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Thursday, 21 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2018 - 5:03pm
Story What Is the Intersection of OpenStack and Kubernetes? Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2018 - 4:37pm
Story Graphics: Vulkan, AMDGPU, Wayland Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2018 - 4:01pm
Story Security: OpenBSD, FUD and More Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2018 - 3:36pm
Story Mozilla: Diversity & Inclusion in Open Source, VR, Phabricator, Rust and WebRender Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2018 - 3:27pm
Story Canonical: GNOME Software, Buzzwords, Ubuntu Server, Themes and Zenkit Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2018 - 3:09pm
Story OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Updated Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2018 - 2:54pm
Story CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 Released for Those Who Want to Run Linux Containers Rianne Schestowitz 20/06/2018 - 2:54pm
Story Fedora Core OS: The New Upstream To Red Hat's CoreOS Rianne Schestowitz 20/06/2018 - 2:51pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/06/2018 - 2:44pm

Graphics: Wayland, RadeonSI, NVIDIA and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Session suspension and restoration protocol
  • A Session Suspension & Restoration Protocol Proposed For Wayland

    KDE Wayland developer Roman Gilg who started contributing to Wayland via last year's Google Summer of Code is proposing a new Wayland protocol for dealing with desktop session suspension and restoration.

    This protocol extension would allow for more efficient support for client session suspension and restoration such as when you are logging out of your desktop session and want the windows restored at next log-in or if you are suspending your system. While Roman Gilg is working on this protocol with his KDE hat on, he has been talking with Sway and GNOME developers too for ensuring this protocol could work out for their needs.

  • RadeonSI Lands OpenGL 3.3 Compatibility Profile Support

    Thanks to work done over the past few months by AMD's Marek Olšák on improving Mesa's OpenGL compatibility profile support and then today carried over the final mile by Valve's Timothy Arceri, Mesa 18.2 now exposes OpenGL 3.3 under the compatibility context.

    Hitting Git tonight is the enabling of the OpenGL 3.3 compatibility profile for RadeonSI.

  • NVIDIA Releases DALI Library & nvJPEG GPU-Accelerated Library For JPEG Decode

    For coinciding with the start of the Computer Vision and Patern Recognition conference starting this week in Utah, NVIDIA has a slew of new software announcements.

    First up NVIDIA has announced the open-source DALI library for GPU-accelerated data augmentation and image loading that is optimized for data pipelines of deep learning frameworks like ResNET-50, TensorFlow, and PyTorch.

  • NVIDIA & Valve Line Up Among The Sponsors For X.Org's XDC 2018

    -
    The initial list of sponsors have been announced for the annual X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2018) where Wayland, Mesa, and the X.Org Server tend to dominate the discussions for improving the open-source/Linux desktop.

    This year's XDC conference is being hosted in A Coruña, Spain and taking place in September. The call for presentations is currently open for X.Org/mesa developers wishing to participate.

  • Intel Broxton To Support GVT-g With Linux 4.19

    Intel developers working on the GVT-g graphics virtualization technology have published their latest batch of Linux kernel driver changes.

Fedora and Red Hat: Fedora Atomic, Fedora 29, *GPL and Openwashing ('Open Organization')

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation To Be Renamed Fedora Silverblue

    -
    Back in early May was the announcement of the Silverblue project as an evolution of Fedora Atomic Workstation and trying to get this atomic OS into shape by Fedora 30. Beginning with Fedora 29, the plan is to officially rename Fedora Atomic Workstation to Fedora Silverblue.

    Silverblue isn't just a placeholder name, but they are moving ahead with the re-branding initiative around it. The latest Fedora 29 change proposal is to officially change the name of "Fedora Atomic Workstation" to "Fedora Silverblue".

  • Fedora 29 Will Cater i686 Package Builds For x86_64, Hide GRUB On Boot

    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) approved on Friday more of the proposed features for this fall's release of Fedora 29, including two of the more controversial proposals.

  • Total War: WARHAMMER II Coming to Linux, Red Hat Announces GPL Cooperation Commitment, Linspire 8.0 Alpha 1 Released and More

    Starting today, Red Hat announced that "all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3". The announcement notes that this development is the latest in "an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses".

  • Red Hat Launches Process Automation Manager 7, Brackets Editor Releases Version 1.13, Qt Announces New Patch Release and More

    Red Hat today launched Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7, which is "a comprehensive, cloud-native platform for developing business automation services and process-centric applications across hybrid cloud environments". This new release expands some key capabilities including cloud native application development, dynamic case management and low-code user experience. You can learn more and get started here.

  • A summer reading list for open organization enthusiasts

    The books on this year's open organization reading list crystallize so much of what makes "open" work: Honesty, authenticity, trust, and the courage to question those status quo arrangements that prevent us from achieving our potential by working powerfully together.

Server Domination by GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Security and Performance Help Mainframes Stand the Test of Time

    As of last year, the Linux operating system was running 90 percent of public cloud workloads; has 62 percent of the embedded market share and runs all of the supercomputers in the TOP500 list, according to The Linux Foundation Open Mainframe Project’s 2018 State of the Open Mainframe Survey report.

    Despite a perceived bias that mainframes are behemoths that are costly to run and unreliable, the findings also revealed that more than nine in 10 respondents have an overall positive attitude about mainframe computing.

    The project conducted the survey to better understand use of mainframes in general. “If you have this amazing technology, with literally the fastest commercial CPUs on the planet, what are some of the barriers?” said John Mertic, director of program management for the foundation and Open Mainframe Project. “The driver was, there wasn’t any hard data around trends on the mainframe.”

  • HPE announces world's largest ARM-based supercomputer

    The race to exascale speed is getting a little more interesting with the introduction of HPE's Astra -- what will be the world's largest ARM-based supercomputer.

    HPE is building Astra for Sandia National Laboratories and the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA will use the supercomputer to run advanced modeling and simulation workloads for things like national security, energy, science and health care.

HHVM 3.27 Released

Filed under
Development

Programming/Development: C++, 'Agile', and Pronghorn, a Java framework

Filed under
Development
  • What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++

    Earlier this year, Bjarne Stroustrup, creator of C++, managing director in the technology division of Morgan Stanley, and a visiting professor of computer science at Columbia University in the US, wrote a letter inviting those overseeing the evolution of the programming language to “Remember the Vasa!”

    Easy for a Dane to understand no doubt, but perhaps more of a stretch for those with a few gaps in their knowledge of 17th century Scandinavian history. The Vasa was a Swedish warship, commissioned by King Gustavus Adolphus. It was the most powerful warship in the Baltic Sea from its maiden voyage on the August 10, 1628, until a few minutes later when it sank.

  • Has Agile Programming Lost its Way?

    Programmers are passionate about which development methodology is the best. Is it Agile? Waterfall? Feature Driven Development? Scrum? So everyone took notice when one of the 17 authors of the seminal Agile Manifesto wrote a blog post last month headlined “Developers Should Abandon Agile.”

    Further down in his post, Ron Jeffries made a clear distinction between Manifesto Agile — “the core ideas from the Manifesto, in which I still believe” — and its usurping follower, “Faux Agile” (or, in extreme cases, “Dark Agile”). Jeffries ultimately urged developers to learn useful development methods — including but not limited to Extreme Programming — that are true to the Manifesto’s original principles, while also detaching their thinking from particular methodologies with an Agile name.

  • Write fast apps with Pronghorn, a Java framework

    In 1973, Carl Hewitt had an idea inspired by quantum mechanics. He wanted to develop computing machines that were capable of parallel execution of tasks, communicating with each other seamlessly while containing their own local memory and processors.

    Born was the actor model, and with that, a very simple concept: Everything is an actor. This allows for some great benefits: Separating business and other logic is made vastly easier. Security is easily gained because each core component of your application is separate and independent. Prototyping is accelerated due to the nature of actors and their interconnectivity.

  • Systems Languages: An Experience Report

    Recently, there’s been a lot of turmoil in the systems language community. We have the Rust Evangelism Strikeforce nudging us towards rewriting everything in Rust. We have the C++17 folks who promise the safety and ease of use of modern programming languages with the performance and power of C. And then there’s a long tail of other “systems” programming languages, like Nim, Reason / OCaml, Crystal, Go, and Pony.

    Personally, I’m super excited we’re seeing some interesting work in the programming language theory space. This got me excited to learn more about what’s out there. A lot of the problems I solve are usually solved in C. Recently, Go has begun to encroach on C’s territory. I enjoy C and Go as much as the next person — They’re good languages for getting shit done. Often times, they leave a lot to be desired, and leave me envious of other programmers with tools like Flow, Typescript, and Dialyzer. Coming from developing in Erlang, even with its rudimentary type system, functional programming just came far more easily to me.

Software: Brackets, WebArchives, KDE Plasma Vault, Bustle and Linux Instant Messaging Clients

Filed under
Software
  • Open Source Web Design Editor Brackets 1.13 Released

    The latest Brackets 1.13 release brings new features, like the ability to opening remote files, drag and drop support for the FileTreeFiew, an option to automatically update Brackets, and bug fixes.

    Brackets is a free, open source editor focused on web development / design, created by Adobe. The editor is available on Mac, Windows and Linux, and what makes it special is its live HTML, CSS and JS editing / preview.

  • Browse Wikipedia Offline With WebArchives For Linux

    WebArchives is a web archive reader for Linux desktops which provides the ability to browse articles offline from websites such as Wikipedia or Wikisource, in multiple languages.

    The application is useful for those without a permanent Internet connection or those using metered connections - the offline sources can be downloaded at a friend's house, copied on a USB stick, and imported into WebArchives. Or maybe you want to do some research somewhere up in the mountains where there's no Internet. No problem, install WebArchives and download the Wikipedia source on your laptop before you go. After downloading a source, no Internet connection is needed to read, search and browse Wikipedia.

    The software supports reading ZIM files, an open file format that stores wiki content for offline usage, and it offers download links for a large number of sources, including Wikipedia, Stack Exchange sites (including Code Review, Super User, AskUbuntu, Bitcoin, etc.), ArchWiki, RationalWiki, TED talks, Vikidia, WikiMed Medical Encyclopedia, Wikinews, Wikisource, and many others.

  • Testing KDE Plasma Vault on openSUSE Leap 15

    KDE Plasma Vault is a wonderful application. It works as advertised and is another killer feature for the KDE Plasma desktop environment. I highly encourage you to give it a try on openSUSE Leap 15.

  • Bustle 0.7.1: jumping the ticket barrier

    Bustle 0.7.1 is out now and supports monitoring the system bus, without requiring any prior system configuration. It also lets you monitor any other bus by providing its address, which I’ve already used to spy on ibus traffic.

  • Best Free Linux Instant Messaging Clients

    Instant messaging (IM) is a form of real-time communication between two or more individuals based on typed text. The text is conveyed via devices connected over a network such as the Internet.

    There are so many different instant messaging clients available, some software supports multiple protocols, others confine themselves to supporting a single protocol only.

    To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 13 high quality open source Linux IM clients. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who wants to converse with their family, friends, colleagues, and clients.

Endless OS Launches New Major Version For Users Who Have Less Internet Access

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The developers of Endless OS have just announced the release of version 3.4 of the distribution, it is a major update and it focuses mainly on helping users to take advantage of their Internet connection when they suppose to have it.

Endless OS is a distribution oriented mainly to novice users who want to pay the least attention to the installation and configuration process and instead look for something that is ready with all the basic applications they will need.

Read more

“Respects Your Freedom” (RYF) and Purism's Librem 5

Filed under
GNU
Gadgets
  • Purism's Librem 5 To Rely On Secondary Processor For Binary Blobs

    With not being able to deliver a 100% fully free software / libre system, the Librem 5 smartphone will rely upon a secondary processor for dealing with the necessary binary blobs for hardware initialization to keep them out of touch from the U-Boot boot-loader and Linux kernel.

    The first road-block in their effort to make the Librem 5 smartphone as open as possible is the DDR PHY with firmware blobs needed for the DDR4 memory training process at boot time. With it not being realistic for them to rewrite the firmware blob to do the DDR4 PHY training, they are planning to punt the binary-only blobs out to a secondary processor. In doing so, they can also apply for an exclusion with the Free Software Foundation for still having a device that "Respects Your Freedom" while still having necessary binary blobs at play.

  • Solving the first FSF RYF hurdle for the Librem 5

    While investigating using the i.MX 8 for the Librem 5 phone we found an issue that would have been problematic for us to obtain the Free Software Foundation’s “Respects Your Freedom” (RYF) hardware endorsement...

Red Hat: Education, Automation, RHEL 6.10 and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat, Lord Wandsworth College and University of Surrey collaborate

    Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, has announced its collaboration with Lord Wandsworth College (LWC), an independent school for girls and boys aged 11 to 18, and the University of Surrey, a public research university specialising in science, engineering, medicine and business, on the Open Schools Coding Competition, designed to inspire the next generation of coders and software developers. In so doing, the competition hopes to contribute to building the UK’s digital talent pool.

    The competition is now in its second year, with 10 schools and approximately 100 students in the UK taking part. The competition aims to engage children ahead of making their subject choices for GCSE, so is open to Key Stage 3 students. It challenges teams of students to use any free visual programming environment to create a gaming app that will help a charity of their choice. The competition enables participants to apply the basic principles of open source software development and open collaboration to solve a real world problem in a fun and competitive environment, with the opportunity to win a prize for their team and recognition for their school. In choosing a charitable cause, each student can gain a sense of how they can use digital skills to make their own contribution to addressing societal challenges and how open source technology and methodology can drive positive change in the world.

  • Red Hat Unveils Next-Generation Process Automation Offering
  • Red Hat Drives Mission-Critical Stability with Latest Update to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
  • Red Hat Data Grid on Three Clouds (the details behind the demo)

    If you saw or heard about the multi-cloud demo at Red Hat Summit 2018, this article details how we ran Red Hat Data Grid in active-active-active mode across three cloud providers. This set up enabled us to show a fail over between cloud providers in real time with no loss of data. In addition to Red Hat Data Grid, we used Vert.x (reactive programming), OpenWhisk (serverless), and Red Hat Gluster Storage (software-defined storage.)

  • RedHat stock falls after Raymond James downgrade

Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds and Windows 'Fun'

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #164
  • PyRoMineIoT cryptojacker uses NSA exploit to spread

    Larry Trowell, principal consultant with Synopsys Software Integrity Group, said the government shares some of the blame for the NSA exploit.

    "It's in every country's interest to develop systems enabling offensive and defensive strategies to protect individuals and national services," Trowell wrote via email. "There is no fault in that. If the NSA does have some blame to share in this situation, it is for allowing secrets to be exfiltrated -- not in developing them."

    Jett said although the NSA exploit was stolen, "they didn't create the vulnerabilities that allow for the malware to exploit devices."

    "As such, you can't hold them responsible for the malware that has emerged from the EternalRomance exploit. Vendors whose products are vulnerable to EternalRomance are responsible for resolving the exploit problem," Jett wrote. "Additionally, it has been more than a year since the NSA exploits were released, and vendors have created patches. It becomes incumbent on the users to make sure they are properly patching their software and reducing the threat surface for these exploits."

  • Can Hackers Crack the Ivory Towers?

    While both researchers agreed that their colleagues would gain from incorporating hackers' discoveries into their own work, they diverged when diagnosing the source of the gulf between the two camps and, to a degree, even on the extent of the rift.

  • 6-Year-Old Malware Injects Ads, Takes Screenshots On Windows 10

    A sneaky and persistent malware has surfaced which spams Windows 10 PCs with ads and takes screenshots to eventually send it to the attackers.

    Security researchers at Bitdefender found this malware named Zacinlo which first appeared in 2012. About 90% of Zacinlo’s victims are from the US running Microsoft Windows 10. There are other victims too from Western Europe, China, and India with a small fraction running Windows 7 or 8.

25th Anniversary for FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • 25th Anniversary for FreeBSD

    On June 19, 1993 the name FreeBSD was officially agreed on and has been used ever since. Find out more about how to celebrate this important day with us.

  • June 19 Has Been Declared National FreeBSD Day, Happy 25th Anniversary FreeBSD!

    The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce today that June 19 has been declared National FreeBSD Day to celebrate the project's official name 25th anniversary.

    Exactly 25 years ago on this day, on June 19, 1993, David Greenman sent an email to one of the mailing lists available at that point in time to suggest "FreeBSD" as the name for the Unix-like operating system used by billions of people all over the world, which continues to have a positive impact on us every single day.

SparkyLinux 5.4 GameOver, Multimedia, and Rescue Special Editions Are Out Now

Filed under
Linux

Released last week on June 11, 2018, the SparkyLinux 5.4 "Nibiru" rolling release operating system was available only as LXQt, MinimalGUI, and MinimalCLI editions. Today, the project launches three more editions, namely GameOver, Multimedia, and Rescue.

"New live/install ISO images of special editions of SparkyLinux 5.4 "Nibiru": GameOver, Multimedia & Rescue are out. Sparky 5 follows the rolling release model and is based on Debian testing branch "Buster"," reads today's announcement.

Read more

KDE Plasma 5.13 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, over 20 Bugs Fixed

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment launched a week ago as the best release of the acclaimed desktop designed for GNU/Linux distributions, introducing new lock and login screens, redesigned system settings, Plasma Browser Integration, Plasma Discover enhancements, and many other improvements and changes.

Now, users can update their KDE Plasma 5.13 installations to the first point release, KDE Plasma 5.13.1, which brings more than 20 bug fixes across various components, such as Plasma Discover, Plasma Add-ons, Plasma Desktop, Plasma Networkmanager (plasma-nm), KWin, and KDE Hotkeys.

Read more

Qt 5.11.1 Released

Filed under
KDE

I am pleased to announce that Qt 5.11.1 is released today. As a patch release Qt 5.11.1 does not add any new functionality, but provides important bug fixes and other improvements.

New Qt 5.11.1 is first patch release for Qt 5.11 series. There are fixes for over 150 bugs and it contains more than 700 changes compared to Qt 5.11.0. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.11.1. And don’t worry if some fix is missing from new Qt5.11.1 release; we are planning to release Qt 5.11.2 at the beginning of September.

Read more

Also: Qt 5.11.1 Released With 150+ Bug Fixes

Google Ignores Windows and Releases its VR Video Editing Tool for Linux and Mac

Filed under
News

Google has launched a new Virtual Reality video editor called VR180 Creator. Surprisingly, it is available for Linux and macOS, not Windows.
Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 6th Birthday of It’s FOSS: Win Linux Laptop, Stickers and more Gifts
  • Five Useful Features That Are On Their Way To The Chrome OS
  • HackUp is a Desktop Hacker News Client for Linux

    Avid readers of social news sharing site Hacker News might be interested in a new app recently added to Flathub.

    Called HackUp, it is a Hacker News desktop client written in Vala. It lets you browse and read Hacker News submissions without needing to open a web browser (which for a legendary procrastinator like me, is a good thing).

  • Why use Chef for automation and orchestration

    Chef has been a leading open source tool for automating the provisioning and configuration of servers for the better part of a decade. In recent years the company added InSpec and Habitat to the portfolio, open source projects that automate policy compliance testing and the deployment and configuration of applications, respectively. The company’s flagship commercial offering, Chef Automate, brings all of these pieces together.  

  • Xfdesktop 4.13.2 Released As Another Step Towards Xfce 4.14

    As another step towards the long-awaited Xfce 4.14 desktop environment release, Xfdesktop 4.13.2 is now available as the latest development release for this important piece of the Xfce desktop stack.

    Xfdesktop is the component that manages the desktop background, the pop-up list of applications, drawing icons on the desktop, etc. Xfdesktop 4.13.2 is the first development release since Xfdesktop 4.13.1 one year ago.

  • Monday Markdown

    I’ve spent the first portion of the coding period focused on improving the documentation browser for GNOME Javascript. In 2015/16 ptomato began porting GIR sources (the source of most GJS documentation) to [DevDocs.io], an open-source documentation browser, using g-ir-doc-tool in gobject-introspection. He did excellent work and produced a functioning product that now lives at [devdocs.baznga.org]. My goals were to take the current product and incorporate GNOME theming, fix issues with incorrect documentation, rebase the project on upstream, and reorient some of the project’s features to better serve an object oriented and GNOME model.

  • Refactor: Backend and UI

    Fractal is currently structured into two parts: The API part (fractal-matrix-api) and GTK part (fractal-gtk). The first one mostly just does the https calls to the Matrix server, the GTK part does everything else. This post will not talk about the API part since that will remain more or less the same (at least for now).

  • Open source board lets you analyze SPI connections on a USB-connected laptop

    Excamera Labs has launched an open source, $27 and up “SPIDriver” board on Crowd Supply for analyzing and testing SPI-connected displays, sensors, flash, and other components on a laptop or via a built-in color LCD display.

    Monitoring SPI devices such as LCD panels, LED arrays, sensors, and SPI flash may not be quite as gnarly as managing I2C gizmos, but either of these short-distance, serial data transfer protocols can be a hassle. While Arduino boards provide libraries for SPI monitoring, there’s still a lot of guesswork involved due to lack of real-time feedback about the SPI bus state.

  •  

  • Cooperative Learning

    I’ve got some under-utilised KVM servers that I could use to provide test VMs for network software, my original idea was to use those for members of my local LUG. But that doesn’t scale well. If a larger group people are to be involved they would have to run their own virtual machines, use physical hardware, or use trial accounts from VM companies.

    The general idea would be for two broad categories of sessions, ones where an expert provides a training session (assigning tasks to students and providing suggestions when they get stuck) and ones where the coordinator has no particular expertise and everyone just learns together (like “let’s all download a random BSD Unix and see how it compares to Linux”).

    [...]

    There is a Wikipedia page about Cooperative Learning. While that’s interesting I don’t think it has much relevance on what I’m trying to do. The Wikipedia article has some good information on the benefits of cooperative education and situations where it doesn’t work well. My idea is to have a self-selecting people who choose it because of their own personal goals in terms of fun and learning. So it doesn’t have to work for everyone, just for enough people to have a good group.

  • Chinese search giant Baidu creates an open-source A.I. for detecting cancer

    “We hope this open-sourced algorithm can serve as a high-quality baseline for future research in this area,” Li said. “The algorithm is only evaluated on a limited number of public datasets at this stage. However, the algorithm needs to be further assessed using much more clinically relevant data to prove it still maintains higher accuracy than experienced pathologists. Our team will continue improving the algorithm and collaborating with researchers with whom we can share new datasets.”

  • Fynd organizes Hackxagon Open Source Challenge for its Engineers

    As an initiative to give back to the open source community, Fynd, the unique fashion e-commerce portal had launched gofynd.io, a few months ago. This project enabled the engineers of the fashion e-commerce portal to learn new technologies, improve the core infrastructure and enhance the Fynd platform.

  • Netfilter Workshop 2018 Berlin summary

    Lots of interesting talks happened, mostly surrounding nftables and how to move forward from the iptables legacy world to the new, modern nft framework.

    In a nutshell, the Netfilter project, the FLOSS community driven project, has agreed to consider iptables as a legacy tool. This confidence comes from the maturity of the nftables framework, which is fairly fully-compliant with the old iptables API, including extensions (matches and targets).

  • Using W10Privacy To Boost Ubuntu WSL Performance On Windows 10
  • Get the latest in libre from the FSF Bulletin

    The biannual Free Software Foundation (FSF) Bulletin is now available online. We hope you find it enlightening and entertaining!

  • Introducing PyInstaller

    If you're used to working with a compiled language, the notion that you would need to have a programming language around, not just for development but also for running an application, seems a bit weird. Just because a program was written in C doesn't mean you need a C compiler in order to run it, right?

    But of course, interpreted and byte-compiled languages do require the original language, or a version of it, in order to run. True, Java programs are compiled, but they're compiled into bytecodes then executed by the JVM. Similarly, .NET programs cannot run unless the CLR is present.

    Even so, many of the students in my Python courses are surprised to discover that if you want to run a Python program, you need to have the Python language installed. If you're running Linux, this isn't a problem. Python has come with every distribution I've used since 1995. Sometimes the Python version isn't as modern as I'd like, but the notion of "this computer can't run Python programs" isn't something I've had to deal with very often.

  • Demoting multi-factor authentication

    Authentication was done via a Java applet, as there needs to be a verifiably(?)-secure way to ensure the certificate was properly checked at the client without transfering it over the network. Good thing!

    [...]

    Anyway I accepted, as losing so much time to grade is just too much. And... Yes, many people will be happy. Partly, I'm releieved by this (I have managed to hate Java for over 20 years). I am just saddened by the fact we have lost an almost-decent-enough electronic signature implementation and fallen back to just a user-password scheme. There are many ways to do crypto verification on the client side nowadays; I know JavaScript is sandboxed and cannot escape to touch my filesystem, but... It is amazing we are losing this simple and proven use case.

Linux, the Linux Foundation and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux literally loses its Lustre – HPC filesystem ditched in new kernel

    Linux has literally lost its Lustre – the filesystem favoured by HPC types has vanished in the first release candidate of version 4.18 of the Linux kernel.

    Linus Torvalds’ announcement of the new release lauds the fact it’s shrunk markedly, much of which can be attributed to the removal of Lustre.

    “The removal of Lustre may not be all that notable, because it does look like a lot of the development has been happening out of tree, which may be why it never really ended up working as well as people hoped in the staging tree,” Torvalds wrote. “ Greg [ Kroah-Hartman] clearly got pretty frustrated about it, so now it's gone.”

    How frustrated? Kroah-Hartman explained Lustre's omission by saying it has "been in the kernel tree for over 5 years now" but "has not really moved forward into the 'this is in shape to get out of staging' despite many half-completed attempts."

  • Harmonising open source and standards in the telecom world [Ed: Phone surveillance company pays LF and then (mis)appropriates the “Linux” brand to push its “whitepapers” (marketing)]

    Standards have played a major role in telecommunications technology adoption for many years, validating the commercial viability of new technologies, facilitating multi-vendor interoperability, improving product quality, and expediting the introduction of technologies that would otherwise proliferate in a sea of proprietary alternatives.

  • OpenGL Floating Point Textures No Longer Encumbered By Patents, Enabled In Mesa

    Back in 2012 when talking with Gabe Newell of Valve about open-source/Linux challenges one of the topics he was awed about was patents encumbering the open-source graphics driver progress. Six years later, Timothy Arceri working on the Valve Linux graphics driver team has freed Mesa's ARB_texture_float support from being built conditionally due to these patent fears.

  • Vulkan 1.1.78 Released With Various Issues Resolved

    Vulkan 1.1.78 is now available as the newest version of the Vulkan specification.

    The Vulkan 1.1.78 spec update is another fairly small update that doesn't introduce any new VK extensions or any major changes. Vulkan 1.1.78 has minor documentation fixes, resumes publishing of the Vulkan 1.0 + KHR extension documentation, clears up some behavior in some Vulkan usage, and other changes.

  • AMDGPU Performance Tests With New WattMan-Like Settings, Power Capping

    With the recent stable debut of the Linux 4.17 kernel, one of the most common performance test requests coming in has been for checking out the Radeon WattMan-like support that was introduced with the Linux 4.17 AMDGPU code for recent generations of Radeon graphics card. Here are some benchmarks of that and on a somewhat related note also some Linux gaming benchmark results when carrying out some power capping tests to restrict the graphics card to a given Wattage.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.0.1 Is Coming Next Week

    Just a heads up that Phoronix Test Suite 8.0.1 is slated for release next week if there are any last minute bug reports or requests.

11 Best Linux Gaming Distros You Need To Use In 2018 and Fortnite Coming to Android

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • 11 Best Linux Gaming Distros You Need To Use In 2018

    Gaming on Linux scene is improving each year with better hardware support and increasing support from game developers. Apart from established distros like Ubuntu and Arch Linux, gamers are using Linux gaming distros like Steam OS to get a better experience. The other popular gaming operating systems are Sparky Linux – Gameover edition, Ubuntu GamePack, Lakka Linux, etc.

    Apart from many general-purpose Linux distributions, there exists a crop of distros for specific purposes. Gaming Linux distros too belong to one such category. These distros are specifically built to address your gaming needs, thanks to better hardware support and tons of preinstalled tools.

  • Fortnite: After Nitendo Switch, Android Is The Next Stop

    While the E3 concluded with lots of surprises and striking gaming news, Nitendo came up with its own pandora box. In its E3 presentation, Nitendo released Fortnite version for Switch which can be downloaded through Nitendo eShop.

    It is now absolutely clear that next stop of Epic Games Fortnite would be Android Devices. According to the Fortnite blog, developers are very rigid on summer release of its Android version. In the month of March, Fortnite revealed its iOS version adding to the list of platforms including Xbox One, PS4, PC, iOS and now Nitendo Switch.

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