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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2017 - 5:05am
Story Graphics: Texture Compression, Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL), and AMD FreeSync Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2017 - 5:02am
Story KStars 2.8.9 is released! Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2017 - 4:23am
Story Security: Mirai, Vista 10, Starbucks, and Hacking Team Investigation Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2017 - 4:14am
Story GNOME: Bluetooth, Predictions, Librsvg and NetworkManager Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2017 - 4:12am
Story Parrot Security 3.10 Ethical Hacking OS Adds Full Firejail/AppArmor Sandboxing Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2017 - 3:36am
Story GNOME 3.27.3 Released Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2017 - 3:33am
Story Review: OnePlus 5T Rianne Schestowitz 16/12/2017 - 8:42pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 16/12/2017 - 8:40pm
Story Canonical Releases Small Kernel Patch for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS to Fix a Regression Rianne Schestowitz 16/12/2017 - 8:31pm

OSS/Sharing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Chrome 64 Beta: stronger pop-up blocker, Resize Observer, and import.meta
  • Chrome 64 Beta Brings Stronger Pop-Up Blocker, JavaScript Improvements

    Ahead of the holidays Google has pushed out the Chrome 64 beta to all supported platforms.

  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® Hadoop® v3.0.0 General Availability

    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, today announced Apache® Hadoop® v3.0.0, the latest version of the Open Source software framework for reliable, scalable, distributed computing.

  • Open source science: Scientists researching rice plant genetics agree to not file for patents

    The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR), a nonprofit established in the 2014 Farm Bill with bipartisan congressional support, awarded a $1 million Seeding Solutions grant to University of California, Davis (UC Davis) to study the genetics of rice plants. Together with researchers at the University of North Carolina and collaborators, the team will develop and implement a chemistry-driven gene discovery approach to identify genes that modulate root traits.

  • Lytro could open source their light-field photo sharing platform
  • Lytro considering open source light field photo sharing platform

    Lytro is reportedly considering an open source solution after announcing it would no longer support its sharing platform for Lytro cameras’ ‘living images.’

  • When Waze Won't Help, Palestinians Make Their Own Maps

    If you want to drive the 15 or so miles from Jerusalem to the city of Jericho, in the Palestinian Territories, Google Maps will tell you: “Can’t find a way there.” Waze will issue a warning: “Caution: This destination is in a high risk area or is prohibited to Israelis by law.” If you press “Confirm Drive” nonetheless, the app will direct you, just not all the way.

    When you pass from Israel into the West Bank, part of the occupied Palestinian Territories, Waze’s directions simply end. To keep going, you need to change your setting to allow access to “high risk” areas. Even then, GPS coverage tends to be limited.

  • Using Gmail with OAUTH2 in Linux and on an ESP8266

    One of the tasks I dread is configuring a web server to send email correctly via Gmail. The simplest way of sending emails is SMTP, and there are a number of scripts out there that provide a simple method to send mail that way with a minimum of configuration. There’s even PHP mail(), although it’s less than reliable.

  • Simplicity Before Generality, Use Before Reuse

    A common problem in component frameworks, class libraries, foundation services, and other infrastructure code is that many are designed to be general purpose without reference to concrete applications. This leads to a dizzying array of options and possibilities that are often unused or misused — or just not useful.

    Generally, developers work on specific systems; specifically, the quest for unbounded generality rarely serves them well (if at all). The best route to generality is through understanding known, specific examples, focusing on their essence to find an essential common solution. Simplicity through experience rather than generality through guesswork.

  • What Ruby Needs

    Of all of the questions we receive at RedMonk, one of the most common concerns programming languages. Whether from members of a given community or a commercial entity, the desire is to better understand a given language’s trajectory and the context around it. Is it going up or down, and what are the reasons for that direction? And, of course: can that direction be meaningfully changed?

    Recently, we’ve received several such inquiries around Ruby. For those with an interest in the language, then, the following is a quick public summary of the answers we’ve been providing privately.

  • HTML 5.2 is done, HTML 5.3 is coming

    Today W3C releases HTML 5.2. This is the second revision of HTML5, following last year’s HTML 5.1 Recommendation. In 2014 we expressed a goal to produce a revision roughly every year; HTML 5.2 is a continuation of that commitment.

    This Recommendation like its predecessor provides an updated stable guide to what is HTML. In the past year there has been a significant cleanup of the specification. We have introduced some new features, and removed things that are no longer part of the modern Web Platform, or that never achieved broad interoperability. As always we have also fixed bugs in the specification, making sure it adapts to the changing reality of the Web.

    Many of the features added integrate other work done in W3C. The Payment Request API promises to make commerce on the Web far easier, reducing the risks of making a mistake or being caught by an unscrupulous operator. New security features such as Content Security Policy protect users more effectively, while new work incorporated from ARIA helps developers offer people with disabilities a good user experience of their applications.

Games: SteamOS Birthday, Best Linux Games of 2017, Finding Paradise

Filed under
Gaming
  • It's Been Four Years Since SteamOS Began Shipping With Not Much To Show

    It was four years ago this week that Valve began shipping SteamOS, their Debian-based Linux distribution intended for Steam Machines and those wanting a gaming-oriented Linux distribution. While Valve still technically maintains the SteamOS Linux distribution, the outlook at this point is rather bleak.

    For our coverage from four years ago when Valve began shipping SteamOS 1.0 based on Debian Wheezy, see SteamOS Compositor Details, Kernel Patches, Screenshots, Former NVIDIA, Microsoft Developers Doing Lots Of The SteamOS Work, and The First NVIDIA GeForce Benchmarks On The SteamOS Beta.

  • 7 Best Linux Games of 2017

    We take a look at the best Linux games of 2017, ranging from AAA titles to introspective indie hits.

    So park your gamepad, pop your feet up, and raise a glass of something socially acceptable to what’s been another terrific year for Tux fans with twitchy thumbs!

  • Finding Paradise Available Now for PC, Mac, and Linux

    Canadian indie game studio Freebird Games has released Finding Paradise, a spiritual successor to the studio's hit game To the Moon. You can check out the game's release date trailers below, the first being slightly less of a "serious" trailer:

OSS: Blockchain, Avast, Predictions, GreenKey

Filed under
OSS
  • Startup Aims to Build Open-Source Telecom Ecosystem on Blockchain

    There are 2,000+ mobile network operations in charge of providing communication services at global scale. However, the traditional infrastructure is centralized, inflexible and inaccurate. Common services like 3G/4G, Wi-Fi, BOSS mobile communications solutions and companies that use cloud-based communications solutions are often unable to render accurate content billing and distribution.

    Conventional mobile packages overcharge customers, not to mention that they pose concerns around data transmissions. An alternative solution to average mobile network providers could be Blockchain technology.

  • Merry Xmas, fellow code nerds: Avast open-sources decompiler

    Malware hunting biz and nautical jargon Avast has released its machine-code decompiler RetDec as open source, in the hope of arming like-minded haters of bad bytes and other technically inclined sorts with better analytical tools.

    As discussed as the recent Botconf 2017 in France earlier this month, RetDec provides a way to turn machine code – binary executables – back into an approximation of the original source code.

  • 10 open source predictions for 2018

    With 2017 just about done and dusted, dozens of open source experts have polished their crystal balls and made predictions about what can be expected in the open source space in 2018.

    Now it's our turn. (With fingers firmly crossed) here are 10 open source trends that you may – or may not – see coming to the fore next year. Some are obvious, some are frivolous, and some could just change your life.

  • Stop Calling Everything "Open Source": What "Open Source" Really Means

    "Open source" is an exciting concept in the world of software and beyond. But it shouldn't be applied to contexts where it makes no sense.

  • GreenKey to join Symphony; open source voice software

    GreenKey, creator of patented voice software with integrated speech recognition designed for the financial markets, today announced the firm has joined the Symphony Software Foundation, a nonprofit organization fostering innovation in financial services through open source software (OSS).

  • GreenKey Joins the Symphony Software Foundation; Will Open Source Voice Software

    GreenKey, creator of patented voice software with integrated speech recognition designed for the financial markets, today announced the firm has joined the Symphony Software Foundation, a nonprofit organization fostering innovation in financial services through open source software (OSS). GreenKey will release a Community Edition of its voice software development kit (SDK) that will enable banks and other financial market firms to "voice enable" any web application.

Latest Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

SUSE: Etisalat Digital, OrionVM, Boot Splash Screen

Filed under
SUSE
  • Etisalat Digital to add SUSE open source solutions

    Etisalat Digital is to add Linux and open source solutions to its managed services mix after signing a partnership to on-board SUSE solutions.

  • OrionVM Broadens Cloud Offering with Open Source Enterprise Support Partner SUSE

    OrionVM, an award-winning next-gen Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) provider, today announced continued growth of the OrionVM Wholesale Cloud Platform with the addition of technology partner SUSE, the world’s first provider of an Enterprise Linux Distribution. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server represents the first open source enterprise supported Linux operating system on the OrionVM platform.

  • SUSE Rolls Out New Version Of Their In-Kernel Boot Splash Screen

    Back in October I wrote about SUSE working on a new, in-kernel bootsplash project. That work has yet to be mainlined but it looks like it's still on track for going upstream in the future with the latest version now being released that addresses issues uncovered during review.

    SUSE is developing this in-kernel bootsplash program as an alternative to the user-space Plymouth and other programs. SUSE's implementation runs off the FBCON frame-buffer console rather than DRM/KMS and they hope with it being in the kernel will prove to be more reliable. This in-kernel bootsplash can also allow hiding all kernel output and other differences compared to user-space implementations.

Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

It's FOSS on Linux Vs. Unix and 32-bit Architectures

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Vs. Unix

    ​In computer time, a substantial part of the population has a misconception that the Unix and Linux operating systems are one and the same. However, the opposite is true. Let's look at it from a closer look.

  • Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

    One after the other, Linux distributions are dropping 32-bit support. Or, to be accurate, they drop support for the Intel x86 32-bit architecture (IA-32). Indeed, computers based on x86_64 hardware (x86-64) are superior in every way to their 32-bits counterpart: they are more powerful, run faster, are more compact, and more energy efficient. Not mentioning their price has considerably decreased in just a few years.

Mir 0.29

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu
  • Mir 0.29.0 release

    We are pleased to announce that Mir 0.29.0 has been released and is available in Mir release PPA. There are builds for the supported Ubuntu releases (16.04 LTS “Xenial”, 17.04 “Zesty” and 17.10 “Artful”) .

    Mir 0.29.0 is in the process of uploading into Ubuntu 18.04 “Bionic” (it should move out of “proposed” and into the main archive in about a week). If you need it sooner then a “Bionic” build is also available in the Mir release PPA.

  • Mir 0.29 Released To Improve Their Wayland Implementation

    The past few days Canonical's Mir developers have been preparing their next milestone with pushing this display server along with Wayland protocol support and now that new "v0.29" release is available.

Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon Review: Best ‘Linux’ Distro for Beginners!

Filed under
Reviews

Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon boots fast (even on a slow rotational disk), very stable (I haven’t seen any application crash in the past 3 days that I’ve been using it) and the level of responsiveness it has shown is top-notch, probably matched only by another Linux Mint! As far as the end user-experience is concerned, I’d say it’s the best ‘Linux’ distro for beginners, it certainly knows how to please the end-user… welcome to the HecticGeek‘s review of Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon edition.

Few years ago Linux Mint changed their release strategy. They now rely on the core of Ubuntu LTS releases as the foundation for their operating system. As far as I can see, this is working great for them. Because Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) provides security & maintenance updates up to 5 years & it is already based on a solid foundation set by Ubuntu. This in tern gives Linux Mint developers enough space to ‘breath’ a little and fully concentrate on what they do best: development of their awesome desktop shell & other native Linux Mint user-applications.

Read more

LXLE Review: A Hassle-free Linux for Older Hardware

Filed under
Reviews

LXLE is a lightweight Linux distribution mainly focused on older systems. John takes it for a test drive and shares his experience in this LXLE review.
Read more

Devices: Fairwaves, FriendlyElec, Ataribox and Tizen

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Low-cost embeddable SDR occupies a mini-PCIe card

    The Fairwaves “XTRX” mini-PCIe SDR card is a low-cost embeddable SDR card aimed at high data rate apps including 4G/5G and “massive” MIMO.

    Fairwaves Inc.’s “XTRX” SDR mini-PCIe card, which launched on Nov. 30 at Crowd Supply, has earned more than 80 percent of its funding goal with one month remaining. The company claims the full sized mini-PCIe XTRX card (30 x 51mm) is the smallest commercially available SDR card. For comparison, the USB-interfaced LimeSDR Mini and RTL-SDR boards measure 69 x 31.4mm and 40 x 60mm, respectively.

  • Tiny quad-core Linux SBCs slim down and get an RPi-like carrier

    FriendlyElec has unveiled COM-like variants of its tiny, low-cost quad-core, Allwinner H3- and H5-based NanoPi Neo and Neo2 SBCs, plus an RPi style carrier.

    FriendlyElec’s new $8 “NanoPi Neo Core” and $25 “NanoPi Neo Core2” boards are low-profile variants of the company’s earlier 40 x 40mm NanoPi Neo and NanoPi Neo 2 SBCs, but with their large, topside USB and Ethernet connectors replaced by a third dual-row pin header. As a result, the new boards are more like computer-on-modules (COMs) than single-board computers (SBCs), in that they’re meant to be combined with off-the-shelf or custom carrier boards, such as FriendlyElec’s RPi 3-like Mini Shield (see farther below).

    [...]

    Operating system — Ubuntu Core; Armbian; U-boot bootloader

  • You Can Pre-Order Ataribox Very Soon, But The Thing Is Still Sort Of A Mystery
  • Sling TV now available on 2017 models of Samsung Smart TVs
  • Give your Gear S3 and Gear Sport a Christmas makeover with these FREE watchfaces

Security: Bolt, Updates, NIST, Starbucks

Filed under
Security

Software: Top 5 Linux Music Players, Udeler, and Thomas

Filed under
Software
  • Top 5 Linux Music Players

    No matter what you do, chances are you enjoy a bit of music playing in the background. Whether you’re a coder, system administrator, or typical desktop user, enjoying good music might be at the top of your list of things you do on the desktop. And, with the holidays upon us, you might wind up with some gift cards that allow you to purchase some new music. If your music format of choice is of a digital nature (mine happens to be vinyl) and your platform is Linux, you’re going to want a good GUI player to enjoy that music.

    Fortunately, Linux has no lack of digital music players. In fact, there are quite a few, most of which are open source and available for free. Let’s take a look at a few such players, to see which one might suit your needs.

  • Udeler – A Cross-Platform Udemy Course Video Downloader

    I assume many of our readers are familiar with a number of online study education centers. Some of them focus on programming and computer science related topics alone while others have a wider topic range. Some websites are completely free or paid, and other offer both paid and free courses.

    Just like Khan Academy and Code Academy, Udemy is no newcomer to this domain. It’s a website where you can learn a variety of courses online at your own pace with some of them being available for free.

  • Thomas – A Simple Pomodoro Timer App for Linux

    One of the best methods you can implement to be more productive is time management. It allows you to keep track of how much time it takes you to get work done and how often you exceed your deadlines.

    Timer apps these days seem to have chosen a favorite technique to help users stay sharp and productive as is evident in apps like Gnome Pomodoro and Take a Break. The Pomodoro technique is a common pick.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Kernel Developer: Thomas Gleixner

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

The report states that, since the 2.6.11 release, the top 10 developers together have contributed 45,338 changes — almost 7.1 percent of the total. The top 30 developers contributed just under 16 percent of the total, as seen in the table below.

One of these top 30 developers is Thomas Gleixner, CTO at Linutronix GmbH, who serves in various kernel maintainer roles. In this article, Gleixner answers a few questions about his contributions to the Linux kernel.

Read more

KVM and Xen: Looking Glass, Irby Thompson, and New Release

  • Looking Glass Released For KVM Frame Relay, High Performance Windows VM Gaming

    Geoffrey McRae has published the code to the "Looking Glass" project he's been working on as a "extremely low-latency" KVM frame relay implementation for guests with VGA PCI pass-through.

    Long story short this allows for a graphics card PCI pass-through setup with a KVM guest whereby no separate monitor is needed but rather Looking Glass is like a virtual display for that GPU dedicated to the VM and displays the VM's rendered contents on your main monitor/GPU. Up to now those wanting to use a secondary graphics card pass-through setup with a virtual machine had to use a separate monitor, but with Looking Glass you can get by with a single monitor for the system.

  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Irby Thompson

    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.

  • Xen Hypervisor 4.10 Released With Centriq and ThunderX Support, New Intel Features

    The Xen Project has announced version 4.10 of their open-source hypervisor. Xen 4.10 aims for better security, architectural improvements, better documentation, and more.

CoreOS and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
  • CoreOS’s Open Cloud Services Could Bring Cloud Portability to Container-Native Apps

    With the release of Tectonic 1.8, CoreOS provides a way to easily deploy container-native applications as services, even across multiple service providers and in-house resources.

    “We take open source APIs, make them super easy to consume, and create a catalog of these things to run on top of Kubernetes so they are portable no matter where you go,” said Brandon Philips, CoreOS chief technology officer.

  • Kubernetes 1.9 release brings greater stability and storage features

    The Kubernetes developer community is capping off a successful year with the release of Kubernetes 1.9, adding important new features that should help to further encourage enterprise adoption.

    Kubernetes is the most popular container orchestrator management software. It’s used to simplify the deployment and management of software containers, which are a popular tool among developers that allows them to run their applications across multiple computing environments without making any changes to the underlying code.

  • What’s new in Kubernetes containers

    Promoted to beta in Kubernetes 1.8 and now in production release in Kubernetes 1.9, the Apps Workloads API provides ways to define workloads based on their behaviors, such as long-running apps that need persistent state.

KDE Applications 17.12.0

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.12.0
  • KDE Applications 17.12 Brings HiDPI Improvements, Rest Of KDE Games Ported To KF5

    KDE Applications 17.12 is now available as the newest six-month update to this collection of KDE programs making use of KDE Frameworks 5.

    KDE Applications 17.12 was the cut-off point by which only KF5-programs are permitted while those still making use of KDE4 libraries were forced to be dropped. That cleansing took place and Juk, KImageMapEditor, KMix, KGet, Kolf, Sweeper, and others were among those that saw KF5 ports while some older programs were dropped from the collection -- at least until seeing any KF5 port in the future.

Kernel: Collabora, Sony HID, ZFS On Linux, 6WIND

Filed under
Linux
  • VirtIO DRM Window Server Support: Letting Guest VMs Interface With Host's Compositor

    Collabora's Tomeu Vizoso is working on a interesting VirtIO DRM patch that lets clients running within a virtual machine communicate with a display compositor of the host system.

    Based off work done by Google on their ChromeOS kernel with a "virtio_wl" driver, Tomeu is adding support to the VirtIO DRM driver so that clients running within a virtual machine can communicate with the host system's compositor. Communication is done over the protocol supported by the compositor, e.g. Wayland. Similarly, the ChromeOS VirtIO Wayland work is about offering a virtual device used by a guest VM use a Wayland server on the host system transparently and just focused on Wayland support given the ChromeOS focus.

  • Linux Should Now Work For Some Knockoff PlayStation 3 Controllers

    While the Linux kernel has supported the official Sony PlayStation 3 controller as an input device, some of the off-brand/knockoff models haven't quite behaved correctly on Linux but that's now being rectified.

    Red Hat's Bastien Nocera has made a necessary change to the Sony HID code in the Linux 4.15 kernel to address these knockoff PlayStation 3 controllers as well as a change in BlueZ Git, for the upcoming BlueZ 5.48 release.

  • ZFS On Linux 0.7.4 Brings Linux 4.14 Support, Fixes

    ZFS On Linux 0.7.4 was released this week as the newest stable release for this ZFS file-system implementation for the Linux kernel.

  • 6WIND Announces TCP Boost to Resolve Linux Bottlenecks in TCP-Based Applications

    6WIND, a high-performance networking software company, today announced TCP Boost, a high performance Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) stack for proxy and server deployments. TCP is a client/server protocol used to communicate between applications over an IP network. However, the performance of TCP-based applications is limited by common bottlenecks in the Linux kernel. To overcome these limitations, 6WIND offers TCP Boost as a solution, based on its 6WINDGate™ packet processing software, which is widely deployed as the industry's highest performance TCP userland stack since 2010.

Graphics: OpenCL Compute Comparison, OpenGL, Mesa an More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • 13-Way Radeon AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 vs. NVIDIA Linux OpenCL Compute Comparison

    Given this week's release of the big AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Linux driver update, here are some fresh OpenCL GPU benchmarks comparing the performance of AMD's latest Radeon graphics cards on this newest Linux driver to that of the latest NVIDIA GeForce GPUs on their respective newest driver.

  • Latest Steam Client Update Rolls Out Shader Pre-Caching For OpenGL/Vulkan

    The latest Steam client release on Wednesday rolls out OpenGL and Vulkan shader pre-caching by default.

  • VKD3D Is Beginning Flight As Wine's Direct3D 12 To Vulkan Library

    Back at WineConf 2017 VKD3D was announced for bringing Direct3D 12 to Wine by implementing Microsoft's latest graphics API atop the Vulkan graphics API. The initial code for this new library is beginning to take shape.

    VKD3D is a long-term play for getting viable Direct3D 12 support working within Wine. As noted back at WineConf, this library is being developed independently of the Wine Git repository. This will potentially allow in the future others to make use of this D3D12-to-Vulkan code without pulling in Wine entirely, should porters look to this project for easing their process of getting Windows games running on Linux, etc.

  • Wayland's Weston Sees Patches For FreeBSD, Fractional HiDPI, Rust Bindings

    A new contributor to the Wayland/Weston camp has been working on several improvements to the Weston reference compositor.

    Improvements made to Weston via unmerged patches include adding FreeBSD support to Weston, static linking for backends and gl-renderer, Rust bindings for libweston, and fractional HiDPI scaling support.

  • LunarG Adds New Size Option To Further Reduce Size Of SPIR-V
  • Disjoint Timer Query Added To Mesa For Reporting Accurate OpenGL Timing Data

    The latest OpenGL extension added to Mesa by Intel developers is the rather new EXT_disjoint_timer_query.

  • mesa 17.2.7

    The current queue consists of a variety of fixes, with a sizeable hunk in the shared GLSL codebase.

    Whereas for individual drivers - i965 has a crash fix for when playing various Valve games, r600 and nouveau have tweaks in their compiler backends. Fast clears on radeonsi and RADV are better now, while the VAAPI encoding is playing nicely with GStreamer.

  • Mesa 17.2.7 Released For Those Not Yet On Mesa 17.3

    Emil Velikov of Collabora has announced the release today of Mesa 17.2.7 as the latest point release for this older stable branch of Mesa.

    If you are a devoted Linux gamer or at all care about the best features and performance, it's best you migrate to Mesa 17.3 if you are not habitually riding Mesa Git. But for those still using the Mesa 17.2 series from last quarter, the seventh point release is available.

  • AMD to open-source Vulkan Linux driver ahead of Xmas
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Linux Mint Releases Last KDE Edition "Sylvia"

​Mint fans rejoice as the latest version of Linux Mint 18.3 Sylvia with the KDE desktop is available to download on Linux Mint’s official website. The sad part is that this will be the last offering from Linux Mint that will feature the KDE desktop environment. Read
more

today's leftovers

  • Schaller On Linux In 2018: Rust Rules, Apple Declines, Linux Graphics Compete
    Christian Schaller who has long been involved in GNOME/Fedora development while serving as a senior software engineering manager at Red Hat and formerly with Collabora has some bold predictions about 2018 for open-source software.
  • Fedora Classroom Session: Fedora QA 102
    Fedora Classroom sessions continue next week with a session on Fedora QA. The general schedule for sessions appears on the wiki. You can also find resources and recordings from previous sessions there. Here are details about this week’s session on Wednesday, December 22 at 16:00 UTC. That link allows you to convert the time to your timezone.
  • Cura, the nice 3D print slicer, is now in Debian Unstable
    After several months of working and waiting, I am happy to report that the nice and user friendly 3D printer slicer software Cura just entered Debian Unstable. It consist of five packages, cura, cura-engine, libarcus, fdm-materials, libsavitar and uranium. The last two, uranium and cura, entered Unstable yesterday. This should make it easier for Debian users to print on at least the Ultimaker class of 3D printers. My nearest 3D printer is an Ultimaker 2+, so it will make life easier for at least me. :)
  • #PeruRumboGSoC2018 – Session 5
    Today we have celebrated another session for the #PeruRumboGSoC2018 program at CCPP UNI. It was one of the longest sessions we have experienced.
  • Mozilla releases tools and data for speech recognition
    Voice computing has long been a staple of science fiction, but it has only relatively recently made its way into fairly common mainstream use. Gadgets like mobile phones and "smart" home assistant devices (e.g. Amazon Echo, Google Home) have brought voice-based user interfaces to the masses. The voice processing for those gadgets relies on various proprietary services "in the cloud", which generally leaves the free-software world out in the cold. There have been FOSS speech-recognition efforts over the years, but Mozilla's recent announcement of the release of its voice-recognition code and voice data set should help further the goal of FOSS voice interfaces. There are two parts to the release, DeepSpeech, which is a speech-to-text (STT) engine and model, and Common Voice, which is a set of voice data that can be used to train voice-recognition systems. While DeepSpeech is available for those who simply want to do some kind of STT task, Common Voice is meant for those who want to create their own voice-recognition system—potentially one that does even better (or better for certain types of applications) than DeepSpeech.
  • FreeBSD-Based TrueOS 17.12 Focuses on Faster Boot, Bhyve and LibreSSL Support
    en Moore, the creator of the FreeBSD-based TrueOS computer operating system and Lumina desktop environment, released the TrueOS 17.12 update, which introduces multiple enhancements. Synced with the FreeBSD 12.0-CURRENT and FreeBSD ports tree software repositories as of December 4 and November 30, 2017, respectively, TrueOS 17.12 is an incremental update to the operating system adding improvements to the OpenRC-based boot process, removable-device management, LibreSSL and SysAdm API integrations, as well as Bhyve support for TrueOS Server Install. "We have also been working quite a bit on the server offering of TrueOS, and are pleased to provide new text-based server images with support for Virtualization systems such as bhyve," said Ken Moore in the release announcement. "This allows for simple server deployments which also take advantage of the TrueOS improvements to FreeBSD."
  • Will Your Taxes Go Up or Down? A Calculator for the New Tax Bill
    ...Tax-Calculator, an open-source tax-modeling program.

Games: Slaps and Beans and Games Online For Android

  • Slaps and Beans now in Early Access
    Bud Spencer & Terence Hill: Slaps and Beans [Steam] is now in Early Access after a successful Kickstarter campaign in which the developers gained over $200k.
  • Best First Person Shooter Games Online For Android
    With the ever shining genre of First Person Shooters making it Huge in the PC market, game studios have brought the best of FPS action to people’s mobile devices. Here I present to you my best picks for the Free first person shooter games online for Android.