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Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story RADV vs. AMDVLK Vulkan Drivers Continue Stiff Performance Battle Rianne Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 4:47pm
Story Canonical Needs Your Help to Test GNOME Memory Leak Patches in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 4:44pm
Story GNOME 3.30 "Almeria" Desktop Environment Development Officially Kicks Off Rianne Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 4:43pm
Story 8 Ways Linux Is Taking Over the World Rianne Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 4:38pm
Story A look at KompoZer Web-editor in GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 10:16am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 9:48am
Story Servers: Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0, 'Cloud' CNCF, Cloud Foundry Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 9:47am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 9:46am
Story Security: Russia, Librem, and Apple's Faux Security Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 9:41am
Story Software: Tuptime , dutree, gotop, Nginx Roy Schestowitz 18/04/2018 - 8:12am

GIMP 2.10.0 Release Candidate 2 Released

Filed under
GNU

Hot on the heels of the first release candidate, we’re happy to have a second RC ready! In the last 3 weeks since releasing GIMP 2.10.0-RC1, we’ve fixed 44 bugs and introduced important performance improvements.

As usual, for a complete list of changes please see NEWS.

Read more

Also: GIMP 2.10 RC2 Released With Multi-Threaded Painting, Rewritten Themes

Kernel (Linux 4.17), the Linux Foundation, and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Detailing The Idle Loop Ordering Problem & The Power Improvement In Linux 4.17

    Of the many great features/changes for Linux 4.17, one of the most exciting to us is the idle power efficiency and performance-per-Watt improvements on some systems thanks to a rework to the kernel's idle loop handling. Rafael Wysocki and Thomas Ilsche as two of the developers working on this big code change presented on their work today for this CPU idle loop ordering problem and its resolution.

  • Linux 4.17 development underway

    Linus Torvalds has started the development cycle of the Linux 4.17 kernel series, according to a report by Softpedia.

    The first Release Candidate build has been released, and comes two weeks after the launch of Linux 4.16.

    “Public testers can start downloading, compiling, and installing the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel,” stated the report.

  • Linux Foundation seeks to harmonise open source and standards development

    A year ago The Linux Foundation created its 'Harmonisation 1.0' initiative, focusing on collaboration between projects and with standards bodies. It brought together a set of open source projects, which together form the basis of the modern telecoms systems. Open source creates three values for telcos: speed to services, vendor collaboration, and cost reductions. The LF is also creating a framework between open source and standards communities; for example, this year it announced an agreement with the TM Forum, focused on the APIs that work between the two communities.

  • Broadcom VC5 DRM Driver Might Soon Be On Its Way To The Mainline Linux Kernel

    Eric Anholt believes he is getting quite close to the stage of merging the Broadcom VC5 DRM driver into the mainline Linux kernel tree.

    As part of the VC5 open-source driver stack for supporting the next-gen Broadcom VideoCore 5 graphics hardware, there's been the VC5 Gallium3D driver that is already in mainline Mesa for OpenGL support and the VC5 DRM driver that has been outside of the kernel tree up until now. (There's also been the also out-of-tree experimental work on VC5 Vulkan support via BCMV, etc.)

  • NVIDIA 396.18.02 Vulkan Linux Beta Brings Better Shader Performance

    Last week NVIDIA released their first 396 Linux driver beta that most notably introduces their new "NVVM" Vulkan SPIR-V compiler. Coming out today is a new Vulkan beta update with some continued enhancements.

  • AMDVLK Driver Updated With Latest XGL/PAL Fixes

    AMD kicked off the start of a new week by doing fresh code drops of the PAL and XGL code-bases used to form the AMDVLK open-source Radeon Vulkan Linux driver.

    On the XGL side this latest code drop of around one thousand lines of code reduces the number of malloc/free calls, support for INT64 atomic operations within LLPC (the LLVM Pipeline Compiler), other tweaks to LLPC, more barriers in the render pass clear, adding FMASK shadow table support, and other changes.

  • X.Org 2018 Elections Yield 54% Voter Turnout, Select Four New Board Members

    The 2018 X.Org Board of Directors elections are over with 49 of the 91 X.Org registered members having casted a ballot.

    The new X.Org Board of Directors members are Bryce Harrington (Samsung OSG, formerly Canonical), Eric Anholt (Broadcom, formerly Intel), Keith Packard (HPE / Valve, formerly Intel), and Harry Wentland (AMD).

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • McAfee's Upgraded Cloud Security Protects Containers [Ed: Looks like marketing/spam from ECT]
  • Has a Russian intelligence agent hacked your wifi? [iophk: "AV is not relevant; there are two main ways to avoid malware" : *BSD and */Linux"]

    In short, a global, invisible, low-level conflict is taking place across the internet and it is possible that your router has been conscripted as a foot soldier. Maybe it is worth getting your firewall and antivirus checked out after all.

  • 55 Infosec Professionals Sign Letter Opposing Georgia’s Computer Crime Bill

    In a letter to Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal, 55 cybersecurity professionals from around the country are calling for a veto for S.B. 315, a state bill that would give prosecutors new power to target independent security researchers.

    This isn’t just a matter of solidarity among those in the profession. Georgia represents our nation’s third largest information security sector. The signers have clients, partners, and offices in Georgia. They attend conferences in Georgia. They teach and study in Georgia or recruit students from Georgia. And they all agree that S.B. 315, which would create a new crime of "unauthorized access," would do more harm than good.

Fedora: New F27 ISO, F28 Upgrade Test Day, 2018 Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon

Filed under
Red Hat

Mozilla: Decision in Oracle v. Google Fair Use Case, VR, Web Demystified, Rust

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Decision in Oracle v. Google Fair Use Case Could Hinder Innovation in Software Development

    The technology industry was dealt a major setback when the Federal Circuit recently decided in Oracle v. Google that Google’s use of Java “declaring code” was not a fair use. The copyright doctrine of Fair Use impacts a developer’s ability to learn from and improve on the work of others, which is a crucial part of software development. Because of this ruling, copyright law today is now at odds with how software is developed.*

    This is the second time in this eight year case that the Federal Circuit’s ruling has diverged from how software is written. In 2014, the court decided that declaring code can be copyrighted, a ruling with which we disagreed. Last year we filed another amicus brief in this case, advocating that Google’s implementation of the APIs should be considered a fair use. In this recent decision, the court found that copying the Java declaring code was not a protected fair use of that code.

  • An Open Call to Storytellers: Make Something Amazing With Virtual Reality and the Open Web

    The mixed reality team at Mozilla devoted two years to brainstorming and experimenting to find a way to bring virtual reality to the web. That’s because we believe the web is the best possible platform for virtual and augmented reality. The ability to share and access virtual experiences with a URL is a game-changer; the key needed to take this amazing technology and make it mainstream.

  • A new video series: Web Demystified

    We don’t have to tell you that video is a key channel for sharing information and instructional skills especially for students and developers who’ve grown up with YouTube. At Mozilla, we’ve always been a leader in supporting the open technologies that bring unencumbered video into the browser and onto the web.

  • This Week in Rust 230

Oracle Releases Oracle Linux 7.5 and VirtualBox 5.2.10

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS
  • Announcing the release of Oracle Linux 7 Update 5

    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 for the x86_64 architecture. You can find the individual RPM packages on the Unbreakable Linux Network (ULN) and the Oracle Linux yum server. ISO installation images will soon be available for download from the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud and Docker images will soon be available via Oracle Container Registry and Docker Hub.

  • Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 Released, Offering Two Kernel Options & Still Supporting Btrfs

    Just one week after launching Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5, Oracle has released the latest version of their RHEL7-derived Oracle Linux 7. The Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 pulls in the latest *EL7 changes while also offering their "Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel" option.

  • Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.2.10 now available!

    Oracle has released VirtualBox 5.2 Maintenance Release 10.

    Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.2.10 addresses all the CPU (Critical Patch Updates) Advisory for April 2018 related to Oracle VM VirtualBox; A Critical Patch Update is a collection of patches for multiple security vulnerabilities.

  • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.2.10 with Fix for KDE Plasma Hang, More Bug Fixes

    Oracle announced a few moments ago the release of the VirtualBox 5.2.10 maintenance update for their open-source and cross-platform virtualization solution for Linux, Windows, and macOS operating systems.

    VirtualBox 5.2.10 is here one and a half months after version 5.2.8 to fix all the critical security vulnerabilities related to Oracle VM VirtualBox, as well as various reported bugs. Among these, we can mention a hang that occurred when starting the KDE Plasma desktop environment on various GNU/Linux distributions.

    The update also addresses a regression from VirtualBox 5.2.0 that allowed the presence of multiple NVMe controllers with ICH9 enabled, fixes an interrupt storm issue in FreeBSD guests with HDA audio enabled, and adds support for handling the 0.0.0.0 nameserver as a valid NAT setting.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • German govt opts for open-source cloud solution from Nextcloud

    Open-source file syncing and sharing software company Nextcloud has scored a major client with the German federal government set to move to a self-hosted cloud from the firm.

    A statement from Nextcloud said the Federal Information Technology Centre (ITZBund), which takes care of IT services for the entire federal government, had been running a pilot of 5000 users with Nextcloud since October 2016.

    [...]

    ITZBund employs about 2700 people, mostly IT specialists, engineers and network and security professionals.

    The Nextcloud statement said strict security requirements were crucial for the choice of Nextcloud as the file sync and share solution. Another important concern was scalability both in terms of large numbers of users and extensibility with additional features, for which Nextcloud offers its powerful Apps concept (with over 100 apps available in its app store).

    It claimed that "Nextcloud delivers some of the strongest security measures in the industry, making it the ideal solution for government agencies or companies dealing with data of private citizens".

  • Mirantis Has Seen the Future (Again) & This Time It's Spinnaker

    Mirantis is pivoting again. Two years ago, the company pivoted from OpenStack to Kubernetes. Now it's now saying the Spinnaker open source continuous application integration is the future.Mirantis is pivoting again. Two years ago, the company pivoted from OpenStack to Kubernetes. Now it's now saying the Spinnaker open source continuous application integration is the future.

  • Mirantis bets on Spinnaker, Netflix’s open-source continuous delivery platform

    Spinnaker is the new open-source project to watch. It’s a multi-cloud continuous delivery platform that came out of Netflix and that now also has the backing of Google.

  • LTI joins World’s Largest Open Source Blockchain Initiative, EEA

    Larsen & Toubro Infotech Ltd, a global technology consulting and digital solutions company has joined the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA), the world's largest open source blockchain initiative. As a member of the EEA, LTI will collaborate with industry leaders in pursuit of ethereum-based enterprise technology best practices, open standards, and open-source reference architectures.

  • Open-source blockchain ticketing solution Aventus now available

    Aventus, a Jersey-based foundation using blockchain to provide the ticketing industry with a fair and secure means of ticketing events, has announced the availability of the first version of its Aventus Protocol source-code; an open-source blockchain ticketing platform that will allow anyone to build powerful decentralized applications for the ticketing industry.

  • Apache Breakfast

    In case you missed it but are living in Berlin - or are visiting Berlin/ Germany this week: A handful of Apache people (committers/ members) are meeting over breakfast on Friday morning this week. If you are interested in joining, please let me know (or check yourself - in the archives of the mailing list party@apache.org)

  • FOSS Backstage - Schedule online

    In January the CfP for FOSS Backstage opened. By now reviews have been done, speakers notified and a schedule created.

    I'm delighted to find both - a lot of friends from the Apache Software Foundation but also a great many speakers that aren't affiliated with the ASF among the speakers.

'Microsoft Linux'

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Canonical/Ubuntu: Server, MAAS, and LXD

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 17 April 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team.

  • MAAS 2.4.0 beta 2 released!

    I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.4.0 beta 2 is now released and is available for Ubuntu Bionic.

  • LXD weekly status #43

    This week’s focus was on bugfixes with a good number of clustering related fixes and improvements as well as some tweaks and fixes to other recently added features.

    On the feature development front, the current focus is on improving the database tooling in LXD and adding a new backup feature to the API to implement container export/import.

Debian 11 "Bullseye" & Debian 12 "Bookworm" Are Coming After Debian 10 "Buster"

Filed under
Debian

While we're waiting for the Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series to be released, it looks like the Debian Release Team announced the codenames for the next two upcoming releases.

Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" is already halfway through its development cycle, and the release team recently published an update to inform users and developers about the release dates of various upcoming milestones, such as Transition Freeze on 12 January 2019, Soft Freeze on 12 February 2019, and Full Freeze on 12 March 2019, as well as the approximate final release date.

Read more

You Can Now Create Your Own Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Live System with Pinguy Builder

Filed under
Ubuntu

Pinguy Builder, the open-source and free graphical utility that lets the developers of the Ubuntu-based Pinguy OS distro build their operating system, has been recently updated with support for Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) support.

Pinguy Builder is a fork of the well known Remastersys tool that's no longer maintained. It contains all the scripts needed to create a live ISO image of any of the supported Ubuntu Linux releases in a few minutes and without too much hassle. Also, it can be used to backup your Ubuntu system.

Read more

P-State/CPUFreq CPU Frequency Scaling Tests For Radeon/NVIDIA Gaming With Linux 4.16

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

With last week's release of Feral GameMode as a system tool to optimize Linux gaming performance, which at this point just toggles the CPU frequency scaling driver's governor to the "performance" mode, reignited the CPU governor debate, here are some fresh Linux gaming benchmarks. Tests were done with both the CPUFreq and P-State scaling drivers on Linux 4.16 while testing the various governor options and using both AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards.

This comparison shows how a GeForce GTX 1080 and Radeon RX Vega 64 perform under the different CPU frequency scaling driver/governor options on the Linux 4.16 stable kernel. Tests were done with an Intel Core i7 8700K running at stock speeds throughout the entire benchmarking process.

Read more

A look at Mixxx in GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Most people tend to think of DJ's using Macbooks alongside their equipment when picturing a DJ who uses a laptop in today's world, but little do most realize that GNU/Linux systems can hold their own as well.

As a part-time dabbler in electronic music production (read: I mix tunes for my own amusement, and a couple uploaded here and there) I have a few programs that I bounce around from depending on the purpose I need, but generally speaking I don't really muck around a lot with things, and I tend to prefer to just simply mix two songs together live and on the fly, record it, and win.

Read more

Google’s updated AIY Vision and Voice kits ship with Raspberry Pi Zero WH

Filed under
Linux
Google

Google has launched new versions of its AIY Voice Kit ($50) and AIY Vision Kit ($90) that bundle a Raspberry Pi Zero WH SBC. Google also released an Android app for AIY Projects.

Google and Target have launched updated, and more complete, versions of Google’s AIY Projects kits for audio voice agent and visual neural network processing development that bundle a Raspberry Pi Zero WH SBC. In addition, users of Google’s existing AIY Voice Kit and AIY Vision Kit can now download an Android companion app that works with all old and new AIY kits.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OLPC’s $100 laptop was going to change the world — then it all went wrong [iophk: "This new article is a bit of revisionism as OLPC was killed by Microsoft and Intel"]
  • DOSBox Part 2: Creating, Handling, and Booting from Floppy Images

    Continuing on from the previous tutorial, we move on to boot DOS systems from floppy images. Many floppies contained games or other software that would have automatically booted once the system started (using the autoexec.bat script). This can be simulated by using a floppy image which is simply a file that represents an entire floppy disk drive.

  • Weekly Roundup 2018 – Weeks 14 & 15

    Many thanks for your patience! This is turning into a bi-weekly roundup lately, but we’ll try to get it back on track very soon.

    Team leader elections are happening: Donald and Filip continue to lead Atelier, Papoteur leads Docteam, Yuri leads i18n and the process is underway for all teams. We’ll know the make-up of the Council in the coming days – thanks to Marja for the updates. After that, we’ll be finding out the new composition of the Board. All should be in place by early May.

    The Great Plasma Update is almost there: it includes updates of the KF5, Plasma, KDE applications, LXQT and the underlying QT stacks. It’s currently waiting for the LXQT stack to be fixed. It’s a massive number of packages. We’re hoping it will be moved into updates within the week. Once that’s done, Mageia 6.1 will happen soon after.

  • Manjaro Download now hosted at OSDN

    After a period of testing in close cooperation with OSDN’s CEO Shuji Sado, Manjaro is proud to announce that all our Official and Community ISOs and torrents have found a new home on OSDN‘s Japan-based servers, using their just recently launched File Storage service.
    Sofar we are extremely happy with transfer rates and stability and, above all, OSDN’s truely outstanding personal, highly competent and friendly support.

    Current download links to our install media can of course be found on the Download Page as usual.

  •  

  • 8 Best Android Drawing Apps To Unleash Your Creativity | 2018 Edition
  • An Early Look at Zircon, Google Fuchsia New Microkernel [iophk: "C++"]

     

    Zircon manages the following resources: processor time, memory, I/O, interrupts, and signaling and waiting. Resources are used from user land through handles. Handles have rights associated to them which convey privileges to perform actions such as duplicating, transferring, reading, writing, executing, etc. Drivers in Zircon are implemented as ELF libraries which are loaded into processes. A device manager process, devmgr, keeps track of drivers and devices, manages the discovery of drivers, and administers access to devices. Devices may implement Protocols, using C ABI, such the PCI protocol, the USB protocol and so on.

Events: Red Hat, Curl, and LF's Open Source Summit North America

Filed under
OSS
  • Red Hat Set to Host Largest Red Hat Summit to Date, May 8-10 in San Francisco

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the agenda and keynote speakers for Red Hat Summit 2018, one of the industry’s premier enterprise open source technology conferences. The 14th annual Red Hat Summit is expected to welcome thousands of attendees from around the world to the Moscone Center in San Francisco, May 8-10. Event details and registration are live at https://www.redhat.com/en/summit/2018.

  • Events on the horizon: Previewing 41 events (Charlotte Venture Challenge, Red Hat Summit & more)

    Plenty of technology and life science events are on tap for May, and we suggest you pencil them into your calendar.

    If you’re interested in events coming up in the immediate future, check out our separate roundup of April events happening in the Triangle and in other metros throughout North Carolina. These columns accompany our interactive calendar, along with a separate list of  Triangle meetups.

  • curl up 2018 summary

    The event that occurred this past weekend was the second time we gathered a bunch of curl enthusiasts and developers in the same physical room to discuss the past, the present and the future from a curl perspective.

    Stockholm, Sweden, was the center of gravity this time when Goto 10 hosted our merry collective. Spring has finally arrived here and as the sun was out a lot, it made it a lovely weekend weather wise too. As a bonus, the little coffee shop on the premises was open all through both days. Just for us!

    [...]

    Several people asked me about next year already. I certainly hope we can run another curl up in 2019, but I don't know yet where this should happen. Ideally, I would like to move it around to different countries to give different people the ability to show up easier, but I also value having a local "host" that can provide the room and facilities for us.

  • Speak at Open Source Summit NA: Submit Your Proposal by April 29

    Submit a proposal to speak at Open Source Summit North America taking place August 29-31, in Vancouver, B.C., and share your knowledge and expertise with 2,000+ open source technologists and community members. Proposals are being accepted through 11:59pm PDT, Sunday, April 29.

Kernel and LF: Linux 5, FOSSology Turns 10, Xen Project Interview

Filed under
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds Wants Linux Kernel 5.0 To Be “Meaningless” And “Unpredictable”

    If you follow Linux kernel development closely, you must be knowing that major version transitioning, i.e., jump from Linux 2.0 to 3.0 and 3.0 to 4.0, has taken place in the past at every two million Git objects. This made perfect sense to make a transition to Linux v5.0 at 6 million Git objects landmark.

    [...]

    The announcement post also contained some information on Linux 4.17-rc1 release. He mentioned that apart from dropping many older and outdated architectures, the kernel development team is also adding support for a new architecture: nds32 (Andes Technology 32-0bit RISC architecture).

    Interestingly, this release is also historic as for the first time the team has removed more lines than it added. Again, that’s due to dropping a number of architectures.

  • FOSSology Turns 10 – A Decade of Highlights

    FOSSology turns ten this year. Far from winding down, the open source license compliance project is still going strong. The interest in the project among its thriving community has not dampened in the least, and regular contributions and cross-project contributors are steering it toward productive and meaningful iterations.

    An example is the recent 3.2 release, offering significant improvements over previous versions, such as the import of SDPX files and word processor document output summarizing analysis information. Even so, the overall project goal remains the same: to make it easier to understand and comply with the licenses used in open source software.

    There are thousands of licenses used in Open Source software these days, with some differing by only a few words and others pertaining to entirely different use universes. Together, they present a bewildering quagmire of requirements that must be adhered to, but only as set out in the appropriate license(s), the misunderstanding or absence of which can revert rights to a reserved status and bring about a complete halt to distribution.  

  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Stefano Stabellini

    I started contributing to Xen Project in 2008. At that time, I was working for Citrix in the XenServer product team. I have been contributing every year since then, that makes it 10 years now!

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More in Tux Machines

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!

today's howtos

FOSS Events in Europe: Rust, foss-north, KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018

  • Rust loves GNOME Hackfest: Day 1
    This is a report of the first day of the Rust loves GNOME Hackfest that we are having in Madrid at the moment. During the first day we had a round of introductions and starting outlining the state of the art.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 1
    I'm in Madrid since Monday, at the third GNOME+Rust hackfest! The OpenShine folks are kindly letting us use their offices, on the seventh floor of a building by the Cuatro Caminos roundabout. I am very, very thankful that this time everyone seems to be working on developing gnome-class. It's a difficult project for me, and more brainpower is definitely welcome — all the indirection, type conversion, GObject obscurity, and procedural macro shenanigans definitely take a toll on oneself.
  • Five days left
    I use to joke that the last week before foss-north is the worst – everything is done, all that is left is the stress.
  • KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s flagship conference will be taking place in Copenhagen from May 2-4. It will cover Kubernetes, Prometheus OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, and other key technologies in cloud native computing.

Programming: Taxonomy of Tech Debt, Python and More

  • A Taxonomy of Tech Debt
    Hi there. I’m Bill “LtRandolph” Clark, and I’m the engineering manager for the Champions team on LoL. I’ve worked on several different teams on League over the past years, but one focus has been consistent: I’m obsessed with tech debt. I want to find it, I want to understand it, and where possible, I want to fix it. When engineers talk about any existing piece of technology - for example League of Legends patch 8.4 - we often talk about tech debt. I define tech debt as code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Countless blog posts, articles, and definitions have been written about this scourge of software development. This post will focus on types of tech debt I’ve seen during my time working at Riot, and a model for discussing it that we’re starting to use internally. If you only take away one lesson from this article, I hope you remember the “contagion” metric discussed below.
  • 6 Python datetime libraries
    Once upon a time, one of us (Lacey) had spent more than an hour staring at the table in the Python docs that describes date and time formatting strings. I was having a hard time understanding one specific piece of the puzzle as I was trying to write the code to translate a datetime string from an API into a Python datetime object, so I asked for help.
  • Getting started with Anaconda Python for data science
  • How to install the Moodle learning management system
  • Anatomy of a JavaScript Error
  • Is DevOps compatible with part-time community teams?