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Wednesday, 22 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Why the open source community needs a diverse supply chain

Filed under
OSS

Diversity and inclusivity in the technology industry—and in open source communities more specifically—have received a lot of coverage, both on Opensource.com and elsewhere. One approach to the issue foregrounds arguments about concepts that are more abstract—like human decency, for example.

But the "supply chain" metaphor works, too. And it can be an effective argument for championing greater inclusivity in our open organizations, especially when people dismiss arguments based on appeals to abstract concepts. Open organizations require inclusivity, which is a necessary input to get the diversity that reduces the risk in our supply chain.

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Red Hat: Kerala, Amazon and More

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Red Hat

Programming: Swift, Brilliant Jerks in Engineering, and Career Path for Software Developers

Filed under
Development
  • Swift code will run on Google's Fuchsia OS

    A few days ago, there was a flash-in-the-pan controversy over Google "forking" Apple's open-source programming language Swift. After a few minutes of speculation over whether Google was going to make its own special flavor of the language for its own purposes, Swift's creator Chris Lattner (who now works at Google) helpfully clarified the situation:

  • Brilliant Jerks in Engineering

    This are numerous articles and opinions on the topic, including Brilliant Jerks Cost More Than They Are Worth, and It's Better to Avoid a Toxic Employee than Hire a Superstar. My colleague Justin Becker is also giving a talk at QConSF 2017 on the topic: Am I a Brilliant Jerk?.

    It may help to clarify that "brilliant jerk" can mean different things to different people. To illustrate, I'll describe two types of brilliant jerks: the selfless and the selfish, and their behavior in detail. I'll then describe the damage caused by these jerks, and ways to deal with them.

    The following are fictional characters. These are not two actual engineers, but are collections of related traits to help examine this behavior beyond the simple "no asshole rule." These are engineers who by default act like jerks, not engineers who sometimes act that way.

  • [Older] The missing career path for software developers

    You started hacking on technology thrilled with every stroke of the key, making discoveries with every commit. You went about solving problems, finding new challenges. You were happy for a while, until you hit a plateau. There was a choice to be made. Continue solving the same problems or start managing others. You tried it out, and hated it. Longing to focus on technology, not people, you turned to your open source project. When it became successful, you became an open source maintainer but ended up overwhelmed and burned out. Hoping to get back to doing work that fascinates you, you went work for yourself. Lacking experience running a business, you're crushed with all the decisions you need to make. You’re nearing burnout — again. It feels like you’re on a hamster wheel.

Mastodon is Free Software, But It Does Not Respect Free Speech

Filed under
OSS
Web

Mastodon was always known to be tough on Nazis; it was known that they were strict on free speech only to a degree. After the treatment that I received yesterday, however, I can no longer recommend Mastodon. It may be Free software, but it’s very weak on free speech.

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Mesa 17.3 RC5 and Early Stages of Linux 4.15

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • mesa 17.3.0-rc5

    The fifth release candidate for Mesa 17.3.0 is now available. This is the last planned release candidate before the final release.

    We still have a couple of regressions in our tracker [1] although I'm anticipating for those to be resolved by EOW.

  • Mesa 17.3-RC5 Released, Official Mesa 3D Update Expected By Next Week

    The Mesa 17.3 release game is in overtime but it should be wrapping up in the days ahead.

    Emil Velikov of Collabora announced the Mesa 17.3-RC5 release candidate this morning. He anticipates it being the last release candidate, but there still are a few blocker bugs open. As of writing there still are 4 bugs open with one pertaining to Gallium3D Softpipe and the others being Intel driver issues.

  • Extra KVM Changes For Linux 4.15 Bring UMIP Support, AMD SEV Changes Delayed

    As some additional work past the KVM changes for Linux 4.15 submitted last week, a few more feature items have been queued.

    The second batch of Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) updates sent in today for Linux 4.15 include ARM GICv4 support, x86 bug fixes, the AMD VFIO NFT performance fix, and x86 guest UMIP support. Landing already with Linux 4.15 is Intel UMIP capabilities for User-Mode Instruction Prevention to prevent certain instructions from being executed if the ring level is greater than zero. This latest KVM pull update adds this UMIP support to its space for both real and emulated guests.

  • AMD EPYC Is Running Well On Linux 4.15

    Of the many changes coming for Linux 4.15, as detailed this weekend Radeon GPU and AMD CPU customers have a lot to be thankful for with this new kernel update currently in development. Here are some initial benchmarks of the Linux 4.15 development kernel using an AMD EPYC 7601 32-core / 64-thread setup.

    When it comes to EPYC in Linux 4.15, the kernel side-bits have landed for Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV), CPU temperature monitoring support now working, and improved NUMA node balancing.

Videos: Akademy 2017 Talk, Upgrading Linux Mint, This Week in Linux

Filed under
Misc
  • Akademy 2017 talk

    The talk by Jean-Baptiste Mardelle’s at Akademy 2017 is released along with many other interesting talks.

    Akademy is the annual world summit of KDE, one of the largest Free Software communities in the world. It is a free, non-commercial event organized by the KDE Community.

  • How To In-place Upgrade Linux Mint

    This video shows how to upgrade Linux Mint from 17.3 to 18.3 while keeping all of your personal data intact.

    Please be sure to give EzeeLinux a ‘Like’ on Facebook! Thanks! Also check out http://www.ezeelinux.com for more about Linux.

  • Linux Kernel 4.14, Firefox Quantum, Fedora 27, Munich? Meh | This Week in Linux 14

    On this episode of This Week in Linux. The first 6 Year LTS Linux Kernel was released this week. Huge Update from Mozilla with Firefox Quantum. New distro releases from Fedora and Slax.

LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.2.1 MR

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

LibreELEC 8.2.1 is a maintenance release that includes Kodi 17.6. It also resolves a minor time-zone issue after recent daylight saving changes, a resume from suspend issue with the Apple IR driver, and it provides two new SMB client configuration options in Kodi settings. You can now set a minimum SMB protocol version to prevent prevent SMB1 from ever being used, and a ‘legacy security’ option forces weak authentication to resolve issues seen with the USB sharing functions on some older router/NAS devices. If updating to LibreELEC 8.2 for the first time PLEASE READ THE RELEASE NOTES below here before posting issues in the forums as there are disruptive changes to Lirc, Samba, and Tvheadend.

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Microsoft Worker Leaves for Google, Criticizes Post-Windows Vista Dev Strategy

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Google
Microsoft

Microsoft employee Tim Sneath, who spent no less than 17 years with the company, announced in a blog post that he’s leaving the software giant to work for Google on the new Flutter mobile framework.

Sneath started his post by emphasizing how great Microsoft is, explaining that he company has “incredibly diverse interests” and is “filled with talented people.”

Despite the good parts, however, the former Microsoft Program Manager who worked on a series of projects for developers, discussed what he described as the “missteps” that the Redmond-based software giant embraced beginning with the Windows Vista era.

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Also: ‘Goodbye Microsoft, hello Linux’

LiFT Scholarship Recipients Advance Open Source Around the World

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Fifteen people from 13 different countries have received Linux Foundation Training Scholarships (LiFT) in the category of Linux Newbies. This year, 27 people received scholarships across all categories — the most ever awarded by the Foundation.

Now in its seventh year, the program awards training scholarships to current and aspiring IT professionals worldwide who may not otherwise have the means for specialized training. The Foundation has awarded 75 scholarships worth more than $168,000 since the program began.

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Linux Containers vs Virtual Machines

Filed under
Linux
Server

Ever since containers on Linux became popular, determining the difference between Linux containers and virtual machines has become trickier. This article will provide you with the details to understand the differences between Linux containers and virtual machines.

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Linux gizmo indexes photos and videos for visual recognition search

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Pimloc’s “Pholio” runs Linux on an Nvidia Tegra, and provides offline storage and search of images and video using visual and face recognition.

Digital imaging has lived up to its promise of making it easier to take more images more quickly, but the promise that it would make it easier to find those images has fallen short. Unless you spend time with an image management package and apply tags to each and every photo, it’s a pain to try to find specific images or groups of images. A new Kickstarter project called Pholio promises to skip the prep work and use visual recognition technology to quickly locate any image or video you seek.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why Linus is right (as usual)

    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable.

    This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs.
    The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.

  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes

    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies.

    One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

Filed under
Software
  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting

    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download.

    VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon.
    Why Vidcutter?

    If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily.

    VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More

    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases.

    The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.

  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows

    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux.

    It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.

  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements

    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes.

    MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Reveal.js presentation hacks

    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it.

    Reveal.js is an open source framework for creating presentations in HTML based on HTML5 and CSS. Ryan describes Gist-reveal.it, his project that makes it easier for users to create, fork, present, and share Reveal.js slides by using GitHub's Gist service as a datastore.

  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know

    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me, use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project. Graphic designers are experts in choosing fonts, but in this article I'll explore typefaces for everyone who isn't a professional designer.

  • Broader role essential for OpenStack Foundation, says Mirantis’ Renski
  • URSA Announces Name Change to Open Source Integrators to Reflect Their Full Spectrum of Open ERP Expertise
  • 2018 is Year for Open Source Software for Pentagon

    The US Pentagon is set to make a major investment in open source software, if section 886 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 is passed.

    The section acknowledges the use of open source software, the release of source code into public repositories, and a competition to inspire work with open source that supports the mission of the Department of Defense.

  • How startups save buckets of money on early software development

     

    Moving along, we have to segue with a short modularity lesson. More specifically, how modularity applies to software.

    Essentially, all products and services become cheaper and more plentiful when all the processes involved in production become modularised.

6-Way Enterprise Focused Linux Distribution Comparison With An Intel Core i9, Dual Xeon Gold Systems

Filed under
Linux

Here's our latest Linux distribution comparison with this time looking at the out-of-the-box performance of six Linux distributions while running a range of enterprise/workstation-focused benchmarks while using two systems. One system is a high-end Core i9 7980XE desktop system and the other a Tyan 1U Xeon Scalable server with dual Xeon Gold 6138 processors.

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Security: FOSS Versus Windows

Filed under
Security

Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC.

Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU. The hexa-core SoC has appeared on T-Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399 SBC and RK3399 Coreboard computer-on-module, as well as Videostrong’s VS-RD-RK3399 SBC and Theobroma’s RK3399-Q7 Qseven module. Now we have a new contender: Shenzhen based Vamrs, which built the limited edition Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC as the official RK3399 dev board for Rockchip, is now re-launching the board, which features a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector, with “many in stock” for a discounted price of $75.

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With government approval, OpenStack adoption continues apace in China

Filed under
Server
OSS

Deployments of OpenStack cloud are growing faster in China and the APAC region than anywhere else in the world, backed in part by the Chinese government's vocal support for the open source infrastructure.

It is China in particular where some of the biggest deployments are running. China UnionPay recently overtook Visa for the largest volume of card payments in the world. The state-operated railway network China Rail oversees billions of passengers every year. By total number of subscribers China Mobile tops the list for biggest mobile phone operator globally. And the massive utility organisation the State Grid Corporation of China employs 1.5 million people.

All of these enormous enterprises are running OpenStack clouds. Why?

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Programming and howtos: Python, Swift and Recipes

Security: Updates, Intel, Torvalds

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Intel: We've found severe bugs in secretive Management Engine, affecting millions
    Thanks to an investigation by third-party researchers into Intel's hidden firmware in certain chips, Intel decided to audit its firmware and on Monday confirmed it had found 11 severe bugs that affect millions of computers and servers. The flaws affect Management Engine (ME), Trusted Execution Engine (TXE), and Server Platform Services (SPS).
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 71 - GitHub's Security Scanner
    Josh and Kurt talk about GitHub's security scanner and Linus' security email. We clarify the esoteric difference between security bugs and non security bugs.
  • Linus Torvalds 'sorry' for swearing, blames popularity of Linux itself
    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has apologised – a bit – for calling some security-centric kernel contributors “f*cking morons”. Torvalds unleashed a profanity-laden rant at Google developer Kees Cook, over the latter's proposal to harden the kernel. Another Google security chap, Matthew Garret, asked Torvalds “ Can you clarify a little with regard to how you'd have liked this patchset to look?” To which Torvalds responded that “I think the actual status of the patches is fairly good with the default warning.”

Benchmarks: Linux Power Use, Sabrent EC-SS31, Phoronix Test Suite 7.6 M3

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Ubuntu MATE 17.10

Ubuntu Mate 17.10 is a pretty stable and rock solid distribution which has got most things right. There is nothing unlikable about the distro. However, I feel it could have been a lot better if they had allowed 4 windows to be snapped on each corners and done something about the opaque top panel. The software included are very much standard and even though some of their names have been changed we all know what’s under the hood. Overall Experience has been good. Having already tested Ubuntu with Gnome 3, I can say that Ubuntu Mate 17.10 feels a lot faster and quicker in terms of GUI response. Read more