked by the firm’s new Media Engagement Index (MEI).

  • Israeli Government Is Open Sourcing Its Software Code

    Just yesterday, we told you about German government’s decision to go ahead with an open source solution for creating its private cloud. The government announced a partnership with Nextcloud, which is a popular open source solutions provider.

    In another encouraging development for the open source enthusiasts, the Israeli government has decided to open source its software code. As a result, the released code will be available to public and free to reuse.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, IBM, Elytron and Container Vulnerability Scanning

  • Security updates for Friday
  • IBM Security launches open-source AI
    IBM Security unveiled an open-source toolkit at RSA 2018 that will allow the cyber community to test their AI-based security defenses against a strong and complex opponent in order to help build resilience and dependability into their systems.
  • Elytron: A New Security Framework in WildFly/JBoss EAP
    Elytron is a new security framework that ships with WildFly version 10 and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7.1. This project is a complete replacement of PicketBox and JAAS. Elytron is a single security framework that will be usable for securing management access to the server and for securing applications deployed in WildFly. You can still use the legacy security framework, which is PicketBox, but it is a deprecated module; hence, there is no guarantee that PicketBox will be included in future releases of WildFly. In this article, we will explore the components of Elytron and how to configure them in Wildfly.
  • PodCTL #32 – Container Vulnerability Scanning

NetBSD 8.0 RC1 Available, Bringing Initial USB 3.0 Support & Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation

It's a busy month for the BSDs with DragonFlyBSD 5.2 having come along with OpenBSD 6.3 and right before that was TrueOS 18.03. Now there's finally the release candidate of the long-awaited NetBSD 8.0 update. NetBSD 7.0 arrived back in October 2015 while the NetBSD 8.0 release should not be too much further out. Arguably most interesting with NetBSD 8.0 is its finally bring initial USB 3.0 support though the change-log currently just describes it as "some USB 3 support." Read more

FFmpeg 4.0 Released

  • FFmpeg 4.0 released
    Version 4.0 of the FFmpeg multimedia toolkit is out. There is a long list of new filters, formats, and more; see the announcement for details.
  • April 20th, 2018, FFmpeg 4.0 "Wu"
  • FFmpeg 4.0 Released With New Encoders/Decoders, NVIDIA NVDEC Decoding
    FFmpeg 4.0 is now available as the latest major release for this widely-used open-source multimedia encode/decoder library. FFmpeg 4.0 introduces NVIDIA NVDEC GPU-based decoding for H264 / MJPEG / HEVC / MPEG-1/2/4, VC1, VP8, and VP9 formats. This release also adds an Intel QSV accelerated overlay filter, an OpenCL overlay filter, VA-API MJPEG and VP8 decoding support, new VA-API filters, and many other accelerated code path improvements.

Graphics: AMD, Intel and Vulkan

  • AMDGPU DC Fixes For Linux 4.17 Take Care Of "The Dark Screen Issue"
    AMD's Alex Deucher has sent in a small set of fixes for the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver in the Linux 4.17 kernel. The three patches are for fixing a dark screen issue with AMDGPU DC, a fix for clock/voltage dependency tracking for WattMan, and an updated SMU interface for the yet-to-be-announced Vega 12 GPU.
  • Intel KVMGT 2018-Q1 Release Offers Mediated GPU Pass-Through Improvements
    While the relevant bits for supporting Intel GPU mediated pass-through to virtual machines with KVM are now upstream in the Linux kernel as well as in QEMU 2.12, Intel developers have just announced their quarterly release of "KVMGT" for those wanting the officially blessed configuration for running Intel virtual GPU support with KVM virtual machines.
  • RADV Vulkan Driver Adds Vega M Support
    Following RadeonSI adding "Vega M" support for the new Radeon graphics appearing embedded on select Intel Kabylake processor packages, the RADV developers have similarly staged their Vega M support in this open-source Vulkan driver.
  • The Forge Now Offers Full-Featured Vulkan Support On Linux
    Earlier this month we covered "The Forge" picking up initial Linux support and now they have rounded out their full-featured Linux support with Vulkan rendering.