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Tuesday, 09 Feb 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:16am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:15am
Story More on Unicef's FOSS Plans Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:15am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:14am
Story Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:12am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:10am
Story IBM Supports Linux Foundation's Hyperledger Blockchain as Industry Standard, Plans Deployment Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:02am
Story Samsung’s TV Plus service will soon hit Tizen TVs in South East Asia Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 12:10am
Story A Few Pointers for Companies Going Open Source in 2016 Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 12:07am
Story More on BQ Aquaris M10 Roy Schestowitz 04/02/2016 - 11:43pm

Best Lightweight Linux Distros of 2016

Filed under
Linux

Linux was developed by Linus Torvalds at the University of Helsinki in Finland. It was inspired by Minix, a small Unix System and was introduced in October 1991.

The first official version was Linux 0.02. In 2001, 2.4 version was released. It is developed under GNU license, which allows the source code of Linux to be distributed freely. Linux is used for networking, software development and web hosting.

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Linux Mint Users Need Not Worry About the "New Look and Feel," Devs Say

Filed under
Linux

In the first days of 2016, we reported the fact that this year will be an exciting one for Linux Mint users, as project leader Clement Lefebvre revealed the fact that there might be a new look and feel for the upcoming distribution.

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Here's What's New in Arch Linux's Pacman 5.0 Package Manager

Filed under
Linux

Arch Linux users received today one of the biggest updates in the history of the Linux kernel-based operating system for the built-in pacman package manager utility, which is used for installing, updating and removing packages from the distro.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Rio

    I was really pleased to see Endless, the little company with big plans, initiate a GNOME Design hackfest in Rio.

    The ground team in Rio arranged a visit to two locations where we met with the users that Endless is targeting. While not strictly a user testing session, it helped to better understand the context of their product and get a glimpse of the lives in Rocinha, one of the Rio famous favelas or a more remote rural Magé. Probably wouldn’t have a chance to visit Brazil that way.

  • Windows Phone is dead

    With Lumia sales on the decline and Microsoft's plan to not produce a large amount of handsets, it's clear we're witnessing the end of Windows Phone. Rumors suggest Microsoft is developing a Surface Phone, but it has to make it to the market first. Windows Phone has long been in decline and its app situation is only getting worse. With a lack of hardware, lack of sales, and less than 2 percent market share, it's time to call it: Windows Phone is dead. Real Windows on phones might become a thing with Continuum eventually, but Windows Phone as we know it is done. It won't stop Microsoft producing a few handsets every year as a vanity project, but for everyone else it's the end of the line. Farewell, Windows Phone.

Leftovers: Linux Distros

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux on Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Linux Foundation Partners With Linux Academy on Training

    The Linux Foundation recently announced a new partnership with Linux Academy on discounted Linux training for SysAdmins.

  • Linaro to Release Open-Source Software Platform for ARM Servers

    The group hopes its reference software platform will help accelerate the adoption of ARM-based systems in the data center to challenge Intel.
    When talking about ARM-based processors running in servers and other data center systems, the challenge has been as much getting the necessary software and ecosystem support together as it has ensuring the chips can handle the workloads.

Desktop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • I moved to Linux from being a Windows power user, you should too. Here's Why.

    One year ago, I switched to Linux operating system from windows and I realized how much I've been missing so much of the customization that is offered by Linux. So Why you should move to Linux? There are a number of advantages and there are some downsides too.

  • Distro or Desktop? You Say Both

    In all, 449 of you voted, and a whopping 48.8 percent of you, that would be 219 votes, said that when it comes to considering what to run on your desktop Linux box, the choice of distro and desktop get equal weight, or thereabouts.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Key Stocks of the Day: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)

    As it reflects the theoretical cost of buying the company’s shares, the market cap of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) is currently rolling at 12306.76, making it one of the key stocks in today’s market. Hence, the existing market cap indicates a preferable measure in comprehending the size of the company rather than its worth.

  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Pops 3.72% for January 29

    Red Hat Inc is a provider of open source software solutions, using a community-powered approach to develop and offer reliable and high-performing operating system, middleware, virtualization, storage and cloud technologies.

  • Overpass is the typeface used by Red Hat.

    The origin-artwork that inspired Overpass (Highway Gothic) is public domain.

  • Flock 2016: Kraków, Poland

    The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the 2016 Flock conference, coming August 2-5, 2016 in Krakow, Poland. At Flock, Fedora contributors gather to promote and discuss ideas to improve our distro, community, and userbase, and promote our core values: Freedom, Friends, Features, First.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Snowden at LibrePlanet 2016, GPLv3 Paper

Filed under
GNU
  • Edward Snowden will kick off LibrePlanet 2016: Will you be there?

    This is huge: the opening keynote for LibrePlanet 2016: Fork the System is a conversation with National Security Agency (NSA) whistleblower Edward Snowden and American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Technologist Daniel Kahn Gillmor.

  • Driven to Tears – GPLv3 and the Automotive Industry

    The automotive industry is moving toward the use of Free and Open Source software (FOSS) in vehicles. GPLv3 is currently presenting a roadblock to greater adoption. Specifically the Installation Information requirement in GPLv3 Section 6 (sometimes called the “Anti-Tivoization” clause) is causing some car makers to fear GPLv3. These car-makers want to lock down all software installed on their cars against user modifications, but fear that using GPLv3 software will prevent them from doing so. Although there may be good reasons to lock down some software on cars, car-makers should not fear GPLv3. One solution the industry may wish to consider to allay concerns about the Installation Information requirement in GPLv3 is to adopt and advocate for use of an “Additional Permission” that excepts users from having to comply with that requirement.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Forcing out bugs with stress-ng

    I've also tried to make stress-ng portable, so it can build fine on GNU/Hurd and Debian kFreeBSD (with Linux specific tests not built-in of course). It also contains some architecture specific features, such as handling the data and instruction cache as well as the x86 rdrand instruction and cache line locking. If there are any ARM specific features than can be stressed I'd like to know and perhaps implement stressors for them.

  • OpenSSH and the dangers of unused code

    Unused code is untested code, which probably means that it harbors bugs—sometimes significant security bugs. That lesson has been reinforced by the recent OpenSSH "roaming" vulnerability. Leaving a half-finished feature only in the client side of the equation might seem harmless on a cursory glance but, of course, is not. Those who mean harm can run servers that "implement" the feature to tickle the unused code. Given that the OpenSSH project has a strong security focus (and track record), it is truly surprising that a blunder like this could slip through—and keep slipping through for roughly six years.

  • Why Is Usable Security Hard, and What Should We Do about it?
  • Linux-Based Botnets Accounted for More than Half of DDoS Attacks in Q4 2015

FOSS in Optical Networks

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Open source optical network could create a new Internet

    Key elements for their Internet are optical white boxes and bare metal optical switches. Bare metal switches use merchant chips rather than custom silicon, and can be cheaper and easier to use. Open source software can be used.

    Data Centers are embracing these cheaper open switches that can be programmed like Linux computers, explains Computerworld in a 2015 article.

    I wrote about merchant chips in April 2015 in 'Open source a driver for merchant chips.'

    [...]

    Add to this the idea of a special network virtualization mechanism that lets multiple networks use the same infrastructure, plus the aforementioned open source elements and high-speed light-based networks, and the Internet will be able to move forward with exciting new applications a la Google and iOS, they reckon.

  • Internet may soon carry traffic at speed of light
  • Internet traffic may soon travel at the speed of light

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Seesaw Liberated

Filed under
Google
  • Google’s ‘Seesaw’ Load Balancer Goes Open Source

    If you’re a network or systems administrator, you’re likely familiar with the concept of a load balancer. It’s a hardware device or software stack that distributes network application load across all the machines and servers connected to it in order to help mitigate network congestion. Google’s software solution, called Seesaw, was created in 2012 in response to a lack of adequate load balancing software for Google’s own use. Coded in Google’s own Go language, the software boasted a flexible Linux backbone and was used to manage Google’s own network needs, which entailed things like automated deployment and ease of use and maintenance.

  • Google Open Sources Its Seesaw Load Balancer

    Google announced today that it is open-sourcing Seesaw — a Linux-based load balancing system. The code for the project, which is written in Google’s Go language, is now available on GitHub under the Apache license.

    As Google Site Reliability Engineer Joel Sing, who works on the company’s corporate infrastructure, writes in today’s announcement, Google used to use two different load balancing systems back in 2012. Both, however, “presented different sets of management and stability challenges.” So to fix this, he and his team set out to find a new solution and because the ones available at the time didn’t meet Google’s needs, they started writing their own.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDEPIM/KMail is NOT dead

    I answered that KMail and KDEPIM are still alive and they still continue to be maintain[ed].

  • Krita AppImages
  • So, here were are: Br-Print3D at Campus Party Brasil 9

    Today I made my first talk in a big event, I talked about Qt and C++, and on this talk a 100 people show up, but only 6 people on that group knew about Qt. I remembered when I started to study Qt, and it’s really hard to find Qt programmers on Brazil, until I met the people from KDE Brazil. So my talk was about how to create user interfaces with Qt. What modules we should use to make an app. If is better use QtWidgets or QtQuick. And I think that I made a impression. =D

  • High-DPI Support in Qt 5.6

    Qt 5.6 brings improved high-DPI support, in the form of better support for the devicePixelRatio scaling mode. In this blog we’ll look at how to configure and enable it, from the perspective of a Qt application user and a Qt application developer.

  • Kolab at FOSDEM 2016
  • Kolab: Bringing All Of Us Together, Part 2
  • Kate on Windows

    There are still some things that needs fixing. The current installer is built from git master and not from released packages so the translation stuff hat you usually get with the release packages are missing. So only partially translated. Another feature that I’m still missing is the spell-check. I need to still add a/hspell and language dictionaries to get that to work.

  • Snorenotify 0.7.0

    A few month ago I reported that Snorenotify is becoming a KDE project.

  • SCALE14x fun - openSUSE, KDE
  • How I’ve done these emoticons
  • Qt 5.7 Feature Freeze Planned For Next Week

    The Qt 5.7 release is running slightly behind schedule due to the recent licensing changes with open-sourcing some new components and other reasons, but upstream Qt developers are now planning for the feature freeze to happen next week.

  • KDE neon Launches at FOSDEM this Weekend
  • New "KDE Neon" Project Launching This Weekend

    Jonathan Riddell, the former Kubuntu release manager that was ousted from the project, will be announcing a "KDE Neon" incubator project this weekend at FOSDEM.

    Riddell posted a quick blog post on his personal site about there being a KDE Neon launch party on Saturday night in Brussels followed by a talk on Sunday about the new project.

IPFire 2.17 Open Source Linux Firewall OS Gets OpenSSL 1.0.2f and OpenSSH 7.1p2

Filed under
OSS
Security

The IPFire development team announced last evening the immediate availability for download or update of the IPFire 2.17 Core Update 97 Linux kernel-based firewall distribution.

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Lubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

We’re preparing Lubuntu 16.04, Xenial Xerus, for distribution in April 2016. 16.04 will be an LTS. As 16.04 is an LTS, the focus is on looking out for and fixing bugs.

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