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Thursday, 14 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Latest LWN Articles About Linux (Paywall Has Just Expired) Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 7:25am
Story Security: Intel Management Engine (ME), Snyk FUD, and Latest Security Updates Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 7:23am
Story Programming/Development: Java, GitLab, C++ and Python Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 7:21am
Story Linux Foundation's CNCF Growth Roy Schestowitz 1 07/12/2017 - 6:49am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 6:44am
Story New Chrome Browser and End of Chrome Web Store Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 4:13am
Story Ubuntu Server and Ubuntu 18.04 (LTS) Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 4:11am
Story Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 4:09am
Story Games: Iconoclasts, Steam, Corpse Party and Wine/CrossOver Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 4:08am
Story Devices: Intel Boards, Tizen, and Android Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 4:05am

Wine 3.0 Plan

Filed under
Software
  • The Features To Look Forward To With Wine 3.0

    Yesterday it was confirmed that Wine 3.0 will enter its code freeze next week and begin with the release candidates until the official v3.0.0 milestone is ready sometime around mid-January. Here's a recap of all the Wine developments for 2017 if you are curious about all the features and improvements to be found in this big update.

    Among the changes that built up in the Wine 2.x unstable bi-weekly snapshots ahead of the official Wine 3.0 stable debut include:

  • Wine 3.0 RC1 should be out in early December, final release likely in January

    Alexandre Julliard has put out his plans for the release of the next major version of Wine and it's going to be quite soon.

    The next release, due around December 8th, will be the first Release Candidate for Wine 3.0. From there, they will be doing weekly RC releases and he estimates this will last 4-6 weeks. So the final Wine 3.0 release should be due in January if all goes well and no major release blockers are found.

Solus Review For Casual Users

Filed under
Linux

I have been watching the progress with Solus Linux from afar for some time now. I’ve even had other Freedom Penguin contributors share their thoughts on Solus. So when I decided to give everyone my review, I wanted to make sure I cover the basics…then move on to the stuff I cared about – using it as a daily driver.

GameShell is a Game Boy Styled Retro Gaming Console Based on Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Like most of us, perhaps you owned a Game Boy or a device like that. You spent so much time with it that it became an essential part of your childhood and now a part of your good old memories.

But as the vintage clothes and style are back in fashion, so is vintage or should I say retro gaming. It’s not long that we heard about a retro gaming console from Atari and now we have another Kickstarter campaign that promises a Linux based device that you can use to play classic games from Atari, GB, GBA, NES, SNES etc.

Read more

2017: A year of highs and lows for Linux and open source

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Ah, 2017, it was a good year for Linux—one that continued the solidification of the open source platform on so many levels. From the consumer mobile space to supercomputers, Linux dominated certain sectors in a way no other platform could.

Let's take a look at some of the highlights from the year—both the highs and lows—and hopefully draw a conclusion that 2017 was a banner year for Linux.

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Mozilla’s new open source model aims to revolutionize voice recognition

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS

You may have noticed the steady and sure progress of voice recognition tech in recent times – all the big tech firms want to make strides in this arena if only to improve their digital assistants, from Cortana to Siri – but Mozilla wants to push harder, and more broadly, on this front with the release of an open source speech recognition model.

Read more

Also: Mozilla releases open source speech recognition tools

Windows 10 vs. Linux 4.15 + Mesa 17.4-dev Radeon Gaming Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

As we end out November, here is a fresh look at the current Windows 10 Pro Fall Creator's Update versus Ubuntu 17.10 with the latest Linux 4.15 kernel and Mesa 17.4-dev Radeon graphics driver stack as we see how various games compete under Windows 10 and Linux with these latest AMD drivers on the Radeon RX 580 and RX Vega 64 graphics cards.

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Debian-Based Univention Corporate Server 4.2 OS Gets Microsoft AD Improvements

Filed under
Debian

Coming two and a half months after the second point release, Univention Corporate Server 4.2-3 is a small maintenance update that appears to mostly address various regressions reported by users from previous versions of the operating systems. These include more checks for Microsoft Active Directory (AD) domains and expanded configurability and usability of the management system.

"The usability and configurability of the management system were further expanded. The design of the assistants and dialogues of the management system was revised with regard to usability aspects," explains developer Nico Gulden. "Additional configuration options for the single sign-on of the management system have also been added, e. g. the configurability of the certificate used."

Read more

From Linux to Cloud, why Red Hat matters for every enterprise

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

In 1994, if you wanted to make money from Linux, you were selling Linux CDs for $39.95. By 2016, Red Hat became the first $2 billion Linux company. But, in the same year, Red Hat was shifting its long-term focus from Linux to the cloud.

Here's how Red Hat got from mail-order CDs to the top Linux company and a major cloud player.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software: TLDR, Notes-Up, Bashhub, Mozilla, LibreOffice and GNU libmicrohttpd

Filed under
Software
  • TLDR summarizes Linux commands

    TLDR is a free command line utility for various Linux distributions that provides you with summaries of Linux commands on request.

    Linux commands can be quite intimidating, especially if you are a new user. While you may use the man command to get information on a particular command, man descriptions are often not the easiest to go through.

  • Notes-Up – A Markdown Note Editor & Manager for Elementary OS

    Notes Up is an open-source notes editor and manager aimed at Elementary OS. Its main attractions include a minimalist User Interface, an intuitive Markdown editor, support for keyboard shortcuts, dragging and dropping images, plugin extensions, and exporting notes to PDF.

    Although Notes-Up is aimed at Elementary OS, it is available for openSUSE and users of other Linux distros are free to try it out via its PPA.

  • Bashhub – Access Your Terminal History From Anywhere

    As you already know, all commands you run on your shell will be saved and you can view them at any time either by using history command or using UP/Down arrows keys or doing a reverse search using CTRL+R key combination from the Terminal. All commands that you run on the Terminal will be saved in .bash_history file. But you can view, access, and re-run them only from the same machine itself. What if you want to access your Terminal history from a different system on the network? No problem! Here is where “Bashhub” utility comes in help. It is a simple online web service where you can save all commands and access them from anywhere. Bashhub saves every commands entered across all sessions and systems, so you can access them from anywhere. To put this simply, your entire BASH history will be available in the cloud and the entire bash history is indexed, and searchable! Bashhub is completely free and open source.

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  • Mozilla's WebRender Making Good Progress, Can Be Tested On Firefox Nightly

    Mozilla engineers aren't letting up after their Quantum work in Firefox 57 that made the browser much faster. Next they have been improving WebRender and can be tested easily with Firefox Nightly.

    WebRender as a reminder is Mozilla's GPU-based renderer used currently within the Servo engine and has also been fitted into Firefox with Gecko. Those unfamiliar with WebRender can learn more about its architecture on their GitHub Wiki and this Mozilla Hacks blog post from last month.

  • LibreOffice Is Now Available on Flathub, the Flatpak App Store

    Its arrival allows anyone running a modern Linux distribution to install the latest stable release of LibreOffice in a click or two, without having to hunt down a PPA, tussle with tarballs or wait for a distro provider to package it up.

    A LibreOffice Flatpak has been available for users to download and install since August of last year and the LibreOffice 5.2 release.

    What’s “new” here is the distribution method. Rather than release updates through their own dedicated server The Document Foundation has opted to use Flathub.

  • Dialog Tunnelling

    I’m simply going to talk about what I’ve been currently working on in Collabora Online or LibreOffice Online, as part of my job at Collabora.

  • GNU libmicrohttpd 0.9.57 released
  • GNU libmicrohttpd 0.9.57 Brings Significant Improvements

    The libmicrohttpd GNU project is the C library that makes it easy to run an HTTP web-server as part of another application while being as small as about ~32k compiled.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Open Source Software Developers Find A Home At Gitcoin

    Open source software is often the ugly stepchild of technology development. Because developers are largely donating their time and efforts, progress lags on building better versions of apps, blockchains and other software. That stifles progress, and leaves advancement in the hands of for-profit ventures, many of them without the public’s best interests at heart.

  • Open source grows up, needs to learn to play with others

    Open source technologies like OpenStack are expanding their presence within service provider environments, emerging as a critical solutions set for operators looking to drive agility and cost efficiency in their infrastructure through automation and digitalisation. That role will only increase with technologies like containers, MEC and 5G come online to drive up demands on the network and deliver new service architectures and capabilities. But even as OpenStack matures inside service provider environments, it must now learn to play with others that form the greater service provider ecosystem, including other open source communities like ONAP and ETSI NFVI, says Ericsson’s Susan James.

  • Will Open-Source Finally Unlock Ag Technology’s Potential?

    To Aaron Ault’s eyes, ag technology right now is something like a walled garden — not unlike the Microsoft of yesteryear, which attempted to gain dominion over the emerging online world by pushing exclusive use of its Windows OS and for-pay Internet Explorer browser.

    “Microsoft was wrong for a long time,” says Ault, who is Senior Research Engineer for the Open Ag Technology and Systems (OATS) Group at Purdue University. “They wanted to own the internet. Now they’re a huge open-source shop” — joining what Ault calls the “business model of success” found today at Android, Google, Facebook, and Amazon.

    Agricultural technology needs a similar open-source awakening, Ault says. The current state of ag data, he says frankly, “stinks.” Most farmers don’t share their data, and often justify their stance by noting there’s not much data out there anyway so what does it matter. And because the little data that is out there isn’t used much, a perception lingers that it doesn’t have to be particularly good data.

  • Inocybe aims to take complexity out of open source

    Anyone who’s trying to navigate the telecom waters that are open source these days may appreciate that there are entities out there that want to help.

    Montreal, Canada-based Inocybe is targeting Tier 2 and 3 wired/wireless service providers globally and enterprises to talk open source. The company has been involved with OpenDaylight since the beginning and is one of its top five contributors, and it wants to help entities that don’t have the type of resources the bigger Tier 1 operators have to devote to open-source projects, of which there are many.

  • From 0 to Kubernetes

    Although you hear a lot about containers and Kubernetes these days, there's a lot of mystery around them. In her Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, "From 0 to Kubernetes," Amy Chen clears up the confusion.

    Amy, a software engineer at Rancher Labs, describes containers as baby computers living inside another computer that are suffering an "existential crisis" as they try to figure out their place in the world. Kubernetes is the way all those baby computers are organized.

  • 5 best practices for getting started with DevOps

    DevOps often stymies early adopters with its ambiguity, not to mention its depth and breadth. By the time someone buys into the idea of DevOps, their first questions usually are: "How do I get started?" and "How do I measure success?" These five best practices are a great road map to starting your DevOps journey.

  • HDMI 2.1 Specification Brings 4K@120Hz / 8K@60Hz

Security: NSA Leaks, Linux 'Distro' Accidentally Uploaded, and Magento Patches

Filed under
Security
  • Researcher discovers classified Army intel app, data on open public AWS bucket

    After uncovering a massive trove of social media-based intelligence left on multiple Amazon Web Services S3 storage buckets by a Defense Department contractor, the cloud security firm UpGuard has disclosed yet another major cloud storage breach of sensitive intelligence information. This time, the data exposed includes highly classified data and software associated with the Distributed Common Ground System-Army (DCGS-A), an intelligence distribution platform that DOD has spent billions to develop. Specifically, the breach involves software for a cloud-based component of DCGS-A called "Red Disk."

  • Latest NSA Leak Reveals Secret Army Intelligence Project

    The program, led by U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command, a division of the National Security Agency, was supposed to help the Pentagon get real-time information about what was happening on the ground in Afghanistan in 2013 by collecting data from U.S. computer systems on the ground, according to tech news site ZDNet. But the agency killed the initiative in 2014 because of technical problems that it described in the leaked documents as “a major hindrance to operations.”

  • Top secret Army, NSA data found on public internet due to misconfigured AWS server
  • New details of NSA's Ragtime program appear in leaked files

    A leaked document shines new light on a surveillance program developed by the National Security Agency.

    The program, known as Ragtime, collects the contents of communications, such as emails and text messages, of foreign nationals under the authority of several US surveillance laws.

  • Magento Releases Security Updates for Commerce and Open Source 1.x

    Magento Released two updates today to address some security concerns with Magento 1.x installations. While 2.x received some recent security updates, this is the first 1.x in some time.

Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Is Available To Download

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" has been released and is available to download from the official website. The release is based on Ubuntu 16.04, contains many improvements and new applications. Some important software were rewritten making them work much faster and look cleaner. Some less useful applications have also been removed to clean the system installation. So let's look at the major improvements in Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia".

Read<br />
more

Security: Apple, Microsoft, and Human Error (GNU/Linux)

Filed under
Security

KDE’s Goal: Privacy

Filed under
KDE
Security

In the past, KDE software has come a long way in providing privacy tools, but the tool-set is neither comprehensive, nor is privacy its implications widely seen as critical to our success in this area. Setting privacy as a central goal for KDE means that we will put more focus on this topic and lead to improved tools that allow users to increase their level of privacy. Moreover, it will set an example for others to follow and hopefully increase standards across the whole software ecosystem. There is much work to do, and we’re excited to put our shoulder under it and work on it.

Read more

Open Hardware Rising: RISC-V

Filed under
Hardware
  • Western Digital To Begin Shipping Devices Using RISC-V

    RISC-V has a big new hardware backer... Western Digital.

    Western Digital just announced at the RISC-V Workshop conference that they will be getting behind RISC-V for the next generation of big data and fast data. They plan to switch over "one billion cores per year to RISC-V." By the time their transition is complete, they anticipate to be shipping two billion RISC-V cores per year.

  • SiFive and Microsemi Expand Relationship with Strategic Roadmap Alignment and a Linux-Capable, RISC-V Development Board

    SiFive, the first fabless provider of customized, open-source-enabled semiconductors, and Microsemi Corporation (Nasdaq: MSCC), a leading provider of semiconductor solutions differentiated by power, security, reliability and performance, at the 7th RISC-V Workshop today announced the companies have formed a strategic relationship to meet the growing interest and demand in the RISC-V instruction set architecture. The companies have previously collaborated to provide RISC-V soft CPU cores for Microsemi's PolarFire® FPGAs, IGLOO™2 FPGAs, SmartFusion™2 system-on-chip (SoC) FPGAs and RTG4™ FPGAs, currently available as part of the Microsemi Mi-V RISC-V ecosystem.

Games: Oxygen Not Included, Civilization VI, ATOM RPG

Filed under
Gaming
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An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

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Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

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KDE Applications 17.12 Lands with Dolphin Enhancements, HiDPI Support for Okular

KDE Applications 17.12 has been in development for the past several months and it's now available as a drop-in replacement for the previous series of the software suite, KDE Applications 17.08, which reached end of life in early November. As expected, several of the included apps received various enhancements and new features in this release. Among these, we can mention that the Dolphin file manager is now capable of saving searches, can limit the search only to folders, makes renaming of files easier by allowing the user to simply double-click on the file name, displays extra information about files like origin URL of downloaded file or modification date, and introduces new Bitrate, Genre, and Release Year columns. Read more Also: KDE Applications 17.12 Brings HiDPI Improvements, Rest Of KDE Games Ported To KF5 KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.12.0

Stable kernels 4.14.6 and 4.9.69

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