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Quick Roundup

  • 22/05/2020 - 6:08am
    Marius Nestor
  • 20/01/2020 - 5:37am
    johnwalsh
  • 07/07/2019 - 5:40pm
    JamieCull
  • 04/07/2019 - 7:09pm
    ksanaj
  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
  • 11/07/2017 - 9:36am
    itsfoss
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    Variscite
  • 09/04/2017 - 4:47pm
    mwilmoth
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:02am
    tishacrayt

TenFourFox FPR27 available

Filed under
Mac
Moz/FF
Web

TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 27 final is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). Unfortunately, I have thus far been unable to solve issue 621 regarding the crashes on LinkedIn, so to avoid drive-by crashes, scripts are now globally disabled on LinkedIn until I can (no loss since it doesn't work anyway). If you need them on for some reason, create a pref tenfourfox.troublesome-js.allow and set it to true. I will keep working on this for FPR28 to see if I can at least come up with a better wallpaper, though keep in mind that even if I repair the crash it may still not actually work anyway. There are otherwise no new changes since the beta except for outstanding security updates, and it will go live Monday evening Pacific assuming no new issues.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Doom Emacs For Noobs

    Doom Emacs is my preferred text editor, and I have made several videos about it. But some of those videos assumed that the viewer had some knowledge of Vim and/or Emacs. So I decided to make this Doom Emacs introductory video for the complete noob! This video covers how to install Doom Emacs, how to configure it, and some of the basic keybindings and commands.

  • The Endless Stream Of Linux Video Topics To Sift Through
  • Debian Janitor: Expanding Into Improving Multi-Arch

    The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor.

  • New Debian Maintainers (July and August 2020)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

    Chirayu Desai
    Shayan Doust
    Arnaud Ferraris
    Fritz Reichwald
    Kartik Kulkarni
    François Mazen
    Patrick Franz
    Francisco Vilmar Cardoso Ruviaro
    Octavio Alvarez
    Nick Black
    Congratulations!

  • MYIR launches FZ5 EdgeBoard AI Box for AI on the Edge

    Back in July of this year (2020), MYRI technology announced the MYIR’s FZ3 deep learning accelerator card powered by the Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ ZU3EG Arm FPGA MPSoC and it is capable of delivering up to 1.2TOPS computing power. With only a few months since that launch, MYRI technology is now announcing another two related sets of products – FZ5 EdgeBoard AI Box and the FZ5 Card.

  • SYNCPLIFY.ME AFT! V3.0 SUPPORTS LINUX ON ARM

    But, arguably, the most relevant new feature is AFT!’s native support for ARM processors, when in combination with a Linux operating system. With giants like Apple, moving away from the x86 architecture to fully embrace ARM on their entire product line, it was a strategic choice for Syncplify to be ahead of the curve, and release an ARM-native version of their software.

  • Where’s the Yelp for open-source tools?

    We’d like an easy way to judge open-source programs. It can be done. But easily? That’s another matter. When it comes to open source, you can’t rely on star power.

    The “wisdom of the crowd” has inspired all sorts of online services wherein people share their opinions and guide others in making choices. The Internet community has created many ways to do this, such as Amazon reviews, Glassdoor (where you can rate employers), and TripAdvisor and Yelp (for hotels, restaurants, and other service providers). You can rate or recommend commercial software, too, such as on mobile app stores or through sites like product hunt. But if you want advice to help you choose open-source applications, the results are disappointing.

    It isn’t for lack of trying. Plenty of people have created systems to collect, judge, and evaluate open-source projects, including information about a project’s popularity, reliability, and activity. But each of those review sites – and their methodologies – have flaws.

    Take that most archaic of programming metrics: Lines of code (LoC). Yes, it’s easy to measure. But it’s also profoundly misleading. As programming genius Edsger Dijkstra observed in 1988, LoC gives people “the reassuring illusion that programs are just devices like any others, the only difference admitted being that their manufacture might require a new type of craftsmen, viz. programmers. From there it is only a small step to measuring ‘programmer productivity’ in terms of ‘number of lines of code produced per month.’ This is a very costly measuring unit because it encourages the writing of insipid code.”

    We’ve gotten better since then, haven’t we? Perhaps not.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 79
  • Fun with Java Records

    Records, like lambdas and default methods on interfaces are tremendously useful language features because they enable many different patterns and uses beyond the obvious.

    Java 8 brought lambdas, with lots of compelling uses for streams. What I found exciting at the time was that for the first time lots of things that we’d previously have to have waited for as new language features could become library features. While waiting for lambdas we had a Java 7 release with try-with-resources. If we’d had lambdas we could have implemented something similar in a library without needing a language change.

  • How to code a basic WordPress plugin

    With over 7 million downloads for WordPress 5.3 alone, WordPress has become one of the most influential CMS of all time.

  • Laravel CSRF Protection

    The full form of CSRF is Cross-Site Request Forgery. It is one type of online attack in which the attacker sends requests as an authorized user to a system by gaining access information of a particular user of that system and performs different types of malicious activities by using the identity of that user. The impact of this attack depends on the victim’s privileges on the system. If the victim is a normal user then it will affect the personal data of the victim only. But if the victim is the administrator of the system then the attacker can damage the whole system. The users of any business website, social networking can be affected by this attack. This attack can be prevented easily by using Laravel CSRF protection to make the system more secure. Laravel generates CRSF token for each active user session automatically by which any request and approval are given to the authenticated user for the system. How Laravel CSRF Protection can be applied in the Laravel application is shown in this tutorial.

  • Popular VPN closes critical vulnerability on Linux client

    The VPN service Private Internet Access (PIA) has released a new version of its Linux client which fixes a critical vulnerability that could have allowed remote attackers to bypass the software's kill switch.

    The vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2020-15590, was discovered by Sick Codes and it affects versions 1.5 through 2.3 of PIA's Linux client.

    The client's kill switch is configured to block all inbound and outbound network traffic when a VPN connection drops. However, privileged applications still have the ability to send and receive network traffic even when the kill switch is turned on if net.ipv4.ip_forward has been enabled in the system kernel parameters.

    [...]

    “For the issue raised, we have no legacy customer support requests relating to this use case. We welcome input from community sources in addressing their usage and with this in mind, we took the decision to support this use case with our next Linux client release.”

    PIA users running Docker on Linux should upgrade to version 2.4 of the company's client as soon as possible to avoid any potential attacks leveraging this vulnerability.

  • 3 ways to protect yourself from imposter syndrome

    Poet and activist Maya Angelou published many books throughout her storied career, but each time, she feared people would figure out that she'd "run a game on everybody, and they're going to find me out." This seems an odd response from a well-honored writer. What she is describing is her own challenge with imposter syndrome.

    Think for a moment about your own accomplishments. Being hired into a new role. Having your first open source contribution merged into the project. Receiving an award or recognition. Being invited to participate in a project or event with people you respect and look up to. Did you question whether you belonged there? Did you fear people would "know that you didn't belong?" There is an extremely high likelihood that you have also experienced imposter syndrome. Please check the survey at the end of this article to see that you're not alone.

Graphics: NVIDIA, Intel, AMD and Zink

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

     
  • NVIDIA GeForce Now quietly starts working on Linux as the Avengers come to play

    If you use or have been following NVIDIA GeForce Now, the cloud gaming platform that delivers PC titles you already own from sources such as Steam and Epic Games to a multitude of devices, the latest development seems to have emerged silently. Spotted by the team at GamingonLinux, users of Linux can now, it seems, access GeForce Now in either Chromium of Google Chrome.

    Indeed, previously this tactic involved fudging user agents to make GeForce Now believe you were on a Chromebook, following the launch of the web client for Google's laptops. And it works just fine, I logged in and played some games with no issues on Ubuntu in both browsers. And just to double check, Firefox still shows an incompatible device error.

  • Intel Compute Runtime 20.37.17906 Brings Rocket Lake Support

    Intel's software team has released a new version of their Compute Runtime that provides OpenCL and oneAPI Level Zero capabilities for their graphics hardware on Linux.

  • AMDGPU TMZ + HDCP Should Allow Widevine DRM To Behave Nicely With AMD Linux Systems

    Coming together this year for the mainline Linux kernel was the AMDGPU Trusted Memory Zone (TMZ) capability for encrypted video memory support with Radeon GPUs. This topic was talked about at this week's XDC2020 conference.

    AMDGPU TMZ prevents unauthorized applications from accessing the encrypted/trusted memory of an application. TMZ protects both reads and writes while leveraging an AES cipher. But while discrete Radeon GPUs can also support TMZ, for now the AMD Linux developers have just been focused on the capability for their APU platforms.

  • Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan Seeing Some 50~100% FPS Gains

    After working on getting the Zink OpenGL-over-Vulkan driver up to OpenGL 4.6 with still pending patches, former Samsung OSG engineer Mike Blumenkrantz has been making remarkable progress on the performance aspect as well.

    This generic Mesa OpenGL implementation that works atop Vulkan drivers is about to see much better performance. Blumenkrantz recently commented the performance was turning out better than expected but that was for micro-benchmarks. But now with more optimizations he is achieving even better results.

Sculpt OS release 20.08

Filed under
OS

  • Sculpt OS release 20.08

    The new version of Sculpt OS is based on the latest Genode release 20.08. In particular, it incorporates the redesigned GUI stack to the benefit of quicker boot times, improved interactive responsiveness, and better pixel output quality. It also removes the last traces of the noux runtime. Fortunately, these massive under-the-hood changes do not disrupt the user-visible surface of Sculpt. Most users will feel right at home.

    Upon closer inspection, there are couple of new features to appreciate. The CPU-affinity of each component can now be restricted interactively by the user, components can be easily restarted via a click on a button, font-size changes have an immediate effect now, and the VESA driver (used when running Sculpt in a virtual machine) can dynamically change the screen resolution.

  • Sculpt OS 20.08 Released With Redesigned GUI Stack

    Building off the recent Genode OS 20.08 operating system framework release is now Sculpt OS 20.08 as the open-source project's general purpose operating system attempt.

    Sculpt OS 20.08 pulls in the notable Genode 20.08 changes like the redesigned GUI stack with better responsiveness and other benefits. It also includes the ability to run the Falk web browser as the first Chromium-based browser on Genode/Sculpt.

    Sculpt OS is Genode's effort around creating a general purpose OS but for right now is still largely limited to developers, hobbyists, and those wishing to tinker around with new operating systems.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Python 3.8.5 : Linked List - part 001.
  • Doug Hellmann: sphinxcontrib.datatemplates 0.7.0

    sphinxcontrib.datatemplates is an extension for Sphinx to render parts of reStructuredText pages from data files in formats like JSON, YAML, XML, and CSV.

  • Python : 10 Ways to Filter Pandas DataFrame

    In this article, we will cover various methods to filter pandas dataframe in Python. Data Filtering is one of the most frequent data manipulation operation. It is similar to WHERE clause in SQL or you must have used filter in MS Excel for selecting specific rows based on some conditions. In terms of speed, python has an efficient way to perform filtering and aggregation. It has an excellent package called pandas for data wrangling tasks. Pandas has been built on top of numpy package which was written in C language which is a low level language. Hence data manipulation using pandas package is fast and smart way to handle big sized datasets.

  • Top GUI Frameworks that is every Python Developer's Favorite

    Python is one of the most popular and widely known programming languages that is a favorite in the developer community. Its advanced libraries and file extensions enable developers to build state-of-the-art tools for real-world problems, or simply design a GUI (Graphic User Interface). GUI plays an essential role in the computer world as it makes human-machine interaction easier. Python offers a diverse range of options for GUI frameworks. Some of these frameworks are more preferred by the developers to build both .apk and .exe applications. Moreover, its GUI toolkits include TK, GTK, QT, and wxWidgets, which come with more features than other platform-specific kits. Though the Python wiki on GUI programming lists on 30 cross-platform frameworks, we have selected our top 4 picks. They are:

    Kivy: It an open-source Python library for the rapid development of applications that makes use of innovative user interfaces, such as multi-touch apps. This liberal MIT-licensed Kivy is based on OpenGL ES 2 and includes native multi-touch for each platform. It is an event-driven framework based around the main loop, making it very suitable for game development. It supports multiple platforms, namely, Windows, MacOSX, Linux, Android-iOS, and Raspberry Pi. Unlike QtCreator, Kivy doesn’t have a visual layout program, but it uses its own design language to help you associate UI layout with code objects.

C/C++ Programming

Filed under
Development
  • How to use Strcpy() in C language?

    In this article, we are going to learn about the strcpy() function in the C programming language. The strcpy() function is a very popular standard library function to perform the string copy operation in the C programming language. There are several standard header files in C programming language to perform standard operations. The “string.h” is one of such header files, which provides several standard library functions to perform string operations. The “strcpy()” function is one of the library functions provided by “string.h”.

  • How to Use C++ Vector

    An array is a series of same object types in consecutive memory locations. An array cannot increase ore reduce in length. A vector is like an array, but its length can be increased or reduced. A vector, therefore, has many more operations than an array.

    C++ has many libraries, all of which form the C++ Standard Library. One of these libraries is the container library. A container is a collection of objects, and certain operations can be performed on the collection. C++ containers can be grouped into two sets: sequence containers and associative containers. Sequence containers are vector, array (not the same array discussed previously), deque, forward_list, and list. These are different collections (array-like data structures), and each offers distinct trade-offs.

    Any programmer should know how to decide whether to use a vector, an array, a deque, a forward_list, or a list. When a programmer needs a structure that requires more operations than those associated with an ordinary array, the ordinary array should not be used.

    If the task involves frequent insertions and deletions in the middle of the sequence, then a list or forward_list should be used. If the task involves frequent insertions and deletions in the beginning or end of a sequence, then a deque should be used. A vector should be used when these kinds of operations are not required.

  • How to Use isalpha() in C Language

    There are several standard library header files in the C programming language used to perform various standard operations. The “ctype.h” is one such header file, and the “isalpha()” function is one of the library functions provided by “ctype.h.” The isalpha() library function is used to identify whether a character is an alphabet. In this article, you will learn about the isalpha() library function in C language.

  • NVIDIA C++ Standard Library Now Available Via GitHub

    Introduced last year as part of CUDA 10.2 was libcu++ as the CUDA C++ standard library, which works with not only NVIDIA CUDA enabled configurations but also CPUs. The libcu++ sources are now available via GitHub.

FreeBSD 12.2-BETA2 Now Available

Filed under
BSD


The second BETA build of the 12.2-RELEASE release cycle is now
available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.2-BETA2 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA2 i386 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA2 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.2-BETA2 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.2-BETA2 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA2 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 RPI2
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.2-BETA2 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA2 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.2-BETA2 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.2-BETA2 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.2/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.2" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.1-BETA1 includes:

o A regression affecting the PowerPC architecture had been fixed.

o A race condition that could lead to a system crash when using jails
  with VIMAGE had been fixed.

o Several wireless driver updates, including an update to ath(4), as
  well as 802.11n support for run(4) and otus(4).

o Capsicum support had been added to rtsol(8) and rtsold(8).

o A fix to certctl(8) to prevent overwriting a file on rehash.

o TRIM support had been added to the bhyve(4) virtio-blk backend.

o Fixes to libcompiler_rt have been added.

o The ice(4) driver had been added, providing support for Intel 100Gb
  ethernet cards.

o Fixes to ixl(4) affecting the PowerPC64 architecture have been added.

o Support for the Novatel Wireless MiFi 8000 and 8800 have been added to
  the urndis(4) driver.

o Fixes to the ure(4) driver to prevent packet-in-packet attacks have
  been addressed.  [SA-20:27]

o Fixes to bhyve(4) to prevent privilege escalation via VMCS access have
  been addressed.  [SA-20:28, SA-20:29]

o A fix to the ftpd(8) daemon to prevent privilege escalation via
  ftpchroot(5) had been addressed.  [SA-20:30]

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.2-RELEASE cycle progresses.

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 12.2 BETA2 Brings TRIM For Bhyve's VirtIO-BLK, Intel ICE Added

Announcing Istio 1.7.2

Filed under
Server

This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.7.1 and Istio 1.7.2

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F-Droid Free Applications catalog for Android

Filed under
Android
GNU

F-Droid is an installable catalogue of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) applications for the Android platform. F-Droid respects your privacy by not tracking your device or the applications you install. You do not need an account to use the client, and it sends no additional identifying data when talking to our F-Droid server other than its version number.

[...]

It is also possible to create a personal catalog using the F-Droid server tools.

In order to install the F-Droid client, the installation from “unknown sources” in the Android settings need to be allowed and download the apk from the official site.

In the following video (Spanish) I show how to install and use the F-Droid client.

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This week in KDE: everything happened

Filed under
KDE

This was a pretty huge week for KDE. Apparently people had a lot of pent-up work, because right after Akademy finished last week, the floodgates started opening! Amazing stuff has been landing left and right every day this week! Some highlights are touch support in Dolphin, user-configurable per-view sort ordering in Elisa, optional Systemd startup, tons of Okular scrolling improvements, and much, much, much more.

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Top 6 Web Hosting Control Panels

A Web hosting control panel is a web-based interface that enables users to manage hosted services in a single location. Control panels can manage email account configuration, databases, FTP users’ accounts, monitor web space and bandwidth consumed, provide file management functionality, create backups, create subdomains and much more.

Web hosting control panels offer an attractive solution to developers and designers that host multiple web sites on virtual private servers and dedicated servers. This type of server management software simplifies the process of managing servers. By offering an easy to user interface, the control panels avoid the need to have expert knowledge of server administration.

Two of the most popular control panels are Plesk and cPanel. These are web-based graphical control panels that allow you to easily and intuitively administer websites, DNS, e-mail accounts, SSL certificates and databases. However, they are both proprietary software. Hosting providers will charge a monthly fee for these control panels to be installed on a server. Fortunately, there is a wide range of open source software available to download at no cost that offers a real alternative to these proprietary solutions.

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 6 high quality web hosting control panels tools that let users take full control of a web hosting account. We give our highest recommendations to ISPConfig, Virtualmin and Webmin.

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Games: Black Ice, Mini Countries, Colmen's Quest and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Dive into cyberspace this weekend with the latest Black Ice upgrade

    After finishing the first act of Black Ice story, this cyberpunk FPS continues getting content expansions and some of it sounds hilarious.

    Black Ice has always been a first-person shooter that leaned into the crazy and it's all the more enjoyable for it. Since it's in cyberspace, it doesn't need to conform to being normal in any shape or form. That's certainly true when you look at all the weapons types which are wild and varied - now even more so.

    The "Black Ice Enhancement Update" went live today, September 19, adding in new types of enemies like static Turrets which pump out bullets at you to mix up the gameplay. There's also E-Snails, which lob pools of fire (and other elements) at the ground and explode if you destroy the barrel on their back. More new enemies arrived with this including Mini-webcrawlers and E-xploding-snails which spawn as ambush waves to surprise you.

  • Give tiny countries a resource transport network in the upcoming Mini Countries

    Mini Countries from Yheeky Games looks like a fresh take on the transport-network puzzle strategy system. With each level being a new miniaturised country that you need to build up.

    What they've created looks like a very unique blend of ideas in other games like Rise of Industry, Train Valley 2 and the likes. Although, the developer cited inspiration from others like Mini Metro. You're responsible for building up your industry in each tiny country, and getting a network of it all going. Looks like a very sweet and streamlined approach to it.

  • Atmospheric fantasy turn-based RPG Colmen's Quest is out now

    Not long after we only just discovered it, the fantasy turn-based RPG Colmen's Quest is now considered finished and released and it also has an updated demo.

    "Colmen's Quest is a turn-based fantasy RPG. You play as Colmen, an aspiring monster hunter, who is on a quest to unveil a dark threat that haunts the village of Valkirk. You will explore Valkirk and its villagers, descend dusky dungeons, fight monsters and eventually collect a bunch of loot and treasures."

  • The Hotline Miami series is launching on Stadia soon, WWE 2K Battlegrounds out now

    Hotline Miami and Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number are the next set of games to be announced for Google's game streaming service Stadia.

    They're both going to be releasing next week, on September 22. Both games are available on desktop Linux already, from Dennaton Games and Devolver Digital.

  • Proton Deals: A New Service for Linux Gamers

    If you are anything like me, you probably check deals for Steam games on a regular basis across different sources – after all, why buy games at full price if you can get them discounted? I also like having a look at deals periodically since it helps me discover games I have not heard about before.

    The problem with deals (outside of the Steam store), is that it can be time consuming and tedious to find the best ones and check ProtonDB afterwards to ensure the game also works well on Linux. It’s 2020, and there is a good number of games that work out of the box, but as you know, Proton is not a perfect compatibility layer for all titles out there yet.

    So we are introducing Proton Deals, a newsletter service which crawls for the best deals out there, cross-references them with the ProtonDB ratings, and filters them out to make them as relevant as possible (removing the ones that have very poor compatibility, for example). Here’s what it looks like. Note that the “PROTON:” descriptions directly link to ProtonDB for more information about compatibility.

EndeavourOS Releases September 2020 ISO with Linux 5.8, Improved Installation

Filed under
Linux

Besides launching the EndeavourOS ARM operating system for ARM devices, the EndeavourOS team also released today the September 2020 ISO, which includes all the latest software updates and some much-needed improvements.

The September 2020 release of EndeavourOS is here for everyone who wants to install this Arch Linux-based distribution for personal computers. EndeavourOS makes installing Arch Linux a breeze for newcomers as it uses the powerful Calamares graphical installer by default.

Read more

4MLinux 34.0 Released with New Default Media Player, Mozilla Thunderbird 78.2

Filed under
Linux

4MLinux creator Zbigniew Konojacki announced today the release and general availability of 4MLinux 34.0, a new stable series of his independently developed GNU/Linux distribution for personal computers and servers.

4MLinux 34.0 is here three months after 4MLinux 33.0, which is now marked as the “old stable” branch, and it’s packed with some of the latest Open Source software releases and a bunch of improvements to make your experience better, more stable, and more secure.

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Arch Linux-Based EndeavourOS ARM Launches for ARM Devices

Filed under
Linux

Two months ago, I wrote about the upcoming launch of EndeavourOS ARM, when the Arch Linux-based distribution celebrated its first anniversary. But today is the day, and the Linux community can now finally download the mobile version of EndeavourOS if they want to install it on their ARM devices.

Basically, EndeavourOS ARM is a port of Arch Linux ARM, but packing all the benefits of the EndeavourOS distribution, which is the successor to Antergos Linux (formerly Cinnarch), making life a bit easier for those who want to use Arch Linux.

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Running deepin 20 LiveCD

Filed under
Linux

If you run deepin 20 from usb, you will find it is an Installer similar to Microsoft Windows Installer and not a LiveCD. Meaning, in order to try out deepin you must install it and cannot try it out beforehand like Ubuntu. Fortunately, actually the deepin installer includes LiveCD Session. We just need a little adjustment at the boot time and it works. Enjoy!

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Open Source Lightweight Directory Access Protocol Solutions

Filed under
OSS

LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is an application protocol for accessing directory services. It runs on a layer above the TCP/IP stack incorporating simplified encoding methods, and offers a convenient way to connect to, search, and modify Internet directories, specifically X.500-based directory services. It is an open, vendor-neutral, industry standard application protocol. LDAP utilizes a client-server model.

This protocol is specifically targeted at management applications and browser applications that provide read/write interactive access to directories.

The main benefit of using an LDAP server is that information for an entire organization can be consolidated into a central repository. LDAP supports Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS), so that sensitive data can be protected. LDAP servers are used for a variety of tasks including, but not limited to, user authentication, machine authentication, user/system groups, asset tracking, organization representation, and application configuration stores.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Ned Batchelder: Scriv

    I’ve written a tool for managing changelog files, called scriv. It focuses on a simple workflow, but with lots of flexibility. I’ve long felt that it’s enormously beneficial for engineers to write about what they do, not only so that other people can understand it, but to help the engineers themselves understand it. Writing about a thing gives you another perspective on it, your own code included.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSpdlog 0.0.2: New upstream, awesome new stopwatch

    Following up on the initial RcppSpdlog 0.0.1 release earlier this week, we are pumped to announce release 0.0.2. It contains upstream version 1.8.0 for spdlog which utilizes (among other things) a new feature in the embedded fmt library, namely completely automated formatting of high resolution time stamps which allows for gems like this (taken from this file in the package and edited down for brevity)...

  • [Perl] Week #078: Leader Element & Left Rotation

    First thing first, I managed to do video session for both tasks this week. It is so satisfying when everything goes as per the plan. For the last couple of weeks, I could only do one video session. One day, I would like to video with PIP. At the moment, I am little uncomfortable showing my face in the video. There is another reason why I can’t do it now. I don’t have my personal office in the house. I have been working from home since mid-March, nearly 6 months, sitting on sofa, 9-5. I must confess it is not easy. I miss my office chair and noise-free environment. I have 3 years twin girls. Luckily the school started last week, I get no-noise moment for few hours during the day. Also this week, I found time to do coding in Swift.

  • Searching Greek and Hebrew with regular expressions

    According to the Python Cookbook, “Mixing Unicode and regular expressions is often a good way to make your head explode.” It is thus with fear and trembling that I dip my toe into using Unicode with Greek and Hebrew. I heard recently that there are anomalies in the Hebrew Bible where the final form of a letter is deliberately used in the middle of a word. That made me think about searching for such anomalies with regular expressions. I’ll come back to that shortly, but I’ll start by looking at Greek where things are a little simpler.

  • Java 15 Gains Garbage Collection, Text Block Features

    Java 15 became generally available on Sept. 15, marking the second release in 2020 of the widely deployed programming language. The Java 15 release follows Java 14, which debuted in March, and is noteworthy for a number of improvements, as well as the fact that the release was not delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Best Free and Open Source Terminal Session Recording

The vast majority of computer users depend on a graphical user interface, and fear the command line. However, the command line holds significant power and versatility. Commands issued from a shell offer system administrators a quick and easy way to update, configure and repair a system. The benefits of the command line are not only confined to system administration. The ability to transverse the file system quickly, give more information about files and directories, automate tasks, bring together the power of multiple console tools in a single command line, and run shell scripts are just a few examples of how the command line can offer a potent, multifarious toolbox. Read more

Geniatech XPI 3128 RK3128 SBC is Equipped with an NXP WIFi 5 Module

Geniatech XPI family of single board computers was first introduced in 2018 with the launch of the XPI-S905X development board following many of Raspberry Pi 3 Model B features and form factor. The company has now added another board to the family with XPI 3128 single board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3128 quad-core Cortex-A7 processor coupled with up to 2 GB RAM and 64 GB flash, as well as an NXP WiFi 5 and Bluetooth 4.2 module. Read more

Keep Tabs on Your To-Do Lists With This GNOME Extension

Task Widget is an open source GNOME extension that shows your to-do list embedded in the GNOME message tray (also known as the calendar or notification shade). This widget area displays your pending to-do items, and lets you check off tasks as you complete them. Task Widget is is able to integrate “…with GNOME Online Accounts and a number of GNOME applications, such as Evolution and To Do” but it is is not, by design, intended to replace any of those apps or services. Or to put it another way: it’s not a standalone task manager or to-do app. You can’t, for example, add a task from the widget area, or edit one either. You can only mark a task as done (or unmark it as done). Read more