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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux/FOSS Events Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:13am
Story Servers/Networks Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:12am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:10am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:07am
Story Linux and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:06am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:03am
Story Wickr Liberated Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 9:48am
Story Why enterprises should embrace open source Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 9:37am
Story Open Source First: A manifesto for private companies Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 9:18am
Story Transit Routing in GNOME Maps Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 9:01am

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Thousands of WordPress websites defaced through patch failures

    Thousands of WordPress domains have been subject to attack through a severe content injection security flaw that many website operators have failed to protect themselves against.

    The security flaw, a zero-day vulnerability that affects the WordPress REST API, allows attackers to modify the content of posts or pages within a website backed by the WordPress content management system (CMS).

    As noted by cybersecurity firm Sucuri, one of the REST endpoints allows access via the API to view, edit, delete, and create posts.

  • Introducing Capsule8: Industry's First Container-Aware, Real-time Threat Protection for Linux

    "The cloud has catapulted Linux to the most popular platform on the planet, and now the use of container technology is exploding. Yet there has been no world-class commercial security offering focused on securing the Linux infrastructure until now," said Bob Goodman, partner at Bessemer. "Capsule8 is solving the difficult problem of providing zero-day threat protection for Linux, whether legacy, container or something in-between. Simply put, John, Dino and Brandon are pioneering the most comprehensive and effective security protection ever offered for Linux."

  • Container-Aware Security Startup Capsule8 Emerges from Stealth

    Capsule8, a Brooklyn, NY-based security startup, emerged from stealth today to debut its container-aware threat protection platform for Linux.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Another Potential CPU Optimization For Mesa: Quadratic Probing

    Mesa developer Thomas Helland is looking at reviving an old set of Mesa patches that could help out in some CPU-bound scenarios.

    Helland re-discovered some old Mesa patches from April 2015 for implementing quadratic probing in hash tables for being faster rather than the linear re-probing hash table as is used currently. Helland explained further in the patch, "This will allow us to remove the large static table and use a power of two hash table size that we can compute on the fly. We can use bitmasking instead of modulo to fit our hash in the table, and it's less code. By using the algorithm hash = sh + i/2 + i*i/2 we are guaranteed that all retries from the quad probing are distinct, and so we should be able to completely fill the table."

  • Libinput X.Org Driver Updated With New Capabilities

    Libinput is the input handling library that originated with Wayland but has since been adopted by Mir as well as X.Org when using the xf86-input-libinput handling driver. This xf86-input-libinput adaptation for X.Org Servers has seen a new release today.

    Last month marked the libinput 1.6 release with new features to the input library. Now xf86-input-libinput has been upgraded for improving the support for this generic input handling implementation on xorg-server systems.

  • RadeonSI Working Toward Better Rocket League Performance

    Marek Olšák has posted a set of patches today to the Mesa mailing list and they should help some Linux games, at least Rocket League.

  • Wayland's Weston 2.0 Beta Released

    One day after the Wayland 1.13 Beta, the reference Weston compositor is updated to its 2.0 beta state.

    Wayland's reference compositor, Weston, is moving to version 2.0 rather than version 1.13 since its new output configuration ABI has broken Weston's ABI. In addition to the new output handling API, Weston 2.0 has seen work on DRM compositor improvements, support for using EGL_KHR_swap_buffers_with_damage, initial window positioning for XWayland apps, desktop shell refinements, and other improvements.

Jolla Releases Sailfish OS 2.1, Adds Copy & Paste To The Browser

Filed under
OS

Ahead of Mobile World Congress (MWC17) happening later this month, Jolla has released Sailfish OS 2.1.

Sailfish OS 2.1 is now the latest release of this Finnish mobile phone operating system powered by Linux. It does add some new features, but nothing considered extraordinary by comparison to Android and iOS.

Read more

Also: Sailfish OS 2.1.0 now available to early access for Jolla devices

Remix OS: Is This the Droid You Were Looking For?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

Ever wanted to try Android on your PC but there weren’t any really usable projects? Now you can. Remix OS is an Android based operating system that’s designed to offer a full-fledged desktop PC-like experience. The developers have done a lot of work to implement many desktop-centric features such as multi-window multi-tasking. It offers a very familiar interface inspired by Windows, so the learning curve is not that steep. If you have used Android before, you will find yourself at home.

Remix OS is being developed by Jide Technologies, a company founded by three ex-Googlers, “with a mission to unlock the potential of Android in order to accelerate a new age of computing,” reads the “about us” page.

Read more

Top 9 GNOME shell extensions to customize your desktop Linux experience

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

Everyone has a list of customizations that they absolutely must make when they first set up a new computer. Maybe it's switching desktop environment, installing a different terminal shell, or something as simple as installing a favorite browser or picking out the perfect desktop wallpaper.

For me, towards the top of my list when setting up a new Linux machine is installing a few extensions to the GNOME desktop environment to fix a few quirks and allow it to better serve my daily use. I was originally a slow and reluctant GNOME 3 convert, but once I found the right combination of extensions to meet my needs, and found the GNOME Tweak Tool settings that changed a few other basic behaviors, I've been a happy GNOME 3 user for a few years now.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Has Been Delayed Once Again, Should Land on Monday Now

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical announced today that they are not ready to release the long-anticipated Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system because there are still some minor issues that need to be addressed.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Struck By A Last-Minute Delay

Mesa 13.0 vs. 17.0 Performance For RADV/RadeonSI: Big Gains For Vulkan, OpenGL Boosts

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With Mesa 17.0 due to be released in the days ahead, I've been running fresh benchmarks of this latest user-space 3D driver stack on Intel, Radeon, and Nouveau. For your viewing pleasure this Thursday are the RadeonSI benchmarks comparing the Mesa 17.0 Git code to that of the latest Mesa 13.0 branch with a few different AMD graphics cards. There are also some tests of the RADV Vulkan driver.

Read more

Linux 4.9.9

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.9 kernel.

All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.4.48

Hands-On: Solus Linux and the Budgie desktop

Filed under
OS
Linux

I have heard from a number of people recently suggesting that I take a look at Solus Linux. Since I have not tried a completely new distribution in a while, and I don't want to get bored or stale, I decided this would be a good time to give it a try.

A quick perusal of the Solus web page seems promising. I like the fact that Solus is built from scratch, not just another Ubuntu (or whatever) derivative. I am also impressed by the fact that the Solaris team has developed the Budgie Desktop to suit their own needs and preferences. I think that says a lot about their competence and ambition.

Read more

Robot arm kit features a Raspberry Pi HAT

Filed under
Linux

Mime’s open source “MeArm Pi” kit is up on Kickstarter, consisting of a robot arm and a HAT board designed to work with the Raspberry Pi.

Mime Industries has launched an easier to use follow-on to its popular MiArm robot arm kit aimed at kids of about 11 or older. It’s specifically designed to work with the Raspberry Pi via a HAT add-on board. The successful KickStarter campaign will continue through Mar. 8, with shipments due in July.

Read more

Back Yard Linux

Filed under
Linux

My how times have changed.

It wasn’t long ago that Linux users couldn’t get any respect. People on the street had absolutely never even heard of Linux, and if you needed the services of technical support, like from your ISP, you might as well forget it. Back in the day, the help desk’s favorite thing to say was “we don’t support Linux.”

What they meant, of course, was that they had no clue on how to do anything in Linux. They were skilled at guiding users through arcane parts of Windows to determine whether the problem was with the company’s servers or with the customer’s computer. If the truth be known, they didn’t really know anything about Windows either, but they had a script.

Read more

Open source smart home platform gains Ubuntu snap packages

Filed under
OSS
Ubuntu

Canonical has released a Snap package mechanism for running Ubuntu apps under the openHAB smart home stack, complete with Azul’s Zulu Embedded Java Runtime.

Canonical’s snap package management mechanism can now run on the open source, Java-driven openHAB home automation framework, enabling easier deployment and secure updating of Ubuntu apps. Last June, Canonical spun off the secure Ubuntu snap format from its container-like Snappy Ubuntu Core IoT distribution, proposing it as an open source, universal package management solution for all Linux distributions. For now, however, it essentially provides an easy, secure way to download, run, and maintain Ubuntu apps packaged under snap.

Read more

6 Best Linux Distributions For Programming

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Do you need a Linux distro for programming? For starters, there aren’t any distros that are specifically targeting programmers per se. It doesn't really matter, as a Linux distribution is mostly the same as the next one in regards to what software you'll be able to use on it. But then again, there are a few distros available that will be preferable due to the way they have been built up. You should also consider the kind of programming you’re into, whether web-based or system or application programming.

Read more

Wine Staging Release 2.1

Filed under
Software
  • Release 2.1

    The main change of this release is the reworked CSMT (Command Stream Multithreading) patchset. As many Wine Staging users will already know, the idea of CSMT is to move the execution of OpenGL commands to a separate thread, and to use available CPU and GPU resources more efficiently. In the new version the existing code has been cleaned up and various hacks have been removed. The result of this work is that all D3D related tests pass again. We also tested some D3D11 games which were previously broken with CSMT enabled and they started working. If you encountered bugs when using the CSMT, it might be a good time to retest them with the new release.

  • Wine-Staging 2.1 Reworks CSMT For D3D10/D3D11

    Riding off last week's Wine 2.1 release as the first post-2.0 bi-weekly development snapshot, Wine-Staging 2.1 has been released that continues to incorporate all of its various experimental/testing patches.

  • Wine-Staging 2.1 release with CSMT support for DirectX 10 & 11

    Wine-Staging has a big new update which brings in their CSMT (Command Stream Multithreading) support for DirectX 10 & 11. See their news here for the full details.

    CSMT should enable games run in Wine to run better and closer to the level found in Windows directly. They do note, that right now their focus was on getting it working and it doesn't have some of the performance changes from the earlier version of CSMT.

OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Gnome - Better but not really

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

It is time to give Leap a second chance. Let me be extra corny. Give leap a chance. Yes. Well, several weeks ago, I reviewed the Plasma edition of the latest openSUSE release, and while it was busy firing all cannon, like a typical Stormtrooper, most of the beams did not hit the target. It was a fairly mediocre distro, delivering everything but then stopping just short of the goodness mark.

I will now conduct a Gnome experiment. Load the distro with a fresh new desktop environment, and see how it behaves. We did something rather similar with CentOS recently, with some rather surprising results. Hint. Maybe we will get lucky. Let's do it.

Read more

Also new: Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Users New Vulkan, 4.9.7 Kernel

Kodi Illegal, Open Source Now a Word

Filed under
-s

Seems the top story today was the arrest of five individuals for selling devices loaded up with Open Source Kodi. Apparently the kits came with add-ons that allowed users to stream pirated content. In other news, Merriam-Webster has added the word "Open Source" to its database of official words, along with 1000 others. Jonathan Terrasi described his Linux awakening and blogger Dedoimedo said the GNOME version of openSUSE 42.2 is better than Plasma, but it still doesn't redeem the mediocre release.

Read more

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

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Red Hat News

Kernel Space/Linux

today's howtos

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more