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Friday, 02 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story NVIDIA vs. AMDGPU-PRO vs. RadeonSI OpenGL Comparison For Holidays 2016 Roy Schestowitz 27/11/2016 - 4:42pm
Story What Is Rasberry Pi Project? Mohd Sohail 27/11/2016 - 3:48am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/11/2016 - 10:41pm
Story AV Linux Update: Good but Not Better Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2016 - 8:09pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/11/2016 - 7:51pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/11/2016 - 7:47pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 26/11/2016 - 7:45pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 26/11/2016 - 7:09pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 26/11/2016 - 5:35pm
Story GNU/Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 26/11/2016 - 4:50pm

Tails 3.0 Anonymous Live OS to Be Based on Debian 9 "Stretch", Require 64-bit PC

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

A few days after the announcement of Tails 2.7, the development team behind the popular amnesic incognito live system based on Debian GNU/Linux unveiled a few technical details about the next major release.

Yes, we're talking about Tails 3.0, which is now in development and appears to be the next major update of the anonymous live OS that ex-CIA employee Edward Snowden used to protect his identity online. Tails is a Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution built around the popular Tor anonymity network and Tor Browser anonymous browser.

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Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Zorin OS 12

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Zorin OS 12 Core and Ultimate Are Here: Our Biggest Release Ever

    We’re proud to announce the availability of the Zorin OS 12 Core and Ultimate–the biggest release in the history of Zorin OS. With this new version, we’ve introduced an entirely new desktop experience that will make your computer more useful, more powerful and more enjoyable to use.

  • Zorin OS 12 Officially Released, the Biggest Release Ever of the Linux Distro

    The guys behind the Ubuntu-based Zorin OS Linux operating system were proud to announce the general availability of the final release of Zorin OS 12, which comes in both Core and Ultimate flavors.

    Zorin OS 12 is the result of many months of hard work, and it looks like it's the project's biggest release ever. The GNU/Linux distribution is now based on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, it's powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel, and ships with the Zorin Desktop 2.0 desktop environment.

OpenSUSE 42.2 Merges Best Features of Enterprise, Community Models

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Reviews
SUSE

In the world of Linux distributions, users are often faced with the option of choosing an enterprise-grade distribution or a community distribution. With the openSUSE Leap approach, SUSE is attempting to merge the best of both the enterprise and community models into a new type of Linux distribution. In the pure community-first model the upstream open-source code is packaged in a distribution, which can then be further hardened to eventually produce an enterprise-grade Linux product. The open-source openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux distribution became generally available on Nov. 16 and takes a different approach. Code from the SUSE Linux Enterprise Service Pack 2 release, which debuted on Nov. 8, is now in the freely available openSUSE Leap 42.2 update. As part of its enterprise community stability focus, openSUSE Leap benefits from the Linux 4.4 Long Term Support Kernel (LTS). SUSE expects to support openSUSE Leap releases for 36 months. The new release also includes the latest in open-source application packages with LibreOffice and Firefox as well as developer and graphics tools. This slide show eWEEK takes a look at some of the features in the new openSUSE 42.2 Linux operating system release.

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Phoronix Graphics News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

KDE Ships Beta of KDE Applications 16.12

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KDE
  • KDE Ships Beta of KDE Applications 16.12

    Today KDE released the beta of the new versions of KDE Applications. With dependency and feature freezes in place, the KDE team's focus is now on fixing bugs and further polishing.

    Check the community release notes for information on new tarballs, tarballs that are now KF5 based and known issues. A more complete announcement will be available for the final release

    The KDE Applications 16.12 releases need a thorough testing in order to maintain and improve the quality and user experience. Actual users are critical to maintaining high KDE quality, because developers simply cannot test every possible configuration. We're counting on you to help find bugs early so they can be squashed before the final release. Please consider joining the team by installing the beta and reporting any bugs.

  • KDE Applications 16.12 Enters Beta Testing, Final Release Arrives on December 15

    Today, November 18, 2016, KDE announced the availability for public testing of the Beta build of the upcoming KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for KDE Plasma 5 desktop environments.

    As reported last week, the KDE Applications 16.08 series reached end of life with the third and last maintenance update, versioned 16.08.3, which means that work begun on the next major branch, KDE Applications 16.12, which you can now take for a test drive using today's Beta release.

  • KDE Applications 16.12 Now In Beta

    KDE Applications 16.12 is now in beta while this collection of KDE software is under a dependency and feature freeze ahead of next month's official release.

Linux Foundation and Linux

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Linux

openSUSE Tumbleweed News

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/46

    Now this is a week I call fully rolling. There was a full 7 snapshots since the last review – which is about the maximum we can do in a week with one snapshot per day (or we have to change the versioning to not be only ‘date’ based). So, this review is about the snapshots {20161110..20161116}.

  • When Trying Out Tumbleweed, It's Easy To See Why OpenSUSE Leap Disabled Nouveau

    I've been running some fresh benchmarks of the recently released openSUSE Leap 42.2 compared to the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed and friends. Those benchmarks will be posted shortly, but after using the Nouveau experience on Tumbleweed I found the need to comment.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Ubuntu Core 16 Enables Snappy IoT

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Core 16 is now available. It is a tiny, transactional implementation of Ubuntu Linux that targets embedded applications such as the Internet of Things (IoT). It uses a new packaging system with modules called snaps that include metadata about their connectivity and interface requirements (Fig. 1).

A snap can have one or more interfaces that are either a plug or a slot providing connections between snaps. A snap exists as a read-only, immutable, compressed squashFS blob, while an instance also includes a private, writeable directory. Communication with the operating system services uses the interface mechanism. Snaps can be given access to other directories.

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RadeonSI Benchmarks On Budgie, GNOME Shell, KDE Plasma 5, LXDE, MATE, Unity, Xfce

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last month when Ubuntu 16.10 was released I ran some desktop gaming benchmarks with Intel Skylake graphics under Unity, GNOME, Xfce, LXDE, KDE, Openbox, and MATE. Following that article a few Phoronix Premium readers requested similar tests be done under the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver stack, so here are those numbers.

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Nothing good is free: How Linux and open source companies make money

Filed under
Linux
OSS

We all know how popular and helpful Linux and open source products are. But since most of them are available for free, how do the companies that produce them make any money to pay their bills? As it turns out, lots of ways.

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Choosing Your Open-Source Licenses

Filed under
OSS

Open-source development covers a lot of bases. There's everything from documentation to development that is freely available on the web. It’s rather magical to know that you’ve got access to the code that drives some of the industry’s most widely used platforms like OpenStack, Kubernetes, Docker, and much more.

As a purveyor of some open-source goodness myself, I’ve started to become more aware of the nuances of each of the various open-source licenses. There is much more to these licenses than many of us may realize. It is a legal contract, so it is important to be aware of the differences in each license.

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Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk

Filed under
Ubuntu

Powered by Ubuntu and Robot Operating System (ROS), the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk open development hardware and software kit enables drones to transform into smart robots. Parrot's S.L.A.M.dunk (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) technology enables the design of advanced applications that enable the drone to understand and map its surroundings in 3D and self-navigate in environments with multiple barriers or lack of a GPS signal.

Because Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk exploits ROS, the leading Linux-based versatile robotic development environment, it can be used not only for standard drone applications but also for a much wider set of "robots"—that is, flying wings, articulated arms and roving robots.

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Permabit pulls on Red Hat, opens arms for a Linux cuddle

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

The Mad Hatter of Linux is getting Alice in Wonderland style physical space virtualisation with thin provisioning, compression and deduplication courtesy of Permabit.

Building on its June 2016 Linux availability announcement, Permabit and Red Hat have a go-to-market partnership based on the former's Albireo deduplication and HIOPS compression technology being added as a kernel module to Red Hat Linux. Up until now dedupe and compression have largely been storage array features, and then appearing in software-only storage running on servers and direct-attached disks, SSDs or JBODs.

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This Ubuntu Linux laptop packs a 4K display and Nvidia's beastly GeForce GTX 1070

Filed under
Ubuntu

System76’s Ubuntu-based Oryx Pro is a Linux laptop loaded with features also found in some of the fastest Windows laptops.

The Oryx Pro can be the ultimate Linux gaming laptop. It can be configured with a 15.6-inch 4K screen and Nvidia’s latest Pascal GeForce GTX 1070 GPU.

The laptop with those features starts at $1,987, and goes higher as more storage and memory are added. The ultimate 4K Oryx Pro configuration with 9TB of SSD storage prices out at $7,012. It comes preloaded with Ubuntu 16.04 or 16.10.

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Open source AI voice interface mounts on dashboards

Filed under
OSS

The Next Thing’s “Dashbot” is an automotive gizmo that offers voice control of a phone’s music, nav, and texts. Inside is a CHIP Pro COM running Linux.

A little over a month after announcing a computer-on-module version of the CHIP (Computer Hardware in Products) SBC called the CHIP Pro, The Next Thing went to Kickstarter to launch a hands-free automotive/mobile interface called the Dashbot, based on the COM. At publication time, the open source device was more than halfway to its $100K goal, with the funding round open until Dec. 17. Don’t expect to see your Dashbot under the Christmas tree, however. The $49 device won’t ship until July 2017.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • The most beautiful Android BlackBerry ever: DTEK60 - first impressions

    The DTEK60 is the latest BlackBerry-branded smartphone manufactured by partner TCL, the Chinese company behind the Alcatel handsets. The difference in hardware design is immediately obvious. Spotting a gorgeous glass back and a smooth, curvy body just 6.99mm thick, the phone (HK$4,488) is by far the most beautiful BlackBerry phone that runs on the Android system.

    Like its predecessor, the DTEK50, the overall design remains minimalist, but the new release comes with a fingerprint sensor that is conveniently located at the back of the phone right below the camera lens.

  • Samsung Updates Android Nougat Beta For Galaxy S7 Devices

    Samsung announced the beta release of Android 7.0 Nougat for its 2016 Samsung Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge devices a week ago in three important smartphone markets: the United Kingdom, United States of America and South Korea. Beta programs are designed to allow customers or users to experience an unfinished product so as to provide feedback to the company. For a major software version such as Android Nougat, a developer – or in this case the smartphone manufacturer – will conduct a large number of internal tests, but because smartphones are both extremely complicated and customers can download and install large numbers of third party applications, it is useful to allow the pre-release version of the operating system to be tested “in the wild.” This way, Samsung can hope to capture many different device configurations and uncover bugs and glitches that might otherwise not be found until the software is officially released.

  • Android 7.0 Beta For Galaxy S7 Family Now Available In China

    As many of you know by now, Samsung had launched the Galaxy Beta Program last week, and the company is essentially allowing Samsung Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge consumers in specific markets to try out Android 7.0 Nougat beta firmware. Needless to say, Android 7.0 Nougat is the last big iteration of Android, even though the company had released Android 7.1 Nougat as well. In any case, Samsung has just started rolling out the Galaxy Beta Program in yet another region, read on.

today's leftovers

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Misc
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Open/Hacker Hardware

4MLinux 20.1 released.

This is a minor maintenance release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel. The release ships with the Linux kernel 4.4.34, which restores PAE support that "magically" disappeared in 4MLinux 20.0 (sorry :-). Additionally, some popular programs (Double Commander, Dropbox, Firefox, Java RE, Opera, PeaZip, Thunderbird, Wine) have been updated, too. Read more

Refracta 8.0 Is a Pint-Sized Powerhouse

Refracta is a somewhat obscure Linux distribution that offers exceptional functionality and stability. Obscurity is not always a bad thing when it comes to Linux distros. You can find some very worthwhile alternatives to your current operating system. Refracta is a big surprise in a small package. Many look-alike desktop distros are difficult to distinguish from run-of-the-mill garden varieties. Others offer new adopters something unique that makes using them fun and productive. Refracta is one of the few full-service Linux distros that makes an easy and more convenient replacement for pocket Linux options such as Puppy Linux. Not all Linux distros that install to a USB drive -- and have the ability to save files and system settings in a persistent mode -- work equally well. Read more

Clear Linux With Mesa 13 Is A Strong Match For Intel Linux Performance

When benchmarking Intel's Clear Linux distribution earlier this year we found its Intel graphics performance to be quite good and slightly faster than other Linux distributions even when Clear was using an older version of Mesa. Now with Clear Linux having switched to Mesa 13, I decided to run some fresh Intel OpenGL benchmarks on it compared to other distributions. Read more