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Wednesday, 26 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Canonical Ltd.'s Ubuntu Core Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 7:33pm
Story Live kernel patches for Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 7:29pm
Story Apache on Ubuntu Linux For Beginners: Part 2 Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 7:25pm
Story Linux Foundation Certified Engineer: Karthikeyan Ramaswamy Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 7:21pm
Story A Doctor Learns How to Code Through Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 7:20pm
Story Announcing the Release of Fedora 25 Beta Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 7:11pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 12:50pm
Story News About Servers Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 12:50pm
Story Software and Games Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 12:49pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 12:48pm

Linux Kernel News

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  • UBIFS Supports OverlayFS In Linux 4.9, Readying UBI For MLC Support

    The UBI/UBIFS pull request for the Linux 4.9 kernel for those interested in the Unsorted Block Image tech on Linux.

    First up, for those running UBIFS on raw flash memory, there is now OverlayFS support. OverlayFS, as a reminder, provides a union mount for other file-systems. O_TMPFILE, RENAME_WHITEOUT/EXCHANGE are now supported by UBIFS for handling OverlayFS.

  • KThread Improvements Coming To Linux 4.9

    Andrew Morton's pull request for Linux 4.9 has landed some improvements for kernel threads.

    For the kthread code in Linux 4.9 there is an API cleanup, a new kthread_create_worker() call (and kthread_create_worker_on_cpu()) to hide implementation details, kthread_destroy_worker() as an easier way to end a worker, support for delayed kthreads, better support for freezable kthread workers, and related kthread work.

Linux Devices

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  • Smart Linux Home Hubs Mix IoT with AI

    Industrial, rather than home, applications will likely dominate the Internet of Things (IoT) market in the years to come. Yet, in the early going, the home automation market has had the greatest visibility. And it hasn’t always been pretty.

    Despite steady growth, retail sales have yet to achieve inflated expectations. Too many companies promised and failed to deliver interoperability with a growing catalog of often buggy smart home products. The lack of essential applications, complex installation, and in many cases, high prices, have also conspired against the segment.

    Yet the smart home segment appears to be rebounding with the help of maturing technology and IoT interoperability standards. There is particular interest in connecting voice-enabled AI assistants with the smart home in products such as Amazon’s Echo. Google recently announced Google Home, a major competitor to Alexa. These are being joined by open source Linux smart home voice agents like Mycroft, Silk, and ZOE (see below).

  • COM Express Type 7 module has dual 10GbE and 32 PCIe lanes

    Congatec unveiled the “Conga-B7XD,” one of the first COM Express Type 7 modules, featuring Intel “Broadwell” CPUs, 2x 10GbE Ethernet, and 32x PCI lanes.

  • Pixel Takes Raspbian to the Next Level

    A couple of weeks ago, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced they had tuned up the look and feel of Raspbian. The new buzzword created to help bring about the message that the UI had changed was dubbed “Pixel,” which stands for “Pi Improved Xwindows Environment, Lightweight.” While I’m not completely sold on trying to make Pixel stand for something, what I am completely sold on is what it has brought to the table for the Raspberry Pi. With Pixel, Raspbian has the look and feel of an elegant OS and I’m beyond happy that they have put this together for the Raspberry Pi community. I’ve tried out Pixel for the past week and here’s my take to date.

  • Build a Spooky Halloween Music-Light Show with Raspberry Pi and Linux

    My son just turned 4, and he is super-excited about Halloween and zombies. So I planned to create a haunted house-like experience for him. The biggest challenge was to get audio-visual effects. I wanted spooky music synchronized with well-placed lighting.

    Instead of buying some expensive Halloween decorations, I wanted to build them myself. I also wanted to be able to control the lights over the network. I looked around and didn’t find the perfect solution, so I did what DIY people do best: I picked and chose different pieces to create what I needed.

    In this tutorial, I am going to share how you can build a board with Raspberry Pi and open source software that synchronizes music with lights for less than $20. You can place this board inside a plastic pumpkin decoration, for example, or attach LEDs to props and create spooky displays for Halloween. Be creative!

SUSE News: New Release, More

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  • Tumbleweed gets new Wayland, FreeType, Digikam

    A couple of snapshots have been released since the last Tumbleweed update, but in those two snapshots were an enormous amount of package updates.

    Snapshot 20161003 was the first snapshot to arrive in Tumbleweed during the month of October and it brought two new major version packages.

    Digikam 5.2.0 was updated in the repository and the release introduces a new red eyes tool that automates the red-eyes effect reduction process, which was from a new algorithm written by a Google Summer of Code 2016 student named Omar Amin. Python3-setuptools to 28.0.0 was the other package that received a major version upgrade.

  • OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Lands Wayland 1.12, Qt 5.7

    There are a number of exciting package updates for the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling-release Linux distribution.

    The recently-released Wayland 1.12 has landed in openSUSE Tumbleweed, but as far as I know the GNOME or KDE editions of Tumbleweed are yet to use Wayland by default.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Receives Wayland 1.12, LibreOffice 5.2.2, and digiKam 5.2

    Today, October 13, 2016, openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio announced the latest software packages that landed in the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling release operating system.

    It appears that only a couple of snapshots have been released for openSUSE Tumbleweed during the past week, but they brought a large amount of updated packages, among which we can mention the LibreOffice 5.2.2 office suite, Qt 5.7 GUI toolkit, LightDM 1.19.5 login manager, as well as digiKam 5.2.0 image editor and organizer.

  • Why 4KB I/O requests are not merged on DM target

Games for GNU/Linux

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  • Transport Fever confirmed for day-1 Linux release on November 8th, plus gameplay video

    Transport Fever [Official Site, Steam] is really starting to look great, and the best news is that Linux is confirmed to be a day-1 release. We also have a new gameplay video.

    This is the first actual proper gameplay video, and it's really got me excited to try it out.

    It's impressive that you can zoom right into street level and see each individual person walking or driving around.

  • Looks like the beautiful open source RTS '0 A.D.' is closing in on the next release, Alpha 21
  • Colony building sim 'Maia' has a big update, taking another look

    'Maia' [Official Site, Steam] is an Early Access colony building sim that has always shown promise, but the problem is that it has been quite buggy. This new release has polished the game up quite a bit.

    The AI certainly feels a lot more polished, there's far less wandering around when you have set down some build orders, something that plagued earlier builds. It still happens, but far less often.

  • Tyranny, the new RPG from Obsidian, gets a release date

    This is a game I’m personally very excited for. I enjoyed Pillars of Eternity a great deal – even if it had more than its fair share of kinks at launch. The premise for Tyranny is a world where the evil overlord has won and the player is entrusted to pacify and hand down judgment in the conquered lands. Developer diaries and videos emphasize that choices can have very far-ranging consequences on the game world and so this should be a title with plenty of replayability. The setting and lore also seem pretty interesting so I can’t wait until the game is out to explore it.

  • Steam Dev Days: VR, VR, VR; Valve Looking To Contract Mesa Developers For AMD Work

    For those not paying attention to the #SteamDevDays tweets from the many developers at the Seattle event, the first day of Valve's 2016 conference appears to have been a huge success and the overall focus was on VR.

Ubuntu 16.10 'Yakkety Yak' Released, Let's See What's New In Ubuntu 16.10

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And finally after 6 months of development, Ubuntu 16.10 'Yakkety Yak' has been released today. There is definately something new, improved and fixed in this release. Let's see what new has been introduced in Ubuntu 16.10.

Read<br />

They Said Nobody in Jordan Knew About Linux but They Were Wrong

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In this story, “Roblimo” takes us back to 2002, to an open source conference in a country where the common belief was that “nobody knew anything about Linux.” Boy, were they in for a surprise.

In December, 2002, I gave the keynote speech at an open source conference in Amman, Jordan. It was a tense time in that part of the world. Not long before I was there, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAISD) chief in Amman was assassinated. Anti-U.S. demonstrations had been shut down by Jordan’s armed forces earlier in the year. King Abdullah II was still new in the job and did not yet have as certain a hand on the helm as his father, Hussein (amateur radio call JY1) did during previous decades. To make things even more fun, the country was flooded with refugees from Iraq, and rumors were rife that the U.S. would soon go to war with Saddam Hussein over 9/11. Or something. Of course, the war rumors turned out to be true.

Read more

Linux/FOSS Events

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  • Carriers Embrace Trial & Error Approach as NFV Becomes Real

    Telcos kicked off the SDN World Congress here with boasts about how un-telco-like they’ve become, influenced by software-defined infrastructure and the world of virtualization.

    Specifically, they’re starting to adopt software’s “agile” philosophy by being willing to proceed in small steps, rather than waiting for technology to be fully baked.

  • How to stay relevant in the DevOps era: A SysAdmin's survival guide [Ed: How to stay relevant in the [stupid buzzword] era: rewrite the CV with silly buzzwords like DevOps]

    The merging of development and operations to speed product delivery, or DevOps, is all about agility, automation and information sharing. In DevOps, servers are often treated like cattle”that can be easily replaced, rather than individual pets”to be nurtured.

  • Fear Makes The Wolf Look Bigger

    DevOps is based on 3 key pillars: People, Process and Automation. I believe their importance to a business should be considered in that order.

  • Red Hat Offers Turnkey Cloud Installation Toolset

    When it comes to deploying a cloud computing solution, one of the biggest hurdles is installation. With that in mind, Red Hat recently introduced its QuickStart Cloud Installer. The new installer comes on the heels of Red Hat's OpenStack Platform 9 release, which became generally available only a few weeks ago.

Leftovers: Software

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  • ​IRC 3: The original online chat program gets updated

    Internet Relay Chat (IRC) was born in 1988 to help people message each over over the pre-web internet. While many other programs have become more popular since then, such as Whatsapp, Google Allo, and Slack, IRC lives on primarily in developer communities. Now, IRC developers are updating the venerable protocol to revitalize it for the 21st century.

  • 3 command line conversion tools for Linux

    Recently, a friend innocently asked me how many file formats there are. My semi-serious response was "Think of a soup bowl filled with beach sand."

    OK, there aren't quite that many file formats. That said, you've probably never heard of many of the formats that are commonly-used enough to warrant listing on Wikipedia. Chances are, you'll never see and never use most of them. If, however, you want or need to convert between file formats then there are a quite a few applications for the job.

    Let's take a look at three solid file conversion tools for the Linux command line.

  • axdigi resurrected

    Seems funny to talk about 20 year old code that was a stop-gap measure to provide a bridging function the kernel had not (as yet) got, but here it is, my old bridge code.

    When I first started getting involved in Free Software, I was also involved with hamradio. In 1994 I release my first Free Software, or Open Source program called axdigi. This program allowed you to “digipeat”. This was effectively source route bridging across hamradio packet networks. The code I used for this was originally network sniffer code to debug my PackeTwin kernel driver but got frustrated at there being no digipeating function within Linux, so I wrote axdigi which is about 200 lines.

Linux Foundation and Linux

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  • The Open Source SDN Distro That Keeps Microsoft’s WiFi Secure

    Dr. Bithika Khargharia, a principal solutions architect at Extreme Networks and director of product and community management at the Open Networking Foundation (ONF), then elaborated on the new approach by discussing a project called Atrium Enterprise. Atrium Enterprise is an open source SDN distribution that’s ODL-based and has an integrated unified communications and collaboration application. It runs on Atrium partner hardware according to Khargharia.

  • Blockchain Adoption Faster Than Expected

    A study released last week by IBM indicates that blockchain adoption by financial institutions is on the rise and beating expectations. This is good news for IBM, which is betting big on the database technology that was brought to prominence by Bitcoin. Yesterday, Big Blue announced that it has made its Watson-powered blockchain service available to enterprise customers.

    For its study, IBM's Institute for Business Value teamed with the Economist Intelligence Unit to survey 200 banks spread through 16 countries about “their experience and expectations with blockchains.” The study found that 15 percent of the banks surveyed plan to implement commercial blockchain solutions in 2017.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Adds OpenTracing Project

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) today officially announced that the open-source OpenTracing project has been accepted as a hosted project.

  • System calls again

    And speaking of searching — there is filter box now. You can type syscall name (or part of it) there and have table filtered. Same can be done with system call number as well. You used Valgrind and it said that has no idea how to handle syscall 145? Just enter number and you see that it is getresuid(), nfsservctl(), readv(), sched_getscheduler(), setreuid() or setrlimit() — depends which architecture you are testing.

OpenStack: Newton, OpenStack Day, and Contributors

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  • OpenStack Newton promises better resiliency, scalability and security

    OpenStack has released the latest edition of its popular open-source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud: Newton. With broad industry support from more than 200 vendors — including Cisco, Dell, HP Enterprise, IBM, Intel, Oracle, Rackspace, Red Hat, SUSE and VMware — this version should quickly see wide deployment.

    This release features numerous new features. Perhaps the most important is simply making OpenStack easier to use. OpenStack is powerful, but it’s notoriously hard to master. While OpenStack classes are becoming more common, even with help, mastering OpenStack isn’t easy.

  • Lessons learned as an OpenStack Day organizer
  • Recognizing OpenStack Cloud Contributors--Including Those Who Don't Code

    Although it is still a very young cloud computing platform, each week there is more evidence of how entrenched OpenStack has become in enterprises and even in smaller companies. In fact, just this week, we reported on findings that show OpenStack adoption in the telecom industry to be widespread.

    Contributors are a big part of what has driven OpenStack's success, and as the OpenStack Summit approaches, there are several new initiatives being put in place to serve up recognition for meaningful contributors. Notably, the recognition is going to partially go to those who actually contribute code, but there will also be recognition of other forms of giving to OpenStack.

KDE Leftovers

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  • How to make animated videos with Krita

    There are lots of different kinds of animation: hand-drawn, stop motion, cut-out, 3D, rotoscoping, pixilation, machinima, ASCII, and probably more. Animation isn't easy, by any means; it's a complex process requiring patience and dedication, but the good news is open source supplies plenty of high-quality animation tools.

    Over the next three months I'll highlight three open source applications that are reliable, stable, and efficient in enabling users to create animated movies of their own. I'll concentrate on three of the most essential disciplines in animation: hand-drawn cel animation, digitally tweened animation, and stop motion. Although the tools are fairly specific to the task, these principles apply to other styles of animation as well.

    You can read about some of the more technical details about animation in Animation Basics by Nikhil Sukul.

  • Kdenlive 16.08.2 Open-Source Video Editor Released with Over 35 Improvements

    Today, October 13, 2016, Kdenlive developer Farid Abdelnour announced the release and immediate availability of the second maintenance update to the Kdenlive 16.08 open-source video editor software project.

    Distributed as part of the soon-to-be-released KDE Applications 16.08.2 software suite for the latest KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment, Kdenlive 16.08.2 is here five weeks after the release of the previous maintenance version with no less than 36 improvements and bug fixes, addressing keyframe, UI, workflow, compilation, and proxy clip rendering related issues reported by users.

  • Qt 5.6.2 Toolkit Officially Released with Almost 900 Improvements and Bug Fixes

    Today, October 12, 2016, the Qt Company, through Tuukka Turunen, announced the general availability of the second maintenance release to the long-term supported Qt 5.6 open-source and cross-platform GUI toolkit.

    Qt 5.6.2 is here four months after the release of the first maintenance version, Qt 5.6.1, bringing approximately 900 improvements and bug fixes to keep Qt 5.6 a stable and reliable release for Qt application developers on GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

    "This is the second patch release to the long-term supported Qt 5.6, and there will still be more patch releases to come. While a patch release does not bring new features, it contains security fixes, error corrections and general improvements," says Tuukka Turunen in today's announcement.

Linux Graphics

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Authorities Opening Up

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  • NL Parliament makes open standards mandatory

    The use of open standards will be made mandatory for public administrations. A law proposal by MP Astrid Oosenbrug was adopted by the Parliament’s lower house yesterday. According to the MP, the open standards requirement will be one of several changes to the country’s administrative law, introduced next year. “The minister has earlier agreed to make open standards mandatory”, she said. “The parliament is making sure this actually happens.”

    The first public administration that should improve its use of open standards, is the Parliament’s lower house itself, MP Oosenbrug said. “Ironically, lower house published the adopted law on its website by providing a download link to a document in a proprietary format.”

  • France adds source code to list of documents covered by freedom of information laws

    French freedom of information law now treats source code as disclosable in the same way as other government records.

    The new "Digital Republic" law took effect Saturday, with its publication in France's Official Journal.

    It adds source code to the long list of government document types that must be released in certain circumstances: dossiers, reports, studies, minutes, transcripts, statistics, instructions, memoranda, ministerial replies, correspondence, opinions, forecasts and decisions.

    But it also adds a new exception to existing rules on access to administrative documents and reuse of public information, giving officials plenty of reasons to refuse to release code on demand.

    These rules already allow officials to block the publication of documents they believe threaten national security, foreign policy, personal safety, or matters before court or under police investigation, among things.

    Now they can oppose publication if they believe it threatens the security of government information systems.

  • CMPD launches 'Open Source Data' page to share police info with public

    Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police announced Wednesday the launch of its “Open Source Data” page on the department’s website.

    Police say the information source is a step forward in how they share information with the public and is an “opportunity for even greater accountability and transparency” with the Charlotte community. The department faced criticism in the wake of the Keith Scott shooting as protesters said CMPD should have been more transparent during their investigation of the incident.

Android and Tizen Leftovers

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Huawei Linux Devices

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  • Huawei Mate 9 leaked in flat and curved-screen variants

    Evan Blass has leaked renders of two variants of the upcoming Huawei Mate 9: a flat-screened and dual curved screen version that looks an awful lot like the Galaxy Note 7. While the wrapping will come off the new phone/s on November 3 in Munich, these renders are apparently the real deal and Blass’ sources have confirmed that the previously leaked Mate 9 specs are legit.

  • Huawei launches Honor 8 in India, along with Honor 8 Smart
  • Huawei Teases Honor S1 smartwatch, No mention of Android Wear

    Huawei is currently teasing their new smartwatch which is to be released under the Honor brand named as the Honor S1. The Chinese manufacturer has an event scheduled for October 18 at which we expect the S1 to be unveiled. But could it be running Tizen ? Huawei are already known as stating they will not release anymore Android wear smartwatches for the remainder of this year, so this leaves either Tizen or some other proprietary OS. According to a report in the JoongAng Ilbo newspaper Huawei are currently working with Samsung to deploy the Tizen operating system in its next smartwatches.

Security News

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  • Just Too Much Administration – Breaking JEA, PowerShell’s New Security Barrier

    Just Enough Administration (JEA) is a new Windows 10/Server 2016 feature to create granular least privilege policies by granting specific administrative privileges to users, defined by built-in and script-defined PowerShell cmdlets. Microsoft's documentation claimed JEA was a security boundary so effective you did not need to worry about an attacker stealing and misusing the credentials of a JEA user.

    But every JEA role capability example I found Microsoft had published had vulnerabilities that could be exploited to obtain complete system administrative rights, most of them immediately, reliably, and without requiring any special configuration. I find it hard to believe most custom role capabilities created by system administrators in the wild are going to be more secure than these, given the track record of the functionally similar features in Linux, the non-obvious nature of vulnerabilities, and the importance of dangerous cmdlets to routine system troubleshooting and maintenance.

    I recommended Microsoft invert what their JEA articles and documentation said about security. Instead of leading with statements that JEA was a security barrier, users with JEA rights should not be considered administrators, and their credentials do not need to be protected like real administrators with a note that this may not be the case if you are not careful; Microsoft's JEA documentation should lead with statements that JEA should not be treated like a security barrier and users with JEA rights and their credentials should be tightly controlled exactly like normal administrators unless the role capabilities have been strictly audited by security professionals. Additionally, the README files and comments of their example role capabilities should start with stern reminders of this.

  • Thousands of internet-connected devices are a security disaster in the making

    The first problem: many IoT devices, like those cameras, are consumer-oriented, which means their owners don't have a security-conscious IT department. "Individuals do not have the purchasing power of a large corporation," says John Dickson, principal of Denim Group, "so they cannot demand security features or privacy protections that a large corporation can of an a product or software vendor."

    PC Pitstop Vice President of Cyber Security Dodi Glenn points out that many IoT purchasers neglect basic security measures, failing to change passwords from obvious defaults. And even if they did want to secure their devices, there are limits to what they can do: "You can't secure these devices with antivirus applications."

  • A SSHowDowN in security: IoT devices enslaved through 12 year old flaw

    In what researchers call the "Internet of Unpatchable Things," a 12-year-old security flaw is being exploited by attackers in a recent spate of SSHowDowN Proxy attacks.

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is an emerging market full of Wi-Fi and networked devices including routers, home security systems, and lighting products. While the idea of making your home more efficient and automating processes is an appealing one, unfortunately, vendors en masse are considering security as an afterthought for thousands of devices now in our homes, leaving our data vulnerable.

  • Microsoft was unable to meaningfully improve the software

    Documents in a class-action lawsuit against Ford and its original MyFord Touch in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) system reveal that the company's engineers and even its top executive were frustrated with the problematic technology.

    The documents from the 2013 lawsuit show Ford engineers believed the IVI, which was powered by the SYNC operating system launched in 2010, might be "unsaleable" and even described a later upgrade as a "polished turd," according to a report in the Detroit News, which was confirmed by Computerworld.

    The SYNC OS was originally powered by Microsoft software. Microsoft continued releasing software revisions it knew were defective, according to the lawsuit.

    "In the spring of 2011, Ford hired Microsoft to oversee revisions, and hopefully the improvement, of the [software]. But ... Microsoft was unable to meaningfully improve the software, and Ford continued releasing revised software that it knew was still defective," the lawsuit states.

    Last week, a U.S. District Court judge certified the case as a class action.

  • Senator wants nationwide, all-mail voting to counter election hacks

    "It's not a question of if you're going to get hacked—it's when you're going to get hacked."

    Those were the words of Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam as he sought to assure investors last week that the company is still interested in purchasing Yahoo despite the massive data breach of Yahoo consumer accounts.

    Whether McAdam's words ring true for the hodgepodge of election systems across the US is anybody's guess. But in the wake of the Obama administration's announcement that the Russian government directed hacks on the Democratic National Committee and other institutions to influence US elections, a senator from Oregon says the nation should conduct its elections like his home state does: all-mail voting.

  • SourceClear Adds Atlassian Stack to Its Open Source Security Platform

    Open source security company SourceClear said it is integrating Atlassian’s suite of developer tools including Bitbucket Pipelines, JIRA Server, JIRA Cloud, and Bamboo into the company’s open source platform. The integration will result in automated security checks being a part of the developer workflow before they ship code.

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