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Friday, 25 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME Development/Developers Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 7:24am
Story Debian Development/Developers Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 7:22am
Story Linux Graphics: AMD and Mesa Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 7:11am
Story FreeBSD 11.2-BETA2 Now Available, DragonFly BSD 5.2.1 Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 7:08am
Story Congratulations to Tesla on Their First Public Step Toward GPL Compliance Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 6:33am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 3:32am
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 6:44pm
Story Security/OpenPGP: Purism and Pure FUD From EFF Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 12:58pm
Story Cinnamon Desktop Spices Up RoboLinux Raptor Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 12:56pm
Story GCC 9 Drops Support For Older ARM Microarchitecture Versions Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2018 - 9:21am

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Considering an RSAC Expo booth? Our Experience, in 5,000 words or less

     

    So we decided to try a booth for 2018, and figured we'd document our experience (and thoughts) along the way. In this post you'll find a full breakdown of all our costs for attending and boothing at RSAC, including what it takes to get a space; kitting it out with furniture, equipment, swag and more; staffing the booth; the crazy that is conference pricing; and the logistics for actually making it happen.

  • OpenStack Summit Vancouver 2018

    OpenStack Summit is the leading event in Open Infrastructure, bringing together the builders and operators for sessions and workshops on containers, CI/CD, telecom & NFV, public cloud, multi-cloud and more.

  • rr Chaos Mode Improvements

    rr's chaos mode introduces nondeterminism while recording application execution, to try to make intermittent bugs more reproducible. I'm always interested in hearing about bugs that cannot be reproduced under chaos mode, especially if those bugs have been diagnosed. If we can figure out why a bug was not reproducible under chaos mode, we can often extend chaos mode to make it reproducible, and this improves chaos mode for everyone. If you encounter such a bug, please file an rr issue about it.

  • This week in Mixed Reality: Issue 6

    The team and community continue to add new features, fix bugs, and respond to early user and developer feedback to deliver a solid experience across Firefox Reality, Hubs and the content related projects.

  • Best free and open source Microsoft Excel alternatives
  • Microsoft's Latest Excel Update Has Security Pros Anxious

     

    [...] But JavaScript also creates more interconnection and more access points—meaning more points of potential vulnerability. It's already a bit of a web security nightmare. And on top of that, attackers have long shown their willingness to exploit customization and automation features in Excel—and other Microsoft Office programs—to create malicious files for phishing and other attacks. The ubiquity of Microsoft Office files make them the perfect vector for tricking victims and wreaking havoc.

  • Windows Subsystem for Linux - Many distros!
  • $125 Million Richer, Mesosphere Tackles Big Data at the Edge [Ed: Be very careful of Mesos and Mesosphere. Microsoft people, those who participated in competition crimes, are funding it and Microsoft attempted a literal takeover.]
  • New release of eiffel-iup

    It is already available a new version of eiffel-iup, a Liberty Eiffel wrapper to IUP toolkit. So you can build your graphical application from Eiffel using Liberty Eiffel, the GNU implementation of Eiffel language. So happy hacking.

  • Gnome Login Screen Redesign, CentOS Update, VirtualBox, Mender Team and IoT

    Oracle recently announce the available of VirtualBox 5.2.12. This latest update includes support for the Linux 4.17 kernel, alongside your typical bug fixes.

  • Linux for developers comes to Chrome OS, using AR to assist surgeons, and more open source news

    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at Linux for developers coming to Chrome OS, a tool that uses AR to assist surgeons, and more.

  • Java: Executing code in comments?!

System76 vs. The LVFS Firmware Updating Service

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

This week the latest open-source drama was a differing of opinions between Richard Hughes of Red Hat who maintains Fwupd and LVFS for Linux firmware updating from the desktop and that of Linux PC vendor System76.

Richard Hughes volleyed a blog post that recommend not buying System76 hardware for those wanting firmware updates via LVFS (the Linux Vendor Firmware Service). He wrote that post based upon System76 not currently using UEFI UpdateCapsule for BIOS updates, System76 developing a Rust tool to flash the embedded controller, and them rolling out their own firmware update handler that officially targets Ubuntu and Pop!_OS. Richard then encouraged Linux users to buy Dell XPS laptops instead.

Richard's post in full can be read here.

On Friday, System76 responded to those accusations. According to System76, Richard expressed via email that the approach System76 is using for firmware updating likely wouldn't work with LVFS and also their distributing of a proprietary firmware flashing tool likely wouldn't be approved by Red Hat legal and they also found flashing the embedded controler from user-space to be sub-optimal.

Read more

Scientific Linux 7.5 Released As RHEL 7.5 Rebuild

Filed under
Red Hat
Sci/Tech

Testing of the release candidate earlier this month went well and out now is the official Scientific Linux 7.5 release.

Scientific Linux 7.5 is the re-spin derived from upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 and its many changes/improvements.

Read more

FreeBSD 11.2 Beta Now Available For Testing

Filed under
BSD

FreeBSD 11.2 has reached the beta milestone to succeed FreeBSD 11.1 from last year and ahead of FreeBSD 12.0 that is expected this November.

FreeBSD 11.2 is targeted for release around the end of June but before then they expect to do a total of three beta releases and up to three release candidates.

Read more

Even Microsoft Admits Its Products Are Inherently Faulty

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft to replace Surface Pro 4 tablets affected by screen flickering

    Microsoft is formally launching a replacement program for Surface Pro 4 devices affected by screen flickering. Any Surface Pro 4 units experiencing the problem will be covered for up to three years from the time of original purchase. “We have heard your feedback and after careful examination, have determined that a small percentage of Surface Pro 4 devices are exhibiting a screen flicker that cannot be addressed with a firmware or driver update,” the company said on its support page with details on the program.

    The annoying flickering has been well-documented on Microsoft’s support forums, with some users taking drastic steps like putting their Surface Pro 4 in a freezer to temporarily fix the issue. Back in February, Microsoft said it was closely monitoring the situation, and the company came to the conclusion that there’s no convenient fix.

  • Microsoft can’t fix “flickergate” Surface Pro 4s with software, so it’s replacing them
  • Don't Skype Me: How Microsoft Turned Consumers Against a Beloved Brand

    In March tech investor and commentator Om Malik summarized the negativity by tweeting that Skype was “a turd of the highest quality” and directing his ire at its owner. “Way to ruin Skype and its experience. I was forced to use it today, but never again.”

Get Privacy Tools on Ubuntu 18.04

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

If you are already aware about 2013 global privacy case, I believe you care about your internet privacy by now. If you just switched to Ubuntu, here's a list of user-friendly programs (free software only) and search engine to protect your privacy. You will find my recommendation of a web search engine, a specific web browser, add-ons, email client enhancements, and password storage. This list accompanies the previous list of 20 useful programs for 18.04.

[...]

Free software is not gratis software but software that the user is free. Free software is about the user's right, either individually or collectively, to control over the software. If you run your activities with nonfree software (also called proprietary), you don't control the whole things software does within your computer, which only means there is somebody else controlling you and the computers. To protect your privacy, you should make sure you run only free software and relies only on privacy-respecting internet services.

Read more

Slackware is Moving to XOrg 1.20 and Slackware 14.2 Gets "Love"

Filed under
Slack
  • Moving to XOrg 1.20
  • Let’s show some love to 14.2

    With all the excitement going on about the disruptive changes in Slackware-current (migration to the new C++ ABI caused all of Slackware to be recompiled, and then the upgrade of openssl to 1.1 caused many packages to be recompiled again), I had to spend all of my time and CPU power to keep up with the changes and fix my packages for -current.
    That meant, less attention to the package updates for Slackware 14.2. I realize I left the users of our stable release somewhat in the cold.
    I am going to do something about that. During the next weeks I will try to bridge the gap that had been expanding for package versions in my own repository, between 14.2 and -current.

KDE: FreeText, Modern C++ and Qt, KDE Partition Manager

Filed under
KDE
  • FreeText typewriter annotation WYSIWYG implementation ideas

    As a part of the GSoC project, I’m working with my mentor Tobias Deiminger on implementing the FreeText typewriter annotation with click-to-type WYSIWYG editing feature in Okular to write directly on PDF page.

  • Modern C++ and Qt – part 2.

    I recently did a short tongue-in-cheek blog post about Qt and modern C++. In the comments, people discovered that several compilers effectively can optimize std::make_unique<>().release() to a simple new statement, which was kind of a surprise to me.

    I have recently written a new program from scratch (more about that later), and I tried to force myself to use standard library smartpointers much more than what I normally have been doing.

  • Google Summer of Code 2018 – Community Bonding Part 2: Studies about LVM

    As I said in my previous post, I’m using this community bonding period to understand how LVM works in kpmcore. It involved studying about how the three parts of LVM (Physical Volumes, Volume Groups and Logical Volumes) work in the library and how this logic was implemented.

    In this text, I’m intending to give a short explanation about LVM, discuss about some plannings related to the process of creation of LVM VGs in Calamares and talk about some corrections related to it that I’ve implemented in kpmcore and KDE Partition Manager.

    [...]

    Community Bonding period is almost finishing, but I’ll write another post about it before that, talking a little bit about my studies involving RAID arrays and which are my ideas to implementing it. See you later!

Security: Google, Blockchains and More

Filed under
Security
  • Google will soon require OEMs to roll out ‘regular’ Android security patches
  • Google Updates Chrome for Desktop to Fix Privilege Escalation Bug in Extensions

    Google released on Thursday a new stable version of its Chrome 66 web browser, version 66.0.3359.170, which is currently rolling out to Linux, Mac, and Windows users, to fix a few important security issues.

  • Will Blockchains Include Insecurity by Design?

    Ask any journalist to pick an adjective to use in connection with standards development and the answer will invariably be "boring." But according to a recent New York Times article (yes, it also used that word - as well as "wonky"), the process of creating standards just became a whole lot more interesting - at least when it comes to the blockchain. The reason? A standards working group may have been infiltrated by state actors bent on embedding security flaws into the very standards being created for the purpose of preventing attacks.

    And why not? The power of a successful standard comes from the fact that vendors have to adopt it in order to sell a given product or service, such as a WiFi router or a USB device. Indeed, laptops and smart phones include hundreds of standards, each of which is essential to a given function or service. As I noted last week, the blockchain will need standards, too, in order for it to take hold in multiple areas. Some of those standards will be intended to make the blockchain more secure.

  • 6 Things You Should Do to Secure Your NAS
  • Packets over a LAN are all it takes to trigger serious Rowhammer bit flips

    For the first time, researchers have exploited the Rowhammer memory-chip weakness using nothing more than network packets sent over a local area network. The advance is likely to further lower the bar for triggering bit flips that change critical pieces of data stored on vulnerable computers and servers.

Fedora: Review of Fedora 28, LibreCAD, Custom Fedora Live Media, EPEL Outage Report

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 28: Another Release for Power Users

    Fedora is widely recognized to be a smooth Linux distribution with up-to-date software, and is also used by a lot of developers around the world. Just around a 10 days ago Fedora 28 was released, bringing many changes and updated software.

    This review will guide you through the new release and what to expect so far.

    [...]

    Fedora 28 is yet another updated release for power users around the world. With updated software and some interesting new features and battery optimizations, Fedora 28 can be a good choice if you are looking for the latest stable up-to-date packages or you would like to get software just as they are from upstream.

    You may, however, face one of the common bugs in Fedora 28 of face crashes and hangs like we did, but this doesn’t mean that it’s not worth to try. Your experience on your hardware may be different than ours.

  • Fedora 28 : The LibreCAD application.
  • Custom Fedora Live Media
  • EPEL Outage Report 2018-11-05

Games: Mission Critical, GameMode and Dust Racing 2D

Filed under
Gaming
  • Classic sci-fi adventure 'Mission Critical' is now on GOG with a Linux version

    Fancy a space adventure? How about a classic? Mission Critical has recently made its way onto GOG and it has a Linux version.

    Released by Legend Entertainment way back in 1995, when I was just a wee lad, Mission Critical was really well reviewed with some going as far as calling it a "masterpiece".

  • Feral's GameMode 1.1 Released For Optimizing Linux Gaming Performance

    One month ago Linux game porter Feral Interactive introduced GameMode as a utility/service for dynamically optimizing the Linux system performance when running games. The initial focus on GameMode was on ensuring the CPU scaling governor was in its performance mode while today brought the GameMode v1.1 release.

    In the month since publicly unveiling GameMode, there has been dozens of commits going into this tool to "optimize Linux system performance on demand" though at the moment still largely remains focused on setting the Intel/AMD CPU frequency scaling driver's governor. But a lot of infrastructure work is now laid so hopefully soon we will see GameMode expand to offer more performance tweaks/optimizations.

  • Dust Racing 2D – An Open Source Car Racing Game Written in Qt And OpenGL

    Howdy, game lovers! Today, you can add one more cool game to your collection. Say hello to “Dust Racing 2D”, a traditional top-down (aerial-view) car racing game that makes your holidays fun and interesting. It is available as single or two-player mode, so your friend can join in the race and play along with you. It is a free, open source and cross-platform game written in Qt (C++) and OpenGL. Dust Racing 2D is currently available for Linux and Windows. In this tutorial, we will be learning how to install and play Dust Racing 2D game in Linux.

GNOME: GNOME Web, Purism, Report From Fractal Hackfest

Filed under
GNOME
  • Work is Underway to Make the GNOME Web Browser Mobile Friendly

    To do well, the upcoming Linux-powered Librem 5 smartphone will need a decent set of mobile-ready apps — and a good web browser is key to that.

    Hoping to step up to the plate is GNOME Web (aka Epiphany), whose developers are working hard to make sure that the webkit-based browser is in fine form for finger-friendly fun while surfing.

  • Purism wants to create a GNOME mobile shell for Linux smartphones (and other Librem 5 phone update)

    Linux computer maker Purism hopes to ship their smartphone in January, and the corporation has been providing updates about development of the upcoming Librem 5 smartphone periodically since launching a crowdfunding campaign last September (that campaign eventually raised more than $1.5 million through pre-orders).

    We know that the phone will feature an NXP i.MX8 processor, that it will ship with a custom version of Purism’s PureOS operating system, and that it will support several different user interfaces and operating systems including Ubuntu Touch, KDE Plasma Mobile, and Purism’s own GNOME-based user interface.

  • Fractal Hackfest, Strasbourg (day 1

    Yesterday was the first day in the first Fractal Hackfest. I'll try to write an small blog post every day to share the development with the world.

    My travel to Strasbourg was not an easy travel because I've to take two flights to get here from Málaga so a long day travelling.

    I met with Mathew from Matrix.org at the London airport because we took the same flight to here and it was really cool to meet him in person and we talk a little about the current Matrix situation.

    I've met the other Fractal people and collaborators at the event, and it's great that people from Purism, Matrix, Gnome and the two GSoC students come here to work together in this great application.

GNU: LibreJS 7.14, Hiring, and GNU Guix

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • LibreJS 7.14 released

    GNU LibreJS aims to address the JavaScript problem described in Richard Stallman's article The JavaScript Trap. LibreJS is a free add-on for GNU IceCat and other Mozilla-based browsers. It blocks nonfree nontrivial JavaScript while allowing JavaScript that is free and/or trivial.

  • Contract opportunity: JavaScript Developer for GNU LibreJS

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF), a Massachusetts 501(c)(3) charity with a worldwide mission to protect computer user freedom, seeks a contract JavaScript Developer to work on GNU LibreJS, a free browser add-on that addresses the problem of nonfree JavaScript described in Richard Stallman's article The JavaScript Trap. This is a temporary, paid contract opportunity, with specific deliverables, hours, term, and payment to be determined with the selected candidate. We anticipate the contract being approximately 80 hours of full-time work, with the possibility of extension depending on results and project status.

  • Paper on reproducible bioinformatics pipelines with Guix

    I’m happy to announce that the bioinformatics group at the Max Delbrück Center that I’m working with has released a preprint of a paper on reproducibility with the title Reproducible genomics analysis pipelines with GNU Guix.

    We built a collection of bioinformatics pipelines called "PiGx" ("Pipelines in Genomix") and packaged them as first-class packages with GNU Guix. Then we looked at the degree to which the software achieves bit-reproducibility, analysed sources of non-determinism (e.g. time stamps), discussed experimental reproducibility at runtime (e.g. random number generators, the interface provided by the kernel and the GNU C library, etc) and commented on the practice of using “containers” (or application bundles) instead.

Linux-based networking SBC features five GbE ports and optional SFP

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Gateworks has launched a rugged, headless “Newport GW6400” SBC that runs Linux on a dual- or quad-core Cavium OcteonTX with 3x mini-PCIe, 2x USB 3.0, 5x GbE ports (2x with PoE) and optional SFP.

Last November, Gateworks announced a new product family of rugged Newport SBCs that run OpenWrt or Ubuntu on Cavium’s dual or quad-core ARMv8.1 Octeon TX networking SoCs. The debut model was a 105 x 100mm GW6300 SBC. Now, Gateworks has followed up with the promised high-end, 140 x 100mm Newport GW6400 model, which has 5x Gigabit Ethernet ports instead of 3x on the GW6300. Later this year we’ll see a GW6100 with a single gigabit port and a GW6200 with 2x GbE.

Read more

Ubuntu: Crazy Justice, Mir, and Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The developer of Crazy Justice has shown off a quick teaser of it on Ubuntu

    Black Riddles Studio has finally shown Crazy Justice [Official Site] on Ubuntu, although it's only a small teaser of their third-person shooter it has me excited.

    Crazy Justice is the third-person shooter developed by two brothers, which was crowdfunded on Fig where they managed to get $51K in funding. Since the campaign finished, they've hit just shy of $70K thanks to people pre-ordering it.

    They later announced a Battle Royale mode, which has me excited because Linux doesn't really have one currently. You could argue we have stuff with last man standing modes, sure, but they're quite different. Given how popular the BR genre is, it will be sweet to have it on Linux. As a reminder, the Early Access release should hopefully be available before the end of June. Looks like I might be getting an early birthday present this year…

  • Logind Support For Mir Is Getting Closer To Working

    Mir developers have been working on support for systemd's Logind and there is a "mess of a branch" that is nearly functionally complete and could soon be merged.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E10 – Ten Little Ladybugs - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we’ve been smashing up a bathroom like rock stars. We discuss the Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) LTS release, serve up some command line love and go over your feedback.

Ubuntu: Crazy Justice, Mir

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The developer of Crazy Justice has shown off a quick teaser of it on Ubuntu

    Black Riddles Studio has finally shown Crazy Justice [Official Site] on Ubuntu, although it's only a small teaser of their third-person shooter it has me excited.

    Crazy Justice is the third-person shooter developed by two brothers, which was crowdfunded on Fig where they managed to get $51K in funding. Since the campaign finished, they've hit just shy of $70K thanks to people pre-ordering it.

    They later announced a Battle Royale mode, which has me excited because Linux doesn't really have one currently. You could argue we have stuff with last man standing modes, sure, but they're quite different. Given how popular the BR genre is, it will be sweet to have it on Linux. As a reminder, the Early Access release should hopefully be available before the end of June. Looks like I might be getting an early birthday present this year…

  • Logind Support For Mir Is Getting Closer To Working

    Mir developers have been working on support for systemd's Logind and there is a "mess of a branch" that is nearly functionally complete and could soon be merged.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E10 – Ten Little Ladybugs - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we’ve been smashing up a bathroom like rock stars. We discuss the Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) LTS release, serve up some command line love and go over your feedback.

Security: Updates, NSA Back Doors in Windows/Microsoft, Vista 10 Bricking and Intel Back Doors

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Windows Under Attack as NSA Exploit Usage Skyrockets

    EternalBlue, the stolen NSA exploit that was used to create the infamous WannaCry ransomware, is back in business, only that this time usage appears to skyrocket, according to security vendor ESET.

    Researcher Ondrej Kubovič notes that while WannaCry attacks have dropped, EternalBlue is still around, and the first months of 2018 brought a worrying increase in the number of attacks based on this exploit.

    EternalBlue is an exploit stolen from the NSA by hacking group Shadow Brokers in April 2016. It takes advantage of a vulnerability in the Windows Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, and Microsoft shipped patches even before the flaw went public.

    But this doesn’t mean that attackers have stopped searching for targets. The researcher says cybercriminals are scanning the Internet for exposed SMB ports and are trying to compromise the host with an exploit that eventually allows for payloads deployed on the target machine and leading to different outcomes.

    “Interestingly, according to ESET’s telemetry, EternalBlue had a calmer period immediately after the 2017 WannaCryptor campaign: over the following months, attempts to use the EternalBlue exploit dropped to “only” hundreds of detections daily,” the researcher notes.

    “Since September last year, however, the use of the exploit has slowly started to gain pace again, continually growing and reaching new heights in mid-April 2018.”

  • Microsoft Says It Won’t Fix a Bug Causing BSODs on Windows 10

    A bug causing Windows machines to crash when a USB drive is inserted won’t get a patch from Microsoft, despite the issue said to be affecting all versions of the operating system, including the newly-launched April 2018 Update.

    Security researcher Marius Tivadar says in a post on GitHub that he first reported the problem to Microsoft in July 2017 after discovering that a USB drive running a handcrafted NTFS image can cause any system to crash even if locked.

    “Microsoft was very responsive regarding my disclosure 1 year ago, but they didn’t issue a security patch,” Tivadar explains.

  • Purism's FSP Reverse Engineering Effort Might Be Stalled

    Purism has been working on reverse-engineering the Intel Firmware Support Package (FSP) module but it looks like that work may have taken a turn.

    A Phoronix reader tipped us off this morning that the Intel FSP reverse-engineering information made public by Purism has now been retracted. The past several months Purism has been working on reverse-engineering the Intel FSP to free the system further to run on only open-source code rather than still having the Intel binary-only module paired with Coreboot. Their big focus this year has been on figuring out the actual silicon initialization code inside the FSP. Purism's Youness Alaoui was very close to finding out this information at the start of April and he wrote a lengthy blog post outlining his reverse-engineering work.

AMD Graphics and Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Radeon EQAA Anti-Aliasing Support Merged To Mesa 18.2

    In addition to the potentially performance-doubling AMD Kaveri fix landing yesterday in Mesa 18.2 Git, also hitting this next version of Mesa is Enhanced Quality Anti-Aliasing (EQAA) support for Radeon GCN graphics processors.

    RadeonSI Gallium3D has wired up its Enhanced Quality Anti-Aliasing support. EQAA aims to deliver better quality over multi-sample anti-aliasing (MSAA) by providing more coverage samples per pixel. EQAA should have only slightly higher performance requirements than MSAA but with significant visual quality benefits.

  • AMD Kaveri Gets A Big Performance Boost With Mesa 18.2 & AMDGPU DRM

    When using the latest Git/development code of Mesa 18.2 on Kaveri APUs you may find up to a 2x increase in performance if you are using the AMDGPU DRM driver rather than the default Radeon DRM driver.

    It turns out the number of render back-ends reported by the kernel driver was wrong for Kaveri: there's two, not one. Both render back-ends for Kaveri should now be enabled when using Mesa 18.2 Git since yesterday, but you need to be using the AMDGPU kernel driver as otherwise with the Radeon DRM kernel driver one of the back-ends will still be disabled.

  • Radeon ROCm 1.8 Compute Stack Released

    Following the slew of recent AMD/Radeon Linux driver updates, the ROCm 1.8.0 release was issued today for the Radeon Open Compute stack.

    ROCm 1.8 can be obtained via the GitHub instructions. Binary packages are provided for Ubuntu 16.04 and CentOS/RHEL 7.4.

End of Red Hat Summit 2018: Coverage

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Summit 2018 Wraps Up With Containers/Virtualization Still Being Hot

    Red Hat Summit 2018 in San Francisco has now wrapped up, marking Red Hat's 25th year hosting the event of customers and partners. Virtualization and containers continued being among the most discussed topics at the tech event.

    While there's been signs of an approaching Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Alpha, sadly there was seemingly no RHEL8 mentions at this year's summit, at least when it came to public announcements pertaining to this next-generation enterprise Linux platform. So we'll have to wait and see on the RHEL8 front, but based upon their past release cycles and the alpha references we've been seeing, I suspect we'll hear more later in the year.

  • Red Hat, Boston Children’s Collaborate on Open Source Image Sharing

    Red Hat announced its collaboration with Boston Children’s Hospital to provide a distributed user open source image sharing interface so clinicians and radiologists can share images in real-time anywhere around the world.

    The ChRIS Research Integration Service is a web-based medical image platform deployed on the Massachusetts Open Cloud (MOC). The MOC is a multi-provider cloud that was created by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and several research universities.

    The collaboration was put into motion by the need for faster and more convenient access to medical images. Waiting for images to be scanned, shared, and analyzed causes delays in patient care, which can cause further medical problems.

  • Photos: Red Hat Gets Hot & Sweaty

    Tech conference protip: When attending conferences, my rule is I wear jeans to events with the name "open" in the title, and otherwise wear a suit. Red Hat is a unique edge case -- the word "open" isn't in the title, but the company is founded on open source. On the other hand, it's enterprise focused, suggesting a suit as appropriate business attire. I went with a suit on day one, and jeans on day two.

    When I was not running around working on articles, and feeling the pain of sugar/carb withdrawal, I found some interesting oddities in corners of the conference. Click on the slideshow below for some of what I saw.

  • Red Hat shows the way for open-source licensing. Will the industry follow?

    The licensing of open-source software is complicated and runs counter to human intuition. Developers put their blood, sweat and tears into creating an elegant piece of software and then sign away the copyrights so that others can use and improve on it free and clear. Say what?

    The tech community has been grappling with this issue basically since Richard Stallman developed a free UNIX-style operating system in the early 1980s. As the open-source community has grown, the products have become more diverse and the stakes are higher.

    [...]

    At the heart of open-source licensing is the General Public License, or GPL, the compliance instrument that governs much of Red Hat’s software, including its Enterprise Linux. The GPL is known as a “copyleft” license, meaning that a developer can create open-source software and distribute it to someone else with all of the necessary copyrights. The recipient can copy it, distribute it, or improve on it in any way they see fit.

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MX Tools - A year later, the toolbox got better

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The story of Gentoo management

I have recently made a tabular summary of (probably) all Council members and Trustees in the history of Gentoo. I think that this table provides a very succinct way of expressing the changes within management of Gentoo. While it can’t express the complete history of Gentoo, it can serve as a useful tool of reference. What questions can it answer? For example, it provides an easy way to see how many terms individuals have served, or how long Trustee terms were. You can clearly see who served both on the Council and on the Board and when those two bodies had common members. Most notably, it collects a fair amount of hard-to-find data in a single table. Read more

Success for net neutrality, success for free software

We've had great success with the United States Senate voting in support of net neutrality! Congratulations and thank you to everyone in the US for contacting your congresspeople, and all of you who helped spread the word. However, it's not over yet. Here are more actions you can take if you're in the United States. Now that the (CRA) has passed the Senate, it moves to the House of Representatives. Just as we asked you to call your senators, now it's time to call your House representatives. Find their contact info here and use the script below to ask them to support the reinstatement of net neutrality protections. The timing hasn't been set for future votes and hearings yet, but that's no reason to wait: make sure your representatives know how you feel. Read more Also: GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 18 new GNU releases!

today's leftovers

  • 10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream – For The Record
    10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream. Yeah, the title is totally link-bait. However, it’s worth noting that I actually deliver what the title describes and then some. Linux is awesome, but sadly, most people haven’t heard of it. Here’s why.
  • Linux Works For You
    Linux allows YOUR computer to work for you, not against you. Wearing this shirt/hoodie demonstrates to all who see it that you are not a slave to your PC. You are in control and Linux is the reason for this.
  • Robin "Roblimo" Miller
    The Linux Journal mourns the passing of Robin Miller, a longtime presence in our community.
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  • Pidgin / Libpurple SkypeWeb Plugin Sees New Stable Release
    SkypeWeb is a plugin that allows using Skype in Pidgin / libpurple chat clients. The plugin can be used to send instant messages and participate in group chats, but it does not yet support voice / video calling.
  • Feral's GameMode May Soon Have Soft Real-Time Capabilities
    Feral Interactive's Linux system tuning daemon, GameMode since being introduced earlier this year has primarily offered the ability to easily change the CPU scaling governor when gaming but not much more. Though a new feature is now in the works for GameMode.
  • Mini DebConf Hamburg
    Last week I attended the MiniDebConfHamburg. I worked on new releases of dracut and rinse. Dracut is an initramfs-tools replacement which now supports early microcode loading. Rinse is a tool similar to debootstrap for rpm distributions, which now can create Fedora 28 environments aka chroots.
  • Android and Automotive Grade Linux battle, as car becomes a data center
    Volvo’s decision to pick Intel’s Atom automotive system-on-chip (SoC) to run in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) for its new XC40 SUV highlights the intensifying competition among chipmakers in this fast growing sphere. The decision to base the system on Android also illuminates the evolving operating system scene for cars, with Linux the primary alternative in its AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) variant. However, given the complementary strengths of Android and Linux, it looks more likely that both will be deployed by many automobile makers in hybrid packages, so that they can take advantage of Android’s huge app ecosystem, encouraging plenty of third party enhancements, as well as harnessing the independence and enterprise scale of Linux. As cars become mini-data centers or edge compute…
  • Vending machine boardset works with UP or UP Squared boards
    Aaeon’s “AIOT-MSSP01” is a vending machine boardset powered by a PIC32 MCU that’s optimized to work with the UP or UP Squared SBCs. It offers vending-friendly I/O like MDB, EXE, and DEX, as well as motor controllers and 6x USB ports. The AIOT-MSSP01 is an industrial-grade vending machine controller (VMC) solution designed to run 24/7 “without a glitch,” says Aaeon. The boardset is optimized for use with the UP or UP Squared SBCs, but works with standard PCs and “most computer boards on the market.” There’s no mention of OS support for the connected computer, but the UP SBCs support Linux, Android, and Windows.