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Sunday, 22 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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FFmpeg 4.0 Released

Filed under
Movies
OSS
  • FFmpeg 4.0 released

    Version 4.0 of the FFmpeg multimedia toolkit is out. There is a long list of new filters, formats, and more; see the announcement for details.

  • April 20th, 2018, FFmpeg 4.0 "Wu"
  • FFmpeg 4.0 Released With New Encoders/Decoders, NVIDIA NVDEC Decoding

    FFmpeg 4.0 is now available as the latest major release for this widely-used open-source multimedia encode/decoder library.

    FFmpeg 4.0 introduces NVIDIA NVDEC GPU-based decoding for H264 / MJPEG / HEVC / MPEG-1/2/4, VC1, VP8, and VP9 formats. This release also adds an Intel QSV accelerated overlay filter, an OpenCL overlay filter, VA-API MJPEG and VP8 decoding support, new VA-API filters, and many other accelerated code path improvements.

Graphics: AMD, Intel and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMDGPU DC Fixes For Linux 4.17 Take Care Of "The Dark Screen Issue"

    AMD's Alex Deucher has sent in a small set of fixes for the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver in the Linux 4.17 kernel.

    The three patches are for fixing a dark screen issue with AMDGPU DC, a fix for clock/voltage dependency tracking for WattMan, and an updated SMU interface for the yet-to-be-announced Vega 12 GPU.

  • Intel KVMGT 2018-Q1 Release Offers Mediated GPU Pass-Through Improvements

    While the relevant bits for supporting Intel GPU mediated pass-through to virtual machines with KVM are now upstream in the Linux kernel as well as in QEMU 2.12, Intel developers have just announced their quarterly release of "KVMGT" for those wanting the officially blessed configuration for running Intel virtual GPU support with KVM virtual machines.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Adds Vega M Support

    Following RadeonSI adding "Vega M" support for the new Radeon graphics appearing embedded on select Intel Kabylake processor packages, the RADV developers have similarly staged their Vega M support in this open-source Vulkan driver.

  • The Forge Now Offers Full-Featured Vulkan Support On Linux

    Earlier this month we covered "The Forge" picking up initial Linux support and now they have rounded out their full-featured Linux support with Vulkan rendering.

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Red Hat Rebranding and Shares

Filed under
Red Hat

Databases: Revenue Shift and PostgreSQL

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • How open source databases are sucking revenue out of legacy vendors’ pockets

    In other words, the value of the open source database market to customers/users is measured in the tens of billions, or even hundreds of billions, of dollars. One other way of thinking about this? That's tens or hundreds of billions of dollars that proprietary vendors will never capture.

  • Has the time finally come for PostgreSQL?

    For nearly 30 years, PostgreSQL (a.k.a., Postgres) has arguably been the most common SQL open source database that you have never heard of. Call it the Zelig of databases, its technology either sat behind or acted as the starting point behind an array of nearly a dozen commercial database offerings from EnterpriseDB to Redshift, Greenplum, Netezza, CockroachDB and a host of others. And PostgreSQL has distinguished lineage as one of the brainchilds of Turing Award winner and database legend Dr. Michael Stonebraker, who started the PostgreSQL project based on the lessons learned from his previous database venture, Ingres.

How to Turn Any Linux PC Into a Kodi-Based HTPC With Kodibuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

Kodi originated as Xbox Media Center, or XBMC. However, it evolved into what’s now Kodi. The utilitarian open-source media center plays pretty much any audio and video file you throw at it.

Plus, Kodi add-ons serve as apps similar to what’s found on streaming devices like Roku. For instance, the Plex for Kodi add-on provides access to your Plex media server library, while the Funimation Now add-on lets you stream Funimation from Kodi. Furthermore, the robust Kodi media center provides plenty of options to access networked media files.

As a Kodi-based Linux distro, Kodibuntu is a fusion of Kodi and Lubuntu, a lightweight Ubuntu derivative. Yet Kodibuntu differs from the likes of OpenELEC, LibreELEC, and OSMC in that it’s a full on Linux distro with a desktop environment. While the main focus is media center use, you benefit from the ability to access and edit system files.

Thus, it’s more comprehensive than most Kodi OSes. If you’ve used Ubuntu, then Kodibuntu should present a familiar experience. Learn more about Kodi with our complete A-Z of Kodi guide!

Read more

Also: Will You Upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS? [Poll]

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.16, KDE Plasma 5.12.4

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

Quite a few snapshots have been released this week and the last one for OpenSuSE Tumbleweed, bringing some of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software. Among these, we can mention the recently released Linux 4.16 kernel series as the operating system is now powered by Linux kernel 4.16.2.

"The 4.16.2 Linux Kernel made ip_tunnel, ipv6, ip6_gre, ip6_tunnel and vti6 better to validate user provided tunnel names. Due to a build system failure, not all 4.16.2 binaries were built correctly; this will be resolved in the 20180417 snapshot, which will be released shortly," said Douglas DeMaio in a recent report.

Read more

Best open source help desk software

Filed under
OSS

The help desk market is crowded and dominated by player like Zendesk, Salesforce and Spiceworks, but there are some solid open source alternatives for smaller businesses with the time and patience.

A good piece of help desk software should allow any business to log, track and respond to customer support queries across a range of platforms.

Open source solutions may not be as feature rich or fully formed out of the box, and they won't look as good as Zendesk or Salesforce, but they give great customisation options and are much more cost effective than closed source solutions.

Read more

Linux Kernel 4.15 Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.16 Now

Filed under
Linux

After a very busy cycle due to the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities, which were publicly disclosed earlier this year and later discovered to put billions of devices using modern processors at risk of attacks, the Linux 4.15 kernel series was released at the of January heavily redesign against two critical hardware bugs.

Now, nearly three months and only eighteen maintenance updates later, the Linux 4.15 kernel series reached end of life and it will no longer receive support. As such, all those using a kernel from the Linux 4.15 branch on their GNU/Linux distributions are urged to upgrade to the latest Linux 4.16 kernel series as soon as possible.

Read more

LibreOffice 6.1 Lands Mid August 2018, First Bug Hunting Session Starts April 27

Filed under
LibO

Work on the next big release of the widely-used open-source and cross-platform office suite for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems, LibreOffice 6.1, has already begun this week with a focus on revamping the online experience and improving the Writer and Calc components.

A first bug hunting session was scheduled for the end of next week, on April 27, 2018, when developers will hack on the first alpha milestone of LibreOffice 6.1, which should be available to download for all supported platforms a few days before the event. During the bug hunting session, devs will try to fix as many bugs as possible.

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This Chart Shows How The Radeon RX 580 vs. GeForce GTX 1060 Now Compete Under Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

It was just last year that open-source RadeonSI/RADV developers were trying to get the Radeon RX 580 "Polaris" GPU to be competitive with the GeForce GTX 1060 as it is under Windows given each GPU's capabilities. We've seen the RX 580 and GTX 1060 dancing under Linux the past few months and yesterday's 20-way GPU comparison with Rise of the Tomb Raider was quite significant -- perhaps most surprising being how well the RX 580 performed. Heck, just one or two years ago it was an accomplishment seeing any official Radeon driver support at-launch for new Linux game releases. So here are some extensive tests looking closer at the GTX 1060 vs. RX 580 battle in this latest Vulkan-powered Linux game port.

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Linux 4.9.95

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.95 kernel.

All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Openwashing Apple and Microsoft Proprietary Frameworks/Services

Filed under
OSS

Viperr Linux Keeps Crunchbang Alive with a Fedora Flair

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Do you remember Crunchbang Linux? Crunchbang (often referred to as #!) was a fan-favorite, Debian-based distribution that focused on using a bare minimum of resources. This was accomplished by discarding the standard desktop environment and using a modified version of the Openbox Window Manager. For some, Crunchbang was a lightweight Linux dream come true. It was lightning fast, easy to use, and hearkened back to the Linux of old.

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Openwashing Cars

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source: sharing patents to speed up innovation

    Adjusting to climate change will require a lot of good ideas. The need to develop more sustainable forms of industry in the decades ahead demands vision and ingenuity. Elon Musk, chief executive of Tesla and SpaceX, believes he has found a way for companies to share their breakthroughs and speed up innovation.

    Fond of a bold gesture, the carmaker and space privateer announced back in 2014 that Tesla would make its patents on electric vehicle technology freely available, dropping the threat of lawsuits over its intellectual property (IP). Mr Musk argued the removal of pesky legal barriers would help “accelerate the advent of sustainable transport”.
    The stunning move has already had an impact. Toyota has followed Tesla by sharing more than 5,600 patents related to hydrogen fuel cell cars, making them available royalty free. Ford has also decided to allow competitors to use its own electric vehicle-related patents, provided they are willing to pay for licences.

    Could Telsa’s audacious strategy signal a more open approach to patents among leading innovators? And if more major companies should decide to adopt a carefree attitude to IP, what are the risks involved?

  • Autonomous car platform Apollo doesn't want you to reinvent the wheel

    Open source technologies are solving many of our most pressing problems, in part because the open source model of cooperation, collaboration, and almost endless iteration creates an environment where problems are more readily solved. As the adage goes, "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow."

    However, self-driving vehicle technology is one rapidly growing area that hasn't been greatly influenced by open source. Most of today's autonomous vehicles, including those from Volkswagen, BMW, Volvo, Uber, and Google, ride on proprietary technology, as companies seek to be the first to deliver a successful solution. That changed recently with the launch of Baidu's Apollo.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • KDE Applications 18.04 Brings Dolphin Improvements, JuK Wayland Support

    The KDE community has announced the release today of KDE Applications 18.04 as the first major update to the open-source KDE application set for 2018.

  • Plasma Startup

    Startup is one of the rougher aspects of the Plasma experience and therefore something we’ve put some time into fixing

    [...]

    The most important part of any speed work is correctly analysing it.
    systemd-bootchart is nearly perfect for this job, but it’s filled with a lot of system noise.

  • Announcing Virtlyst – a web interface to manage virtual machines

    Virtlyst is a web tool that allows you to manage virtual machines.

    In essence it’s a clone of webvirtmgr, but using Cutelyst as the backend, the reasoning behind this was that my father in law needs a server for his ASP app on a Win2k server, the server has only 4 GiB of RAM and after a week running webvirtmgr it was eating 300 MiB close to 10% of all available RAM. To get a VNC or SPICE tunnel it spawns websockify which on each new instance around 20 MiB of RAM get’s used.

    I found this unacceptable, a tool that is only going to be used once in a while, like if the win2k freezes or goes BSOD, CPU usage while higher didn’t play a role on this.

  • OPNFV: driving the network towards open source "Tip to Top"

    Heather provides an update on the current status of OPNFV. How is its work continuing and how is it pursuing the overall mission? Heather says much of its work is really ‘devops’ and it's working on a continuous integration basis with the other open source bodies. That work continues as more bodies join forces with the Linux Foundation. Most recently OPNFV has signed a partnership agreement with the open compute project. Heather says the overall OPNFV objective is to work towards open source ‘Tip to top’ and all built by the community in ‘open source’. “When we started, OPNFV was very VM oriented (virtual machine), but now the open source movement is looking more to cloud native and containerisation as the way forward,” she says. The body has also launched a C-RAN project to ensure that NFV will be ready to underpin 5G networks as they emerge.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E07 – Seven Years in Tibet - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Failure to automate: 3 ways it costs you

    When I ask IT leaders what they see as the biggest benefit to automation, “savings” is often the first word out of their mouths. They’re under pressure to make their departments run as efficiently as possible and see automation as a way to help them do so.

    Cost savings are certainly a benefit of automation, but I’d argue that IT leaders who pursue automation for cost-savings alone are missing the bigger picture of how it can help their businesses.

    The true value of automation doesn’t lie in bringing down expenses, but rather in enabling IT teams to scale their businesses.

  • Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0 Launches With Secured Kubernetes

    After months of development effort, Kubernetes is now fully supported in the stable release of the Docker Enterprise Edition.

    Docker Inc. officially announced Docker EE 2.0 on April 17, adding features that have been in development in the Docker Community Edition (CE) as well as enhanced enterprise grade capabilities. Docker first announced its intention to support Kubernetes in October 2017. With Docker EE 2.0, Docker is providing a secured configuration of Kubernetes for container orchestration.

    "Docker EE 2.0 brings the promise of choice," Docker Chief Operating Officer Scott Johnston told eWEEK. "We have been investing heavily in security in the last few years, and you'll see that in our Kubernetes integration as well."

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Milestones and Diversity Update

Filed under
Debian
  • 15.010958904109589041

    And yes! On April 15, I passed the 15-year-mark as a Debian Developer.

  • 10 years + 1 day

    yesterday 10 years ago I became a Debian Developer.

  • Diversity Update

    Which brings us to a panel for the upcoming Debconf in Taiwan. There is a suggestion to have a Gender Forum at the Openday. I'm still not completely sure what it should cover or what is expected for it and I guess it's still open for suggestions. There will be a plan, let's see to make it diverse and great!

    I won't promise to send the next update sooner, but I'll try to get back into it. Right now I'm also working on a (German language) submission for a non-binary YouTube project and it would be great to see that thing lift off. I'll be more verbose on that front.

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Beta 2, Replacement for gksu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Unique Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Beta 2

    It is the most unique among the Official Flavors in the 18.04. It's the only to bring Chromium browser, and it gives you the unique Budgie Desktop experiences. It is really a good place for everyone who wants new, distinct desktop experience with modern version of software and broad space to explore. And ultimately it is still available for 32 bit, which has been abandoned by Ubuntu original. We will wait until the planned release on April 26.

  • Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Behind communitheme: interviewing Frederik

    My name is Frederik, I live in Germany and I am working as a java software developer in my daily job.

    I am using Ubuntu since 5 years and quickly started to report bugs and issues when they jumped into my face. Apart from that, I like good music, and beautiful software. I also make my own music in my free time.

  • gksu Removed From Ubuntu, Here's The Recommended Replacement

    gksu is used to allow elevating your permissions when running graphical applications, for example in case you want to run a graphical text editor as root to edit a system file, or to be able to remove or add a file to a system folder.

  •  

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Microsoft Linuxwashing and Research Openwashing

today's howtos

Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more

Graphics: Intel and Mesa 18.1 RC1 Released

  • Intel 2018Q1 Graphics Stack Recipe
    Last week Intel's Open-Source Technology Center released their latest quarterly "graphics stack recipe" for the Linux desktop. The Intel Graphics Stack Recipe is the company's recommended configuration for an optimal and supported open-source graphics driver experience for their Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics found on Intel processors.
  • Mesa 18.1-RC1 Released With The Latest Open-Source 3D Driver Features
    Seemingly flying under our radar is that Mesa 18.1 has already been branched and the first release candidate issued. While the Mesa website hasn't yet been updated for the 18.1 details, Dylan Baker appears to be the release manager for the 18.1 series -- the second quarter of 2018 release stream.